Note: This page contains sample records for the topic processing facility swpf from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Preliminary Evaluation of DWPF Impacts of Boric Acid Use in Cesium Strip for SWPF and MCU.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with bo...

M. Stone

2010-01-01

2

Testing of Air Pulse Agitators to Support Design of Savannah River Site Highly Radioactive Processing at the Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to concentrate the highly radioactive constituents from waste salt solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Air Pulse Agitators (APAs) were selected for process mixing in high-radiation locations at the SWPF. This technology has the advantage of no moving parts within the hot cell, eliminating potential failure modes and the need for maintenance within the high-radiation environment. This paper describes the results of APA tests performed to gain operational and performance data for the SWPF design. (authors)

Gallego, R.M.; Stephens, A.B. [General Atomics, P. O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Wilkinson, R.H.; Dev, H. [Parsons Corporation, 2331 S. Centennial Avenue, Aiken, SC 29803 (United States); Suggs, P.C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Box A, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

2006-07-01

3

PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE PRODUCED USING SWPF SIMULANTS  

SciTech Connect

The overwhelming majority of waste to be immobilized at the Saltstone Production Facility will come from the waste stream exiting the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). These SWPF batches are salt solutions that result from pretreatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) supernate by an Actinide Removal Process followed by Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. The concentration of aluminate within these streams will vary and be determined by (1) the concentration in the incoming salt waste stream, (2) the degree of aluminum leaching from the HLW, (3) the method for introducing the aluminate into the waste stream (continuous or batch) and (4) and any operational or regulatory limitations. The overall Performance Assessment outcome for the Saltstone Disposal Facility will depend significantly on the performance properties of the SWPF Saltstone grouts. This report identifies and quantifies, when possible, those factors that drive the performance properties of the projected SWPF grouts. Previous work has identified aluminate concentration in the salt waste stream as a key factor in determining performance. Consequently, significant variation in the aluminate concentration to a maximum level of 0.65 M was investigated in this report. The SWPF baseline grout is a mix with a 0.60 water to cementitious ratio and a premix composition of 45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash and 10 wt % portland cement. The key factors that drive performance of the SWPF mixes were determined to be (1) the time/temperature profile for curing, (2) water to cementitious materials ratio, (3) aluminate concentration in the waste stream, and (4) wt % slag in the premix. An increase in the curing temperature for mixes with 45 wt % slag resulted in a 2.5 times decrease in Young's modulus. The reduction of Young's modulus measured at 60 C versus 22 C was mitigated by an increase in the aluminate concentration but was still significant. For mixes containing 60 wt % slag, the reduction in Young's modulus between these two curing temperatures was significantly lessened. The importance of curing conditions can not be overemphasized. The gain realized in performance by, e.g., a higher level of aluminate or wt % slag or a reduction in w/cm ratio, can be offset by the effects of a higher curing temperature. In fact, the final performance properties of a mix cured at 60 C can be lower than the initial values before any of the performance enhancing changes are introduced. Control of the time/temperature curing profile can be managed by pour schedules and other temperature control measures. The reduction in performance at higher curing temperatures is consistent with results obtained in a separate study. Although preliminary, results from this task on the measurement of hydraulic conductivity at MACTEC showed that curing of a Saltstone mix at 60 C increased the hydraulic conductivity by several orders of magnitude. The permeability data are based on only one mix but, were consistent with a measured reduction in Young's modulus for these same samples. Therefore, it is recommended that impact of curing temperature on performance properties be further investigated. An increase in dynamic Young's modulus (indicator of performance) is observed as the water to cementitious materials (w/cm) ratio decreases. The w/cm ratio is a process parameter which can be adjusted to improve performance as long as the processing properties of the grout are still within an operational window that will lead to successful placement. The same conclusions apply to wt % slag in the premix. That is, an increase in the wt % slag at the expense of fly ash in the premix increases Young's modulus and performance. An increase in wt % slag (as with a decrease in w/cm ratio) increases viscosity and yield stress and a final mix design must be balanced such that acceptable processing properties are obtained. The performance properties of SWPF mixes show a non-linear dependence on aluminate concentration. As the aluminate concentration is increased from 0.1 M to 0.25 M, the Young's modulus and compressive strength inc

Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.

2010-02-16

4

BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.

Lee, S.

2012-05-10

5

PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF DWPF IMPACTS OF BORIC ACID USE IN CESIUM STRIP FOR SWPF AND MCU  

SciTech Connect

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with boric acid. To support this effort, the impact of using 0.01M, 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M boric acid in place of 0.001M nitric acid was evaluated for impacts on the DWPF facility. The evaluation only covered the impacts of boric acid in the strip effluent and does not address the other changes in solvents (i.e., the new extractant, called MaxCalix, or the new suppressor, guanidine). Boric acid additions may lead to increased hydrogen generation during the SRAT and SME cycles as well as change the rheological properties of the feed. The boron in the strip effluent will impact glass composition and could require each SME batch to be trimmed with boric acid to account for any changes in the boron from strip effluent additions. Addition of boron with the strip effluent will require changes in the frit composition and could lead to changes in melt behavior. The severity of the impacts from the boric acid additions is dependent on the amount of boric acid added by the strip effluent. The use of 0.1M or higher concentrations of boric acid in the strip effluent was found to significantly impact DWPF operations while the impact of 0.01M boric acid is expected to be relatively minor. Experimental testing is required to resolve the issues identified during the preliminary evaluation. The issues to be addressed by the testing are: (1) Impact on SRAT acid addition and hydrogen generation; (2) Impact on melter feed rheology; (3) Impact on glass composition control; (4) Impact on frit production; and (5) Impact on melter offgas. A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with boric acid. To support this effort, the impact of using 0.01M, 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M boric acid in place of 0.001M nitric acid was evaluated for impacts on the DWPF facility. The evaluation only covered the impacts of boric acid in the strip effluent and does not address the other changes in solvents (i.e., the new extractant, called MaxCalix, or the new suppressor, guanidine). Experimental testing with the improved solvent is required to determine the impact of any changes in the entrained solvent on DWPF processing.

Stone, M.

2010-09-28

6

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Modular CSSX Unit (CSSX), and Waste Transfer Line System of Salt Processing Program (U)  

SciTech Connect

All of the waste streams from ARP, MCU, and SWPF processes will be sent to DWPF for vitrification. The impact these new waste streams will have on DWPF's ability to meet its canister production goal and its ability to support the Salt Processing Program (ARP, MCU, and SWPF) throughput needed to be evaluated. DWPF Engineering and Operations requested OBU Systems Engineering to evaluate DWPF operations and determine how the process could be optimized. The ultimate goal will be to evaluate all of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) System by developing process modules to cover all facilities/projects which are relevant to the LRW Program and to link the modules together to: (1) study the interfaces issues, (2) identify bottlenecks, and (3) determine the most cost effective way to eliminate them. The results from the evaluation can be used to assist DWPF in identifying improvement opportunities, to assist CBU in LRW strategic planning/tank space management, and to determine the project completion date for the Salt Processing Program.

CHANG, ROBERT

2006-02-02

7

Laser materials processing facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The laser materials processing facility and its capabilities are described. A CO2 laser with continuous wave, repetitive pulse, and shaped power-time cycles is employed. The laser heated crystal growth station was used to produce metal and metal oxide single crystals and for cutting and shaping experiments using Si3N4 to displace diamond shaping processes.

Haggerty, J. S.

1982-01-01

8

Modular Containerless Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Modular Containerless Processing Facility (MCPF) of the Space Station Freedom, being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is described. The MCPF will be capable of positioning, manipulating, and performing processing operations on samples completely free of container walls. It will be comprised of a host facility and a series of interchangeable plug-in modules. Initial iterations of MCPF modules will be flown on the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of Shuttle flights. The Drop Physics Module schedualed to fly on USML-1 in March 1992 is also considered.

Morrison, Andrew D.

1990-01-01

9

Studsvik Processing Facility Update.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which ...

J. B. Mason T. W. Oliver G. M. Hill P. F. Davin M. R. Ping

2003-01-01

10

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25

11

BCP processing facility  

SciTech Connect

FNAL is engaged in the fabrication of two types of superconducting RF cavities: 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavities for the RF separator of the CKM experiment and 3.9 GHz 3rd harmonic accelerating mode cavities for the FNAL-NICADD photo-injector upgrade. Thorough surface treatment at several fabrication stages is required for both cavity types to achieve acceptable performance. Buffered chemical polishing (BCP) was chosen as a baseline treatment process. This paper describes the details of the BCP process implementation at the facility under development at FNAL.

Yuri Tereshkin et al.

2003-10-14

12

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) γ, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science

Muenchausen; Ross E

2012-01-01

13

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25

14

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09

15

Inline Monitors for Measuring Cs137 in the SRS Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, a portion of dissolved saltcake waste will be processed through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The MCU employs the CSSX

Casella

2006-01-01

16

Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information  

SciTech Connect

The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

2012-10-01

17

SRS Process Facility Significance Fire Frequency  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the method and assumptions of a study performed to determine a site generic process facility significant fire initiator frequency and explains the proper way this value should be used.

Sarrack, A.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-10-01

18

Chemical Process Safety at Fuel Cycle Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This NUREG provides broad guidance on chemical safety issues relevant to fuel cycle facilities. It describes an approach acceptable to the NRC staff, with examples that are not exhaustive, for addressing chemical process safety in the safe storage, handli...

D. A. Ayres

1997-01-01

19

Defense Waste Processing Facility Canister Impact Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes impact testing of seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high level waste canisters during FY 1988. Impact testing was conducted to demonstrate compliance of DWPF canisters with the drop test specification of the Waste Accep...

K. M. Olson J. M. Alzheimer

1989-01-01

20

SALTSTONE PROCESSING FACILITY TRANSFER SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

On May 19, 2010, the Saltstone Production Facility inadvertently transferred 1800 gallons of untreated waste from the salt feed tank to Vault 4. During shut down, approximately 70 gallons of the material was left in the Saltstone hopper. A sample of the slurry in the hopper was sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze the density, pH and the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals. The sample was hazardous for chromium, mercury and pH. The sample received from the Saltstone hopper was analyzed visually while obtaining sample aliquots and while the sample was allowed to settle. It was observed that the sample contains solids that settle in approximately 20 minutes (Figure 3-1). There is a floating layer on top of the supernate during settling and disperses when the sample is agitated (Figure 3-2). The untreated waste inadvertently transferred from the SFT to Vault 4 was toxic for chromium and mercury. In addition, the pH of the sample is at the regulatory limit. Visually inspecting the sample indicates solids present in the sample.

Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

2010-08-04

21

40 CFR 52.279 - Food processing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Food processing facilities. 52...PLANS California § 52.279 Food processing facilities. (a...modifications, and relax the control on emissions from food processing facilities...

2013-07-01

22

Benchmarking facility management: applying analytic hierarchy process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper illustrates the theoretical framework of applying the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) when benchmarking facility management service provider performance. A case study is presented to demonstrate the structure and organization of the model. The case study also illustrates how AHP is particularly effective for handling performance measures that involves multi-attribute multivariate qualitative and quantitative data. The paper concludes by

John D. Gilleard; Philip Wong Yat-lung

2004-01-01

23

Teaching Basic Nanofabrication Processing Using Core Facilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nanofabrication is "manipulating and assembling materials atom by atom" and it is used to create materials, devices, and systems with new and unique properties. This involves the application of nanofabrication processing equipment, devices and materials. It behooves industrial technology programs to prepare students with skills necessary to supervise and manage the workforce of any organization that desire to implement nanofabrication technology. This paper addresses the educational aspects of research facilities and nano-research clusters for nanofabrication processing at Jackson State University (JSU).

Ejiwale, James

2011-03-18

24

Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy.

Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

1991-01-01

25

Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R & D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R & D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy.

Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

1991-12-31

26

Implementing change in the facilities planning process  

SciTech Connect

In the post-Cold War climate of reduced budgets at the national laboratories, the Sites Planning Department at Sandia National Laboratories was faced with the problem of securing funding for capital construction projects in a very competitive environment. The Department of Energy (DOE), felt that requests for new facilities were not always well coordinated with its mission needs. The Sites Planning Department needed to revolutionize the way they were doing business. To be successful in obtaining approval and funding for future facilities, they recognized the need to concentrate their efforts on project proposals that tap strategic programs at DOE. The authors developed a series of new processes to identify, evaluate, prioritize, and develop line item project proposals to request approval and obtain funding. A matrixed group of sites and facilities directors was formed to establish criteria and make preliminary recommendations to upper management. Matrixed working groups were also established at the staff level to develop and prepare projects for the prioritization process. Ultimately, similar processes will be applied to all project types, and a prioritized plan generated for each. These plans will become the blueprint for an overarching strategic site plan. What started as a means of increasing success in obtaining approval and funding of capital projects has launched a whole new approach to project development that permits incorporation of facilities planning into overall corporate strategic planning.

Williams, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Sites Planning Dept.

1995-08-01

27

Process Waste Assessment Electroplating Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

This process Waste Assessment was conducted on the Electroplating Research Facility to identify waste generating processes with the goal of minimizing hazardous wastes. The primary focus was on the hazardous chemical and toxic waste streams with special attention given to the Oakite 90 alkaline cleaning solution. It was concluded that this facility, which contributes less than 1% of the hazardous wastes to the site`s overall waste stream, is committed to minimization of hazardous wastes. It is recommended that a research program be implemented to study the possibility of replacing the Oakite 90 cleaning solution with a less hazardous one and/or minimizing its volume of waste. Instituting a formal documentation system to keep track of the most used raw materials would be helpful also.

Phillips, N.M.

1992-06-01

28

Systematics of Reconstructed Process Facility Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of the characteristics of twenty-one criticality accidents occurring in nuclear processing facilities of the Russian Federation, the United States, and the United Kingdom are examined. By systematics the authors mean the degree of consistency or agreement between the factual parameters reported for the accidents and the experimentally known conditions for criticality. The twenty-one reported process criticality accidents are not sufficiently well described to justify attempting detailed neutronic modeling. However, results of classic hand calculations confirm the credibility of the reported accident conditions.

Pruvost, N.L.; McLaughlin, T.P.; Monahan, S.P.

1999-09-19

29

Sustainable Acquisition Process Improvement for Naval Facilities Engineering Command.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mandated reduction of natural resources consumed by U.S. Federal Facilities has forced agencies to reconsider how facilities are acquired. The process for acquiring federal facilities is guided by laws, executive orders, policies and regulations. While th...

E. H. Sanders

2003-01-01

30

Node 2 In Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Node 2 awaits launch in the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) since its arrival on June 1, 2003. Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Alenia built Node 2 as part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). Weighing in at approximately 30,000 pounds, the Node is more than 20-feet long and 14.5-feet wide. This centerpiece of the ISS will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station and will result in a roomier Station, allowing it to expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

2003-01-01

31

Process, optimized acidizing reduce production facility upsets  

SciTech Connect

The filtration/absorption process, coupled with optimum treatments, prevent facility upsets that increase the time and resources required for bringing a well back on-line following an acid stimulation. Surface active agents, required in acidizing to improve well productivity, can form oil/water emulsions and cause unacceptable oil and grease levels during acid flowback. But recent offshore experiences after acidizing show that operators can achieve oil and grease discharge limits without facility upsets. To minimize oil and grease, the additives need to be optimized by adding a mutual breakout solvent (MBS). MBS has the dual function of being a mutual solvent and a sludge and emulsion control additive. The paper discusses acidizing problems, acid additives, handling options, and a case history of the Main Pass A field.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); McConnell, S.B. [Schlumberger Dowell, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, M.R. [Gulf States Environmental Solutions Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-02-10

32

Defense waste processing facility startup progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high level waste produced since operation began have been consolidated into 33 million gallons by evaporation at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy has authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. Cold startup testing using simulated non-radioactive feeds is scheduled to begin in November 1992 with radioactive operation scheduled to begin in May 1994. While technical issues have been identified which can potentially affect DWPF operation, they are not expected to negatively impact the start of non-radioactive startup testing.

Iverson, D.C.; Elder, H.H.

1992-07-01

33

Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and the world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioac...

D. B. Little J. T. Gee W. M. Barnes

1997-01-01

34

Technical and process highlights for the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Plant has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950's. Fuel and target elements are fabricated and irradiated to produce nuclear materials. After removal from the reactors, the fuel elements are processed to extract the products, and the waste is stored. During the thirty-plus years of operation, about 32 million gallons of high level radioactive waste has accumulated. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), under construction at Savannah River, will process this waste into a borosilicate glass for long-term geologic disposal. The construction of the DWPF is about 84% complete; this paper will describe the status of the project, including design demonstrations, emphasizing the melter system. 8 figs.

Elder, H.H.; McIntosh, D.L.; Papouchado, L.M.

1988-01-01

35

Defense Waste Processing Facility canister impact testing  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes impact testing of seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) high level waste canisters during FY 1988. Impact testing was conducted to demonstrate compliance of DWPF canisters with the drop test specification of the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specification. The prototypical stainless steel canisters were filled with simulated waste to about 85% capacity at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). They were received from SRL in April 1988. Each canister was approximately 300 cm (9 ft 10 in.) long, and 61 cm (2 ft) in diameter, and weighed about 2150 kg (4740 lb). Each canister was dropped twice from a height of 7 m (23 ft). The first drop was a vertical bottom impact where the bottom of the canister was oriented parallel to the impact pad. The second was a center-of-gravity-over-the-corner top impact. Procedures used to examine the canisters were the application and analysis of strain circles, helium leak testing, dye penetrant examination, and canister dimensional measurements. 39 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

Olson, K.M.; Alzheimer, J.M.

1989-09-01

36

RADCAP: an operational parallel processing facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is presented of RADCAP, the operational associative array processor (AP) facility installed at Rome Air Development Center (RADC). Basically, this facility consists of a Goodyear Aerospace STARAN associative array (parallel) processor and various peripheral devices, all interfaced with a Honeywell Information Systems (HIS) 645 sequential computer, which runs under the Multics timeshared operating system. The RADCAP hardware and

James D. Feldman; Louis C. Fulmer

1974-01-01

37

The added value of facilities management: benchmarking work processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose To provide a review of the various approaches to benchmarking and best practice facilities benchmarking techniques currently applied on the European Facilities Management Market. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Using practical examples, the benchmarking methodologies for assessing the three main aspects of facilities service provision i.e. process, quality and costs are identified and discussed in the context of their

Bram Wauters

2005-01-01

38

Defense Waste Processing Facility Nitrite-Destruction Precipitate Hydrolysis Process  

SciTech Connect

Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium/sup 137/ and other alkali tetraphenylborate precipitates will be an important step in preparing high level waste for vitrification in the Savannah River Plant's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The tetraphenylborates will be hydrolyzed with formic acid and copper (II) catalyst to form primarily benzene and boric acid. The precipitate slurry will contain nitrite ion at concentrations ranging from about 0.05/endash/0.2 M. High-boiling side products (diphenylamine, terphenyl), which reduce the removal of aromatic carbon, are formed during hydrolysis at these levels of nitrate. To achieve aromatic carbon removals of over 90%, a two-stage process was developed. Nitrite in the precipitate feed will be converted to nitrous oxide (N20) with hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) as the precipitate slurry is fed into the reactor. After the feed to the reactor is complete, the reactor contents will be heated to boiling (/approximately/101/degree/C) for five hours to complete the hydrolysis reactions. Engineering data and hazards prevention are presented for the DWPF Nitrite-Destruction Precipitate Hydrolysis Process. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Jacobs, R.A.; Randall, C.T.

1988-01-01

39

Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research  

SciTech Connect

Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

2013-05-08

40

Managing the Rural School Facility Construction Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The decision to renovate or replace a school building is the starting point for a long and challenging journey with many phases: planning, development, and project delivery and construction. Each phase requires different levels of expertise, skills, and activities. The challenge of a rural facility project is to find leadership to provide guidance

Passarelli, Angelo; Goehring, Wade; Harley, Anne

41

Automation in a material processing/storage facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper.

Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

1997-05-01

42

Defense Waste Processing Facility radioactive operations -- Part 2, Glass making  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly 3 year non-radioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March, 1996. The results of the first 8 months of radioactive operations are presented. Topics include facility production from waste preparation batching to canister filling.

Carter, J.T.; Rueter, K.J.; Ray, J.W.; Hodoh, O.

1996-12-31

43

Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience  

SciTech Connect

MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as cross-cutting industries such as welding and heat treating. MPLUS consists of four primary facilities: (1) Materials Processing, (2) Materials Joining, (3) Materials Characterization and Properties, and (4) Materials Process Modeling. Each facility provides rapid access to unique, state-of-the-art equipment, capabilities, and technical expertise necessary for solving materials processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging technologies. These capabilities include: (1) materials synthesis; (2) deformation processing; (3) materials characterization; (4) joining and mathematical modeling.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Raschke, R.A. [eds.] [comps.

1998-02-12

44

Recent National Transonic Facility Test Process Improvements (Invited).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes the results of two recent process improvements; drag feed-forward Mach number control and simultaneous force/moment and pressure testing, at the National Transonic Facility. These improvements have reduced the duration and cost of tes...

W. A. Kilgore S. Balakrishna C. W. Bobbitt J. B. Adcock

2001-01-01

45

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP) Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The Project Hanford Management Contractor, Fluor Hanford, Inc., has been assigned responsibili...

D. L. Chase

2001-01-01

46

Receipt of the Observatory at the Orbital Processing Facility  

NASA Video Gallery

These series of photos show the receipt of the observatory at the Orbital processing facility at VAFB. The observatory was received on April 16, 2013 and transferred to its handling fixture and the...

47

Process improvement in facilities management: the SPICE approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considers the application of structured process improvement for construction environments (SPICE) as a process improvement technique and its extension into the context of facilities management (FM). SPICE is a research project that developed a step-wise process improvement framework for the construction environment, utilising experience from the software industry, and in particular the capability maturity model (CMM), which has resulted in

Dilanthi Amaratunga; Marjan Sarshar; David Baldry

2002-01-01

48

Design criteria for Waste Coolant Processing Facility and preliminary proposal 722 for Waste Coolant Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A-E) in the performance of Titles 1 and 2 design for the construction of a facility to treat the biodegradable, water soluble, waste machine coolant generated at the Y-12 plant. The purpose of this facility is to reduce the organic loading of coolants prior to final treatment at the proposed West Tank Farm Treatment Facility.

Not Available

1991-09-27

49

Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as delayed access, this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

2013-09-20

50

Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

1997-12-31

51

Process control and dosimetry in a multipurpose irradiation facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Availability of the multipurpose irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has encouraged several local industries to use gamma radiation for sterilization or decontamination of various products. Prior to routine processing, dose distribution studies are undertaken for each product and product geometry. During routine irradiation, dosimeters are placed at the minimum and maximum dose positions of a process load.

Cabalfin, E. G.; Lanuza, L. G.; Solomon, H. M.

1999-08-01

52

NASA Construction of Facilities Validation Processes - Total Building Commissioning (TBCx)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Key Atributes include: Total Quality Management (TQM) System that looks at all phases of a project. A team process that spans boundaries. A Commissioning Authority to lead the process. Commissioning requirements in contracts. Independent design review to verify compliance with Facility Project Requirements (FPR). Formal written Commissioning Plan with Documented Results. Functional performance testing (FPT) against the requirements document.

Hoover, Jay C.

2004-01-01

53

Remote viewing of melter interior: defense waste processing facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is under construction at the Savannah River Plant. In DWPF, an immobilization process solidifies high-level radioactive waste material into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. A molten mixture of waste and glass is produced in an electrically heated melter. The mixture is subsequently allowed to solidify in a stainless steel canister for eventual transportation to an

Heckendorn

1986-01-01

54

Health physics monitoring at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Remote radiation monitoring has been designed into the Vitrification portion of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Local alarms and remote readings are provided for area radiation levels, door alarms, airborne radioactivity, effluent air activity and liquid (process system) activity.

Hogue, M.G.; Priester, H.P.

1994-06-01

55

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Lewis, C.J.

1995-10-01

56

Defense Waste Processing Facility Radioactive Operations - Year Two  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste vitrification facility. This waste (130 million liters) which has been stored in carbon steel underground tanks and is now being pretreated, melted into a highly durable borosilicate glass and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Following a ten-year construction period and nearly three-year nonradioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. The first nine months of radioactive operations have been reported previously. As with any complex technical facility, difficulties were encountered during the transition to radioactive operations. Results of the second year of radioactive operations are presented in this paper. The discussion includes: feed preparation and glass melting, resolution of the melter pouring issues, improvements in processing attainment and throughput, and planned improvements in laboratory attainment and throughput.

Occhipinti, J.E.; Carter, J.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Beck, R.S.; Iverson, D.C.

1998-03-01

57

The Defense Waste Processing Facility: Two Years of Radioactive Operation  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC is currently immobilizing high level radioactive sludge waste in borosilicate glass. The DWPF began vitrification of radioactive waste in May, 1996. Prior to that time, an extensive startup test program was completed with simulated waste. The DWPF is a first of its kind facility. The experience gained and data collected during the startup program and early years of operation can provide valuable information to other similar facilities. This experience involves many areas such as process enhancements, analytical improvements, glass pouring issues, and documentation/data collection and tracking. A summary of this experience and the results of the first two years of operation will be presented.

Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Gee, J.T.; Sproull, J.F.

1998-05-01

58

Remote viewing of melter interior Defense Waste Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A remote system has been developed and demonstrated for continuous reviewing of the interior of a glass melter, which is used to vitrify highly radioactive waste. The system is currently being implemented with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) now under construction at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The environment in which the borescope\\/TV unit is implemented combines high temperature,

Heckendorn; F. M. II

1986-01-01

59

Energy determination in industrial X-ray processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In industrial irradiation facilities, the determination of maximum photon or electron energy is important for regulated processes, such as food irradiation, and for assurance of treatment reproducibility. With electron beam irradiators, this has been done by measuring the depthdose distribution in a homogeneous material. For X-ray irradiators, an analogous method has not yet been recommended. This paper describes a procedure

M. R. Cleland; O. Gregoire; F. Stichelbaut; I. Gomola; R. A. Galloway; J. Schlecht

2005-01-01

60

Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) facility  

SciTech Connect

These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the Administrative Controls required to ensure safe operation of the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). As will be shown in the report, Safety Limits, Limiting Control Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, and Surveillance Requirements are not required for safe operation of WRAP.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2001-07-10

61

Energy Conservation Opportunities at a Pineapple Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the process followed to quantify no-cost and low-cost energy conservation opportunities found during a five-day energy audit at a pineapple processing facility in Kenya. The project started with an energy audit conducted to identify energy conservation opportunities. Various energy conservation opportunities were identified during the walkthrough audit and from metered data. The conservation opportunities included repairing faulty

A. Z. Dalgleish; L. J. Grobler

2008-01-01

62

Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

1996-06-01

63

Geotechnical Seismic Assessment Report for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

High level waste facilities at the Savannah River Site include several major structures that must meet seismic requirements, including the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Numerous geotechnical and geological investigations have been performed to characterize the in-situ static and dynamic properties of the soil sediments. These investigations have led to conclusions concerning the stability of foundation soils in terms of liquefaction potential and structure settlement. This report reviews past work that addresses seismic soil stability and presents the results of more recent analyses incorporating updated seismic criteria.

McHood, M.

2000-10-04

64

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

DAVIS, W.E.

2000-03-08

65

Control system for BCP processing facility at FNAL  

SciTech Connect

The surface processing is one of the key elements of superconducting RF cavity fabrication. Safety and reliability are the main requirements for the chemical surface treatment facility being developed at FNAL. Accepting the Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) as the baseline process, a ''gravity feed and open etching tank'' approach has been chosen at this stage. This choice resulted in the introduction of a control system with a strong automation since the number of elements to be controlled at different steps of the process is rather big. In order to allow for maximum flexibility, two operational modes were defined within the control system: semi-automatic, which requires an operator's decision to move from one stage to another, and manual. This paper describes the main features of the control system for the BCP facility that is under development at FNAL.

Cristian Boffo et al.

2003-09-11

66

Design characteristics for facilities which process hazardous particulate  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is establishing a research and processing capability for beryllium. The unique properties of beryllium, including light weight, rigidity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and nuclear properties make it critical to a number of US defense and aerospace programs. Concomitant with the unique engineering properties are the health hazards associated with processing beryllium in a particulate form and the potential for worker inhalation of aerosolized beryllium. Beryllium has the lowest airborne standard for worker protection compared to all other nonradioactive metals by more than an order of magnitude. This paper describes the design characteristics of the new beryllium facility at Los Alamos as they relate to protection of the workforce. Design characteristics to be reviewed include; facility layout, support systems to minimize aerosol exposure and spread, and detailed review of the ventilation system design for general room air cleanliness and extraction of particulate at the source.

Abeln, S.P.; Creek, K.; Salisbury, S.

1998-12-01

67

Master slave manipulator maintenance at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Equipment has been developed and tested to provide transport, installation, removal, decontamination, and repair for the master slave manipulators that are required for thirty-five discrete work locations in the 221-S Vitrification Building of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This specialized equipment provides a standardized scheme for work locations at different elevations with two types of manipulators.

Lethco, A.J.; Beasley, K.M.

1991-12-31

68

Master slave manipulator maintenance at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Equipment has been developed and tested to provide transport, installation, removal, decontamination, and repair for the master slave manipulators that are required for thirty-five discrete work locations in the 221-S Vitrification Building of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This specialized equipment provides a standardized scheme for work locations at different elevations with two types of manipulators.

Lethco, A.J.; Beasley, K.M.

1991-01-01

69

Operation of an industrial radiation processing facility in Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 10 years old JS-6500 industrial Cobalt 60 irradiator was installed in 1980 at the ININ Nuclear Center in Mexico with 960 kGy. The facility was commissioning in August with some minor changes with respect to the original AECL design, in order to give services to different industries and also to do research in several fields. During that year promotional activities were done to increase interest from industry in the use of radiation processing. In 1981, an interruption due to pool's leakage and its reparation, put the facility out of operation. During the next three years the demand increases but never reach more than 50% if the capacity. In that time, the potential users did not show confidence in the process, even knowing that health authorities approved with no restrictions radiation sterilization. Actually, there are 34 different companies irradiating 48 different products. Even those within the same grouping, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses, so the facility has been operated combining products and valumes. The experiences are presented in this paper. Also, maintenance of the irradiator is discussed and some modifications to the original programme have been done due to the necessity to use local spare parts instead of imported ones.

Torres C., Gilberto

70

Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

1996-03-01

71

Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

1996-04-01

72

Technical and project highlights for the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Plant has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950's. Fuel and target elements are fabricated and irradiated to produce nuclear materials. After removal from the reactors, the fuel elements are processed to extract the products, and the waste is stored in under ground tanks. During approximately thirty-five plus years of operation, about 83 million gallons of high level radioactive waste have been generated. This waste has been reduced to about 33 million gallons by evaporation in the waste tank farms. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), nearing completion at Savannah River, will process this waste into a borosilicate glass for long-term geologic disposal. The construction of the DWPF is about 90% complete; this paper will describe the status of the project, including the checkout and run-in of equipment prior to cold runs. 13 refs.

Mellen, J.B.; Burke, T.H.; Kitchen, B.G. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant; Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

1989-01-01

73

Tributylphosphate in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A material balance investigation and evaluation of n- tributylphosphate (TBP) recycle throughout ITP and its carryover to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was performed. Criticality and DWPF-related issues were determined to pose no adverse consequences due to TBP addition. Effects of decomposition products were also considered. Flammability of 1-butanol, a TBP decomposition product, in Tank 22 was investigated. Calculations show that Tank 22 would be ventilated with air at a rate sufficient to maintain a 1-butanol concentration (volume percent) well below 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL) for 1-butanol.

Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs, D.T.; Swingle, R.F.

1993-11-23

74

The Defense Waste Processing Facility: an innovative process for high-level waste immobilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), under construction at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), will process defense high-level radioactive waste so that it can be disposed of safely. The DWPF will immobilize the high activity fraction of the waste in borosilicate glass cast in stainless steel canisters which can be handled, stored, transported and disposed of in

1985-01-01

75

Criticality assessment of the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of nuclear criticality potential of the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is required to ensure the safe processing of radioactive waste for final disposal. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), high-level radioactive wastes are stored as caustic slurries. During storage, the wastes separate into a supernate layer and a sludge layer. The radionuclides from the sludge and supernate will be immobilized into borosilicate glass for storage and eventual disposal. The DWPF will initially immobilize sludge only, with simulated non-radioactive Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) product. This paper demonstrates that criticality poses only a negligible risk in the DWPF process because of the characteristics of the waste and the DWPF process. The waste contains low concentration of fissile material and many elements which act as neutron poisons. Also, the DWPF process chemistry does not affect separation and accumulation of fissile materials. Experiments showed that DWPF can process all the high-level radioactive wastes currently stored at SRS with negligible criticality risk under normal and abnormal/process upset operation.

Ha, B.C.; Williamson, T.G.; Clemmons, J.S.; Chandler, M.C.

1996-08-01

76

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

Williamson, T.G.

1994-10-17

77

Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Processes  

SciTech Connect

On February 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLW/MLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLW/MLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified dispos al process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

Shrader, T. A.; Macbeth, P. J.

2002-02-26

78

Risk assessment on processing facility of raw organic garbage.  

PubMed

To investigate the cause of an explosion during disposal processing of raw garbage, the property of the raw garbage was primarily examined by a thermo gravimetry-differential thermal analyzer. With mutable oil concentration, the results showed variable onset temperatures of the exothermal reaction for the samples, for example, decreasing from 150 degrees C in the samples typically containing 10.9-14.1% oil to 114 degrees C when the oil content was raised to 40%. The disposal process was then simulated in a laboratory-scale facility being heated by hot air of 150 degrees C, which was blown into the bottom through nozzles. In the case of the dried garbage containing 14.1% oil, white smoke emitted after several hours, accompanying with an abrupt rise of the temperatures in particular at the bottom of the facility. The maximum temperature reached to 1070 degrees C. Meanwhile, gases, including flammable ones, whose amounts were CO2 approximately CO>H2>methane>ethane in order, were yielded. It indicated that smoldering developed from the zones near the hot air supply nozzle and propagated along the pathway of the imposed air. The continuously released gases possibly induced the transition of smoldering to flame or explosion after accumulating for hours. PMID:18006152

Li, Xin-Rui; Koseki, Hiroshi; Iwata, Yusaku

2008-06-15

79

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-01-01

80

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-12-31

81

Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

Lambert, D.P.

2000-03-22

82

Personal dust exposures at a food processing facility.  

PubMed

A field study was performed to quantify personal dust exposures at a food processing facility. A review of the literature shows very little exposure information in the food processing industry. The processing area consisted of a series of four rooms, connected by a closed-loop ventilation system, housed within a larger warehouse-type facility. Workers were exposed to various fruit and vegetable dusts during the grinding, sieving, mixing and packaging of freeze-dried or air-dried products. Eight two-hour periods were monitored over two days. Personal total suspended particulate samples were collected on 37 mm PVC filters with 5 microm pore size according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 0500. The filters were analyzed gravimetrically. The two-hour task sampling personal dust exposures ranged from 0.33-103 mg/m3. For each worker, an eight-hour time weighted average (TWA) concentration was calculated, and these ranged from 3.08-59.8 mg/m3. Although there are no directly appropriate occupational exposure limits that may be used for comparison, we selected the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for particulates not otherwise classified (PNOC) of 10 mg/m3 for inhalable particles. Neglecting the respiratory protection used, five out of eight of the worker time-weighted averages exceeded the TLV. It should be noted that the TLV is based on the inhalable fraction and in this study total suspended particulate was measured; additionally, the TLV is applicable for dusts that are insoluble or poorly soluble, and have low toxicity, which may have limited protective ability in this case due to the irritant nature of certain dusts (e.g., jalapeno peppers, aloe vera). Sieving resulted in significantly higher exposure than grinding and blending. Measuring area concentrations alone in this environment is not a sufficient method of estimating personal exposures due to work practices for some operations. PMID:16893837

Lacey, Steven E; Conroy, Lorraine M; Forst, Linda S; Franke, John E; Wadden, Richard A; Hedeker, Donald R

2006-01-01

83

OVERVIEW OF TESTING TO SUPPORT PROCESSING OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site began processing of its third sludge batch in March 2004. To avoid a feed outage in the facility, the next sludge batch will have to be prepared and ready for transfer to the DWPF by the end of 2006. The next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), will consist of a significant volume of HM-type sludge. HM-type sludge is very high in aluminum compared to the mostly Purex-type sludges that have been processed to date. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with Liquid Waste Operations to define the sludge preparation plans and to perform testing to support qualification and processing of SB4. Significant challenges have arisen during SB4 preparation and testing to include poor sludge settling behavior and lower than desired projected melt rates. An overview of the testing activities is provided.

Herman, C

2006-09-20

84

Process safety and risk management: Is your facility under control?  

SciTech Connect

By 1990, the US Congress had passed two significant pieces of legislation dealing with the prevention of accidents involving hazardous chemical substances--Section 112(r) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, and legislation that required the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue its Process Safety Management regulations. On June 20, 1996, the final Rule on Risk Management Plans (RMP) for Chemical Accident Prevention was published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The final RMP Rule requires facilities with covered processes to be in full compliance with EPA`s Risk Management and Certification requirements by June 21, 1999. Meanwhile, the OSHA regulations, issued in final form in February 1992 (29CFR1910.119), provided a five-year compliance phase-in. One principal difference between the EPA and OSHA Rules arises from EPA`s position on exemptions: there are none under EPA`s Rule. With the RMP Rule, only the presence of a process containing a regulated substance above its threshold quantity determines applicability; the nature of the business is not considered in determining specific compliance requirements. Compliance of these regulations is discussed.

Sulkowski, J. [Sulkowski (John), Charleston, SC (United States)

1997-08-01

85

A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1997-05-01

86

Spartan is moved for processing in the Multi-Payload Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft is moved onto a workstand in the Multi-Payload Processing Facility at KSC. Spartan is one of the payloads for the STS-95 mission, scheduled to launch Oct. 29. Other research payloads include the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

1998-01-01

87

Spartan is moved for processing in the Multi-Payload Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft is moved from a bridge in the Multi-Payload Processing Facility at KSC where it had been stored for protection from a hurricane threatening the area. Spartan is one of the payloads for the STS-95 mission, scheduled to launch Oct. 29. Other research payloads include the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

1998-01-01

88

Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as

G. Mackiewicz-Ludtka; R. A. Raschke

1998-01-01

89

Estimating and bidding for the Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This new, unique Cost Engineering Report introduces the 800-page, C-100 government estimate for the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) and Volume IV Aerospace Construction Price Book. At the January 23, 1991, bid opening for the SSPF, the government cost estimate was right on target. Metric, Inc., Prime Contractor, low bid was 1.2 percent below the government estimate. This project contains many different and complex systems. Volume IV is a summary of the cost associated with construction, activation and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) design, estimating, fabrication, installation, testing, termination, and verification of this project. Included are 13 reasons the government estimate was so accurate; abstract of bids, for 8 bidders and government estimate with additive alternates, special labor and materials, budget comparison and system summaries; and comments on the energy credit from local electrical utility. This report adds another project to our continuing study of 'How Does the Low Bidder Get Low and Make Money?' which was started in 1967, and first published in the 1973 AACE Transaction with 10 more ways the low bidder got low. The accuracy of this estimate proves the benefits of our Kennedy Space Center (KSC) teamwork efforts and KSC Cost Engineer Tools which are contributing toward our goals of the Space Station.

Brown, Joseph A.

1993-01-01

90

Performance of a Coal-Gas-Cleanup Process-Evaluation Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A coal gasification combined cycle process evaluation facility has been operated. The gas cleanup process, which contains the major functional elements of a commercial low temperature gas cleanup process has been evaluated. The critical unit operations, w...

D. M. Rib S. G. Kimura D. P. Smith

1982-01-01

91

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer's attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant gu...

E. T. Gitau G. A. Coles J. Hockert M. D. Zentner

2013-01-01

92

Methodology for Determining Increases in Radionuclide Inventories for the Effluent Treatment Facility Process  

SciTech Connect

A study is currently underway to determine if the Effluent Treatment Facility can be downgraded from a Hazard Category 3 facility to a Radiological Facility per DOE STD-1027-92. This technical report provides a methodology to determine and monitor increases in the radionuclide inventories of the ETF process columns. It also provides guidelines to ensure that other potential increases to the ETF radionuclide inventory are evaluated as required to ensure that the ETF remains a Radiological Facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-16

93

Army's Facility Construction and Maintenance Process: An Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army and private sector follow similar steps in facility construction and maintenance, but they differ in carrying them out, especially in budget allocation and management. These differences-caused by the Army's operating environment-result in higher ...

D. R. Gallay M. Corfman P. R. Ober T. Muller W. B. Moore

2000-01-01

94

Process design of oil and gas production facilities using expert systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

An expert system known as the Automated Project Design System (APDS#8482;) has been developed to assist process and facilities engineers in performing preliminary feasibility studies, optimization studies, and provide the basic information required for the initiation of the detailed design for offshore oil and gas production facilities.Given the feedstock and product specifications, the expert system produces a preliminary process flow

Hafez Aghili; George Montgomery; Al Amlani; Jatin Shah II

1988-01-01

95

Characterization of Radioactive Aerosols in Florida Phosphate Processing Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The health risks to workers in the Florida phosphate industry resulting from chronic inhalation of radionuclide-containing aerosols have not been adequately addressed. The present study establishes a database of information on the particle size distribution, density, shape, chemical composition, and radioactivity concentration for six phosphate facilities in the northern and central regions of the state. A seven-stage cascade impactor was

Kwang Pyo Kim; Chang-Yu Wu; Brian Birky; Wesley Nall; Wesley Bolch

2006-01-01

96

Integrating Sustainability Programs into the Facilities Capital Planning Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With detailed information about the costs and benefits of potential green investments, educational facilities can effectively evaluate which initiatives will ultimately provide the greatest results over the short and long term. Based on its overall goals, every school, college, or university will have different values and therefore different

Buchanan, Susan

2011-01-01

97

Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notifie...

C. M. Toomey E. T. Gitau M. I. Schanfein M. M. Curtis S. J. Johnson

2013-01-01

98

Evaluation of the DYMAC demonstration program. Phase III report. [LASL Plutonium Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

An accountancy system based on the Dynamic Materials Accountability (DYMAC) System has been in operation at the Plutonium Processing Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since January 1978. This system, now designated the Plutonium Facility/Los Alamos Safeguards System (PF/LASS), has enhanced nuclear material accountability and process control at the Los Alamos facility. The nondestructive assay instruments and the central computer system are operating accurately and reliably. As anticipated, several uses of the system, notably scrap control and quality control, have developed in addition to safeguards. The successes of this experiment strongly suggest that implementation of DYMAC-based systems should be attempted at other facilities.

Malanify, J.J.; Bearse, R.C. (comps.)

1980-12-31

99

30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standardscoal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance StandardsCoal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

100

30 CFR 937.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standardscoal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance StandardsCoal Processing plants and Support...

2013-07-01

101

30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standardscoal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance StandardsCoal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

102

Hardware Development Process for Human Research Facility Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The simple goal of the Human Research Facility (HRF) is to conduct human research experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts during long-duration missions. This is accomplished by providing integration and operation of the necessary hardware and software capabilities. A typical hardware development flow consists of five stages: functional inputs and requirements definition, market research, design life cycle through hardware delivery, crew training, and mission support. The purpose of this presentation is to guide the audience through the early hardware development process: requirement definition through selecting a development path. Specific HRF equipment is used to illustrate the hardware development paths. The source of hardware requirements is the science community and HRF program. The HRF Science Working Group, consisting of SCientists from various medical disciplines, defined a basic set of equipment with functional requirements. This established the performance requirements of the hardware. HRF program requirements focus on making the hardware safe and operational in a space environment. This includes structural, thermal, human factors, and material requirements. Science and HRF program requirements are defined in a hardware requirements document which includes verification methods. Once the hardware is fabricated, requirements are verified by inspection, test, analysis, or demonstration. All data is compiled and reviewed to certify the hardware for flight. Obviously, the basis for all hardware development activities is requirement definition. Full and complete requirement definition is ideal prior to initiating the hardware development. However, this is generally not the case, but the hardware team typically has functional inputs as a guide. The first step is for engineers to conduct market research based on the functional inputs provided by scientists. CommerCially available products are evaluated against the science requirements as well as modifications needed to meet program requirements. Options are consolidated and the hardware development team reaches a hardware development decision point. Within budget and schedule constraints, the team must decide whether or not to complete the hardware as an in-house, subcontract with vendor, or commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) development. An in-house development indicates NASA personnel or a contractor builds the hardware at a NASA site. A subcontract development is completed off-site by a commercial company. A COTS item is a vendor product available by ordering a specific part number. The team evaluates the pros and cons of each development path. For example, in-bouse developments utilize existing corporate knowledge regarding bow to build equipment for use in space. However, technical expertise would be required to fully understand the medical equipment capabilities, such as for an ultrasound system. It may require additional time and funding to gain the expertise that commercially exists. The major benefit of subcontracting a hardware development is the product is delivered as an end-item and commercial expertise is utilized. On the other hand, NASA has limited control over schedule delays. The final option of COTS or modified COTS equipment is a compromise between in-house and subcontracts. A vendor product may exist that meets all functional requirements but req uires in-house modifications for successful operation in a space environment. The HRF utilizes equipment developed using all of the paths described: inhouse, subcontract, and modified COTS.

Bauer, Liz

2000-01-01

103

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is intended to provide the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its safeguards obligations. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of IAEA safeguards as those safeguards evolve towards a State-Level approach. The Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept can facilitate the implementation of these effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards (Bjornard, et al. 2009a, 2009b; IAEA, 1998; Wonder & Hockert, 2011). This report, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administrations Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, introduces a methodology intended to ensure that the diverse approaches to Safeguards by Design can be effectively integrated and consistently used to cost effectively enhance the application of international safeguards.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Scott J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-08-01

104

FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K.

2009-01-28

105

RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-06-25

106

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01

107

PROCESSING OF COMPOSITES USING VARIABLE AND FIXED FREQUENCY MICROWAVE FACILITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractThis paper starts with the characteristics and advantages of microwaves processing. The shortcomings of fixed frequency, typically at 2.45 GHz were also mentioned. On account of this, the newly developed variable frequency microwave (VFM) fabrication was mentioned and adopted in place of the fixed frequency process. Two cases of fixed frequency microwave processing of materials were described; the characteristics and

Harry Siu-Lung Ku; Talal Yusaf

2008-01-01

108

Safety and environmental process for the design and construction of the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laser fusion experimental facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This paper describes the safety and environmental processes followed by NIF during the design and construction activities.

Brereton, S.J., LLNL

1998-05-27

109

Recent Process and Equipment Improvements to Increase High Level Waste Throughput at The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates

R. J. ODriscoll; A. B. Barnes; J. R. Coleman; T. L. Glover; R. C. Hopkins; D. C. Iverson; J. N. Leita

2008-01-01

110

RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates

R Odriscoll; A Allan Barnes; J Jim Coleman; T Timothy Glover; R Robert Hopkins; D Dan Iverson; J Jeff Leita

2008-01-01

111

Waste management, waste resource facilities and waste conversion processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, waste management concept, waste management system, biomass and bio-waste resources, waste classification, and waste management methods have been reviewed. Waste management is the collection, transport, processing, recycling or disposal, and monitoring of waste materials. A typical waste management system comprises collection, transportation, pre-treatment, processing, and final abatement of residues. The waste management system consists of the whole

Ayhan Demirbas

2011-01-01

112

Seismic Qualification Program Plan for continued operation at DOE-SRS Nuclear Material Processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Facilities for the most part were constructed and maintained to standards that were developed by Du Pont and are not rigorously in compliance with the current General Design Criteria (GDC); DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. In addition, any of the facilities were built more than 30 years ago, well before DOE standards for design were issued. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed a program to address the evaluation of the Nuclear Material Processing (NMP) facilities to GDC requirements. The program includes a facility base-line review, assessment of areas that are not in compliance with the GDC requirements, planned corrective actions or exemptions to address the requirements, and a safety assessment. The authors from their direct involvement with the Program, describe the program plan for seismic qualification including other natural phenomena hazards for existing NMP facility structures to continue operation. Professionals involved in similar effort at other DOE facilities may find the program useful.

Talukdar, B.K.; Kennedy, W.N.

1991-12-31

113

Seismic Qualification Program Plan for continued operation at DOE-SRS Nuclear Material Processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Facilities for the most part were constructed and maintained to standards that were developed by Du Pont and are not rigorously in compliance with the current General Design Criteria (GDC); DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. In addition, any of the facilities were built more than 30 years ago, well before DOE standards for design were issued. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed a program to address the evaluation of the Nuclear Material Processing (NMP) facilities to GDC requirements. The program includes a facility base-line review, assessment of areas that are not in compliance with the GDC requirements, planned corrective actions or exemptions to address the requirements, and a safety assessment. The authors from their direct involvement with the Program, describe the program plan for seismic qualification including other natural phenomena hazards for existing NMP facility structures to continue operation. Professionals involved in similar effort at other DOE facilities may find the program useful.

Talukdar, B.K.; Kennedy, W.N.

1991-01-01

114

Implementing full backtracking facilities for Prolog-based image processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PIP (Prolog image processing) is a system currently under development at UWCC, designed to support interactive image processing using the PROLOG programming language. In this paper we discuss Prolog-based image processing paradigms and present a meta-interpreter developed by the first author, designed to support an approach to image processing in PIP which is more in the spirit of Prolog than was previously possible. This meta-interpreter allows backtracking over image processing operations in a manner transparent to the programmer. Currently, for space-efficiency, the programmer needs to indicate over which operations the system may backtrack in a program; however, a number of extensions to the present work, including a more intelligent approach intended to obviate this need, are mentioned at the end of this paper, which the present meta-interpreter will provide a basis for investigating in the future.

Jones, Andrew C.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

1995-10-01

115

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10

116

A facile layer-by-layer deposition process for the fabrication of highly transparent superhydrophobic coatings.  

PubMed

A facile layer-by-layer deposition process is developed to fabricate highly-transparent superhydrophobic coatings, which comprise the underlying antireflective nanoporous silica layer and the top transparent superhydrophobic SiO(2) nanoparticle layer. PMID:19532936

Li, Yang; Liu, Feng; Sun, Junqi

2009-05-21

117

Status of spent fuel dry storage facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Department of Energy owned, Westinghouse Nuclear Company (WINCO) operated, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), one of many facilities on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), located approximately fifty miles west of Idah...

K. F. Childs A. B. Christensen D. M. Shell

1992-01-01

118

Criticality safety evaluation report for the cold vacuum drying facility's process water handling system  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

NELSON, J.V.

1999-05-12

119

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01

120

40 CFR 80.513 - What provisions apply to transmix processing facilities and pipelines that produce diesel fuel...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...apply to transmix processing facilities and pipelines that produce diesel fuel from pipeline interface? 80.513 Section 80.513...apply to transmix processing facilities and pipelines that produce diesel fuel from pipeline...

2013-07-01

121

40 CFR 60.5400 - What equipment leak standards apply to affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? 60.5400...of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution...affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? This...

2013-07-01

122

Photographic Processing Interpretation Facility Wastewater Conceptual Treatment Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force maintains and operates self-contained, mobile photographic processing and interpretation units in support of air reconnaissance. Should the need arise, these units could be deployed to forward operating areas where there may be no waste trea...

E. J. Donovan O. K. Scheible G. R. Gray

1983-01-01

123

Lax regulation of oil vessels and processing facilities continues  

SciTech Connect

Four years after the grounding of the Exxon Valdez on Bligh Reef in 1989, oil spills continue to occur with alarming frequency: In 1992 the Shoko Maru spilled more than 96,000 gallons of crude oil into the Texas City Channel and a leak at an offshore well in Louisiana spilled at least 30,000 gallons; in 1991 alone, there were 677 spills in the Port of New Orleans, 398 spills in New York Harbor, 239 spills in Port of Hampton Roads, 235 spills in Port of Philadelphia, 130 spills in Seattle, and 116 spills in Boston Harbor. The amount of oil spilled in these ports alone in one year exceeded 300,000 gallons. The recent huge spills off foreign coasts-the Shetland Islands, the coasts of Spain and Indonesia-reinforce the importance of regulation. The Oil Pollution Act, passed in August 1992 mandates that all vessels traveling in US waters and all oil transfer and storage facilities take measurable and enforceable actions to reduce spills. However, major problems remain, both with the act and with enforcing it. This article discusses both the problems and the solutions to pollution control of oil spills.

Sankovitch, N.

1993-12-31

124

DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY ANALYTICAL METHOD VERIFICATION FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Microsoft Academic Search

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved

D Click; T Tommy Edwards; H Henry Ajo

2008-01-01

125

Quality Assurance Program description, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's (WSRC) Quality Assurance Program for Defense Waste Processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC is the operating contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the SRS. The following objectives are achieved through developing and implementing the Quality Assurance Program: (1) Ensure that the attainment of quality (in accomplishing defense high-level waste processing objectives at the SRS) is at a level commensurate with the government's responsibility for protecting public health and safety, the environment, the public investment, and for efficiently and effectively using national resources. (2) Ensure that high-level waste from qualification and production activities conform to requirements defined by OCRWM. These activities include production processes, equipment, and services; and products that are planned, designed, procured, fabricated, installed, tested, operated, maintained, modified, or produced.

Maslar, S.R.

1992-11-02

126

Application of artificial intelligence to melter control: Realtime process advisor for the scale melter facility  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is currently under construction and when completed will process high-level radioactive waste into a borosilicate glass wasteform. This facility will consist of numerous batch chemical processing steps as well as the continuous operation of a joule-heated melter and its off-gas treatment system. A realtime process advisor system based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques has been developed and is currently in use at the semiworks facility, which is operating a 2/3 scale of the DWPF joule-heated melter. The melter advisor system interfaces to the existing data collection and control system and monitors current operations of this facility. The advisor then provides advice to operators and engineers when it identifies process problems. The current system is capable of identifying process problems such as feed system pluggages and thermocouple failures and providing recommended actions. The system also provides facilities normally with distributed control systems. These include the ability to display process flowsheets, monitor alarm conditions, and check the status of process interlocks. 7 figs.

Edwards, Jr, R E

1988-01-01

127

Grout pump selection process for the Transportable Grout Facility  

SciTech Connect

Selected low-level radioactive liquid wastes at Hanford will be disposed by grouting. Grout is formed by mixing the liquid wastes with solid materials, including Portland cement, fly ash, and clay. The mixed grouts will be pumped to disposal sites (e.g., trenches and buried structures) where the grout will be allowed to harden and, thereby, immobilize the wastes. A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) will be constructed and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to perform the grouting function. A critical component of the TGF is the grout pump. A preliminary review of pumping requirements identified reciprocating pumps and progressive cavity pumps as the two classes of pumps best suited for the application. The advantages and disadvantages of specific types of pumps within these two classes were subsequently investigated. As a result of this study, the single-screw, rotary positive displacement pump was identified as the best choice for the TGF application. This pump has a simple design, is easy to operate, is rugged, and is suitable for a radioactive environment. It produces a steady, uniform flow that simplifies suction and discharge piping requirements. This pump will likely require less maintenance than reciprocating pumps and can be disassembled rapidly and decontaminated easily. If the TGF should eventually require discharge pressures in excess of 500 psi, a double-acting duplex piston pump is recommended because it can operate at low speed, with only moderate flow rate fluctuations. However, the check valves, stuffing box, piston, suction, and discharge piping must be designed carefully to allow trouble-free operations.

McCarthy, D.; Treat, R.L.

1985-01-01

128

Progress of the High Level Waste Program at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13178  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site treats and immobilizes High Level Waste into a durable borosilicate glass for safe, permanent storage. The High Level Waste program significantly reduces environmental risks associated with the storage of radioactive waste from legacy efforts to separate fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels. In an effort to support the disposition of radioactive waste and accelerate tank closure at the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility recently implemented facility and flowsheet modifications to improve production by 25%. These improvements, while low in cost, translated to record facility production in fiscal years 2011 and 2012. In addition, significant progress has been accomplished on longer term projects aimed at simplifying and expanding the flexibility of the existing flowsheet in order to accommodate future processing needs and goals. (authors)

Bricker, Jonathan M.; Fellinger, Terri L.; Staub, Aaron V.; Ray, Jeff W.; Iaukea, John F. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01

129

76 FR 44049 - Guidance for Fuel Cycle Facility Change Processes  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Change Processes AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...41527), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...DG-3037 describes the types of changes for fuel cycle...TWB-05-B01M, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...2011, the Nuclear Energy Institute (ADAMS...

2011-07-22

130

Risk assessment on processing facility of raw organic garbage  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the cause of an explosion during disposal processing of raw garbage, the property of the raw garbage was primarily examined by a thermo gravimetry-differential thermal analyzer. With mutable oil concentration, the results showed variable onset temperatures of the exothermal reaction for the samples, for example, decreasing from 150C in the samples typically containing 10.914.1% oil to 114C when

Xin-Rui Li; Hiroshi Koseki; Yusaku Iwata

2008-01-01

131

Facile one-step transfer process of graphene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is emerging as a popular method for growing large-area graphene on metal substrates. For transferring graphene to other substrates the technique generally used involves deposition of a polymer support with subsequent etching of the metal substrate. Here we report a simpler one-step transfer process. Few-layer graphene (FLG) grown on a Cu substrate were transferred to a

Reeti Bajpai; Soumyendu Roy; Lokendra Jain; Neha Kulshrestha; Kiran S. Hazra; D. S. Misra

2011-01-01

132

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department's low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-01-01

133

The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department`s low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

Wilhite, E.L.

1992-11-01

134

Statistical process control program at a ceramics vendor facility  

SciTech Connect

Development of a statistical process control (SPC) program at a ceramics vendor location was deemed necessary to improve product quality, reduce manufacturing flowtime, and reduce quality costs borne by AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), and the vendor. Because of the lack of available KCD manpower and the required time schedule for the project, it was necessary for the SPC program to be implemented by an external contractor. Approximately a year after the program had been installed, the original baseline was reviewed so that the success of the project could be determined.

Enke, G.M.

1992-12-01

135

Development of Advanced Multizone Facilities for Microgravity Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has been interested in experimental ground based study to investigate the fundamental processes involved in phase transformation processes during growth of metallic, nonmetallic and electronic materials. Solidification, vapor growth and solution growth techniques of growing crystals are of special interest because of the inherent importance of convection in the nutrient solution. Convection enhances the mass transport through the nutrient and results in faster growth rates. Availability of low gravity environment of space has provided scientists a new variable to control the extent of convection and thus isolate the diffusive phenomena for their better understanding. The thermal gradient at the liquid-solid interface is determined by the alloy characteristics, the hot zone temperature, cold zone temperature and the width of the insulating zone. The thermal profiles get established by the existing material and geometrical constraints of the experimental set up. The major effort under this research was devoted to designing a programmable furnace which can be used to obtain thermal profiles along the length of the sample as per the demands of the scientists. The furnace did not have active cooling of the zones. Only active heating and passive cooling were utilized.

1998-01-01

136

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

Not Available

1994-03-01

137

Structure, Components, and Interfaces of the Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) Processing and Archiving Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The product generation from hyperspectral sensor data has high requirements on the processing infrastructure, both hardware and software. The Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) processing and archiving facility has been set up to provide for the automated generation of level-1 calibrated data and user-configurable on-demand product generation for higher processing levels. The system offers full reproducibility of user orders and processing

Andreas Hueni; Jan Biesemans; Koen Meuleman; Francesco Dell' Endice; Daniel Schlapfer; Daniel Odermatt; Mathias Kneubuehler; Stefan Adriaensen; Stephen Kempenaers; Jens Nieke; Klaus I. Itten

2009-01-01

138

Design of the Waste Receiving and Processing Module 2A Facility  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company has determined that a facility is required for the treatment of mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Site. The mission of that facility will be to receive, process/treat, package, certify, and ship the contact-handled, mixed low-level waste that must be handled by Hanford Site to permanent disposal. Preconceptual and conceptual design studies were performed by United Engineers and Constructors, and a conceptual design report was issued. This report presents a summary of the conceptual design for a facility that will meet the mission established.

Lamberd, D.L.

1993-03-01

139

Automation of process accountability flow diagrams at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many industrial processes (including reprocessing activities; nuclear fuel fabrication; and material storage, measurement and transfer) make use of process flow diagrams. These flows can be used for material accountancy and for data analysis. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Technical Area (TA)-55 Plutonium Facility is home to various research and development activities involving the use of special nuclear material

P. Knepper; R. Whiteson; R. Strittmatter; K. Mousseau

1999-01-01

140

AERIAL SHOWING COMPLETED REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627) ADJOINING FUEL PROCESSING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

AERIAL SHOWING COMPLETED REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) ADJOINING FUEL PROCESSING BUILDING AND EXCAVATION FOR HOT PILOT PLANT TO RIGHT (CPP-640). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-60-1221. J. Anderson, Photographer, 3/22/1960 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

141

Process logic flow diagram write up for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) is planning a facility to disassemble pits and convert the plutonium in the pits into a form suitable for international inspection. The facility, called the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Facility, must handle much of the 38.2 metric tons of plutonium declared excess to national security needs in ten years of operation. A process logic flow diagram for the ARIES Facility is presented here. This flow diagram is based on and supported by a library of fact sheets on topics that impact the design of the facility. Developing the flow diagram raised issues that significantly impact the design of the facility. These issues are discussed later in this document, and for some issues, discussed in greater detail in the appropriate fact sheets. The flow diagram is designed to show requirements that dictate the need for space and/or equipment. In physically designing the facility, the same space or equipment may be used to meet several requirements. The flow diagram merely shows the activities that need to occur to meet requirements for the facility. The flow diagram is not associated with any DOE site. The requirements shown on the flow diagram may be met by an existing facilities at a given site. The flow diagram and this write up do not contain a great deal of detail on how each step in the diagram is performed. At this stage of design, the flow diagram merely identifies the need for the activity. Examples for some of the activities are given in the appropriate fact sheet. How the steps are performed becomes more defined as the design of the facility progresses.

Zygmunt, S.J.

1997-05-01

142

Development of Remote Hanford Connector Gasket Replacement Tooling for the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and...

D. Krementz

2007-01-01

143

Nonradioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) is to examine assay, characterize, treat, and repackage solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. WRAP 1 will contain equipment and facilities necessary for non-destructive examination (NDE) of wastes and to perform a non-destructive examination assay (NDA) of the total radionuclide content of the wastes, without opening the outer container (e.g., 55-gal drum). WRAP 1 will also be equipped to open drums which do not meet waste acceptance and shipping criteria, and to perform limited physical treatment of the wastes to ensure that storage, shipping, and disposal criteria are met. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and transuranic and low level mixed wastes (LLMW). The WRAP 1 facility will only accept contact handler (CH) waste containers. A Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (TBACT) assessment has been completed for the WRAP 1 facility (WHC 1993). Because toxic emissions from the WRAP 1 facility are sufficiently low and do not pose any health or safety concerns to the public, no controls for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and installation of HEPA filters for particulates satisfy TBACT for the facility.

Not Available

1993-02-01

144

Onboard experiment data support facility. Task 2 report: Definition of onboard processing requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The onboard experiment data support facility (OEDSF) will provide data processing support to various experiment payloads on board the space shuttle. The OEDSF study will define the conceptual design and generate specifications for an OEDSF which will meet the following objectives: (1) provide a cost-effective approach to end-to-end processing requirements, (2) service multiple disciplines (3) satisfy user needs, (4) reduce the amount and improve the quality of data collected, stored and processed, and (5) embody growth capacity.

1976-01-01

145

The Establishment of a New Friction Stir Welding Process Development Facility at NASA/MSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Full-scale weld process development is being performed at MSFC to develop the tools, fixtures, and facilities necessary for Ares I production. Full scale development in-house at MSFC fosters technical acuity within the NASA engineering community, and allows engineers to identify and correct tooling and equipment shortcomings before they become problems on the production floor. Finally, while the new weld process development facility is currently being outfitted in support of Ares I development, it has been established to support all future Constellation Program needs. In particular, both the RWT and VWT were sized with the larger Ares V hardware in mind.

Carter, Robert W.

2009-01-01

146

Tritium confinement in a new tritium processing facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A new tritium processing facility, named the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF), has been completed and is being prepared for startup at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The RTF has the capability to recover, purify and separate hydrogen isotopes from recycled gas containers. A multilayered confinement system is designed to reduce tritium losses to the environment. This confinement system is expected to confine and recover any tritium that might escape the process equipment, and to maintain the tritium concentration in the nitrogen glovebox atmosphere to less than 10{sup {minus}2} {mu}Ci/cc tritium.

Heung, L.K.; Owen, J.H.; Hsu, R.H.; Hashinger, R.F.; Ward, D.E.; Bandola, P.E.

1991-01-01

147

Tritium confinement in a new tritium processing facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A new tritium processing facility, named the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF), has been completed and is being prepared for startup at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The RTF has the capability to recover, purify and separate hydrogen isotopes from recycled gas containers. A multilayered confinement system is designed to reduce tritium losses to the environment. This confinement system is expected to confine and recover any tritium that might escape the process equipment, and to maintain the tritium concentration in the nitrogen glovebox atmosphere to less than 10{sup {minus}2} {mu}Ci/cc tritium.

Heung, L.K.; Owen, J.H.; Hsu, R.H.; Hashinger, R.F.; Ward, D.E.; Bandola, P.E.

1991-12-31

148

Isopar L Release Rates from Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solven...

A. Cozzi C. Nash J. Zamecnik M. Bronikowski R. Eibling

2008-01-01

149

ISOPAR (TRADE NAME) L Release Rates From Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Deactivated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent e...

A. D. Cozzi A. R. Marinik C. A. Nash M. G. Bronikowski R. E. Eibling

2006-01-01

150

Critical Protection Item classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology for Critical Protection Item (CPI) classification and its application to the Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) of a waste processing facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The WSRC methodology for CPI classification includes the evaluation of the radiological and non-radiological consequences resulting from postulated accidents at the waste processing facility and comparison of these consequences with allowable limits. The types of accidents considered include explosions and fire in the facility and postulated accidents due to natural phenomena, including earthquakes, tornadoes, and high velocity straight winds. The radiological analysis results indicate that CPIs are not required at the waste processing facility to mitigate the consequences of radiological release. The non-radiological analysis, however, shows that the Waste Storage Tank (WST) and the dike spill containment structures around the formic acid tanks in the cold chemical feed area and waste treatment area of the facility should be identified as CPIs. Accident mitigation options are provided and discussed.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-10-01

151

How work context affects operating room processes: using data mining and computer simulation to analyze facility and process design.  

PubMed

The complexity of the operating room (OR) requires that both structural (eg, department layout) and behavioral (eg, staff interactions) patterns of work be considered when developing quality improvement strategies. In our study, we investigated how these contextual factors influence outpatient OR processes and the quality of care delivered. The study setting was a German university-affiliated hospital performing approximately 6000 outpatient surgeries annually. During the 3-year-study period, the hospital significantly changed its outpatient OR facility layout from a decentralized (ie, ORs in adjacent areas of the building) to a centralized (ie, ORs in immediate vicinity of each other) design. To study the impact of the facility change on OR processes, we used a mixed methods approach, including process analysis, process modeling, and social network analysis of staff interactions. The change in facility layout was seen to influence OR processes in ways that could substantially affect patient outcomes. For example, we found a potential for more errors during handovers in the new centralized design due to greater interdependency between tasks and staff. Utilization of the mixed methods approach in our analysis, as compared with that of a single assessment method, enabled a deeper understanding of the OR work context and its influence on outpatient OR processes. PMID:19851238

Baumgart, Andr; Denz, Christof; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Schleppers, Alexander

2009-01-01

152

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1998-11-30

153

Application for approval to construct the Waste Receiving And Processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The following Application For Approval Of Construction is being submitted by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office pursuant to 40 CFR 61.07, ``Application for Approval of Construction or Modification,`` for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1). The WRAP 1 facility will be a new source of radioactive emissions to the atmosphere. The WRAP 1 facility will be housed in the new 2336-W Building, which will be located in the 200 West Area south of 23rd Street and west of Dayton Avenue. The 200 West Area is located within the boundary of the Hanford Site. The mission of the WRAP 1 facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, and repackage solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the waste in accordance with all applicable regulations. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low-level waste (LLW), Transuranic (TRU) waste, TRU mixed waste, and low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The WRAP 1 facility will only accept contact handled (CH) waste containers. CH waste is a waste category whose external surface dose rate does not exceed 200 mrem/h. These containers have a surface dose rate of less than 200 mrem/h.

Not Available

1993-02-01

154

Feasibility Study for Vinccler Gas Production and Processing Facility Project, East Falcon, Venezuela.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a study to determine the feasibility of developing a gas production and processing facility project by Vinccler Oil and Gas, C.A. (Vinccler) for the La Vela Field Onshore Reserves located in the state of Falcon (East). In order to be viable, the p...

2003-01-01

155

Outsourcing facilities management in the process industry: A comparison of Swedish and UK patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of external providers, multiple or single, for peripheral support services has expanded during the 1990s. This investigation analyses patterns of support service outsourcing against a background of industry and national differences. Questionnaires and interviews with managers of three Swedish and three UK process industry plants (chemical, newspaper and steel) show to what extent facilities management (FM) and FMrelated

Jan Brchner; Per Adolfsson; Marcus Johansson

2002-01-01

156

Supporting decision-making process in facilities management services procurement: A methodological approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to make a contribution to the decision-making process related to procurement of facilities management services in the public sector, particularly with reference to local authorities. Adopting a contingency approach, a model for selecting sourcing strategies is presented. Some empirical evidence resulting from the analysis of various managers experiences is reported and, based on the

Alessandro Ancarani; Guido Capaldo

2005-01-01

157

QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Word Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required

2000-01-01

158

QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Hanford Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required

M. G. CANTALOUB; C. E. WILLS

2000-01-01

159

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and

N. Giffen; M. Peterson; S. Reasor; L. Pounds; G. Byrd; M. C. Wiest; C. C. Hill

2009-01-01

160

Liquid Waste Processing Facilities (LWPF) Reliability and Availability and Maintainability (RAM) Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis was prepared for the liquid effluents support being provided to the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The availability of liquid effluents services to the WTP was determined. Recommendations are provided on improvements and upgrades to increase the availability of the Liquid Waste Processing Facilities treatment and disposal systems.

LOWE, S.S.

2001-02-20

161

Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix E: Experiment M512 Materials processing facility (MSFC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses for Experiment M512, Materials Processing Facility (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditions are presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

Thomas, O. H., Jr.

1973-01-01

162

Plasma separation process facility for large-scale stable isotope production  

Microsoft Academic Search

A facility for large-scale separation of stable isotopes using the plasma separation process (PSP) is under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PSP is capable of separating isotopes at a large throughput rate with medium purity product and at relatively low cost. The PSP has a number of convenient features that make it an attractive technology for general

T. S. Bigelow; E. D. Collins; J. G. Tracy

1997-01-01

163

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01

164

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

Brann, E.C. II

1994-09-09

165

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

Rosnick, C.K.

1996-04-19

166

Safeguards design strategies: designing and constructing new uranium and plutonium processing facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) is transforming its outdated and oversized complex of aging nuclear material facilities into a smaller, safer, and more secure National Security Enterprise (NSE). Environmental concerns, worker health and safety risks, material security, reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy while maintaining the capability for an effective nuclear deterrence by the United States, are influencing this transformation. As part of the nation's Uranium Center of Excellence (UCE), the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, will advance the U.S.'s capability to meet all concerns when processing uranium and is located adjacent to the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF), designed for consolidated storage of enriched uranium. The HEUMF became operational in March 2010, and the UPF is currently entering its final design phase. The designs of both facilities are for meeting anticipated security challenges for the 21st century. For plutonium research, development, and manufacturing, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) building at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico is now under construction. The first phase of the CMRR Project is the design and construction of a Radiological Laboratory/Utility/Office Building. The second phase consists of the design and construction of the Nuclear Facility (NF). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) selected these two sites as part of the national plan to consolidate nuclear materials, provide for nuclear deterrence, and nonproliferation mission requirements. This work examines these two projects independent approaches to design requirements, and objectives for safeguards, security, and safety (3S) systems as well as the subsequent construction of these modern processing facilities. Emphasis is on the use of Safeguards-by-Design (SBD), incorporating Systems Engineering (SE) principles for these two projects.

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Jon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-28

167

Use of process monitoring for verifying facility design of large-scale reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

During the decade of the 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) faces the challenge of implementing safeguards in large, new reprocessing facilities. The Agency will be involved in the design, construction, checkout and initial operation of these new facilities to ensure effective safeguards are implemented. One aspect of the Agency involvement is in the area of design verification. The United States Support Program has initiated a task to develop methods for applying process data collection and validation during the cold commissioning phase of plant construction. This paper summarizes the results of this task. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Hakkila, E.A.; Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ehinger, M.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Franssen, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01

168

Establishing a cGMP pancreatic islet processing facility: the first experience in Iran.  

PubMed

It has been predicted that one of the greatest increase in prevalence of diabetes will happen in the Middle East bear in the next decades. The aim of standard therapeutic strategies for diabetes is better control of complications. In contrast, some new strategies like cell and gene therapy have aimed to cure the disease. In recent years, significant progress has occurred in beta-cell replacement therapies with a progressive improvement of short-term and long term outcomes. In year 2005, considering the impact of the disease in Iran and the promising results of the Edmonton protocol, the funding for establishing a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) islet processing facility by Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Several islet isolations were performed following establishment of cGMP facility and recruitment of all required equipments for process validation and experimental purpose. Finally the first successful clinical islet isolation and transplantation was performed in September 2010. In spite of a high cost of the procedure it is considered beneficial and may prevent long term complications and the costs associated with secondary cares. In this article we will briefly describe our experience in setting up a cGMP islet processing facility which can provide valuable information for regional countries interested to establish similar facilities. PMID:21818570

Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak; Amoli, Mahsa M; Ao, Ziliang; Jafarian, Ali; Mahdavi-Mazdah, Mitra; Ghanaati, Hossein; Baradar-Jalili, Reza; Sharghi, Sasan; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

2012-12-01

169

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary User Centers including: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing including (extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, high density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials data bases. A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state of the art materials characterization capabilities, high performance computing, to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized User-submitted Proposal and a User Agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provides free of charge while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27

170

Electromagnetic containerless processing requirements and recommended facility concept and capabilities for space lab  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Containerless melting, reaction, and solidification experiments and processes which potentially can lead to new understanding of material science and production of new or improved materials in the weightless space environment are reviewed in terms of planning for spacelab. Most of the experiments and processes discussed are amenable to the employment of electromagnetic position control and electromagnetic induction or electron beam heating and melting. The spectrum of relevant properties of materials, which determine requirements for a space laboratory electromagnetic containerless processing facility are reviewed. Appropriate distributions and associated coil structures are analyzed and compared on the basis of efficiency, for providing the functions of position sensing, control, and induction heating. Several coil systems are found capable of providing these functions. Exchangeable modular coils in appropriate sizes are recommended to achieve the maximum power efficiencies, for a wide range of specimen sizes and resistivities, in order to conserve total facility power.

Frost, R. T.; Bloom, H. L.; Napaluch, L. J.; Stockhoff, E. H.; Wouch, G.

1974-01-01

171

Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

1999-01-01

172

The environmental impact assessment process for nuclear facilities: An examination of the Indian experience  

SciTech Connect

India plans to construct numerous nuclear plants and uranium mines across the country, which could have significant environmental, health, and social impacts. The national Environmental Impact Assessment process is supposed to regulate these impacts. This paper examines how effective this process has been, and the extent to which public inputs have been taken into account. In addition to generic problems associated with the EIA process for all kinds of projects in India, there are concerns that are specific to nuclear facilities. One is that some nuclear facilities are exempt from the environmental clearance process. The second is that data regarding radiation baseline levels and future releases, which is the principle environmental concern with respect to nuclear facilities, is controlled entirely by the nuclear establishment. The third is that members of the nuclear establishment take part in almost every level of the environmental clearance procedure. For these reasons and others, the EIA process with regard to nuclear projects in India is of dubious quality. We make a number of recommendations that could address these lacunae, and more generally the imbalance of power between the nuclear establishment on the one hand, and civil society and the regulatory agencies on the other.

Ramana, M.V., E-mail: mvramana@gmail.co [Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Environment and Development, Bangalore (India); Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Environment and Development, ISEC Campus, Nagarbhavi, Bangalore 560 070 (India); Rao, Divya Badami, E-mail: di.badamirao@gmail.co [Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Environment and Development, Bangalore (India); Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Environment and Development, ISEC Campus, Nagarbhavi, Bangalore 560 070 (India)

2010-07-15

173

Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

Sullivan, N.

1995-05-02

174

Bit error rate performance of Image Processing Facility high density tape recorders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Image Processing Facility at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center uses High Density Tape Recorders (HDTR's) to transfer high volume image data and ancillary information from one system to another. For ancillary information, it is required that very low bit error rates (BER's) accompany the transfers. The facility processes about 10 to the 11th bits of image data per day from many sensors, involving 15 independent processing systems requiring the use of HDTR's. When acquired, the 16 HDTR's offered state-of-the-art performance of 1 x 10 to the -6th BER as specified. The BER requirement was later upgraded in two steps: (1) incorporating data randomizing circuitry to yield a BER of 2 x 10 to the -7th and (2) further modifying to include a bit error correction capability to attain a BER of 2 x 10 to the -9th. The total improvement factor was 500 to 1. Attention is given here to the background, technical approach, and final results of these modifications. Also discussed are the format of the data recorded by the HDTR, the magnetic tape format, the magnetic tape dropout characteristics as experienced in the Image Processing Facility, the head life history, and the reliability of the HDTR's.

Heffner, P.

1981-01-01

175

Do high rates of OSCAR deficiencies prompt improved nursing facility processes and outcomes?  

PubMed

Recently, some researchers have argued that high state rates of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) nursing facility deficiencies indicate stringent enforcement, leaving the impression of better-quality care soon to follow; others maintain that the rank ordering of states' quality of nursing facility care remains fairly constant, resting on deep-seated state characteristics that change slowly, so that short-term improvement in poor-quality care is unlikely. The authors examine change in the process and outcome quality of states' Medicare nursing facility long-term care programs across 1999 to 2005, using linear and two-stage least squares regression. They find that (1) nationally, process quality generally falls across this period while outcome quality generally increases; (2) neither a prominent enforcement stringency index nor state culture, a relatively stable state characteristic, exerts much influence on state process and outcome quality scores over time, but (3) the relative costs and benefits for CMS compliance appear to contribute to explaining change in states' quality of resident outcomes over time; and (4) states' process quality is much less stable than outcome quality, and outcome indices distinct from OSCAR deficiency data provide more reliable and possibly more valid measures of care quality. PMID:21985066

Klopfenstein, Kristin; Lockhart, Charles; Giles-Sims, Jean

2011-10-01

176

Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

Forest, Cary B.

2013-09-19

177

Payload/GSE/data system interface: Users guide for the VPF (Vertical Processing Facility)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Payload/GSE/data system interface users guide for the Vertical Processing Facility is presented. The purpose of the document is three fold. First, the simulated Payload and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Data System Interface, which is also known as the payload T-0 (T-Zero) System is described. This simulated system is located with the Cargo Integration Test Equipment (CITE) in the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF) that is located in the KSC Industrial Area. The actual Payload T-0 System consists of the Orbiter, Mobile Launch Platforms (MLPs), and Launch Complex (LC) 39A and B. This is referred to as the Pad Payload T-0 System (Refer to KSC-DL-116 for Pad Payload T-0 System description). Secondly, information is provided to the payload customer of differences between this simulated system and the actual system. Thirdly, a reference guide of the VPF Payload T-0 System for both KSC and payload customer personnel is provided.

1993-01-01

178

The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

1995-03-01

179

Critical Protection Item Classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

As a part of its compliance with the Department of Energy requirements for safety of nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) assigns functional classifications to structures, systems and components (SSCs). As a result, changes in design, operations, maintenance, testing, and inspections of SSCs are performed and backfit requirements are established. This paper describes the Critical Protection Item (CPI) Classification for waste processing facility (WPF) at SRS. The descriptions of the WPF and the processes considered are provided elsewhere. The proposed CPI classification methodology includes the evaluation of the onsite radiological consequences, and the onsite and offsite non-radiological consequences from postulated accidents at the WPF, and comparison of these consequences with allowable frequency-dependent limits. When allowable limits are exceeded, CPIs are identified for accident mitigation.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-12-31

180

Design and verification of shielding for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility.  

PubMed

An Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF) has recently been constructed by a modification of previously unused cells. ACPF is a hot cell with two rooms located in the basement of the Irradiated Materials Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This is for demonstrating the advanced spent fuel conditioning process being proposed in Korea, which is an electrolytic reduction process of spent oxide fuels into a metallic form. The ACPF was designed with a more than 90 cm thick high density concrete shield wall to handle 1.38 PBq (37,430 Ci) of radioactive materials with dose rates lower than 10 muSv h in the operational areas (7,000 zone) and 150 muSv h in the service areas (8,000 zone). In Monte Carlo calculations with a design basis source inventory, the results for the bounding wall showed a maximum of 3 muSv h dose rate at an exterior surface of the ACPF for gamma radiation and 0.76 muSv h for neutrons. All the bounding structures of the ACPF were investigated to check on the shielding performance of the facility to ensure the radiation safety of the facility. A test was performed with a 2.96 TBq (80 Ci) 60Co source unit and the test results were compared with the calculation results. A few failure points were discovered and carefully fixed to meet the design criteria. After fixing the problems, the failure points were rechecked and the safety of the shielding structures was confirmed. In conclusion, it was confirmed that all the investigated parts of the ACPF passed the shielding safety limits by using this program and the ACPF is ready to fulfill its tasks for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process. PMID:18403959

Cho, I J; Kook, D H; Kwon, K C; Lee, E P; Choung, W M; You, G S

2008-05-01

181

Qualification of a Carbon Analyzer to Support the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The I-O Model 1030 carbon analyzer has been qualified for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Model 1030 system with the currently used Model 1010 Analyzer. This recommendation is based on side-by-side comparisons of the new unit to the currently used Model 1010 analyzer that are presented in this report.

T. Edwards; M. Feller

2011-01-01

182

Risk-based process safety assessment and control measures design for offshore process facilities.  

PubMed

Process operation is the most hazardous activity next to the transportation and drilling operation on an offshore oil and gas (OOG) platform. Past experiences of onshore and offshore oil and gas activities have revealed that a small mis-happening in the process operation might escalate to a catastrophe. This is of especial concern in the OOG platform due to the limited space and compact geometry of the process area, less ventilation, and difficult escape routes. On an OOG platform, each extra control measure, which is implemented, not only occupies space on the platform and increases congestion but also adds extra load to the platform. Eventualities in the OOG platform process operation can be avoided through incorporating the appropriate control measures at the early design stage. In this paper, the authors describe a methodology for risk-based process safety decision making for OOG activities. The methodology is applied to various offshore process units, that is, the compressor, separators, flash drum and driers of an OOG platform. Based on the risk potential, appropriate safety measures are designed for each unit. This paper also illustrates that implementation of the designed safety measures reduces the high Fatal accident rate (FAR) values to an acceptable level. PMID:12141993

Khan, Faisal I; Sadiq, Rehan; Husain, Tahir

2002-09-01

183

Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

Shanahan, K.L.

1992-02-01

184

Criticality assessment of initial operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), high level radioactive wastes will be immobilized into borosilicate glass for long term storage and eventual disposal. Since the waste feed streams contain uranium and plutonium, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process has been evaluated to ensure that a subcritical condition is maintained. It was determined that the risk of nuclear criticality in the DWPF during initial, sludge-only operations is minimal due to the dilute concentration of fissile material in the sludge combined with excess neutron absorbers.

Ha, B.C.; Williamson, T.G.

1993-12-31

185

Startup of Savannah River`s Defense Waste Processing Facility to produce radioactive glass  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) began production of radioactive glass in the Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) in 1996 following an extensive test program discussed earlier. Currently DWPF is operating in a `sludge only` mode to produce radioactive glass consisting of washed high-level waste sludge and glass frit. Future operations will produce radioactive glass consisting of washed high-level waste sludge, precipitated cesium, and glass frit. This paper provides an update of processing activities to date, operational problems encountered since entering radioactive operations, and the programs underway to solve them.

Bennett, W.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-08-06

186

Potential applications of fusion neutral beam facilities for advanced material processing  

SciTech Connect

Surface processing techniques involving high energy ion implantation have achieved commercial success for semiconductors and biomaterials. However, wider use has been limited in good part by economic factors, some of which are related to the line-of-sight nature of the beam implantation process. Plasma source ion implantation is intended to remove some of the limitations imposed by directionality of beam systems and also to help provide economies of scale. The present paper will outline relevant technologies and areas of expertise that exist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in relation to possible future needs in materials processing. Experience in generation of plasmas, control of ionization states, pulsed extraction, and sheath physics exists. Contributions to future technology can be made either for the immersion mode or for the extracted beam mode. Existing facilities include the High Power Test Facility, which could conservatively operate at 1 A of continuous current at 100 kV delivered to areas of about 1 m{sup 2}. Higher instantaneous voltages and currents are available with a reduced duty cycle. Another facility, the High Heat Flux Facility can supply a maximum of 60 kV and currents of up to 60 A for 2 s on a 10% duty cycle. Plasmas may be generated by use of microwaves, radio-frequency induction or other methods and plasma properties may be tailored to suit specific needs. In addition to ion implantation of large steel components, foreseeable applications include ion implantation of polymers, ion implantation of Ti alloys, Al alloys, or other reactive surfaces.

Williams, J.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

1994-01-01

187

Solid waste facilities location using of analytical network process and data envelopment analysis approaches.  

PubMed

Selection of the appropriate site for solid waste facilities is a complex problem and requires an extensive evaluation process, because it is very difficult to develop a selection criterion that can precisely describe the preference of one location over another. Therefore selection of these sites can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision-making or multiple attributes decision-making problem. For this purpose, we propose a technique that can effectively take managerial preferences and subjective data into consideration, along with quantitative factors. The tool proposed here relies on the use of the analytical network process (ANP) and to help integrate managerial evaluations into a more quantitatively based decision tool, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is applied. In this paper, a location selection procedure is presented to construct an undesirable facility applying ANP and DEA approaches in two stages. In the first stage ANP approach is used, results of this stage are inputs for the second stage. In this stage, DEA is applied to select the best location. Finally, to illustrate the proposed framework, at "Results and discussion" section, a total of four undesirable facility locations are evaluated. PMID:22382043

Khadivi, M R; Fatemi Ghomi, S M T

2012-06-01

188

FACILITY UPGRADES FOR RECEIPT FROM ACTINIDE REMOVAL AND MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently on an aggressive program to empty its High Level Waste (HLW) tanks and immobilize its radioactive waste into a durable borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). As a part of that program, two new processes will be brought on-line to assist in emptying the HLW tanks. These processes are in addition to the current sludge removal process and are called the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Process. In order to accept and process the streams generated from these two new processes, several facility modifications are required and are broken down into several projects. These projects are handling the facility modifications required for the Tank Farm (241-96H), and DWPF vitrification facility (221-S), and DWPF ancillary facilities (511-S, and 512-S). Additional modifications to the 221-S building were required to address the flammability concern from the solvent carryover from the MCU process. This paper will describe a summary of the modifications impacting the 511-S, 512-S, and the 221-S facilities in order to receive the new streams from the ARP and MCU processes at the DWPF.

Fellinger, T; Stephen Phillips, S; Benjamin Culbertson, B; Beverly02 Davis, B; Aaron Staub, A

2007-02-13

189

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings  

SciTech Connect

Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible.

HUMPHRYS, K.L.

1999-11-03

190

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

1981-07-01

191

Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

2004-01-01

192

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW\\/DWPF\\/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6\\/4\\/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus

Koopman

2004-01-01

193

Modeling of batch operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A computer model is in development to provide a dynamic simulation of batch operations within the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The DWPF will chemically treat high level waste materials from the site tank farm and vitrify the resulting slurry into a borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The DWPF consists of three major processing areas: Salt Processing Cell (SPC), Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and the Melt Cell. Separate models have been developed for each of these process units using the SPEEDUP{trademark} software from Aspen Technology. Except for glass production in the Melt Cell, all of the chemical operations within DWPF are batch processes. Since the SPEEDUP software is designed for dynamic modeling of continuous processes, considerable effort was required to devise batch process algorithms. This effort was successful and the models are able to simulate batch operations and the dynamic behavior of the process. In this paper, we will describe the SPC model in some detail and present preliminary results from a few simulation studies.

Smith, F.G.

1995-02-01

194

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31

195

First Results from the CARIBU Facility: Mass Measurements on the r-Process Path  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the Sn132 double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A=135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

Van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Bertone, P. F.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Morgan, G. E.; Orford, R.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.

2013-08-01

196

Seismic margins assessment of the plutonium processing facility Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Results of the recently completed seismic evaluation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory site indicate a need to consider seismic loads greater than design basis for many structures systems and components (SSCs). DOE Order 5480.28 requires that existing SSCs be evaluated to determine their ability to withstand the effects of earthquakes when changes in the understanding of this hazard results in greater loads. In preparation for the implementation of DOE Order 5480.28 and to support the update of the facility Safety Analysis Report, a seismic margin assessment of SSCs necessary for a monitored passive safe shutdown of the Plutonium Processing Facility (PF-4) was performed. The seismic margin methodology is given in EPRI NP-6041-SL, ``A Methodology for Assessment of Nuclear Power Plant Seismic Margin (Revision 1)``. In this methodology, high confidence of low probability of failure (HCLPF) capacities for SSCs are estimated in a deterministic manner. For comparison to the performance goals given in DOE Order 5480.28, the results of the seismic margins assessment were used to estimate the annual probability of failure for the evaluated SSCs. In general, the results show that the capacity for the SSCs comprising PF-4 is high. This is to be expected for a newer facility as PF-4 was designed in the early 1970`s. The methodology and results of this study are presented in this paper.

Goen, L.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Salmon, M.W. [EQE International, Irwine, CA (United States)

1995-12-01

197

Carbon nanotubes/magnetite hybrids prepared by a facile synthesis process and their magnetic properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a facile synthesis process is proposed to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotubes/magnetite (MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4) hybrids. The process involves two steps: (1) water-soluble CNTs are synthesized by one-pot modification using potassium persulfate (KPS) as oxidant. (2) Fe 3O 4 is assembled along the treated CNTs by employing a facile hydrothermal process with the presence of hydrazine hydrate as the mineralizer. The treated CNTs can be easily dispersed in aqueous solvent. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis reveals that several functional groups such as potassium carboxylate (-COOK), carbonyl (-C dbnd O) and hydroxyl (-C-OH) groups are formed on the nanotube surfaces. The MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids are characterized with respect to crystal structure, morphology, element composition and magnetic property by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), XPS and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. XRD and TEM results show that the Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 20-60 nm were firmly assembled on the nanotube surface. The magnetic property investigation indicated that the CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior and possess a saturation magnetization of 32.2 emu/g. Further investigation indicates that the size of assembled Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles can be turned by varying experiment factors. Moreover, a probable growth mechanism for the preparation of CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids was discussed.

Zhang, Li; Ni, Qing-Qing; Natsuki, Toshiaki; Fu, Yaqin

2009-07-01

198

RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

2008-01-15

199

A facile water-based process for preparation of stabilized Bi nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Stabilized bismuth nanoparticles have been prepared by reducing bismuth chloride with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of sodium oleate under a facile water-based process. The obtained samples are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry (DTA/TG). The present results indicate that the bismuth nanoparticles are spherical, small diameter and in a high purity. In addition, measurement of water contact angle indicates that Bi samples are hydrophobic, which gives defense to samples from further oxidation, samples are steady in 6 months without obvious oxidation.

Wang Yi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yanbian University, Yanji 133000 (China); Zhao Jingzhe [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: zhaojz@mail.jlu.edu.cn; Zhao Xu; Tang Lanqin; Li Yunling; Wang Zichen [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2009-01-08

200

Behavior and control of ruthenium during operation of the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) processes acidic fluoride and nitrate high level liquid wastes, converting them to granular solids in a fluidized bed by internal combustion of kerosene. The off gases pass through a venturi scrubber, silica gel bed...

J. D. Christian

1990-01-01

201

TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes  

SciTech Connect

One of the most used methods for tritium recovery from different sources of tritiated water is based on the combination between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) and Cryogenic Distillation (CD) processes. The development, i.e. configuration, design and performance testing of critical components, of a tritium recovery system based on the combination CECE-CD is essential for both JET and ITER. For JET, a Water Detritiation System (WDS) is not only needed to process tritiated water which has already been accumulated from operation, but also for the tritiated water which will be generated during decommissioning. For ITER, the WDS is one of the key systems to control the tritium content in the effluents streams, to recover as much tritium as possible and consequently to minimize the impact on the environment. A cryogenic distillation facility with the aim to investigate the trade-off between CECE-CD, to validate different components and mathematical modelling software is current under development at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) as an extension of the existing CECE facility.

Cristescu, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Cristescu, I.R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Doerr, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Glugla, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Hellriegel, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Schaefer, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Welte, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Kveton, O.; Murdoch, D

2005-07-15

202

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah

T. Edwards; D. Click; M. Feller

2011-01-01

203

Studsvik Processing Facility - A proven solution for the conservation of a National Asset  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over 7.5 years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 13.3 million pounds (4.96 million kg) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, granular activated carbon (GAC), and filter cartridges which comprised a cumulative total activity of 87,396 Curies (3.23E+09 MBq), with the highest radiation level for any incoming resin container being 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/hr). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF-Erwin) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Spent Filter Cartridges (Metal or Poly), Ion Exchange Resins (IER), powered filter media, GAC, organic solids, graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions. In 2005 Studsvik added advanced robotic technology to the SPF greatly increasing its capabilities to safely handle waste streams with radiation levels in excess of 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h), saving personnel exposure and maximizing ALARA. The most recent addition to Studsvik's capabilities is the cost and volume efficient processing of filter cartridges (both metal and poly). The SPF-Erwin employs the Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR{sup sm}) process, developed and patented by Studsvik, which utilizes pyrolysis/steam reforming technology. THOR{sup sm} reliably and safely processes these wide varieties of LLRWs in a unique, moderate temperature, pyrolysis/steam reforming, fluidized bed treatment system. The THOR{sup sm} technology is also suitable for processing hazardous, mixed, and dry active LLRW with appropriate licensing and waste feed modifications. Studsvik has proven to be an experienced and reliable source for the cost efficient disposition of LLRW for the nuclear industry. These processing concepts and capabilities have helped generators maximize the utilization of the limited available burial space - extending the Class-A, Class-B, and Class-C burial capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of this proven approach for both organic and inorganic LLRWs. A perfect example of the processors and generators working together to conserve a National Asset we have all come to know as the LLRW burial sites. (authors)

Ping, M.; Hill, M.; Harrison, J.; Wise, D. [Studsvik, Inc., Erwin, TN (United States)

2007-07-01

204

Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

1995-01-01

205

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) includes: examining, assaying, characterizing, treating, and repackaging solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low-level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, TRU mixed wastes, and low-level mixed wastes (LLMW). Airborne releases from the WRAP 1 facility will be primarily in particulate forms (99.999 percent of total unabated emissions). The release of two volatilized radionuclides, tritium and carbon-14 will contribute less than 0.001 percent of the total unabated emissions. Table 2-1 lists the radionuclides which are anticipated to be emitted from WRAP 1 exhaust stack. The Clean Air Assessment Package 1988 (CAP-88) computer code (WHC 1991) was used to calculate effective dose equivalent (EDE) from WRAP 1 to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEI), and thus demonstrate compliance with WAC 246-247. Table 4-1 shows the dose factors derived from the CAP-88 modeling and the EDE for each radionuclide. The source term (i.e., emissions after abatement in curies per year) are multiplied by the dose factors to obtain the EDE. The total projected EDE from controlled airborne radiological emissions to the offsite MEI is 1.31E-03 mrem/year. The dose attributable to radiological emissions from WRAP 1 will, then, constitute 0.013 percent of the WAC 246-247 EDE regulatory limit of 10 mrem/year to the offsite MEI.

Not Available

1993-02-01

206

Letter Report. Defense Waste Processing Facility Pour Spout Heaters - Conceptual Designs and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) identified a major task to address performance limitations and deficiencies of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) now in its sixth year of operation. Design, installation, testing, monitoring, operability, and a number of other characteristics were studied by research personnel collaboratively at a number of facilities: Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Because the potential limiting feature to the DWPF was identified as the pour spout/riser heater, researches on alternative design concepts originally proposed in the past were revisited. In the original works, finite element modeling was performed to evaluate temperature distribution and stress of the design currently used at the DWPF. Studies were also made to define the requirements of the design and to consider the approaches for remote removal/replacement. Their heater type/location, their remotely replaceable thermocouples, and their capabilities for remote handling characterized the five alternative designs proposed. Review comments on the alternative designs indicated a relatively wide range of advantages and disadvantages of the designs. The present report provides an overview of the design criteria, modeling results, and alternative designs. Based on a review of the past design optimization activities and an assessment of recent experience, recommendations are proposed for future consideration and improvement.

SK Sundaram; JM Perez, Jr.

2000-09-06

207

USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary.

WESTCOTT, J.L.

2006-11-15

208

USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary.

WESTCOTT, J.L.; JOCHEN; PREVETTE

2007-01-02

209

Node 2 and Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) In Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lining the walls of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the launch awaiting U.S. Node 2 (lower left). and the first pressurized module of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) (upper right), named 'Kibo' (Hope). Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Japan's major contribution to the station, the JEM, was built by the Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo and will expand research capabilities aboard the station. Both were part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Node 2 will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. Once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it, the resulting roomier Station will expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

2003-01-01

210

Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed.

NONE

1997-09-01

211

Detailed results of ASTP experiment MA-011. [biological processing facility in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This experiment was developed in order to conduct engineering and operational tests of electrokinetic equipment in a micro-gravity environment. The experimental hardware in general functioned as planned and electrophoretic separations were obtained in space. The results indicated the development of satisfactory sample collection, return, and preservation techniques. The application of a near-zero zeta potential interior wall coating to the experimental columns, confirmation of biocompatibility of all appropriate hardware components, and use of a sterile operating environment provided a significant step forward in the development of a biological processing facility in space. A separation of a test of aldehyde-fixed rabbit, human, and horse red blood cells was obtained. Human kidney cells were separated into several components and viable cells returned to earth. The isotachophoretic separation of red cells was also demonstrated. Problems associated with the hardware led to a lack of success in the attempt to separate subpopulations of human lymphocytes.

Seaman, G. V. F.; Allen, R. E.; Barlow, G. H.; Bier, M.

1976-01-01

212

Facile fabrication processes for hydrogel-based microfluidic devices made of natural biopolymers.  

PubMed

We present facile strategies for the fabrication of two types of microfluidic devices made of hydrogels using the natural biopolymers, alginate, and gelatin as substrates. The processes presented include the molding-based preparation of hydrogel plates and their chemical bonding. To prepare calcium-alginate hydrogel microdevices, we suppressed the volume shrinkage of the alginate solution during gelation using propylene glycol alginate in the precursor solution along with sodium alginate. In addition, a chemical bonding method was developed using a polyelectrolyte membrane of poly-L-lysine as the electrostatic glue. To prepare gelatin-based microdevices, we used microbial transglutaminase to bond hydrogel plates chemically and to cross-link and stabilize the hydrogel matrix. As an application, mammalian cells (fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells) were cultivated on the microchannel surface to form three-dimensional capillary-embedding tissue models for biological research and tissue engineering. PMID:24803964

Yajima, Yuya; Yamada, Masumi; Yamada, Emi; Iwase, Masaki; Seki, Minoru

2014-03-01

213

Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)  

SciTech Connect

Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya [IHI Corporation: Isogo-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa pref, 235-8501 (Japan); Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15

214

Study volcanic, earthquake, landslide, and hydrological processes with InSAR images from Alaska Satellite Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technology that is capable of measuring surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meters over a relatively large region. This presentation summarizes the progress on exploring InSAR imagery from the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) to study active volcanoes (Alaska), earthquakes (Alaska), landslides (Colorado), land subsidence (Louisiana), and water-level changes over swamp forests (Louisiana). The presentation will show our work on monitoring deformation of Aleutian volcanoes, imaging ground surface deformation that was caused by the November 2003 Denali earthquakes, mapping land surface deformation at a Colorado landslide site and around New Orleans, and detecting water-level changes beneath swamp forests in Louisiana. The results demonstrate that InSAR can improve our understanding of many geophysical, geological, and hydrological processes.

Lu, Z.

2006-12-01

215

QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Hanford Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOEMPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

CANTALOUB, M.G.; WILLS, C.E.

2000-03-24

216

Performance based seismic qualification of reinforced concrete nuclear materials processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

A seismic qualification of a reinforced concrete nuclear materials processing facility using performance based acceptance criteria is presented. Performance goals are defined in terms of a minimum annual seismic failure frequency. Pushover analyses are used to determine the building`s ultimate capacity and relate the capacity to roof drift and joint rotation. Nonlinear dynamic analyses are used to quantify the building`s drift using a suite of ground motion intensities representing varying soil conditions and levels of seismic hazard. A correlation between joint rotation and building drift to damage state is developed from experimental data. The damage state and seismic hazard are convolved to determine annual seismic failure frequency. The results of this rigorous approach is compared to those using equivalent force methods and pushover techniques recommended by ATC-19 and FEMA-273.

Mertz, G.E.; Loceff, F.; Houston, T.; Rauls, G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Mulliken, J. [LPA Group Inc., SC (United States)

1997-09-01

217

Phase stability determinations of DWPF waste glasses. [Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The high-level radioactive wastes stored at Savannah River, will be immobilized in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications require that time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves be provided for expected DWPF compositions, in order to predict the durability of the waste form. In order to derive these TTT curves, samples of simulated glasses are being heat treated and then analyzed. The seven simulated glasses include blend, high aluminum (HM) and high iron (Purex). X-ray diffraction show minimal crystallization for the heat treatments at 400, 1000 and 1100 C; 600 and 700 C produce the greatest amount of crystallization. Scanning electron microscopy show heterogeneous crystallization with the spinel forming on melt insolubles and the acmite nucleating on the spinel. Initial leaching results show that the glass durability decreases with increasing crystallinity for the 700 C glasses. Future plans are outlined. 2 tables, 9 refs. (DLC)

Andrews, M.K.; Cicero, C.A.; Marra, S.L.; Beam, D.C.; Jantzen, C.M.

1992-01-01

218

Analysis of airborne and waterborne particles around a taconite ore processing facility.  

PubMed

Since the mid-1970s, samples of airborne and waterborne fibrous particulates have been collected in the area of the Northshore Taconite Ore Processing Facility by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (PCA), and the University of Minnesota. Indirect sample preparation has consistently been used although other aspects of the sampling methods and sites have varied and analytical procedures were altered over time as more accurate and precise microscopy methods were developed (i.e., phase contrast optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy). In the mid-1970s, levels of airborne fibrous particulate in the Silver Bay area averaged from 0.00030 to 0.03 f/ml. This level was significantly greater than levels of similar particulates in the St. Paul, MN area, although two of the Silver Bay sampling sites, considered individually, did not indicate levels of fibrous particulate markedly different than that seen in St. Paul. More recent sampling data (i.e., 1990-2001) indicate mean concentration of airborne fibrous particulates (amphibole-like fibrous particulates) of 0.0020 f/ml with a range of values from 0.0001 to 0.0140 f/ml. Such levels are not significantly different from those seen in other non-urban environments in the US and Europe. Concentrations of fibrous particulates in water samples were higher in the mid-1970 when iron ore tailings were being deposited in Lake Superior, but since the tailings have been deposited on land waterborne levels of fibrous particulate in the Beaver River have remained relatively constant averaging in the range of 7.5 MFL. This level is only slightly in excess of the current EPA drinking water standard for fibrous particulates. Review and consideration of this data is important in determining the potential health risks associated with airborne and waterborne fibrous particulates in the areas of the Northshore Taconite Ore Processing Facility. PMID:18221826

Axten, Charles W; Foster, David

2008-10-01

219

Using Statistical Process Control to Monitor Radioactive Waste Characterization at a Radioactive Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins ...

J. L. Westcott R. M. Jochen S. S. Prevette

2006-01-01

220

Using Statistical Process Control to Monitor Radioactive Waste Characterization at a Radioactive Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins ...

J. L. Westcott R. M. Jochen S. S. Prevette

2007-01-01

221

A graded approach to safety analysis for Rover Processing Facility deactivation  

SciTech Connect

The Rover Fuels Processing Facility operated in the early 1980`s, recovering uranium from graphite fuels. In 1996 clean-out began of uranium bearing material remaining in the Rover cells where combustion processes had occurred. Success of the Rover Deactivation Project depends on the safe, timely, and cost-effective repackaging and removal of the uranium bearing material. Due to a number of issues which could not be resolved prior to clean-out, and consideration of cost and schedule objectives, a graded approach was taken to projected design and criticality safety analysis. The safety authorization basis was upgraded primarily by a specific Deactivation addendum, instead of being completely rewritten to current format and content standards. In place of having all design activities completed prior to the start of the Deactivation, the project design and accompanying safety documentation evolved as the project progressed. The Unreviewed Safety Question determination process was used to ensure that new project activities were within the safety envelope. This graded approach allowed operational flexibility while maintaining a critically safe work environment.

Henrikson, D.J.

1997-08-01

222

Erosion/corrosion concerns in feed preparation systems at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the high level radioactive waste resulting from these processes as a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF, after having undergone extensive testing, has been approved for operations and is currently immobilizing radioactive waste. To ensure reliability of the DWPF remote canyon processing equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed prior to radioactive operations to determine to what extent erosion/corrosion would impact design life of equipment. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections on critical equipment and follow-up inspections after completion of DWPF cold chemical demonstration runs. Non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques were used to assess erosion/corrosion as well as evaluation of corrosion coupon racks. These results were used to arrive at predicted equipment life for selected feed preparation equipment. It was concluded with the exception of the coil and agitator for the slurry mix evaporator (SME), which are exposed to erosive glass frit particles, all of the equipment should meet its design life.

Gee, J.T.; Chandler, C.T.; Daugherty, W.L.; Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

1997-12-31

223

Process logic flow diagram write up for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) is planning a facility to disassemble pits and convert the plutonium in the pits into a form suitable for international inspection. The facility, called the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Facility, must handle much of the 38.2 metric tons of plutonium declared excess to national security needs in

Zygmunt

1997-01-01

224

Qualification of a Radioactive High Aluminum Glass for Processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a borosilicate glass for approximately eleven years. Currently the DWPF is immobilizing HLW sludge in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). Each sludge batch is nominally two million liters of HLW and produces nominally five hundred stainless steel canisters 0.6 meters in diameter and 3 meters tall filled with the borosilicate glass. In SB4 and earlier sludge batches, the Al concentration has always been rather low, (less than 9.5 weight percent based on total dried solids). It is expected that in the future the Al concentrations will increase due to the changing composition of the HLW. Higher Al concentrations could introduce problems because of its known effect on the viscosity of glass melts and increase the possibility of the precipitation of nepheline in the final glass and decrease its durability. In 2006 Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) used DWPF processes to immobilize a radioactive HLW slurry containing 14 weight percent Al to ensure that this waste is viable for future DWPF processing. This paper presents results of the characterization of the high Al glass prepared in that demonstration. At SRNL, a sample of the processed high Al HLW slurry was mixed with an appropriate glass frit as performed in the DWPF to make a waste glass containing nominally 30% waste oxides. The glass was prepared by melting the frit and waste remotely at 1150 deg. C. The glass was then characterized by - determining the chemical composition of the glass including the concentrations of several actinide and U-235 fission products, - calculating the oxide waste loading of the glass based on the chemical composition and comparing it to that of the target - determining if the glass composition met the DWPF processing constraints such as glass melt viscosity and liquidus temperature along with a waste form affecting constraint that prevents the precipitation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) crystals in the glass melt - measuring the durability of the glass using the ASTM Standard Product Consistency Test (PCT) leach test to determine if the durability of the glass based on B, Li, and Na releases met the requirements for acceptance in a US geologic repository - measuring the leachability of several radionuclides using the ASTM Standard PCT leach test and comparing them to the B, Li, and Na releases - examining the glass by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to determine if any crystals had formed in the glass melt. Results indicate that the high Al glass met all the requirements for processing and product quality in the DWPF. (authors)

Bibler, N.E.; Pareizs, J.M.; Edwards, T.B.; Coleman, C.J.; Crawford, C.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Washington Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01

225

3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of hydrostratigraphy and uranium and nitrate contamination in groundwater at a former nuclear materials processing facility in Oklahoma were undertaken employing 3-dimensional (3D) geospatial modeling software. Models constructed played an important role in the regulatory decision process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because they enabled visualization of temporal variations in contaminant concentrations and plume geometry. Three aquifer

G. L. Stirewalt; J. C. Shepherd

2003-01-01

226

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Sludge Conditioning & Dewatering Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the sludge conditioning and dewatering process of wastewater treatment facilities. In this process, sludge is treated with chemicals to make the sludge coagulate and give up its water more easily. The treated sludge is then dewatered using a vacuum filter. The guide gives step-by-step

Schwing, Carl M.

227

Durability of Defense Waste Processing Facility glasses within the Purex range of compositions  

SciTech Connect

Processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is controlled by constraints on predicted properties of the product glass. One of these properties is chemical durability, which is measured as the response of various glass constituents to the seven-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) [1]. As currently implemented into the DWPF`s Product Composition Control System (PCCS) the response of boron is taken as representative of all of the constituent responses, and control is in terms of the boron response. This response, in normalized units and in log scale, is taken to be a linear function of the glass`s free energy of hydration, {Delta}G. {Delta}G is a parameter which represents the sum of influences on durability of the various glass oxide components. A generalized relationship between these two variables is documented in [2]. This relationship appears to underpredict releases for glasses in the so-called ``Purex`` range of compositions which comprises a worst-case DWPF operating range. Using a similar methodology as in [2], a linear regression specific to Purex compositions is developed herein.

Edwards, T.B.; Kielpinski, A.L.

1995-05-01

228

ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

Best, D.

2010-08-04

229

Remote-controlled NDA (nondestructive assay) systems for process areas in a MOX (mixed oxide) facility  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive assay (NDA) systems have been designed and installed in the process area of an automated mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. These instruments employ neutron coincidence counting methods to measure the spontaneous-fission rate of plutonium in the powders, pellets, and fuel pins in the process area. The spontaneous fission rate and the plutonium isotopic ratios determine the mass of plutonium in the sample. Measurements can be either attended or unattended. The fuel-pin assay system (FPAS) resides above the robotic conveyor system and measures the plutonium content in fuel-pin trays containing up to 24 pins (/approximately/1 kg of plutonium). The material accountancy glove-box (MAGB) counters consist of two slab detectors mounted on the sides of the glove box to measure samples of powder or pellets as they are brought to the load cell. Samples measured by the MAGB counters may contain up to 18 kg of MOX. This paper describes the design and performance of four systems: the fuel-pin assay system and three separate MAGB systems. The paper also discusses the role of Monte Carlo transport techniques in the detector design and subsequent instrument calibration. 5 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Augustson, R.H.; Ohtani, T.; Seya, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.

1989-01-01

230

Advanced Distributed Measurements and Data Processing at the Vibro-Acoustic Test Facility, GRC Space Power Facility, Sandusky, Ohio - an Architecture and an Example  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large-scale, distributed, high-speed data acquisition system (HSDAS) is currently being installed at the Space Power Facility (SPF) at NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, OH. This installation is being done as part of a facility construction project to add Vibro-acoustic Test Capabilities (VTC) to the current thermal-vacuum testing capability of SPF in support of the Orion Project s requirement for Space Environments Testing (SET). The HSDAS architecture is a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enables the system to support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and a very large system channel count. The architecture of the system is presented along with details on system scalability and measurement verification. In addition, the ability of the system to automate many of its processes such as measurement verification and measurement system analysis is also discussed.

Hill, Gerald M.; Evans, Richard K.

2009-01-01

231

Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility study (MMPF): Requirements and Analyses of Commercial Operations (RACO) preliminary data release  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This requirements and analyses of commercial operations (RACO) study data release reflects the current status of research activities of the Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility under Modification No. 21 to NASA/MSFC Contract NAS8-36122. Section 1 includes 65 commercial space processing projects suitable for deployment aboard the Space Station. Section 2 contains reports of the R:BASE (TM) electronic data base being used in the study, synopses of the experiments, and a summary of data on the experimental facilities. Section 3 is a discussion of video and data compression techniques used as well as a mission timeline analysis.

1988-01-01

232

Qualification of the Nippon Instrumentation for use in Measuring Mercury at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system with the currently used Bacharach Mercury Analyzer. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications, spiked samples and unspiked samples. The standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The side-by-side work included the analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. With the qualification of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system in M-14, the DWPF lab will be able to perform a head to head comparison of a second Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system once the system is installed. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analyzes receipt and product samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in the sludge slurry. The SRAT receipt is typically sampled and analyzed for the first ten SRAT batches of a new sludge batch to obtain an average Hg concentration. This average Hg concentration is then used to determine the amount of steam stripping required during the concentration/reflux step of the SRAT cycle to achieve a less than 0.6 wt% Hg in the SRAT product solids. After processing is complete, the SRAT product is sampled and analyzed for mercury to ensure that the mercury concentration does not exceed the 0.45 wt% limit in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The DWPF Laboratory utilizes Bacharach Analyzers to support these Hg analyses at this facility. These analyzers are more than 10 years old, and they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Due to these difficulties, the Bacharach Analyzers are to be replaced by new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems. DWPF issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist in the qualification of the new systems. SRNL prepared a task technical and quality assurance (TT&QA) plan that outlined the activities that are necessary and sufficient to meet the objectives of the TTR. In addition, TT&QA plan also included a test plan that provided guidance to the DWPF Lab in collecting the data needed to qualify the new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems.

Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05

233

Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180C), accessibility (i.e., < 50 m from potential on-site WHR applications) and minimal impact criteria on the performance and safety of existing installations, for potential waste heat recovery. The total amount of waste heat meeting these criteria were estimated at 256 MW and 289 MW at ASAB0 and ASAB1 plants, respectively, both of which are substantial. Of the 289 MW waste generated at ASAB1, approximately 173 MW are recovered by waste heat recovery steam generators (WHRSGs), leaving 116 MW unutilized. The following strategies were developed to recover the above waste heat. At ASAB0, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all five gas turbines be used to power a WHRSG. The steam generated by the WHRSG would both i) drive an absorption refrigeration unit for gas turbine inlet air cooling, which would result in additional electric or mechanical power generation, and pre-cooling of process gas, which could reduce the need for or eliminate air coolers, as well as reduce propane chiller load, and ii) serve for heating of lean gas, which would reduce furnace load. At ASAB1, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all four gas turbines be used to generate steam in WHRSG that would drive an absorption refrigeration unit for either gas turbine inlet air cooling for additional electric or mechanical power generation, or pre-cooling of process gas to eliminate air-coolers and reduce propane chiller cooling load. Considering the smaller amount of waste heat available at ASAB1 (116 MW) relative to ASAB0 (237 MW), these above two recovery options could not be implemented simultaneously at ASAB0. To permit the detailed design and techno-economic feasibility evaluation of the proposed waste heat recovery strategies in a subsequent study, the cooling loads and associated electric power consumption of ASAB0 process gas air-coolers were estimated at 21 MW and 1.9 MW, respectively, and 67 MW and 2.2 MW, respectively for ASAB1 plant. In addition, the heating loads and fuel consumption of ASAB0 furnaces used for lean gas re-generation were estimated at 24 MW and 0.0653 MMSCMD, respectively. In modeling work undertaken in parallel with this study at the Petroleum Institute, the waste heat recovery strategies proposed here were found to be thermodynamically and economically feasible, and to lead to substantial energy and cost savings, hence environmental benefits.

Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

234

Qualification of a Carbon Analyzer to Support the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The I-O Model 1030 carbon analyzer has been qualified for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Model 1030 system with the currently used Model 1010 Analyzer. This recommendation is based on side-by-side comparisons of the new unit to the currently used Model 1010 analyzer that are presented in this report. The side-by-side testing included standards and process samples. The standards, which were used for instrument calibration verifications in the measurement of total inorganic carbon (TIC) and of total organic carbon (TOC), were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The process samples included TIC analyses of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank samples and TOC analyses for Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. After the Model 1030 has been used for production reporting, DWPF should consider an investigation into the uncertainties associated with the TOC measurements to determine how far below the 18,916 ppm limit DWPF must control the average of the measurements for a set of SME samples to account for the uncertainties of the measurements from this new analyzer. Based upon the results presented in this report, it is recommended that the Model 1030 carbon analyzer is qualified for use. This recommendation is based on side-by-side comparisons of the new unit to the currently used Model 1010 analyzer that are presented in this report. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications for TIC and TOC, and process samples. The standards were traceable back to NIST. The process samples included TIC analyses of SRAT Receipt samples and TOC analyses for SME samples. At some point in the future, after the Model 1030 has been used for production reporting, DWPF should consider an investigation into the uncertainties associated with the TOC measurements to determine how far below the 18,916 ppm limit DWPF must control the average of the measurements for a set of SME samples to account for the uncertainties of the measurements from this new analyzer.

Edwards, T.; Feller, M.

2011-07-05

235

GIS analysis of the siting criteria for the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study conducted using the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS) to analyze the criteria used for site selection for the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of the analyses was to determine, based on predefined criteria, the areas on the INEL that best satisfied the criteria. The coverages used in this study were produced by importing the AutoCAD files that produced the maps for a pre site selection draft report into the GIS. The files were then converted to Arc/Info{reg_sign} GIS format. The initial analysis was made by considering all of the criteria as having equal importance in determining the areas of the INEL that would best satisfy the requirements. Another analysis emphasized four of the criteria as ``must`` criteria which had to be satisfied. Additional analyses considered other criteria that were considered for, but not included in the predefined criteria. This GIS analysis of the siting criteria for the IWPF and MLLWTF provides a logical, repeatable, and defensible approach to the determination of candidate locations for the facilities. The results of the analyses support the location of the Candidate Locations.

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-01-01

236

Reconnaissance hydrogeologic investigation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility and Vicinity, Savannah River Plant, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of this report are two-fold: (1) to define the hydrogeologic conditions in the vicinity of the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) and, (2) to evaluate the potential for movement of a concentrated salt-solution waste if released at or near the DWPF. These purposes were accomplished by assembling and evaluating existing hydrogeologic data; collecting additional geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data; developing a local geologic framework; developing a conceptual model of the local ground-water flow system; and by performing laboratory experiments to determine the mobility of salt-solution waste in surface and near-surface sediments. Although the unconsolidated sediments are about 1000 ft thick in the study area, only the Tertiary age sediments, or upper 300 ft are discussed in this report. The top of the Ellenton Formation acts as the major confining unit between the overlying aquifers in Tertiary sediments and the underlying aquifers in Cretaceous sediments; therefore, the Ellenton Formation is the vertical limit of our hydrogeologic investigation. The majority of the hydrologic data for this study come from monitoring wells at the saltstone disposal site (SDS) in Z Area (fig. 3). No recent water-level data were collected in S Area owing to the removal of S Area monitoring wells prior to construction at the DWPF. 46 refs., 26 figs., 7 tabs.

Dennehy, K.F.; Prowell, D.C.; McMahon, P.B.

1989-01-01

237

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25

238

Hypertension and hematologic parameters in a community near a uranium processing facility  

SciTech Connect

Background: Environmental uranium exposure originating as a byproduct of uranium processing can impact human health. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center functioned as a uranium processing facility from 1951 to 1989, and potential health effects among residents living near this plant were investigated via the Fernald Medical Monitoring Program (FMMP). Methods: Data from 8216 adult FMMP participants were used to test the hypothesis that elevated uranium exposure was associated with indicators of hypertension or changes in hematologic parameters at entry into the program. A cumulative uranium exposure estimate, developed by FMMP investigators, was used to classify exposure. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and physician diagnoses were used to assess hypertension; and red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cell differential counts were used to characterize hematology. The relationship between uranium exposure and hypertension or hematologic parameters was evaluated using generalized linear models and quantile regression for continuous outcomes, and logistic regression or ordinal logistic regression for categorical outcomes, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Results: Of 8216 adult FMMP participants 4187 (51%) had low cumulative uranium exposure, 1273 (15%) had moderate exposure, and 2756 (34%) were in the high (>0.50 Sievert) cumulative lifetime uranium exposure category. Participants with elevated uranium exposure had decreased white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and increased eosinophil counts. Female participants with higher uranium exposures had elevated systolic blood pressure compared to women with lower exposures. However, no exposure-related changes were observed in diastolic blood pressure or hypertension diagnoses among female or male participants. Conclusions: Results from this investigation suggest that residents in the vicinity of the Fernald plant with elevated exposure to uranium primarily via inhalation exhibited decreases in white blood cell counts, and small, though statistically significant, gender-specific alterations in systolic blood pressure at entry into the FMMP.

Wagner, Sara E., E-mail: swagner@uga.edu [College of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Georgia, 500 D.W. Brooks Drive, Athens, GA 30602-7396 (United States); Burch, James B. [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States) [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Columbia, SC (United States); WJB Dorn Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, Columbia, SC (United States); Bottai, Matteo [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)] [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Pinney, Susan M. [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [College of Medicine, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Puett, Robin [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States) [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Columbia, SC (United States); Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Porter, Dwayne [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)] [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Vena, John E. [College of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Georgia, 500 D.W. Brooks Drive, Athens, GA 30602-7396 (United States)] [College of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Georgia, 500 D.W. Brooks Drive, Athens, GA 30602-7396 (United States); Hebert, James R. [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States) [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Columbia, SC (United States)

2010-11-15

239

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE\\/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE\\/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap.

J. E. Mack; L. C. Williams

1982-01-01

240

A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE OF THE RESTORATION PROCESS FOR THE FORMER SODIUM DISPOSAL FACILITY AT ENERGY TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING CENTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Site Closure program is nearing the completion of a lengthy process to obtain the regulatory approval of a workplan to remediate its Former Sodium Disposal Facility (FSDF) and restore the area, approximately 3 acres (12,000 sq. meter), to its natural state. This remediation project has undergone numerous cleanup phases and has been closely monitored

S. N. Shah; R. B. Hardy; M. E. Lee; A. Klein; M. J. Sullivan; J. G. Barnes; P. D. Rutherford

241

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01

242

Mechanical design and fabrication of a prototype facility for processing NaK using a chlorine reaction method  

SciTech Connect

A prototype facility has been built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to dispose of 180 gal(0.68 m{sup 3}) of radioactively contaminated NaK (sodium-potassium) that have been stored on site for 35 years. The NaK was used as primary coolant for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) at the INEL and was contaminated during a meltdown of the Mark II core in November 1955. The NaK then was transferred to four containers for temporary storage. The facility process will react the NaK with elemental chlorine using a batch process to produce chemically stable sodium chloride and potassium chloride salts. The first use of the facility will be on a prototype level to verify the method. If results are favorable, the facility will be modified to eventually dispose of the EBR-I NaK. The design and intended operation of the prototype facility are described. 2 figs.

Dafoe, R.; Keller, D.; Stoll, F.

1990-01-01

243

A Microsoft Project-Based Planning, Tracking, and Management Tool for the National Transonic Facility's Model Changeover Process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The removal and installation of sting-mounted wind tunnel models in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) is a multi-task process having a large impact on the annual throughput of the facility. Approximately ten model removal and installation cycles occur annually at the NTF with each cycle requiring slightly over five days to complete. The various tasks of the model changeover process were modeled in Microsoft Project as a template to provide a planning, tracking, and management tool. The template can also be used as a tool to evaluate improvements to this process. This document describes the development of the template and provides step-by-step instructions on its use and as a planning and tracking tool. A secondary role of this document is to provide an overview of the model changeover process and briefly describe the tasks associated with it.

Vairo, Daniel M.

1998-01-01

244

Analysis of the process applied to end-of-life vehicles in Authorised Treatment Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Authorised treatment facilities (ATFs) play a key role in the process undergone by vehicles when they reach their end of life (EoL) within the context of Directive 2000/53/EC. Whenever an EoL vehicle is received at an ATF, a certificate of destruction is issued. The process continues with the depollution of hazardous waste materials from the vehicle and dismantling of parts that will be reused or recycled. Finally, the remaining parts of the vehicle are transported to a shredding plant. Directive 2000/53/EC sets a number of environmental goals regarding the reuse and recycling of vehicle parts and the recovery of waste materials at the EoL of vehicles. These goals will condition the evolution of ATFs as they gradually become more restrictive. As of today, the goals set by Directive 2000/53/EC for the year 2006 are being met (1). However, it would be necessary to assess the situation of those parts that comprise the fraction of the vehicle that is not recycled, reused or recovered in order to predict the degree of compliance with the goals set for the year 2015 (recycling, reusing or recovering 95% by weight of EoL vehicles). The use of lighter materials-light alloys and reinforced plastics-as a vehicle weight-reducing strategy should be coordinated with the process carried out at ATFs in order to ensure compliance with the aforementioned goals. The results of our study seem to indicate that the most usual EoL scenario today-that in which practically all of the ferrous and non-ferrous metals are recycled and the lightweight fraction of vehicles and remaining inert materials are sent to a landfill-should be revised in order to reach the environmental goals set for the year 2015. To that avail, new strategies will have to be developed to allow for an adequate treatment-recycling, reuse or recovery-of those vehicle components that are presently sent to a landfill.

Muoz, C.; Garran, D.; Franco, V.; Royo, M.; Justel, D.; Vidal, R.

2009-11-01

245

Lot No. 2 of Frit 202 for DWPF cold runs. [Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

In the DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility), glass forming chemicals will be added to the waste in the form of premelted glass frit. On an oxide weight basis, DWPF glass will consist of approximately 64 wt% glass frit, 8 wt% precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product, and 28 wt% sludge. The glass frit and the precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product together make up what is called the glass-former composition. Current plants are to control the composition of the frit through the procurement specifications and chemical analyses of representative lot samples. The following report was prepared at the end of 1992 and summarizes the evaluation of the second lot sample of DWPF Frit 202 from Cataphote Inc. The frit was received and evaluated for moisture, particle size distribution, organic-inorganic carbon and chemical composition. The moisture content was within specification. The particle size determination indicates that there was a fraction of a percent more coarse frit (+80 mesh) than the specified amount. The fine end of the distribution was within specification. A representative sample was submitted to Corning Engineering Laboratory Services for chemical analyses. The sample was split and two dissolutions prepared. Each dissolution was analyzed on two separate days. The results indicate that there is a high probability (>95%) that the silica content of this frit was below the specification limit of 77.0 [plus minus] 1.0 wt%. The average of the four analyzed values was 75.3 wt% with a standard deviation of 0.21 wt%. All other oxides were within the elliptical limits established for this product. The vendor was notified that the material was not acceptable for DWPF cold runs.

Schumacher, R.F.

1993-04-05

246

Safeguards Material Control at Licensed Processing Facilities. Quarterly Report, April--June 1977.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the third quarterly report of progress at LLL on assessment methodologies and tools to assist the NRC in the development and enforcement of performance based regulations pertaining to special nuclear material safeguards at licensed facilities. The...

R. B. Hollstien A. Maimoni L. R. Spogen

1977-01-01

247

Critical Protection Item Classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site. Revision 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As a part of its compliance with the Department of Energy requirements for safety of nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) assigns functional classifications to structures, systems and components (...

M. J. Ades R. J. Garrett

1993-01-01

248

Description of Defense Waste Processing Facility reference waste form and canister. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1984. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approx. 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains about 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Leachabilities of SRP waste glasses are expected to approach 10/sup -8/ g/m/sup 2/-day based upon 1000-day tests using glasses containing SRP radioactive waste. Tests were performed under a wide variety of conditions simulating repository environments. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approx. 470 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the sludge and supernate processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 177,000 ci, with a radiation level of 5500 rem/h at canister surface contact. The reference canister is fabricated of standard 24-in.-OD, Schedule 20, 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and a combined lifting and welding flange on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in. with a 3/8-in. wall thickness. The 3-m canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected as an optimum size from glass quality considerations, a logical size for repository handling and to ensure that a filled canister with its double containment shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. 10 references.

Baxter, R.G.

1983-08-01

249

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01

250

Facile adsorption-dry process to incorporate Cu into TiO2 nanotube for highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production.  

PubMed

Cu species was introduced into TiO2 nanotube prepared by hydrothermal method via a facile adsorption-dry process. The fabricated sample exhibited excellent H2 generation activity (76.3 mmol h(-1) g(-1)(catalyst)), which was higher than most of the reported Cu incorporated TiO2 samples, even superior to some Pt/Pd/Au/Ni incorporated TiO2. Compared to wet impregnation and in-situ photo-deposition methods, the facile adsorption-dry process was much simpler but more efficient to introduce Cu species into TiO2 for H2 production. To fully understand the adsorption-dry process, characterizations of the samples were carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, BET surface area analysis, UV-visible spectrophotometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the facile adsorption-dry process could well maintain the morphology of TiO2 support, for instance, 1-D tubular structure and large BET surface area of TiO2 nanotube; moreover, the introduced Cu species was highly dispersed and intensively bonded with TiO2. All of these contributed to the high H2 generation activity. PMID:24245156

Xu, Shiping; Sun, Darren Delai

2013-10-01

251

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04

252

Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-01-15

253

Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments is to be a phased effort. This effort is to be supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-13 ICS-3000 instrument. With the successful qualification of this first ICS-3000, plans will be developed for the installation of the second 'rad' system in the M-14 Lab module later in fiscal year 2009. When the second 'rad' ICS-3000 system is installed, the DX-500 systems will be removed and retired from service.

Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05

254

DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY ANALYTICAL METHOD VERIFICATION FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO3 acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestion of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) SRAT Receipt and SB5 SRAT Product samples. The SB5 SRAT Receipt and SB5 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB5 Batch composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), to form the SB5 Blend composition. The results for any one particular element should not be used in any way to identify the form or speciation of a particular element in the sludge or used to estimate ratios of compounds in the sludge. A statistical comparison of the data validates the use of the DWPF CC method for SB5 Batch composition. However, the difficulty that was encountered in using the CC method for SB4 brings into question the adequacy of CC for the SB5 Blend. Also, it should be noted that visible solids remained in the final diluted solutions of all samples digested by this method at SRNL (8 samples total), which is typical for the DWPF CC method but not seen in the other methods. Recommendations to the DWPF for application to SB5 based on studies to date: (1) A dissolution study should be performed on the WAPS sample by SRNL which consists of the final composition of the sludge (the SB5 Blend); (2) Given the heel of SB4 in Tank 40, the DWPF lab should monitor the aluminum concentration in the first 10 SRAT Receipt batches of SB5 using both CC and sodium peroxide/hydroxide fusion to evaluate the adequacy of aluminum recovery by the CC method for this sludge batch; and (3) SRNL and the DWPF lab should investigate if comparisons between the elemental concentrations of the SME product glass (adjusted for frit addition) obtained by the mixed acid and peroxide fusion digestion and the SRAT Receipt and SRAT Product elemental concentrations obtained via the DWPF CC method provide insight into the adequacy of the CC method for analysis of the SRAT Product. The DWPF lab would need to calcine the SRAT product at 1050 C for the best comparison. If a consistent difference in elemental concentrations is revealed, another type of digestion (i.e. sodium peroxide/hydroxide fusion) should be used to determine the concentration of the element in question. Particular emphasis should be placed on monitoring the aluminum concentration in SB5.

Click, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Henry Ajo, H

2008-07-25

255

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08

256

Chemical hazards database and detection system for Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility (MMPF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to identify contaminants associated with experiments and facilities is directly related to the safety of the Space Station. A means of identifying these contaminants has been developed through this contracting effort. The delivered system provides a listing of the materials and/or chemicals associated with each facility, information as to the contaminant's physical state, a list of the quantity and/or volume of each suspected contaminant, a database of the toxicological hazards associated with each contaminant, a recommended means of rapid identification of the contaminants under operational conditions, a method of identifying possible failure modes and effects analysis associated with each facility, and a fault tree-type analysis that will provide a means of identifying potential hazardous conditions related to future planned missions.

Steele, Jimmy; Smith, Robert E.

1991-01-01

257

An analysis of workplace exposures to benzene over four decades at a petrochemical processing and manufacturing facility (1962-1999).  

PubMed

Benzene, a known carcinogen, can be generated as a by-product during the use of petroleum-based raw materials in chemical manufacturing. The aim of this study was to analyze a large data set of benzene air concentration measurements collected over nearly 40 years during routine employee exposure monitoring at a petrochemical manufacturing facility. The facility used ethane, propane, and natural gas as raw materials in the production of common commercial materials such as polyethylene, polypropylene, waxes, adhesives, alcohols, and aldehydes. In total, 3607 benzene air samples were collected at the facility from 1962 to 1999. Of these, in total 2359 long-term (>1 h) personal exposure samples for benzene were collected during routine operations at the facility between 1974 and 1999. These samples were analyzed by division, department, and job title to establish employee benzene exposures in different areas of the facility over time. Sampling data were also analyzed by key events over time, including changes in the occupational exposure limits (OELs) for benzene and key equipment process changes at the facility. Although mean benzene concentrations varied according to operation, in nearly all cases measured benzene quantities were below the OEL in place at the time for benzene (10 ppm for 1974-1986 and 1 ppm for 1987-1999). Decreases in mean benzene air concentrations were also found when data were evaluated according to 7- to 10-yr periods following key equipment process changes. Further, an evaluation of mortality rates for a retrospective employee cohort (n = 3938) demonstrated that the average personal benzene exposures at this facility (0.89 ppm for the period 1974-1986 and 0.125 ppm for the period 1987-1999) did not result in increased standardized mortality ratio (SMRs) for diseases or malignancies of the lymphatic system. The robust nature of this data set provides comprehensive exposure information that may be useful for assessing human benzene exposures at similar facilities. The data also provide a basis for comparable measured exposure levels and the potential for adverse health effects. These data may also prove beneficial for comparing relative exposure potential for production versus nonproduction operations and the relationship between area and personal breathing zone samples. PMID:23980839

Sahmel, J; Devlin, K; Burns, A; Ferracini, T; Ground, M; Paustenbach, D

2013-01-01

258

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01

259

Safeguards design strategies: designing and constructing new uranium and plutonium processing facilities in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) is transforming its outdated and oversized complex of aging nuclear material facilities into a smaller, safer, and more secure National Security Enterprise (NSE). Environmental concerns, worker health and safety risks, material security, reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy while maintaining the capability for an effective nuclear

Carolynn P Scherer; Jon D Long

2010-01-01

260

INVITED EDITORIAL: Health effects of radiation exposure at uranium processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial public and scientific interest in the health consequences of exposures to ionising radiation in nuclear installations, in particular at nuclear fuels enrichment and production facilities. In this issue of Journal of Radiological Protection, McGeoghegan and Binks report on the follow-up of a cohort of over 19 000 uranium fuel and uranium hexafluoride production workers employed at the

Elisabeth Cardis; David Richardson

2000-01-01

261

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

SciTech Connect

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06

262

A facile method for rapid preparation of individual titania nanotube powders by a two-step process  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} Rapid and facile preparation of individual titania nanotube powders. {yields} Combination of the electrochemical process and the physical processing. {yields} Post ultrasonic treatment acts as the key factor to obtain the individual TiO{sub 2} NT powders. {yields} Individual TiO{sub 2} NTs powder owns higher photocatalytic activities. -- Abstract: Present study reports a facile method for preparing individual TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) powders by a two-step process, which includes that TiO{sub 2} NT bundles are rapidly synthesized by an electro-chemical process in perchlorate-containing electrolyte and then they are disaggregated into individual TiO{sub 2} NT powders under an assistance of ultrasonic oscillation treatment. Morphological and microstructural properties of the individual TiO{sub 2} NT powders are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate that the individual TiO{sub 2} NT powders, which have an outer diameter of about 20 nm and an inner diameter of 10 nm, can be easily obtained from the disaggregation of the TiO{sub 2} NT-bundles by combining the electrochemical process with the physical processing. Furthermore, the individual TiO{sub 2} NT powders exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than the TiO{sub 2} NT-bundle powders.

Liao, Yulong [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)] [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Que, Wenxiu, E-mail: wxque@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)] [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Jin; Zhong, Peng; He, Yucheng [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)] [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning Road West, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

2011-03-15

263

Preparation for Containerless Processing on ISS: Parabolic Flights with the TEMPUS Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of electro-magnetic levitation as a means for measuring material parameters of liquid metals over a wide temperature range under microgravity conditions has been successfully applied in the Spacelab facility TEMPUS. This German payload was flown on the international missions IML- 2, MSL-1 and MSL-1R as well as on six parabolic flight campaigns yielding new results on thermo- physical properties and solidification behavior of undercooled metals and alloys. It is planned to further enhance the established electro-magnetic levitation technique and to develop a new ISS facility, the Electromagnetic Levitator (EML), which shall be a contribution to the ESA payload Materials Sciences Laboratory (MSL). The EML features a highly modular facility concept, with respect to subsystem components and diagnostics features. The sample positioning and heating shall be achieved by use of one single RF coil where the positioning and heating currents are superpositioned. A milestone in this development line has been the performance of a parabolic flight campaign performed with the Airbus A300 as part of the 3rd DLR campaign with an advanced (1) TEMPUS breadboard. During two flight days, a thorough facility test program proved that the newly implemented superpositioning principle concept in combination with two new coil designs stably positions and heats a variety of test samples. The third flight day was dedicated to scientific experiments. For viscosity measurements, sample surface oscillations were induced by applying short heater pulses during sample cooling. During undercooling experiments, the recalescence events were captured with an acquisition rate of 100kHz. In parallel to the envisaged hardware development of the MSL-EML facility, further parabolic flight campaigns both for facility testing and scientific research are planned, with the next campaign planned for November 2002. The paper will provide a brief overview of the MSL-EML features (2) , focus on the results obtained during the parabolic flight campaign performed in November 2001 and give an outlook on the envisaged further MSL-EML development steps. (2)

Diefenbach, A.; Dreier, W.; Lohfer, G.; Piller, J.

2002-01-01

264

Preliminary evaluation of SF/sub 6/ conversion to SO/sub 2/ using existing chemical processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of SF/sub 6/ to SO/sub 2/ has been demonstrated using equipment compatible with existing pilot plant facilities. However, while reduction of SF/sub 6/ to iron sulfide has been demonstrated as an efficient, economic, and scalable process operation, oxidation of the sulfide to SO/sub 2/ causes serious compatibility problems in existing (and commonly used) reactor materials. Further characterization of the sulfide oxidation is necessary to determine the usefulness of this conversion process. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

Reiner, R.H.; VanLaethem, L.M.; Partin, H.B.

1984-06-01

265

Prototype interface facility for intelligent handling and processing of medical image and data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper introduces an interface facility (IF) developed within the overall framework of RACE research project. Due to the nature of the project which it has been focused in the Remote Medical Expert Consultation, the involvement of distances, the versatile user advocation and familiarity with newly introduced methods of medical diagnosis, considerable deficiencies can arise. The aim was to intelligently assist the user/physician by providing an ergonomic environment which would contain operational and functional deficiencies to the lowest possible levels. IF, energizes and activates system and application level commands and procedures along with the necessary exemplified and instructional help facilities, in order to concisely allow the user to interact with the system safely and easily at all levels.

Lymberopoulos, Dimitris C.; Garantziotis, Giannis; Spiropoulos, Kostas V.; Kotsopoulos, Stavros A.; Goutis, Costas E.

1993-06-01

266

Preparation for Containerless Processing on ISS: Parabolic Flights with the TEMPUS Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of electro-magnetic levitation as a means for measuring material parameters of liquid metals over a wide temperature range under microgravity conditions has been successfully applied in the Spacelab facility TEMPUS. This German payload was flown on the international missions IML- 2, MSL-1 and MSL-1R as well as on six parabolic flight campaigns yielding new results on thermo- physical

A. Diefenbach; W. Dreier; G. Lohfer; J. Piller

2002-01-01

267

Gyrotron-powered millimeter-wave beam facility for microwave processing of materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given, as follows. The high intensity millimeter-wave beams (103-105 W\\/cm2) that can be generated by powerful gyrotron oscillators have unique capabilities for rapid, selective heating of nonmetallic materials. A new CW gyrotron-based system is being set up at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to investigate such beams. The facility is being operated jointly by NRL and the

A. W. Fliflet; R. W. Bruce; R. P. Fischer; A. K. Kinkead; S. H. Gold; S. Ganguly

1999-01-01

268

An overview of the waste handling and packaging plant, a major processing facility for remote-handled transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is a FY 1991 line item project proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the facility is to receive, package, certify and ship remote-handled (RH) and special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The scope of the facility includes the mobilization of liquids and sludges from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, transport of these liquids and sludges to the WHPP, solidification to a certifiable waste form, and final packaging and shipment to WIPP. Various solid hot cell wastes will be received at the WHPP from storage at ORNL and from other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The solid wastes will be removed from the storage or shipping container, examined, processed as required, certified and packaged for shipment to WIPP. All packages coming from the processing cell will be in 55 gallon drums, and the facility will have the capability to load these directly into a shielded drum shipping cask, or to load these into the RH TRU canister for remote welding and shipment to WIPP using the RH TRU canister cask. 4 figs.

Turner, D.W.; Stewart, R.C.; du Mont, S.P.

1988-01-01

269

Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal  

SciTech Connect

This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

R. A. Montgomery

2008-05-01

270

RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

MINETTE, M.J.

2007-05-30

271

Feasibility Evaluation and Retrofit Plan for Cold Crucible Induction Melter Deployment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment

A. B. Barnes; D. C. Iverson; B. J. Adkins; E. Tchemitcheff

2008-01-01

272

FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 8118  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment

A Barnes; D Dan Iverson; B Brannen Adkins

2008-01-01

273

FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 8118  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment

A Barnes; D Dan Iverson; B Brannen Adkins

2007-01-01

274

Summary of the development of processes and procedures for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of a plutonium-contaminated facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of processes and procedures for Decontamination and decommissioning of plutonium-contaminated facilities using the retired Redox Plutonium Concentration Facility (Building 233-S) as the demonstration project is described. Special emphasis is given to the technical planning and evaluation aspects of the project. The engineering effort required to carry the project from beginning to end is stressed. Since the production of

Held

1979-01-01

275

Successful Demolition of Historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Facilities: Managing the Process to Maximize Recycle Value to Fund Demolition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will present the history of the Atlas 36 and Titan 40 Space Launch Complexes (SLC), the facility assessment process, demolition planning, recycle methodology, and actual facility demolition that resulted in a 40% reduction in baseline cost. These two SLC launched hundreds of payloads into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS), Florida. The Atlas-Centaur family of rockets

A. Jones; L. Hambro; K. Hooper

2008-01-01

276

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01

277

Dispersion calculations for non-radiological hazardous chemical emissions from the Defense Waste Processing Facility and related activities  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Industrial Source Complex -- Short Term (ISCST) air dispersion model was used to examine potential atmospheric impacts of routine benzene and mercury emissions from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facilities, and the Saltstone Facility. The highest model estimated 8-hour average ground-level benzene concentrations were found to occur in the immediate vicinity of the ITP filter/stripper building (241-96H). Subsequent model calculations were used to determine minimum stack release heights that would be necessary to achieve compliance with this workplace exposure standard for currently anticipated emission levels. The highest 24-hour average site boundary concentrations of benzene and mercury generally occurred to the north of S and H areas. Concentrations were well below the ambient concentration standards that have been identified for these substances in an air toxics policy proposed by the State of South Carolina. Estimates of annual average benzene concentrations for offsite locations were used to estimate the excess lifetime cancer risk. Assuming continuous 70-year exposure to the estimated annual benzene concentrations, the excess cancer risk to the maximum exposed individual was estimated to be 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}. Similar lifetime exposure summed over the surrounding population resulted in an estimated average of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} excess cancers per year. 14 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Hunter, C.H.

1990-10-22

278

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

K. Winterholler

2007-01-31

279

Aerobic biodegradation of sludge with high hydrocarbon content generated by a Mexican natural gas processing facility.  

PubMed

The biodegradation of oil sludge from Mexican sour gas and petrochemical facilities contaminated with a high content of hydrocarbons, 334.7 7.0 g kg(-1) dry matter (dm), was evaluated. Studies in microcosm systems were carried out in order to determine the capacity of the native microbiota in the sludge to reduce hydrocarbon levels under aerobic conditions. Different carbon/nitrogen/phosphorous (C/N/P) nutrient ratios were tested. The systems were incubated at 30 C and shaken at 100 rpm. Hydrocarbon removals from 32 to 51% were achieved in the assays after 30 days of incubation. The best assay had C/N/P ratio of 100/1.74/0.5. The results of the Microtox() and Ames tests indicated that the original sludge was highly toxic and mutagenic, whereas the best assay gave a final product that did not show toxicity or mutagenicity. PMID:21600691

Roldn-Carrillo, T; Castorena-Corts, G; Zapata-Peasco, I; Reyes-Avila, J; Olgun-Lora, P

2012-03-01

280

Facile and flexible fabrication of gapless microlens arrays using a femtosecond laser microfabrication and replication process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate a facile and flexible method to fabricate close-packed microlens arrays (MLAs). Glass molding templates with concave structures are produced by a femtosecond (fs)-laser point-by-point exposures followed by a chemical treatment, and convex MLAs are subsequently replicated on Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] using a hot embossing system. As an example, a microlens array (MLA) with 60-?m rectangular-shaped spherical microlenses is fabricated. Optical performances of the MLAs, such as focusing and imaging properties are tested, and the results demonstrate the uniformity and smooth surfaces of the MLA. We also demonstrated that the shape and alignment of the arrays could be controlled by different parameters.

Liu, Hewei; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Hu, Yang; Shan, Chao; He, Shengguan; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

2012-02-01

281

75 FR 71733 - Requirements for Measurement Facilities Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This notice provides information regarding the responsibilities of lessees, operators, and lessees' representatives with respect to the measurement of Federal production at gas processing plants when royalty is reported and paid on processed gas at or downstream of the plant tailgate under 30 CFR 1206.153. This equipment includes any metering, sampling, or recording devices associated with the......

2010-11-24

282

MODELLING OF STIRRED DOUBLE SHELL REACTOR FOR THE DESIGN OF A SUPERCRITICAL PROCESS PILOT FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a stirring double shell reactor to treat organic wastes containing salt and chlorine by supercritical water oxidation process. A simulation of this process was studied. To that purpose, the complex geometry of the reactor in two dimensions axisymetric has been carried out thanks to GAMBIT software. A mesh has been built in order to perform a simulation

S. Moussire; C. Joussot-Dubien; P. Guichardon; O. Boutin; H.-A. Turc; G. Charbit; B. Fournel

283

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01

284

Noise Evaluation and Control Techniques Used for a Data Processing Facility, March AFB, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Evaluation of noise generated by manually operated data processing machines was made. Noise levels were measured and a noise profile was constructed. No hazardous levels were measured, but there was interference with verbal communications. Techniques for ...

H. P. Guy

1974-01-01

285

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27

286

Minimizing work-in-process and material handling in the facilities layout problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the plant layout problem for a job shop environment. This problem is generally treated as the quadratic assignment problem with the objective of minimizing material handling costs. Here we investigate the relationship between material handling costs and average work-in-process. Under restrictive assumptions, an open queueing network model can be used to show that the problem of minimizing work-in-process

MICHAEL C. FU; BHARAT K. KAKU

1997-01-01

287

Radioactive Carbon Isotope Monitoring System Based on Cavity Ring-down Laser Spectroscopy for Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In decommissioning process of nuclear facilities, large amount of radioactive isotopes are discharged as waste. Radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is one of the key nuclides to determine the upper limit of concentration in the waste disposal. In particular, 14C on the graphite reactor decommissioning should be separated from stable carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and monitored for the public health and safety. We propose an isotope analysis system based on cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRDS) to monitor the carbon isotopes (12C, 13C and 14C) in the isotope separation process for the graphite reactor decommissioning. This system is compact and suitable for a continuous monitoring, because the concentration of molecules including the carbon isotope is derived from its photo absorbance with ultra high sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy. Here are presented the necessary conditions of CRDS system for 14C isotope analysis through the preliminary experimental results of 13C isotope analysis with a prototype system.

Tomita, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Takiguchi, Yu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

288

Extrinsic and intrinsic complexities of the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the data obtained in one year of plutonium accounting at Los Alamos reveals significant complexity. Much of this complexity arises from the complexity of the processes themselves. Additional complexity is induced by errors in the data entry process. It is important to note that there is no evidence that this complexity is adversely affecting the accounting in the plant. We have been analyzing transaction data from fiscal year 1983 processing. This study involved 62,595 transactions. The data have been analyzed using the relational database program INGRES on a VAX 11/780 computer. This software allows easy manipulation of the original data and subsets drawn from it. We have been attempting for several years to understand the global features of the TA-55 accounting data. This project has underscored several of the system's complexities. Examples that will be reported here include audit trails, lot-name multiplicity, etc.

Bearse, R.C.; Longmire, V.L.; Roberts, N.J.

1985-01-01

289

Feed Acceptance for the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) began radioactive operations in December of 1995. The High Level Waste Tank Farm at SRS contains approximately thirty three million gallons of salt, supernate, and insoluble sludge wastes accumulated during more than three decades of weapons manufacture. In the DWPF, the radioactive components from this waste will ultimately be processed into a stable, borosilicate glass for long-term storage in a geological repository.The feeds to the DWPF are pretreated in a number of steps. Insoluble sludges, primarily aluminum, iron and other transition metals, are combined from several tanks, treated by caustic dissolution of aluminum and washed to remove soluble salts; these materials are removed to increase waste loading in the glass produced by the DWPF.The water soluble radioactive species in the salt and supernate, primarily cesium and actinides, are precipitated by sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) or adsorbed onto sodium titanate. The resulting solids are also washed to remove excessive soluble salts before feeding to the DWPF. The soluble species removed by washing are disposed of as low level radioactive waste in a concrete form known as Saltstone. The presentation includes a brief overview of the High Level Waste system, pretreatment, and disposition of the various streams.The washed tetraphenylborate precipitates of cesium and potassium are hydrolyzed by copper catalyzed formic acid hydrolysis in the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) to yield soluble formates, boric acid, benzene and minor organic byproducts.The benzene and most of the organic byproducts are then steam stripped. The resulting aqueous hydrolysis product, including the still insoluble actinides adsorbed onto sodium titanate, is combined in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) with the insoluble sludge which has been treated with nitric acid and formic acid to remove mercury and to adjust the glass redox. Borosilicate glass frit is added and after assuring the melter feed meets glass quality and processing requirements, the slurry is fed to the melter producing glass which is poured into stainless steel canisters. The canisters are sealed, blasted to remove surface contamination, and welded prior to temporary storage in the Glass Waste Storage Building (GWSB). An overview of the DWPF process and its chemistry is included.The composition of the feeds is of primary importance to the DWPF. Critical factors determined by the feeds are related to safety, process design and operability, and glass quality.The Safety Analysis Report (SAR) source term, process shielding, potential for criticality, and generation of flammable gases are safety factors related to feed composition. Canister heat generation, NO{sub x} emissions, and corrosive species are process design parameters determined by feed composition. Nitrite in the washed precipitate, glass insolubles, glass liquidus (temperature of complete melting) and glass melt viscosity are operability parameters determined by composition. And glass durability is the critical quality parameter which requires knowledge and control of the feed compositions. The basis for each of these composition related factors is presented and the system for specifying feed acceptance criteria is described.The composition, and thus the durability, of the glass is determined by the mixing ratios of sludge insolubles, aqueous hydrolysis product, and frit. The frit is a purchased raw material; naturally, its composition is essentially fixed. Also, the glass components in the aqueous hydrolysis product are essentially invariant because the cesium plus potassium to boron ratio is unity, essentially all of the water is evaporated, and the sodium titanate concentration is carefully controlled in the precipitation process.Therefore, the sludge composition is the primary source of feed variability. The combination of process and tank farm history, strategic tank samples, system waste removal plans, and process modeling which project sludge batch composition and evaluate process related pa

Jacobs, R.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Elder, H.H.

1998-03-01

290

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

Not Available

1991-09-01

291

Distribution and identification of culturable airborne microorganisms in a Swiss milk processing facility.  

PubMed

Airborne communities (mainly bacteria) were sampled and characterized (concentration levels and diversity) at 1 outdoor and 6 indoor sites within a Swiss dairy production facility. Air samples were collected on 2 sampling dates in different seasons, one in February and one in July 2012 using impaction bioaerosol samplers. After cultivation, isolates were identified by mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight) and molecular (sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes) methods. In general, total airborne particle loads and total bacterial counts were higher in winter than in summer, but remained constant within each indoor sampling site at both sampling times (February and July). Bacterial numbers were generally very low (<100 cfu/m(3) of air) during the different steps of milk powder production. Elevated bacterial concentrations (with mean values of 391 142 and 179 33 cfu/m(3) of air during winter and summer sampling, respectively; n=15) occurred mainly in the "logistics area," where products in closed tins are packed in secondary packaging material and prepared for shipping. However, total bacterial counts at the outdoor site varied, with a 5- to 6-fold higher concentration observed in winter compared with summer. Twenty-five gram-positive and gram-negative genera were identified as part of the airborne microflora, with Bacillus and Staphylococcus being the most frequent genera identified. Overall, the culturable microflora community showed a composition typical and representative for the specific location. Bacterial counts were highly correlated with total airborne particles in the size range 1 to 5 m, indicating that a simple surveillance system based upon counting of airborne particles could be implemented. The data generated in this study could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the dairy plant's sanitation program and to identify potential sources of airborne contamination, resulting in increased food safety. PMID:24210492

Brandl, Helmut; Fricker-Feer, Claudia; Ziegler, Dominik; Mandal, Jyotshna; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

2014-01-01

292

Case study; Energy conservation-a continual process at defense contractor's manufacturing facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy management is a key tool for strategic planning at Alliant Techsystems. The defense contractor believes the most cost effective means of achieving long-range energy conservation is through Energy Management Process and Total System Approach. At Alliant Techsystems, the operational mission is simple: improve business efficiency, produce a quality product, and reduce operating costs. To this end, the corporation has

1991-01-01

293

78 FR 33995 - Nuclear Proliferation Assessment in Licensing Process for Enrichment or Reprocessing Facilities  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...requirements for advance notice and protection...shipments of specified materials. Further, appendix...prepared'' for the processing, use, or production...special fissionable material. In addition to...The statement that laser technology could...purify other kinds of materials such as SNM is...

2013-06-06

294

Optical Diagnostics Systems Supplementing Integrated Materials Processing Facility of Major University Research Initiative.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the DoD-MURI research program entitled 'Modeling and control of Advanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes: the Control of Defects in Mixed III-V Compound Semiconductors' (Grant F49620-95-1-0447), DURIP funding was provided to establish a rea...

H. T. Banks K. J. Bachmann N. Dietz

2001-01-01

295

The LHEA PDP 11/70 graphics processing facility users guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation of all necessary and useful information needed to allow the inexperienced user to program on the PDP 11/70. Information regarding the use of editing and file manipulation utilities as well as operational procedures are included. The inexperienced user is taken through the process of creating, editing, compiling, task building and debugging his/her FORTRAN program. Also, documentation on additional software is included.

1978-01-01

296

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that ere included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE'S Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Sitewide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2006-03-17

297

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01

298

Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

1993-06-01

299

Statistical process control program at a ceramics vendor facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Development of a statistical process control (SPC) program at a ceramics vendor location was deemed necessary to improve product quality, reduce manufacturing flowtime, and reduce quality costs borne by AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), and the vendor. Because of the lack of available KCD manpower and the required time schedule for the project, it was necessary for the SPC program to be implemented by an external contractor. Approximately a year after the program had been installed, the original baseline was reviewed so that the success of the project could be determined.

Enke, G.M.

1992-12-01

300

Investigation of cosmic-ray muon induced processes by the MIREDO facility.  

PubMed

The MIREDO (Muon Induced Rare Event Dynamic Observatory) spectrometer system is primarily developed for the study of cosmic muon induced processes in different materials. Exploration of such interactions can be important for ultra-low background experiments. The system is based on the 100% relative efficiency ultra-low-background HPGe spectrometer. With the addition of two plastic scintillators and a fast-slow coincidence circuit, the coincidence events between the plastic detectors and the HPGe spectrometer have been investigated. First results derived for a CaO powder sample, placed in a Marinelli beaker, are presented and discussed. PMID:24332344

Bikit, K; Mrdja, D; Bikit, I; Veskovic, M

2014-05-01

301

Historic AVHRR Processing in the Eumetsat Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility (cmsaf) (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EUMETSAT CMSAF project (www.cmsaf.eu) compiles climatological datasets from various satellite sources with emphasis on the use of EUMETSAT-operated satellites. However, since climate monitoring primarily has a global scope, also datasets merging data from various satellites and satellite operators are prepared. One such dataset is the CMSAF historic GAC (Global Area Coverage) dataset which is based on AVHRR data from the full historic series of NOAA-satellites and the European METOP satellite in mid-morning orbit launched in October 2006. The CMSAF GAC dataset consists of three groups of products: Macroscopical cloud products (cloud amount, cloud type and cloud top), cloud physical products (cloud phase, cloud optical thickness and cloud liquid water path) and surface radiation products (including surface albedo). Results will be presented and discussed for all product groups, including some preliminary inter-comparisons with other datasets (e.g., PATMOS-X, MODIS and CloudSat/CALIPSO datasets). A background will also be given describing the basic methodology behind the derivation of all products. This will include a short historical review of AVHRR cloud processing and resulting AVHRR applications at SMHI. Historic GAC processing is one of five pilot projects selected by the SCOPE-CM (Sustained Co-Ordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite data for Climate Monitoring) project organised by the WMO Space programme. The pilot project is carried out jointly between CMSAF and NOAA with the purpose of finding an optimal GAC processing approach. The initial activity is to inter-compare results of the CMSAF GAC dataset and the NOAA PATMOS-X dataset for the case when both datasets have been derived using the same inter-calibrated AVHRR radiance dataset. The aim is to get further knowledge of e.g. most useful multispectral methods and the impact of ancillary datasets (for example from meteorological reanalysis datasets from NCEP and ECMWF). The CMSAF project is currently defining plans for another five years (2012-2017) of operations and development. New GAC reprocessing efforts are planned and new methodologies will be tested. Central questions here will be how to increase the quantitative use of the products through improving error and uncertainty estimates and how to compile the information in a way to allow meaningful and efficient ways of using the data for e.g. validation of climate model information.

Karlsson, K.

2010-12-01

302

Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF. [Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

1992-02-07

303

A macro-ergonomic work system analysis of the diagnostic testing process in an outpatient health care facility for process improvement and patient safety.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of illness is important for quality patient care and patient safety and is greatly aided by diagnostic testing. For diagnostic tests, such as pathology and radiology, to positively impact patient care, the tests must be processed and the physician and patient must be notified of the results in a timely fashion. There are many steps in the diagnostic testing process, from ordering to result dissemination, where the process can break down and therefore delay patient care and reduce patient safety. This study was carried out to examine the diagnostic testing process (i.e. from ordering to result notification) and used a macro-ergonomic work system analysis to uncover system design flaws that contributed to delayed physician and patient notification of results. The study was carried out in a large urban outpatient health-care facility made up of 30 outpatient clinics. Results indicated a number of variances that contributed to delays, the majority of which occurred across the boundaries of different systems and were related to poor or absent feedback structures. Recommendations for improvements are discussed. PMID:16723328

Hallock, M L; Alper, S J; Karsh, B

304

Standard for metal/nonmetal mining and metal mineral processing facilities. 2004 ed.  

SciTech Connect

This standard addresses the protection of diesel-powered equipment and the storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids at these specialized sites. The 2004 edition consolidates requirements from NFPA 122 and 121 : Standard on Fire Protection for Self-Propelled and Mobile Surface Mining Equipment. Major changes include a new chapter on fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. The Standard is also revised to emphasize the use of a fire risk assessment when determining fire protection criteria. Chapter headings are: Administration; Referenced publications; Definitions; General; Fire risk assessment and risk reduction; Fire detection and suppression equipment; Fire protection for diesel-powered equipment in underground mines; Transfer of flammable or combustible liquids in underground mines; Flammable liquid storage in underground mines; Combustible liquid storage in underground mines; Fire suppression for flammable or combustible liquid storage areas in underground mines; Fire protection of surface mobile and self-propelled equipment; and Fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. 3 annexes.

NONE

2004-07-01

305

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01

306

A facile processing way of silica needle arrays with tunable orientation by tube arrays fabrication and etching method  

SciTech Connect

A simple method to fabricate silica micro/nano-needle arrays (SNAs) is presented based on tube-etching mechanism. Using silica fibers as templates, highly aligned and free-standing needle arrays are created over large area by simple processes of polymer infiltration, cutting, chemical etching and polymer removal. Their sizes and orientations can be arbitrarily and precisely tuned by simply selecting fiber sizes and the cutting directions, respectively. This technique enables the needle arrays with special morphology to be fabricated in a greatly facile way, thereby offers them the potentials in various applications, such as optic, energy harvesting, sensors, etc. As a demonstration, the super hydrophobic property of PDMS treated SNAs is examined. - Graphical abstract: Silica needle arrays are fabricated by tube arrays fabrication and etching method. They show super hydrophobic property after being treated with PDMS.

Zhu Mingwei; Gao Haigen; Li Hongwei; Xu Jiao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen Yanfeng, E-mail: yfchen@nju.edu.c [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-03-15

307

Final deactivation report on the Radioactive Gas Processing Facility, Building 3033, and the Actinide Fabrication Facility, Building 3033A, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Buildings 3033 and 3033A, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Buildings 3033 and 3033A prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Buildings 3033 and 3033A will require access to facilitate required S and M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Buildings 3033 and 3033A were stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S and M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S and M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S and M. All materials have been removed from the building, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated.

NONE

1997-09-01

308

Development of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from High-Level Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the chemical performance of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process in its current state of development for removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the US Department of Energy (USDOE) complex. Overall, motivation for seeking a major enhancement in performance for the currently deployed CSSX process stems from needs for accelerating the cleanup schedule and reducing the cost of salt-waste disposition. The primary target of the NG-CSSX development campaign in the past year has been to formulate a solvent system and to design a corresponding flowsheet that boosts the performance of the SRS Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) from a current minimum decontamination factor of 12 to 40,000. The chemical approach entails use of a more soluble calixarene-crown ether, called MaxCalix, allowing the attainment of much higher cesium distribution ratios (DCs) on extraction. Concurrently decreasing the Cs-7SB modifier concentration is anticipated to promote better hydraulics. A new stripping chemistry has been devised using a vitrification-friendly aqueous boric acid strip solution and a guanidine suppressor in the solvent, resulting in sharply decreased DCs on stripping. Results are reported herein on solvent phase behavior and batch Cs distribution for waste simulants and real waste together with a preliminary flowsheet applicable for implementation in the MCU. The new solvent will enable MCU to process a much wider range of salt feeds and thereby extend its service lifetime beyond its design life of three years. Other potential benefits of NG-CSSX include increased throughput of the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), currently under construction, and an alternative modular near-tank application at Hanford.

Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Bonnesen, Peter V [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Leonard, Ralph [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Fink, Samuel D [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Peters, Thomas B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Geeting, Mark W [Savannah River Remediation Company

2011-01-01

309

DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and a lightweight robotic arm for operation of the remote tools. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and tested multiple tools to perform the gasket replacement tasks. Separate pneumatic snap-ring removal tools that use the connector skirt as a reaction surface were developed for removal of the snap ring and spent gasket on both vertical and horizontal Hanford connectors. A pneumatic tool that clamps and centers on the jumper pipe ID was developed to simultaneously install the new gasket and snap ring. A pneumatic snap-ring-loading tool was developed that compresses the snap ring and places it in a groove in the installation tool. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and vents the tools as needed. The entire system has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Deployment of the entire system is expected during FY08. The Hanford connector gasket replacement tooling has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Nitric acid is used in many of the decontamination processes performed in the REDC, where the tooling will be deployed. Although most of the tool components were fabricated/purchased with nitric acid and radioactive service in mind, some of the prototype parts must be replaced with parts that are more compatible with nitric acid/radioactive service. Several modifications to the various tools are needed to facilitate maintenance and replacement of failed components. Development of installation tools for replacement of 1-inch, 2-inch and multi-hole gaskets is being considered. Deployment of the existing system in the DWPF REDC is expected during FY08.

Krementz, D

2007-11-27

310

Superhydrophobic silver surface with dendrites structure on steel substrate by a facile electroless galvanic deposition process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple electroless galvanic deposition process to prepare superhydrophobic surface on steel substrate is presented here. Micro- and nano roughness structure is generated on steel surface by the deposition of silver dendrites with nanoscale leaves. After modified with stearic acid, the as-prepared surface shows a remarkable superhydrophobicity with a high water contact angle (WCA) of 158 and a low sliding angle of about 2. The surface also shows non-sticking properties to a 4 ?L water droplet. The cooperation of dendrites structure and stearic acid modification is responsible for the superhydrophobicty of the as-prepared surface. This simple and reliable method is of great significance to the large scale fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces on steel substrate.

Guo, Feng; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Li, Ping

2012-03-01

311

W-007H B Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

B Plant Process Condensate (BCP) liquid effluent stream is the condensed vapors originating from the operation of the B Plant low-level liquid waste concentration system. In the past, the BCP stream was discharged into the soil column under a compliance plan which expired January 1, 1987. Currently, the BCP stream is inactive, awaiting restart of the E-23-3 Concentrator. B Plant Steam Condensate (BCS) liquid effluent stream is the spent steam condensate used to supply heat to the E-23-3 Concentrator. The tube bundles in the E-23-3 Concentrator discharge to the BCS. In the past, the BCS stream was discharged into the soil column. Currently, the BCS stream is inactive. This project shall provide liquid effluent systems (BCP/BCS/BCE) capable of operating for a minimum of 20 years, which does not include the anticipated decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) period.

Rippy, G.L.

1995-01-20

312

Facile synthesis of single-crystal tin oxide nanorods with tunable dimensions via hydrothermal process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single-crystal SnO 2 nanorods with tunable diameters and lengths, 42 197, 5.5 19.3 and 4.5 39.1 nm, have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process, using a mixture of water/ethanol (1:1 in volume), a mixture of water/ethanol (1:1 in volume) with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, and pure ethanol as reaction media, respectively. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and other techniques were used to characterize the nanorods. The as-synthesized SnO 2 nanorods exhibit preferential growth along the [0 0 1] direction. The related mechanisms of the oriented growth and dimensional tunableness are discussed.

Chen, Deliang; Gao, Lian

2004-11-01

313

Modeling community asbestos exposure near a vermiculite processing facility: Impact of human activities on cumulative exposure.  

PubMed

Contaminated vermiculite ore from Libby, Montana was processed in northeast Minneapolis from 1936 to 1989 in a densely populated urban residential neighborhood, resulting in non-occupational exposure scenarios from plant stack and fugitive emissions as well as from activity-based scenarios associated with use of the waste rock in the surrounding community. The objective of this analysis was to estimate potential cumulative asbestos exposure for all non-occupationally exposed members of this community. Questionnaire data from a neighborhood-exposure assessment ascertained frequency of potential contact with vermiculite processing waste. Monte Carlo simulation was used to develop exposure estimates based on activity-based concentration estimates and contact durations for four scenarios: S1, moved asbestos-contaminated waste; S2, used waste at home, on lawn or garden; S3, installed/removed vermiculite insulation; S4, played in or around waste piles at the plant. The simulation outputs were combined with air-dispersion model results to provide total cumulative asbestos exposure estimates for the cohort. Fiber emissions from the plant were the largest source of exposure for the majority of the cohort, with geometric mean cumulative exposures of 0.02 fibers/cc month. The addition of S1, S2 and S3 did not significantly increase total cumulative exposure above background exposure estimates obtained from dispersion modeling. Activity-based exposures were a substantial contributor to the upper end of the exposure distribution: 90th percentile S4 exposure estimates are ?10 times higher than exposures from plant emissions. Pile playing is the strongest source of asbestos exposure in this cohort, with other activity scenarios contributing less than from plant emissions. PMID:21343955

Adgate, John L; Cho, Sook Ja; Alexander, Bruce H; Ramachandran, Gurmurthy; Raleigh, Katherine K; Johnson, Jean; Messing, Rita B; Williams, A L; Kelly, James; Pratt, Gregory C

2011-01-01

314

Use of the USQ process with an operating SAR for the shutdown\\/terminal cleanout of the PUREX facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility at the Hanford Site is a remote canyon facility that began operations in 1956 to support the Atomic Energy Commission and later the Department of Energy in the recovery of plutonium, uranium, and neptunium from spent reactor fuel. This report follows the transition of the PUREX facility from standby mode in 1990 to shutdown\\/terminal cleanout.

Dodd

1993-01-01

315

30 CFR 947.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area...and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area...and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near the Minesite or Not Within the Permit...

2013-07-01

316

30 CFR 933.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area...and support facilities not located at or near the minesite or not within the permit area...and Support Facilities Not Located at or Near the Minesite or Not Within the Permit...

2013-07-01

317

Risk analysis and risk acceptance criteria in the planning processes of hazardous facilitiesA case of an LNG plant in an urban area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Planning of hazardous facilities is usually carried out on the basis of a risk-informed decision-making and planning process making use of risk analysis. This practice is well established in Norway under petroleum legislation but less so for onshore facilities under non-petroleum legislation. The present paper focuses on the use of risk analysis studies for risk evaluation against risk acceptance criteria,

Jan Erik Vinnem

2010-01-01

318

Evaluation of the Impact of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory Germanium Oxide Use on Recycle Transfers to the H-Tank Farm.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are...

C. M. Jantzen J. E. Laurinat

2011-01-01

319

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Activated Sludge - Aeration & Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for developing standard operating job procedures for wastewater treatment facilities is devoted to the activated sludge aeration and sedimentation process. This process is for conversion of nonsettleable and nonfloatable materials in wastewater to settleable, floculated biological groups and separation of the settleable solids from the

Mason, George J.

320

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28

321

Persistent Listeria monocytogenes subtypes isolated from a smoked fish processing facility included both phage susceptible and resistant isolates.  

PubMed

Contamination of Ready-To-Eat foods with Listeria monocytogenes can typically be traced back to post-processing contamination from environmental sources; contamination is often linked to subtypes that persist in food associated environments. Although phage-based biocontrol strategies have been proposed for controlling this pathogen, information on the efficacy of phage treatment against diverse L.monocytogenes subtypes from food associated environments is still limited. We identified subtypes that were repeatedly found ("persistent") in a smoked fish processing facility by using EcoRI ribotyping data for isolates obtained in 1998-2009. PFGE analysis of 141 isolates (9 ribotypes) supported persistence for up to 11 years. Characterization of selected isolates, representing persistent subtypes, against a panel of 28 listeriaphages showed a wide range of likelihood of phage susceptibility, ranging from 4.6% (for 7 ribotype DUP-1043A isolates) to 95.4% (for 7 ribotype DUP-1044A isolates). In challenge studies with 10(5) and 10(6)CFU/ml L.monocytogenes, using phage cocktails and a commercial phage product at different phage-host ratios, one isolate (ribotype DUP-1043A) was not affected by any treatment. A reduction in L.monocytogenes counts of up to 4 log units was observed, after 8h of treatment, in isolates of two ribotypes, but subsequent re-growth occurred. Survivor isolates obtained after 24h of treatment showed decreased susceptibility to individual phages included in the phage cocktail, suggesting rapid emergence of resistant subtypes. PMID:23628613

Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Roof, Sherry; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Wiedmann, Martin

2013-08-01

322

3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of hydrostratigraphy and uranium and nitrate contamination in groundwater at a former nuclear materials processing facility in Oklahoma were undertaken employing 3-dimensional (3D) geospatial modeling software. Models constructed played an important role in the regulatory decision process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because they enabled visualization of temporal variations in contaminant concentrations and plume geometry. Three aquifer systems occur at the site, comprised of water-bearing fractured shales separated by indurated sandstone aquitards. The uppermost terrace groundwater system (TGWS) aquifer is composed of terrace and alluvial deposits and a basal shale. The shallow groundwater system (SGWS) aquifer is made up of three shale units and two sandstones. It is separated from the overlying TGWS and underlying deep groundwater system (DGWS) aquifer by sandstone aquitards. Spills of nitric acid solutions containing uranium and radioactive decay products around the main processing building (MPB), leakage from storage ponds west of the MPB, and leaching of radioactive materials from discarded equipment and waste containers contaminated both the TGWS and SGWS aquifers during facility operation between 1970 and 1993. Constructing 3D geospatial property models for analysis of groundwater contamination at the site involved use of EarthVision (EV), a 3D geospatial modeling software developed by Dynamic Graphics, Inc. of Alameda, CA. A viable 3D geohydrologic framework model was initially constructed so property data could be spatially located relative to subsurface geohydrologic units. The framework model contained three hydrostratigraphic zones equivalent to the TGWS, SGWS, and DGWS aquifers in which groundwater samples were collected, separated by two sandstone aquitards. Groundwater data collected in the three aquifer systems since 1991 indicated high concentrations of uranium (>10,000 micrograms/liter) and nitrate (> 500 milligrams/liter) around the MPB and elevated nitrate (> 2000 milligrams/ liter) around storage ponds. Vertical connectivity was suggested between the TGWS and SGWS, while the DGWS appeared relatively isolated from the overlying aquifers. Lateral movement of uranium was also suggested over time. For example, lateral migration in the TGWS is suggested along a shallow depression in the bedrock surface trending south-southwest from the southwest corner of the MPB. Another pathway atop the buried bedrock surface, trending west-northwest from the MPB and partially reflected by current surface topography, suggested lateral migration of nitrate in the SGWS. Lateral movement of nitrate in the SGWS was also indicated north, south, and west of the largest storage pond. Definition of contaminant plume movement over time is particularly important for assessing direction and rate of migration and the potential need for preventive measures to control contamination of groundwater outside facility property lines. The 3D geospatial property models proved invaluable for visualizing and analyzing variations in subsurface uranium and nitrate contamination in space and time within and between the three aquifers at the site. The models were an exceptional visualization tool for illustrating extent, volume, and quantitative amounts of uranium and nitrate contamination in the subsurface to regulatory decision-makers in regard to site decommissioning issues, including remediation concerns, providing a perspective not possible to achieve with traditional 2D maps. The geohydrologic framework model provides a conceptual model for consideration in flow and transport analyses.

Stirewalt, G. L.; Shepherd, J. C.

2003-12-01

323

QUALIFICATION OF A RADIOACTIVE HIGH ALUMINUM GLASS FOR PROCESSINGIN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a borosilicate glass for approximately eleven years. Currently the DWPF is immobilizing HLW sludge in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). Each sludge batch is nominally two million liters of HLW and produces nominally five hundred stainless steel canisters 0.6 meters in diameter and 3 meters tall filled with the borosilicate glass. In SB4 and earlier sludge batches, the Al concentration has always been rather low, (less than 9.5 weight percent based on total dried solids). It is expected that in the future the Al concentrations will increase due to the changing composition of the HLW. Higher Al concentrations could introduce problems because of its known effect on the viscosity of glass melts and increase the possibility of the precipitation of nepheline in the final glass and decrease its durability. In 2006 Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) used DWPF processes to immobilize a radioactive HLW slurry containing 14 weight percent Al to ensure that this waste is viable for future DWPF processing. This paper presents results of the characterization of the high Al glass prepared in that demonstration. At SRNL, a sample of the processed high Al HLW slurry was mixed with an appropriate glass frit as performed in the DWPF to make a waste glass containing nominally 30% waste oxides. The glass was prepared by melting the frit and waste remotely at 1150 C. The glass was then characterized by: (1) determining the chemical composition of the glass including the concentrations of several actinide and U-235 fission products; (2) calculating the oxide waste loading of the glass based on the chemical composition and comparing it to that of the target; (3) determining if the glass composition met the DWPF processing constraints such as glass melt viscosity and liquidus temperature along with a waste form affecting constraint that prevents the precipitation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) crystals in the glass melt; (4) measuring the durability of the glass using the ASTM Standard Product Consistency Test (PCT) leach test to determine if the durability of the glass based on B, Li, and Na releases met the requirements for acceptance in a US geologic repository; (5) measuring the leachability of several radionuclides using the ASTM Standard PCT leach test and comparing them to the B, Li, and Na releases; and (6) examining the glass by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to determine if any crystals had formed in the glass melt. Results indicate that the high Al glass met all the requirements for processing and product quality in the DWPF.

Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Tommy Edwards,T; Charles02 Coleman, C; Charles Crawford, C

2008-01-29

324

BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be

R. Leishear; M. Poirier; M. Fowley

2011-01-01

325

Image processing methods for characterizing cryogenic target quality during ice layer formation at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A challenging aspect of preparing cryogenic targets for National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition experiments is growing a single crystal layer (~ 70 ?m thick) of solid frozen deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on the inner surface of a spherical hollow plastic capsule 2 mm in diameter. For the most critical fusion experiments, the layer must be smooth, having uniform thickness, and largely free of isolated defects (e.g. grooves). A single target layer typically takes up to 18 hours to form. X-ray images on 3 orthogonal axes are used to monitor the growth of the crystal and evaluate the quality of the layer. While these methods provide a good indicator of target layer condition, new metrics are currently being developed to take advantage of other properties in the x-ray image, which may give earlier indications of target quality. These properties include symmetry of texture, seed formation, and eigenimage analysis. We describe the approach and associated image processing to evaluate and classify these metrics, whose goal is to improve overall layer production and better quantify the quality of the layer during its growth.

Leach, Richard R.; Field, John E.; Mascio-Kegelmeyer, Laura; Kozioziemski, Bernie; Lee, Tanza; Mapoles, Evan; Roberts, Randy; Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Suratwala, Tayyab

2013-02-01

326

Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

Dux, Joachim; Friedrich, Daniel; Lutz, Werner; Ripholz, Martina [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01

327

Facile low-temperature polyol process for LiFePO4 nanoplate and carbon nanotube composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystalline LiFePO4 nanoplates were incorporated with 5 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via a facile low temperature polyol process, in one single step without any post heat treatment. The CNTs were embedded into the LiFePO4 particles to form a network to enhance the electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 electrode for lithium-ion battery applications. The structural and morphological characters of the LiFePO4-CNT composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and charge/discharge tests. Primary results showed that well crystallized olivine-type structure without any impurity phases was developed, and the LiFePO4-CNT composites exhibited good electrochemical performance, with a reversible specific capacity of 155 mAh g-1 at the current rate of 10 mA g-1, and a capacity retention ratio close to 100% after 100 cycles.

Wu, Guan; Zhou, Yingke; Gao, Xuefeng; Shao, Zongping

2013-10-01

328

Use of the USQ process with an operating SAR for the shutdown/terminal cleanout of the PUREX facility  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility at the Hanford Site is a remote canyon facility that began operations in 1956 to support the Atomic Energy Commission and later the Department of Energy in the recovery of plutonium, uranium, and neptunium from spent reactor fuel. This report follows the transition of the PUREX facility from standby mode in 1990 to shutdown/terminal cleanout. Preparation of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), evaluation of OSR requirements, and the use of the USQ to successfully complete the deactivation of the facility in a timely and cost effective manner are discussed. The major activities, both administrative and procedural, performed as part of the PUREX facility deactivation are described.

Dodd, E.N.

1993-06-01

329

Proposed Use of a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Metals in the S-04 Outfall of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is part of an integrated waste treatment system at the SRS to treat wastes containing radioactive contaminants. In the early 1980s the DOE recognized that there would be significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the radioactive waste in a stable solid form. The Defense Waste Processing Facility was designed and constructed to accomplish this task.

Glover, T.

1999-11-23

330

Evaluation of the Synthoil process. Volume III. Unit block flow diagrams for a 100,000 barrel\\/stream day facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This volume consists of individual block flowsheets for the various units of the Synthoil facility, showing the overall flows into and out of each unit. Material balances for the following units are incomplete because these are proprietary processes and the information was not provided by the respective vendors: Unit 24-Claus Sulfur Plant; Unit 25-Oxygen Plant; Unit 27-Sulfur Plant (Redox Type);

R. Salmon; M. S. Edwards; W. C. Ulrich

1977-01-01

331

18 CFR 157.21 - Pre-filing procedures and review process for LNG terminal facilities and other natural gas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation of the requisite NEPA document. (9) For natural gas facilities other than LNG terminal...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation...

2010-04-01

332

18 CFR 157.21 - Pre-filing procedures and review process for LNG terminal facilities and other natural gas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation of the requisite NEPA document. (9) For natural gas facilities other than LNG terminal...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation...

2009-04-01

333

Short Circuit Coordination Study and ARC Flash Evaluation for Liquid Processing and Capsule Storage 310 Facility Richland, Washington.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Power system studies were performed to analyze the electrical power distribution system of the 310 Building, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The three main areas of investigation are: Short Circuit Analysis. Short circuit studies provide the av...

C. M. Towne

2003-01-01

334

Manufacturing process of self-luminous glass tube (SLGT) utilizing tritium gas: Design of tritium handling facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tritium, the essential material of self-luminous glass tube (SLGT), is a ?-ray emitting radioactive hydrogen isotope that\\u000a requires a special handling facility. The design basis of a tritium handling facility is to minimize the operators exposure\\u000a by tritium uptake and the emission of tritium to the environment. To fulfill the requirements, major tritium handling components\\u000a are located in the secondary

Kyeongsook Kim; KwangSin Kim; Soon Hwan Son; Wi-Soo Kim

2004-01-01

335

Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 6: Specification for EOS Central Data Processing Facility (CDPF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The specifications and functions of the Central Data Processing (CDPF) Facility which supports the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are discussed. The CDPF will receive the EOS sensor data and spacecraft data through the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) and the Operations Control Center (OCC). The CDPF will process the data and produce high density digital tapes, computer compatible tapes, film and paper print images, and other data products. The specific aspects of data inputs and data processing are identified. A block diagram of the CDPF to show the data flow and interfaces of the subsystems is provided.

1974-01-01

336

Solar production of industrial-process hot water. Phase 3: Operation and evaluation of the York Building Products Co., Inc. solar facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A solar heating system to provide hot water for curing concrete blocks is discussed. The objective is to operate, collect data, and evaluate the solar system for a 3 year period. The solar facility utilizes 35 collectors. The system is designed to deliver a water/ethylene glycol solution at 2000 F to a heat exchanger, which, in turn, supplies water at 1800 F to a rotorclave (underground tank) for the concrete block curing process. A fossil fuel boiler system also supplies the rotorclave with processed hot water to supplement the solar system. The program demonstrates the technical feasibility of generating industrial process hot water with solar energy.

Bollinger, J. M.; Kaplan, N.; Wilkening, H. A., Jr.

1981-10-01

337

Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). A description of the sensor, ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The papers in this document were presented at the Imaging Spectroscopy 2 Conference of the 31st International Symposium on Optical and Optoelectronic Applied Science and Engineering, in San Diego, California, on 20 and 21 August 1987. They describe the design and performance of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor and its subsystems, the ground data processing facility, laboratory calibration, and first results.

Vane, Gregg (editor)

1987-01-01

338

Measured 63 Ni contents in Savannah River Site high level waste and Defense Waste Processing Facility glass product by Ni-selective ion exchange purification and ?-decay counting  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe tests of EiChrom Industries' Ni-selective ion exchange resin for use in analysis of63Ni in Savannah River Site high level waste. We report measurement of63Ni content in two sets of Savannah River Site glass product from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The63Ni ?-decay activity was chemically separated in quintuplicate from fission product and plutonium ?-? activities of up to

R. A. Dewberry; N. E. Bibler; D. P. DiPrete

1999-01-01

339

Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

Later, D.W.

1985-01-01

340

Strategic facility planning (SFP)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outlines the evolution of facilities design to the point where it is capable of supporting an organisations strategic content. Explains the key principles of strategic facility planning (SFP) and details the key stages of the design process. Outlines seven steps including elements such as determining space requirements and generating macro layouts. Concludes that SFP can provide the process to turn

Frank Kerns

1999-01-01

341

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01

342

Literature Review of Boric Acid Solubility Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system replaces the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with 0.01 M boric acid. This ...

E. A. Kyser K. P. Crapse

2011-01-01

343

Proof of concept simulations of the Multi-Isotope Process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near-real-time safeguards monitor for nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Atomic Energy Agency will require the development of advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of nondestructive, near-real-time, autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes recent results from model simulations designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) monitor, a novel addition to a safeguards system for reprocessing facilities. The MIP monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in near-real-time. Three computer models including ORIGEN-ARP, AMUSE, and SYNTH were used in series to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate element partitioning during separation, and simulate spectra from product and raffinate streams using a variety of gamma detectors, respectively. Simulations were generated for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup, and cooling time. Hierarchical cluster analysis and partial least squares (PLS) were also used in the analysis. The MIP monitor was found to be sensitive to induced variations of several operating parameters including distinguishing 2.5% variation from normal process acid concentrations. The ability of PLS to predict burnup levels from simulated spectra was also demonstrated to be within 3.5% of measured values.

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

2011-02-01

344

Facile single-step ammonia heat-treatment and quenching process for the synthesis of improved Pt/N-graphene catalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we present a facile route to prepare electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation. The catalyst synthesis route involves the simultaneous reduction and nitrogen doping of graphene oxide (GO) along with the reduction of H2PtCl6 to Pt by a facile ammonia gas heat-treatment and quenching process. The resulting catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy while their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of methanol is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained Pt/graphene composites consist of crystalline Pt nanoparticles in the range of 1-4 nm which are well-dispersed on the N-doped graphene sheets. The best Pt/N-graphene catalyst composite is obtained after a 5 min ammonia treatment at 800 C followed by rapid ammonia gas quenching at room temperature. This catalyst demonstrates superior catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation, with a peak current density of 0.218 A mgPt-1, which is about five times higher than an undoped (hydrogen treated and quenched) Pt/graphene control catalyst. The excellent electrocatalytic performance of the ammonia quenched catalyst is attributed to the nitrogenous functional groups and dopants in the graphene sheets that are formed during the facile quenching process in ammonia.

Xiong, Bin; Zhou, Yingke; O'Hayre, Ryan; Shao, Zongping

2013-02-01

345

Facilities maintenance handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and develop management information in order to statistically identify and analyze variances from those plans. It will also add credibility to the NASA facilities maintenance budgeting process. The key to a successful maintenance program is the understanding and support of the senior Center managers.

1991-01-01

346

Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-07-31

347

Linkage Between Post-Closure Safety Case Review and the Authorization Process for Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Environment Agency (the Agency) has responsibilities under the Radioactive Substances Act of 1993 for regulating the disposal and storage of radioactive wastes in England and Wales, including regulation of the disposal site for UK solid low-level waste (LLW) at Drigg in Cumbria, NW England. To help inform the next review of the Drigg disposal authorization, the Agency has required the operator, British Nuclear Fuels plc to submit a Post-Closure Safety Case which will assess the potential long-term impacts from the site. With the aim of using best practice to determine authorization conditions, the Agency contracted Galson Sciences, Ltd to undertake an international survey of authorization procedures for comparable facilities in other countries. This paper provides an overview of the findings from the international survey.

Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.; Bennett, D. G.

2003-02-27

348

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Tertiary Multimedia Filtration Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes the standard operating job procedures for the tertiary multimedia filtration process of wastewater treatment plants. The major objective of the filtration process is the removal of suspended solids from the reclaimed wastewater. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for pre-start up, start-up, continuous operation, and

Petrasek, Al, Jr.

349

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Primary Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the primary sedimentation process of wastewater treatment plants. The primary sedimentation process involves removing settleable and suspended solids, in part, from wastewater by gravitational forces, and scum and other floatable solids from wastewater by mechanical means. Step-by-step

Charles County Community Coll., La Plata, MD.

350

Use of strategic environmental assessment in the site selection process for a radioactive waste disposal facility in Slovenia.  

PubMed

The benefits of strategic environmental considerations in the process of siting a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) are presented. The benefits have been explored by analyzing differences between the two site selection processes. One is a so-called official site selection process, which is implemented by the Agency for radwaste management (ARAO); the other is an optimization process suggested by experts working in the area of environmental impact assessment (EIA) and land-use (spatial) planning. The criteria on which the comparison of the results of the two site selection processes has been based are spatial organization, environmental impact, safety in terms of potential exposure of the population to radioactivity released from the repository, and feasibility of the repository from the technical, financial/economic and social point of view (the latter relates to consent by the local community for siting the repository). The site selection processes have been compared with the support of the decision expert system named DEX. The results of the comparison indicate that the sites selected by ARAO meet fewer suitability criteria than those identified by applying strategic environmental considerations in the framework of the optimization process. This result stands when taking into account spatial, environmental, safety and technical feasibility points of view. Acceptability of a site by a local community could not have been tested, since the formal site selection process has not yet been concluded; this remains as an uncertain and open point of the comparison. PMID:20846780

Dermol, Urka; Konti?, Branko

2011-01-01

351

Proof of Concept Experiments of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: An Online, Nondestructive, Near Real-Time Monitor for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near-real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel approach to safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of {+-} 1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

2012-04-21

352

Proof of concept experiments of the multi-isotope process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near real-time monitor for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the multi-isotope process (MIP) monitor, a novel approach to monitoring and safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of 1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

2012-04-01

353

New Ideas on Facilities Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

Grimm, James C.

1986-01-01

354

The multi-isotope process monitor: Non-destructive, near-real-time nuclear safeguards monitoring at a reprocessing facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IAEA will require advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at envisioned large scale nuclear reprocessing plants. This dissertation describes results from simulations and experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel safeguards approach for process monitoring in reprocessing plants. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams, nondestructively and in near-real time (NRT). Three different models were used to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate chemical distribution during separation, and simulate spectra from a variety of gamma detectors in product and raffinate streams for processed fuel. This was done for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Experiments were performed to validate the results from the model. Three segments of commercial spent nuclear fuel with variations in burnup and cooling time were dissolved and subjected to a batch PUREX method to separate the uranium and plutonium from fission and activation products. Gamma spectra were recorded by high purity germanium (HPGe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were applied to spectra from both model and experiment to investigate spectral variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup level and cooling time. Partial Least Squares was utilized to extract quantitative information about process variables, such as acid concentration or burnup. The MIP Monitor was found to be sensitive to the induced variations of the process and was capable of extracting quantitative process information from the analyzed spectra.

Orton, Christopher Robert

355

Facile and rapid synthesis of pyrochlore W2O6 x H2O nanoplate via a fluorinion-assisted hydrothermal process.  

PubMed

Pyrochlore W2O6 x H2O were successfully prepared via a facile and rapid hydrothermal process in the presence of fluorinion. It is worth noting that our developed method can efficiently overcome the tedious process in the preparation of nanostructured tungstic oxide in the previous reports. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Results showed the morphologies of the samples were nanoplate and the thickness of the plate was estimated at about several nanometers. TEM image further revealed that the plates were trigonal-like with equal lengths of about 300 nm. Furthermore the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern taken from a single nanoplate indicated that the nanoplates were the single crystals with a preferential growth direction along the [011] direction. The effect of the additive ions on the formation has also been discussed. It was found that the fluorinion played a key role in the formation of W2O6 x H2O nanoplates. It is hoped that our work could provide a new insight into the facile and rapid preparation of metal oxide nanomaterials. PMID:24745265

Zheng, Huarong; Liang, Shijing; Wu, Weiming; Ding, Zhengxin; Wu, Ling

2014-03-01

356

[Evaluation of the content of harmful substances in the air of sewage treatment facilities of Astrakhan gas processing plant].  

PubMed

Despite the fact that the progress in regard to the degree of processing of natural gas and condensate in the Astrakhan gas processing plant is significant, necessary hygienic normalization of working environment on the part of the content of harmful substances in the air of working areas is still unable. Harmful substances were detected in the breathing zone of workers of sewage treatment plant almost constantly. In this connection there is a need in the further joint work hygienists, designers and manufacturers for the development and justification of new, more effective decisions - both on the part of as well technology as hardware design - with the purpose of improvement of working conditions. PMID:24340599

Bo?ko, V I; Dotsenko, Iu I; Bo?ko, O V

2013-01-01

357

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah

T. Peters; S. Fink

2012-01-01

358

CHALLENGES OF PRESERVING HISTORIC RESOURCES DURING THE D & D OF HIGHLY CONTAMINATED HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT PLUTONIUM PROCESS FACILITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because

2006-01-01

359

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because

A. Hopkins; M. Minette; D. Sorenson; R. Heineman; M. Gerber; S. Charboneau; F. Bond

2006-01-01

360

Technical basis for establishing process tube pressure limits for KER loops 2 and 3 and for the NPR Prototype Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

In compliance with a request from Coolant Testing Operation, the Reactor Engineering Operation has made a study to determine the maximum operating pressure limits for the pertinent Zircaloy-2 process tubes. Since these tubes shall be used for testing NPR fuel elements, it is considered desirable that KER Loops 2 and 3 permit operation at temperatures of around 300°C while the

1959-01-01

361

Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) will be a system for the continuous processing of tritium containing gases collected from various operations at Mound. The basis of the system operation will be the oxidation of elemental hydrogen isotopes a...

R. E. Wieneke R. P. Bowser W. H. Hedley T. J. Kissner P. H. Lamberger

1988-01-01

362

Anechoic Aeroacoustic Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The University of Florida has completed the construction of an advanced aeroacoustics testbed to facilitate both existing and future Air Force/ DoD research projects. The proposed facility consists of a versatile anechoic chamber processing a test volume ...

L. N. Cattafesta P. Hubner M. Sheplak B. Carroll

2001-01-01

363

Successful Demolition of Historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Facilities: Managing the Process to Maximize Recycle Value to Fund Demolition  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present the history of the Atlas 36 and Titan 40 Space Launch Complexes (SLC), the facility assessment process, demolition planning, recycle methodology, and actual facility demolition that resulted in a 40% reduction in baseline cost. These two SLC launched hundreds of payloads into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS), Florida. The Atlas-Centaur family of rockets could lift small- to medium-size satellites designed for communications, weather, or military use, placing them with near pinpoint accuracy into their intended orbits. The larger Titan family was relied upon for heavier lifting needs, including launching military satellites as well as interplanetary probes. But despite their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, the Titan rockets, as well as earlier generation Atlas models, were retired in 2005. Concerns about potential environmental health hazards from PCBs and lead-based paint chipping off the facilities also contributed to the Air Force's decision in 2005 to dismantle and demolish the Atlas and Titan missile-launching systems. Lockheed Martin secured the complex following the final launch, removed equipment and turned over the site to the Air Force for decommissioning and demolition (D and D). AMEC was retained by the Air Force to perform demolition planning and facility D and D in 2004. AMEC began with a review of historical information, interviews with past operations personnel, and 100% facility assessment of over 100 structures. There where numerous support buildings that due to their age contained asbestos containing material (ACM), PCB-impacted material, and universal material that had to be identified and removed prior to demolition. Environmental testing had revealed that the 36B mobile support tower (MST) exceeded the TSCA standard for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) paint (<50 ppm), as did the high bay sections of the Titan Vertical Integration Building (VIB). Thus, while most of the steel structures could be completely recycled, about one-third of 36B MST and the affected areas of the VIB were to be consigned to an on-site regulated waste landfill. In all, it is estimated that approximately 10,000,000 kg (11,000 tons) of PCB-coated steel will be land-filled and 23,000,000 kg (25,000 tons) will be recycled. The recycling of the steel and other materials made it possible to do additional demolition by using these funds. Therefore, finding ways to maximize the recycle value of materials became a key factor in the pre-demolition characterization and implementation strategy. This paper will present the following: - Critical elements in demolition planning working at an active launch facility; - Characterization and strategy to maximize steel recycle; - Waste disposition strategy to maximize recycle/reuse and minimize disposal; - Recycle options available at DOD installations that allow for addition funds for demolition; - Innovation in demolition methodologies for large structures - explosive demolition and large-scale dismantlement; - H and S aspects of explosive demolition and large scale dismantlement. In conclusion: The Cape Canaveral AFS Demolition Program has been a great success due to the integration of multiple operations and contractors working together to determine the most cost-effective demolition methods. It is estimated that by extensive pre-planning and working with CCAFS representatives, as well as maximizing the recycle credits of various material, primarily steel, that the government will be able to complete what was base-lined to be a $30 M demolition program for < $20 M. Other factors included a competitive subcontractor environment where they were encouraged with incentives to maximize recycle/reuse of material and creative demolition solutions. Also, by overlapping multiple demolition tasks at multiple facilities allowed for a reduction in field oversight. (authors)

Jones, A.; Hambro, L. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc., Cocoa, FL (United States); Hooper, K. [U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing, Patrick AFB, Florida (United States)

2008-07-01

364

Process safety management in the pipeline industry: parallels and differences between the pipeline integrity management (IMP) rule of the Office of Pipeline Safety and the PSM/RMP approach for process facilities.  

PubMed

In 2001, the Federal Office of Pipeline Safety promulgated its pipeline integrity management rule for hazardous liquid pipelines. A notice of proposed rule making for a similar rule for gas pipelines was issued in January 2003. A final rule must be in place by the end of 2003. These rules derive from formal risk management initiatives of both the pipeline industry and the regulators beginning in the early to mid-1990s. The initiatives and resulting rules built on many of the process safety and risk management concepts and frameworks of the process industries, as modified for pipelines. Looking closely at the parallels and the differences is an interesting study of how the technical, public and industry-specific requirements affect the types of regulations, supporting management system frameworks and the technical activities for improving hazardous materials process safety. This paper is based on the experience of the author in project work with federal and state regulators and with industry groups and companies, in both the process and pipeline industries over the last 17 years. It provides insights into various alternative pathways for communicating process safety concepts and improving process safety as the concepts are translated into specific company and even individual employee actions. It specifically highlights how the commonalities and differences in the types and configurations of physical assets and operating practices of the pipeline companies and process facilities affect respective cultures, language and actions for process safety management. PMID:14602408

DeWolf, Glenn B

2003-11-14

365

Spectroscopic On-Line Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams in Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The current book chapter presents preliminary work toward the use of spectroscopic on-line monitoring for process control and safeguarding of radiochemical streams. Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining U(VI), nitrate, and nitric acid, while visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI) and Nd(III). This method has been established using fuel reprocessing solution stimulants under dynamic flow conditions and on commercial spent nuclear fuel samples. Partial least squares (PLS) models for each analyte were prepared, and the fits of the data presented. A brief review of literature relevant to the use of vibrational spectroscopy and physicochemical measurements for process monitoring of nuclear fuel solutions is reported.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Lines, Amanda M.; Thomas, Elizabeth M.

2011-03-01

366

Fabrication of microspherical LiMnPO 4 cathode material by a facile one-step solvothermal process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microspherical LiMnPO4 cathode material was successfully prepared for the first time by a simple one-step solvothermal process in the presence of critic acid. The reaction conditions (reactant concentration, reaction temperature) were used further to fabricate the size, surface coarseness and morphology of the microspherical LiMnPO4. The as-prepared microspherical LiMnPO4 at variant conditions exhibited remarkably different discharge capacity and rate

Yourong Wang; Yifu Yang; Yanbo Yang; Huixia Shao

2009-01-01

367

Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1: Maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) decontamination and cleanup estimates. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1, a 1991 Line Item, is planned for completion and start of operations in the spring of 1997. WRAP Module 1 will have the capability to characterize and repackage newly generated, retrieved and stored transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed, and suspect TRU waste for shipment to the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, the WRAP Facility Module 1 will have the capability to characterize low-level mixed waste for treatment in WRAP Module 2A. This report documents the assumptions and cost estimates for decontamination and clean-up of a maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) as defined by DOE Order 5480.7A, FIRE PROTECTION. The Order defines MPFL as the value of property, excluding land, within a fire area, unless a fire hazards analysis demonstrates a lesser (or greater) loss potential. This assumes failure of both automatic fire suppression systems and manual fire fighting efforts. Estimates were developed for demolition, disposal, decontamination, and rebuilding. Total costs were estimated to be approximately $98M.

Hinkle, A.W.; Jacobsen, P.H.; Lucas, D.R.

1994-06-30

368

Alternative facility layouts for semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities are widely acknowledged to be among the most complicated industrial systems from a production planning and control point of view. The design of most wafer fabrication facilities has followed the process layout, where similar machines are located together. This feeds to complex, reentrant product flows through the facility. In this paper, we examine the effects on

Christopher D. Geiger; Rieko Hase; Christos G. Takoudis; Reha Uzsoy

1997-01-01

369

Conical scan impact study. Volume 1: General central data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument was studied in terms of: (1) design modifications required in framing and continuous image recording devices; and (2) changes in configurations of an all-digital precision image processor. A baseline system was defined to provide the framework for comparison, and included pertinent spacecraft parameters, a conical MSS, a linear MSS, an image recording system, and an all-digital precision processor. Lateral offset pointing of the sensors over a range of plus or minus 20 deg was considered. The study addressed the conical scan impact on geometric, radiometric, and aperture correction of MSS data in terms of hardware and software considerations, system complexity, quality of corrections, throughput, and cost of implementation. It was concluded that: (1) if the MSS data are to be only film recorded, then there is only a nomial concial scan impact on the ground data processing system; and (2) if digital data are to be provided to users on computer compatible tapes in rectilinear format, then there is a significant conical scan impact on the ground data processing system.

Ebert, D. H.; Eppes, T. A.; Thomas, D. J.

1973-01-01

370

Conical scan impact study. Volume 2: Small local user data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument on a small local-user data processing facility was studied. User data requirements were examined to determine the unique system rquirements for a low cost ground system (LCGS) compatible with the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system. Candidate concepts were defined for the LCGS and preliminary designs were developed for selected concepts. The impact of a conical scan MSS versus a linear scan MSS was evaluated for the selected concepts. It was concluded that there are valid user requirements for the LCGS and, as a result of these requirements, the impact of the conical scanner is minimal, although some new hardware development for the LCGS is necessary to handle conical scan data.

Ebert, D. H.; Chase, P. E.; Dye, J.; Fahline, W. C.; Johnson, R. H.

1973-01-01

371

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RF) saltcrete processing. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work authorized for technical and scientific support to waste cementation and saltcrete processing operations. During this report period, tasks described in amendment M003 were initiated, some were completed, and an additional task not listed in M003 also was completed at the request of DOE RF. Summaries of task-specific activities are in four enclosures to this progress report. Other activities during this quarter included negotiation and initiation of amendment M004, to extend the period of performance and continue WES assistance to DOE RF. The four enclosures are: continuing support to waste cementation and saltcrete operations at DOE Rocky Flats Facility; review of ``Analyses of saltcrete``; review of Connell, et al ``Saltcrete evaluation`` report dated August 16, 1993; and scoping study of simulated saltcrete.

NONE

1995-01-27

372

Tritium Recovery at Fusion Facility 2.Operation Results and Technologies on the Safety Systems of the Tritium Process Laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) is the only facility in Japan using over 1 gram of tritium for fusion R&D. The TPL was constructed on 1984, and its safety systems have been operated since March 1988 (amount of tritium stored in TPL = 18 PBq at March 2002). The average tritium concentration in a stream from a stack of the TPL to the environment was 29 Bq/m ; this is about 1/200 of the regulation value for HTO concentration in exhaust air. The obtained efficiency for tritium removal has been larger than the design values. A series of information for tritium safety technologies was thus obtained through the operations of the TPL. A set of failure data on several main components was also obtained through the operation results of the TPL. R&D for tritium safety technology (tritium accountancy, behavior, and decontamination) has been continued at the TPL.

Yamanishi, Toshihiko

373

Physical Recreation Facilities. A Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New goals in physical education are leading instructors to seek new kinds of athletic facilities. School administrators are in the process of rethinking the classical facilities, i.e., the box-shaped gymnasium -- facilities designed without sensitivity to the students' desire to participate in the games they can continue to play after graduation.

Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

374

Requalification of the 235-F Metallograph Facility gloveboxes for use in the 773-A Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory and plutonium ``Can in Can`` demonstrations  

SciTech Connect

The proposed use for these gloveboxes are: (1) to utilize the Pu metal glovebox system for the primary containment associated with the Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory for obtaining radioactive glass compound viscometer analysis, and (2) to utilize the Pu oxide glovebox system for primary containment associated with the Pu Can in Can Demonstration for proof of principle testing specific to long term Pu immobilization and storage technology. This report presents objective evidence that supports the engineering judgment indicating the existing gloveboxes can be requalified for the proposed uses indicated above. SRS has the ability to duplicate the test parameters, with site forces, that will meet or exceed the identical acceptance criteria established to qualify the existing gloveboxes. The qualification effort will be a documented procedure using the leak test criteria characteristic of the original glovebox purchase. Two equivalent tests will be performed, one for post modification leak test acceptance and one for post installation leak test acceptance. Assurance of this approach is substantiated by thorough reviews of glovebox, leak test and weld standard guidance documents, as well as review of historical Project 3253 design and vendor information specific to the existing gloveboxes. Reuse of these gloveboxes will eliminate the need for competitive procurement of new gloveboxes.

Hinds, S.; Hidlay, J.

1997-04-16

375

[Open space of Non-Profit Organization La Casona de los Barriletes. Support program for youth in the process of being discharged from shelter facilities].  

PubMed

On this paper we outline a work program called Outpatient Therapeutic Family Space (Open Space) of the Non-Profit Organization La Casona de los Barriletes, whose goals consist of supporting youth going through discharge processes from shelter facilities in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires (CABA) where they were admitted or residing, and contributing with the consolidation of social inclusion processes. After a brief inspection of the history of the institution from where this program is developed, we explain a group of conceptual themes that help us focus on the problems, and we develop notions such as vulnerability, mental condition/disorder/disease, and health/illness/care process. Based on these definitions, we describe areas for the development of multidimensional interventions from an interdisciplinary team, aiming at developing cross-institution and cross-sector coordination allowing for the construction of community reference networks for youth accompanied by their families or affective referents. Later on we analyze certain factors that operate as stimuli and obstacles in this task. Lastly, we present several considerations based on the revision of the work carried out. PMID:24151670

Costa, Juan Jos; Mattarucco, Juan Pablo

2013-01-01

376

A facile dip-coating process for preparing highly durable superhydrophobic surface with multi-scale structures on paint films.  

PubMed

Superhydrophobic surfaces with multi-scale nano/microstructures have been prepared on epoxy paint surfaces using a feasible dip-coating process. The microstructures with 5-10 microm protuberances were first prepared on epoxy paint surface by sandblast. Then the nanostructures were introduced on the microstructure surface by anchoring 50-100 nm SiO(2) particles (nano-SiO(2)) onto the sandblasted paint surface, which was completed by dip-coating with a nano-SiO(2)/epoxy adhesive solution (M1). At last the surface was further modified for enhancing hydrophobicity by another dip-coating with a solution of a low surface energy polymer, aminopropyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (ATPS) modified epoxy adhesive (M2). The water contact angle of the as-prepared samples reached as high as 167.8 degrees and the sliding angle was 7 degrees. The prepared superhydrophobic surface exhibited excellent durability to the high speed scouring test and high stability in neutral and basic aqueous solutions and some common organic solvents. In addition, this method can be adopted to fabricate large scale samples with a good homogeneity of the whole surface at very low cost. PMID:19552913

Cui, Zhe; Yin, Long; Wang, Qingjun; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin

2009-09-15

377

Determination of Fissile Loadings onto Monosodium Titanate (MST) under Conditions Relevant to the Actinide Removal Process Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of an experimental study to measure the sorption of fissile actinides on monosodium titanate (MST) at conditions relevant to operation of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). The study examined the effect of a single contact of a large volume of radionuclide-spiked simulant solution with a small mass of MST. The volume of simulant to MST (8.5 L to 0.2 g of MST solids) was designed to mimic the maximum phase ratio that occurs between the multiple contacts of MST and waste solution and washing of the accumulated solids cycle of ARP. This work provides the following results. (1) After a contact time of {approx}2 weeks, we measured the following actinide loadings on the MST (average of solution and solids data), Pu: 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt %, U: 14.0 {+-} 1.04 wt %, and Np: 0.839 {+-} 0.0178 wt %. (2) The plutonium and uranium loadings reported above are considerably higher than previously reported values. The higher loading result from the very high phase ratio and the high initial mass concentrations of uranium and plutonium. A separate upcoming document details the predicted values for this system versus the results. (3) The strontium DF values measured in these tests proved much lower than those reported previously with simulants having the same bulk chemical composition. The low strontium DF values reflect the very low initial mass concentration of strontium in this simulant (<100 {micro}g/L) compared to that in previous testing (> 600 {micro}g/L).

Peters, T

2005-11-15

378

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

1980-12-01

379

Processes to Open the Container and the Sample Catcher of the Hayabusa Returned Capsule in the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility of JAXA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa, which returned from near-Earth-asteroid Itokawa, successfully returned its reentry capsule to the Earth, the Woomera Prohibited Area in Australia in Jun 13th, 2010, as detailed in another paper [1]. The capsule introduced into the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility in the Sagamihara campus of JAXA in the early morning of June 18th. Hereafter, we describe a series of processes for the returned capsule and the container to recover gas and materials in there. A transportation box of the recovered capsule was cleaned up on its outer surface beforehand and introduced into the class 10,000 clean room of the facility. Then, the capsule was extracted from the box and its plastic bag was opened and checked and photographed the outer surface of the capsule. The capsule was composed of the container, a backside ablator, a side ablator, an electronic box and a supporting frame. The container consists of an outer lid, an inner lid, a frame for latches, a container and a sample catcher, which is composed of room A and B and a rotational cylinder. After the first check, the capsule was packed in a plastic bag with N2 again, and transferred to the Chofu campus in JAXA, where the X-ray CT instrument is situated. The first X-ray CT analysis was performed on the whole returned capsule for confirming the conditions of latches and O-ring seal of the container. The analysis showed that the latches of the container should have worked normally, and that the double Orings of the container seemed to be sealed its sample catcher with no problem. After the first X-ray CT, the capsule was sent back to Sagamihara and introduced in the clean room to exclude the electronic box and the side ablator from the container by hand tools. Then the container with the backside ablator was set firmly to special jigs to fix the lid of container tightly to the container and set to a milling machine. The backside ablator was drilled by the machine to expose heads of bolts, which combined the ablator to the outer lid of the container, and after the drilling had been finished, all the bolts were unscrewed and the backside ablator was removed from the container. Then, the container was sent to the Chofu X-ray facility again to examine in detail by a micro X-ray CT instrument in order to reconfirm that the condition of the latches of the lid of container was normal and that its double O-ring seemed to have been sealed after the last X-ray CT analysis.

Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okada, T.; Yano, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Sandford, S.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kawaguchi, J.

2011-01-01

380

RCRA FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

381

Metal-smelting facility  

SciTech Connect

Currently there are 90,000 tons of contaminated ferrous and nonferrous scrap metal stored in aboveground scrap yards at the Department of Energy's Uranium Enrichment Facilities in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio. This scrap is primarily contaminated with 100 to 500 ppM uranium at an average enrichment of 1 to 1.5% /sup 235/U. A study was performed that evaluated smelting of the ORGDP metal in a reference facility located at Oak Ridge. The study defined the process systems and baseline requirements, evaluated alternatives to smelting, and provided capital and operating costs for the reference facility. A review of the results and recommendations of this study are presented.

Kellogg, D.R.; Mack, J.E.; Thompson, W.T.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01

382

Auditing radiation sterilization facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

Beck, Jeffrey A.

383

Results from an initial re-processing of the British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF) archive of CGPS data for 1997 to 2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IESSG (Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy) at the University of Nottingham operates and manages the NERC-funded British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). BIGF provides a unique and secure repository for quality assured raw data, and derived products, from a network of continuous GNSS stations throughout the British Isles, and the interface with the scientific community, in serving demand for data and derived products to carry out research. The fundamental value of BIGF is encapsulated in the secure archive of 30 second GNSS RINEX data, supplied to it from currently 155 CGNSS stations. The archive comprises 1,000 station-years of 30 second, primarily GPS data, with some stations operating since 1996/7. Since 2009, BIGF has started to develop derived products, in the form of homogenous time series of parameters including station velocities, tropospheric integrated water vapour and ionospheric activity, to facilitate scientific users who are interested in these parameters but do not want to carry out their own high-level processing of GNSS data. This poster provides details of BIGF and presents the coordinate time series for the period from 1997 to 2010 obtained from an initial re-processing using an in-house modified version of the Bernese GPS software and the GIPSY/OASIS II software, along with re-processed IGS products. Details of how the derived station velocities have been used to form a map of vertical land movements and to study changes in sea levels around the British Isles are provided.

Bingley, R.; Hansen, D. N.; Leighton, J.; Teferle, F. N.; David, B.

2010-12-01

384

ISOPAR L Release Rates from Saltstone Using Simulated Salt Solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Deactivated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability

Bronikowski

2006-01-01

385

ISOPAR L RELEASE RATES FROM SALTSTONE USING SIMULATED SALT SOLUTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) and the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) will produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) that will go to the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). Recent information indicates that solvent entrainment in the DSS is larger than expected. The main concern is with Isopar{reg_sign} L, the diluent in the solvent mixture, and its flammability

J Zamecnik; M Michael Bronikowski; A Alex Cozzi; R Russell Eibling; C Charles Nash

2008-01-01

386

Optimize facility-siting evaluations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Case histories show how to combine hazard-evaluation tools that effectively assess facility siting. Depending on the complexity of the process and equipment, more than one tool and hazard analysis method (HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) may be needed. Operating facilities must use all possible resources such as checklists, plot plans\\/elevation drawings, models, tours, etc., when performing a process hazard analysis (PHA). More

S. J. Wallace; B. L. Hunter

1994-01-01

387

Feasibility Evaluation and Retrofit Plan for Cold Crucible Induction Melter Deployment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 kHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 deg. C to 200 deg. C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 deg. C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and increase heat transfer to the slurry fed High Level Waste (HLW) sludge, the CCIM may be equipped with bubblers and/or water cooled mechanical agitators. The DWPF could benefit from use of CCIM technology, especially in light of our latest projections of waste volume to be vitrified. Increased waste loading and increased throughput could result in substantial life cycle cost reduction. In order to significantly surpass the waste throughput capability of the currently installed JHM, it may be necessary to install two 950 mm CCIMs in the DWPF Melt Cell. A cursory evaluation of system design requirements and modifications to the facility that may be required to support installation and operation of two 950 mm CCIMs was performed. Based on this evaluation, it appears technically feasible to position two CCIMs in the Melt Cell of the DWPF within the existing footprint of the current melter. Interfaces with support systems and controls including Melter Feed, Power, Melter Cooling Water, Melter Off-gas, and Canister Operations must be designed to support dual CCIM operations. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. (authors)

Barnes, A.B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D.C.; Adkins, B.J. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA NC Inc., Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01

388

FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 8118  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined Joule heated melters. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and increase heat transfer to the slurry fed High Level Waste (HLW) sludge, the CCIM may be equipped with bubblers and/or water cooled mechanical agitators. The DWPF could benefit from use of CCIM technology, especially in light of our latest projections of waste volume to be vitrified. Increased waste loading and increased throughput could result in substantial life cycle cost reduction. In order to significantly surpass the waste throughput capability of the currently installed Joule Heated Melter, it may be necessary to install two 950 mm CCIMs in the DWPF Melt Cell. A cursory evaluation of system design requirements and modifications to the facility that may be required to support installation and operation of two 950 mm CCIMs was performed. Based on this evaluation, it appears technically feasible to position two CCIMs in the Melt Cell of the DWPF within the existing footprint of the current melter. Interfaces with support systems and controls including Melter Feed, Power, Melter Cooling Water, Melter Off-gas, and Canister Operations must be designed to support dual CCIM operations.

Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

2007-11-15

389

FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 8118  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and increase heat transfer to the slurry fed High Level Waste (HLW) sludge, the CCIM may be equipped with bubblers and/or water cooled mechanical agitators. The DWPF could benefit from use of CCIM technology, especially in light of our latest projections of waste volume to be vitrified. Increased waste loading and increased throughput could result in substantial life cycle cost reduction. In order to significantly surpass the waste throughput capability of the currently installed JHM, it may be necessary to install two 950 mm CCIMs in the DWPF Melt Cell. A cursory evaluation of system design requirements and modifications to the facility that may be required to support installation and operation of two 950 mm CCIMs was performed. Based on this evaluation, it appears technically feasible to position two CCIMs in the Melt Cell of the DWPF within the existing footprint of the current melter. Interfaces with support systems and controls including Melter Feed, Power, Melter Cooling Water, Melter Off-gas, and Canister Operations must be designed to support dual CCIM operations. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF.

Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

2008-02-06

390

Facility Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

Graves, Ben E.

1984-01-01

391

FACILITY DATABASE  

Cancer.gov

January 2008 LASP FACILTY Database Form 5.000 Issue Reporting Form This form is used to report data and/or program related issues regarding the FACILITY database, Supplemental, or the LASP Online Access System. Before submitting this form,

392

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

393

School Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the building designs of eight school athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

Athletic Business, 2002

2002-01-01

394

Verification of the Accountability Method as a Means to Classify Radioactive Wastes Processed Using THOR Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming at the Studsvik Processing Facility in Erwin, Tennessee, USA - 13087  

SciTech Connect

Studsviks' Processing Facility Erwin (SPFE) has been treating Low-Level Radioactive Waste using its patented THOR process for over 13 years. Studsvik has been mixing and processing wastes of the same waste classification but different chemical and isotopic characteristics for the full extent of this period as a general matter of operations. Studsvik utilizes the accountability method to track the movement of radionuclides from acceptance of waste, through processing, and finally in the classification of waste for disposal. Recently the NRC has proposed to revise the 1995 Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (1995 BTP on CA) with additional clarification (draft BTP on CA). The draft BTP on CA has paved the way for large scale blending of higher activity and lower activity waste to produce a single waste for the purpose of classification. With the onset of blending in the waste treatment industry, there is concern from the public and state regulators as to the robustness of the accountability method and the ability of processors to prevent the inclusion of hot spots in waste. To address these concerns and verify the accountability method as applied by the SPFE, as well as the SPFE's ability to control waste package classification, testing of actual waste packages was performed. Testing consisted of a comprehensive dose rate survey of a container of processed waste. Separately, the waste package was modeled chemically and radiologically. Comparing the observed and theoretical data demonstrated that actual dose rates were lower than, but consistent with, modeled dose rates. Moreover, the distribution of radioactivity confirms that the SPFE can produce a radiologically homogeneous waste form. The results of the study demonstrate: 1) the accountability method as applied by the SPFE is valid and produces expected results; 2) the SPFE can produce a radiologically homogeneous waste; and 3) the SPFE can effectively control the waste package classification. (authors)

Olander, Jonathan [Studsvik Processing Facility Erwin, 151 T.C. Runnion Rd., Erwin, TN 37650 (United States)] [Studsvik Processing Facility Erwin, 151 T.C. Runnion Rd., Erwin, TN 37650 (United States); Myers, Corey [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)

2013-07-01

395

Solar production of industrial-process hot water. Phase III: operation and evaluation of the York Building Products Co. , Inc. solar facility. Final report, September 1978September 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

AAI Corporation designed, constructed, and operated a solar heating system to provide hot water for curing concrete blocks at the York Building Products Co., Inc.'s new manufacturing facility near Harrisburg, PA. The objective of Phase III of this program was to operate, collect data, and evaluate the solar system for a three-year period. The solar facility utilizes 35 collectors with

J. M. Bollinger; N. Kaplan; H. A. Jr. Wilkening

1981-01-01

396

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31

397

FULL-SCALE LABORATORY SIMULATION FACILITY TO TEST PARTICULATE AND ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM A THIRD WORLD RESIDENTIAL COMBUSTION PROCESS. I. FACILITY DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS OF TESTS OF THREE RURAL CHINA RESIDENTIAL COALS, A U.S. COAL, AND WOOD  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of a series of 12 tests for 3 coals from a rural area of China with abnormally high lung cancer rates, a U. S. coal, and pine wood fuel. It also discusses a residential combustion simulator, built at EPA's Research Triangle Park, NC, facility to conduct em...

398

EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

When processing High Level Waste (HLW) glass, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. Therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream feed stream, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. This strategy is known as 'feed forward statistical process control.' The DWPF depends on chemical analysis of the feed streams from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) where the frit plus adjusted sludge from the SRAT are mixed. The SME is the last vessel in which any chemical adjustments or frit additions can be made. Once the analyses of the SME product are deemed acceptable, the SME product is transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and onto the melter. The SRAT and SME analyses have been analyzed by the DWPF laboratory using a 'Cold Chemical' method but this dissolution did not adequately dissolve all the elemental components. A new dissolution method which fuses the SRAT or SME product with cesium nitrate (CsNO{sub 3}), germanium (IV) oxide (GeO{sub 2}) and cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) into a cesium germanate glass at 1050 C in platinum crucibles has been developed. Once the germanium glass is formed in that fusion, it is readily dissolved by concentrated nitric acid (about 1M) to solubilize all the elements in the SRAT and/or SME product for elemental analysis. When the chemical analyses are completed the acidic cesium-germanate solution is transferred from the DWPF analytic laboratory to the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) where the pH is increased to {approx}12 M to be released back to the tank farm and the 2H evaporator. Therefore, about 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2}/year will be diluted into 1.4 million gallons of recycle. This 2.5 kg/yr of GeO{sub 2} may increase to 4 kg/yr when improvements are implemented to attain an annual canister production goal of 400 canisters. Since no Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) exists for germanium in the Tank Farm, the Effluent Treatment Project, or the Saltstone Production Facility, DWPF has requested an evaluation of the fate of the germanium in the caustic environment of the RCT, the 2H evaporator, and the tank farm. This report evaluates the effect of the addition of germanium to the tank farm based on: (1) the large dilution of Ge in the RCT and tank farm; (2) the solubility of germanium in caustic solutions (pH 12-13); (3) the potential of germanium to precipitate as germanium sodalites in the 2H Evaporator; and (4) the potential of germanium compounds to precipitate in the evaporator feed tank. This study concludes that the impacts of transferring up to 4 kg/yr germanium to the RCT (and subsequently the 2H evaporator feed tank and the 2H evaporator) results in <2 ppm per year (1.834 mg/L) which is the maximum instantaneous concentration expected from DWPF. This concentration is insignificant as most sodium germanates are soluble at the high pH of the feed tank and evaporator solutions. Even if sodium aluminosilicates form in the 2H evaporator, the Ge will likely substitute for some small amount of the Si in these structures and will be insignificant. It is recommended that the DWPF continue with their strategy to add germanium as a laboratory chemical to Attachment 8.2 of the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan (WCP).

Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

2011-08-15

399

On-field investigation and process modelling of end-of-life vehicles treatment in the context of Italian craft-type authorized treatment facilities.  

PubMed

The present article analyses the current situation of End-of-Life-of-Vehicles (ELVs) management in Europe, with particular attention on Italian condition. Similarly to other European countries, metal recycling is the main activity of the whole system, but such situation is evolving due to the 2000/53/EC Directive, which sets out targets for Reuse, Recycling and Recovery of ELVs. Due to the relevance of the ELVs problem, in 2008 Italian Ministry of Environment subscribed a framework agreement with competent stakeholders as carmakers, dismantlers, shredders. The main result is an industrial plan to promote (amongst other objectives) technological progress for residual waste (Automotive Shredder Residue-ASR) treatment. According with Italian Trial 2006 analysis about ELVs, Reuse and Recycling rate is currently estimated to be about 81%. At the present time, dismantling plants constitute the first collection points for ELVs; for this reason, during 2009 an investigation has been done over a number of ten Authorized Treatment Facilities (ATFs) operating in Italy. The first step of the analysis was aimed to find out major practices and methods through observations of ATFs activities and interviews to operators. Furthermore, the depollution and dismantling treatments of about 70 different ELVs have been observed and timed in detail over a period of three months. The results included the identification of most relevant critical issues in ELVs treatment, such as distortions between scrapping activities and Directive's regulation, and the assessment of the time and of the resources needed to perform each operation. In the second step of the survey, a process simulation model has been built on the basis of such data. The model was aimed to include the real variability and all the uncertainties that are typical of dismantling activities; it is intended as a tool for process layout planning and for its management. Some control parameters have been introduced; these are able to dynamically modify process path depending on ELVs queues and priorities. The model can also be used for the economic assessments of single operations or of the whole treatment activity. PMID:23352084

Berzi, Lorenzo; Delogu, Massimo; Giorgetti, Alessandro; Pierini, Marco

2013-04-01

400

Control Technology Assessment for Coal Gasification and Liquefaction Processes, Coal Gasification Facility, Caterpiller Tractor Company, York, Pennsylvania. Report for the Site Visit of May 1981.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A control technology survey was conducted at the coal gasification facility of the Caterpillar Tractor Company (SIC-5161), in York, Pennsylvania on August 18, 1980 and May 7, 1981, in conjunction with an industrial hygiene characterization study. Potentia...

D. R. Telesca

1982-01-01

401

Review of Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Claims Billed with Patient Status Code 05 Processed by National Government Services for Calendar Year 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRF) provide rehabilitation for patients who require a hospital level of care, including a relatively intense rehabilitation program and an interdisciplinary, coordinated team approach to improve their ability to funct...

2010-01-01

402

Facilities performance measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

States that performance measurement is a technique often used throughout organizations, particularly in manufacturing. However, it is not used that frequently, or particularly well, throughout facilities management. Seeks to address this missed opportunity by presenting in outline the principles and process of performance measurement and the benefits it can bring when used in an appropriate way. Sets out some examples

Barry J. Varcoe

1996-01-01

403

Aeropropulsion Environmental Test Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the DoD Base Realignment and Closure process, the unique Navy capability to test aircraft engines under various environmental conditions is being transitioned to the Air Force. A new facility, using two modified sea level Air Force T-9 test cel...

J. K. Lominac J. F. Boytos

1998-01-01

404

Convention and Conference Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rigorous statistical analysis indicates that large group bookings are a dominant source for errors in convention and conference facilities. This study demonstrates that the accuracy of the quantitative forecast can benefit from human judgment when an explicit structured process is applied to the judgmental adjustments. It develops and fits a correcting model that simulates managers' predictions. The results suggest

Zvi Schwartz

1997-01-01

405

Mission analysis report - deactivation facilities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This document examines the portion of the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission that deals with facility deactivation. How facilities get identified for deactivation, how they enter EM-60 for deactivation, programmatic alternatives to perform facility deactivation, the deactivation process itself, key requirements and objectives associated with the deactivation process, and deactivation planning are discussed.

Lund, D.P.

1996-09-27

406

Asian Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

Nakahata, M.

2011-04-01

407

Technology Facility Siting Characteristics and Infrastructure Needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study developed data on coal, water, land, manpower and capital requirements of coal conversion facilities, and assessed the ability of the Appalachian region to support these facilities. Eight processes were considered, from coal cleaning to electri...

1976-01-01

408

Empowering Facilities Teams through Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Facilities departments at colleges and universities are facing the same challenge: how not to do just the most projects, but also the right projects with the limited funds they are given. In order to make the best decisions, they need more control over the capital planning process, which requires accurate, current facility condition data. Each

Cormier, Scott

2013-01-01

409

Lurie Nanofabrication Facility  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Michigan Nanofabrication Facility (MNF) at the University of Michigan Solid-State Electronics Laboratory (SSEL) is one of the leading centers worldwide on micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) and microsystems. It provides facilities and processes for the integration of Si integrated circuits and MEMS with nanotechnology, with applications in biology, medical systems, chemistry, and environmental monitoring. The MNF builds on its experience in integration of Si-based electronics with MEMS transducers and micropackaging to push these interfaces into the nanometer regime with emphasis on the fabrication, packaging, and testing of integrated devices for chemical and biological sensing, electrical stimulation of biological systems, and integrated fluidic systems.

2008-11-04

410

Facility model for the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Plutonium Facility contains more than sixty unit processes and handles a large variety of nuclear materials, including many forms of plutonium-bearing scrap. The management of the Plutonium Facility is supporting the development of a computer model of the facility as a means of effectively integrating the large amount of information required for material control, process planning, and facility development. The model is designed to provide a flexible, easily maintainable facility description that allows the faciltiy to be represented at any desired level of detail within a single modeling framework, and to do this using a model program and data files that can be read and understood by a technically qualified person without modeling experience. These characteristics were achieved by structuring the model so that all facility data is contained in data files, formulating the model in a simulation language that provides a flexible set of data structures and permits a near-English-language syntax, and using a description for unit processes that can represent either a true unit process or a major subsection of the facility. Use of the model is illustrated by applying it to two configurations of a fictitious nuclear material processing line.

Coulter, C.A.; Thomas, K.E.; Sohn, C.L.; Yarbro, T.F.; Hench, K.W.

1986-01-01

411

Safe design of healthcare facilities  

PubMed Central

The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety?driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety?driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety.

Reiling, J

2006-01-01

412

Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility (CFMF) is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried into space in the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate systems and technologies required to efficiently and effectively manage cryogens in space. The facility hardware is configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage, transfer concepts and processes. Significant design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer systems will be obtained. Future applications include space-based and ground-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV), space station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, space-based weapon systems and space-based orbit maneuvering vehicles (OMV). This paper describes the facility and discusses the cryogenic fluid management technology to be investigated. A brief discussion of the integration issues involved in loading and transporting liquid hydrogen within the Shuttle cargo bay is also included.

Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Symons, E. P.; Kroeger, E. W.

1984-01-01

413

V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17

414

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31

415

Solar production of industrial process hot water. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the York Building Products Co. , Inc. , Solar Facility. Final report, September 1978September 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under contract from the Department of Energy, AAI Corporation designed, constructed, and operated a solar heating system to provide hot water for curing concrete blocks at the York Building Products Co., Inc.'s new manufacturing facility near Harrisburg, PA. The objective of Phase III of this program was to operate, collect data, and evaluate the solar system for a three-year period

J. M. Bollinger; N. Kaplan; H. A. Jr. Wilkening

1981-01-01

416

Troubled Asset Relief Program: Treasury Needs to Strengthen Its Decision-Making Process on the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) was created by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) to help meet consumer and small business credit needs by supporting issuance of asset-backed securities (ABS) and c...

2010-01-01

417

Full-scale experimental facility for the development technologies for the reprocessing of tritium contaminated light and heavy water wastes by CECE process and cryogenic distillation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of the formation and accumulation of the tritiated heavy and light water wastes produced under operation of the various nuclear facilities is considered. It is shown that the tritium contaminated wastes may have a wide spectrum of isotope concentrations of H:D:T and correlation one with other. Reprocessing of these wastes is expensive matter due to the small tritium

V. D. Trenin; I. A. Alekseev; S. P. Karpov; S. D. Bondarenko; T. V. Vasyanina; K. A. Konoplev; O. A. Fedorchenko; V. V. Uborski; T. Voronina

1995-01-01

418

Medical Image Analysis Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

1978-01-01

419

Microgravity Control Integration Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

To verify that the International Space Station (ISS) payload facility racks do not disturb the microgravity environment of neighboring facility racks during any ISS microgravity period, a control integration process must be followed. Currently no facility racks have taken this process from start to finish. The authors are assisting the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Fluids Combustion Facility (FCF) in

J. Heese; Carlos M. Grodsinsky

2002-01-01

420

Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and

Miller, Glen M.; And Others

1993-01-01