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1

Preliminary Evaluation of DWPF Impacts of Boric Acid Use in Cesium Strip for SWPF and MCU.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system includes the option to replace the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with bo...

M. Stone

2010-01-01

2

BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.

Lee, S.

2012-05-10

3

Laser materials processing facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The laser materials processing facility and its capabilities are described. A CO2 laser with continuous wave, repetitive pulse, and shaped power-time cycles is employed. The laser heated crystal growth station was used to produce metal and metal oxide single crystals and for cutting and shaping experiments using Si3N4 to displace diamond shaping processes.

Haggerty, J. S.

1982-01-01

4

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25

5

Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Process Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II using electro?metallurgical treatment. To process fuel without waiting for periodic sample analyses to assess process conditions, an electrorefiner process model predicts the composition of the electrorefiner inventory and effluent streams. For the chemical equilibrium portion of the model, the two common

DeeEarl Vaden

2006-01-01

6

SRS Process Facility Significance Fire Frequency  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the method and assumptions of a study performed to determine a site generic process facility significant fire initiator frequency and explains the proper way this value should be used.

Sarrack, A.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-10-01

7

SALTSTONE PROCESSING FACILITY TRANSFER SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

On May 19, 2010, the Saltstone Production Facility inadvertently transferred 1800 gallons of untreated waste from the salt feed tank to Vault 4. During shut down, approximately 70 gallons of the material was left in the Saltstone hopper. A sample of the slurry in the hopper was sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze the density, pH and the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals. The sample was hazardous for chromium, mercury and pH. The sample received from the Saltstone hopper was analyzed visually while obtaining sample aliquots and while the sample was allowed to settle. It was observed that the sample contains solids that settle in approximately 20 minutes (Figure 3-1). There is a floating layer on top of the supernate during settling and disperses when the sample is agitated (Figure 3-2). The untreated waste inadvertently transferred from the SFT to Vault 4 was toxic for chromium and mercury. In addition, the pH of the sample is at the regulatory limit. Visually inspecting the sample indicates solids present in the sample.

Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

2010-08-04

8

10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...those housing or adjacent to the new process); however, all facilities...in § 70.64, Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities...wholly dependent upon any single element of the design,...

2010-01-01

9

10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...those housing or adjacent to the new process); however, all facilities...in § 70.64, Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities...wholly dependent upon any single element of the design,...

2011-01-01

10

10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...those housing or adjacent to the new process); however, all facilities...in § 70.64, Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities...wholly dependent upon any single element of the design,...

2013-01-01

11

10 CFR 70.64 - Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...those housing or adjacent to the new process); however, all facilities...in § 70.64, Requirements for new facilities or new processes at existing facilities...wholly dependent upon any single element of the design,...

2012-01-01

12

Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Process Model  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II using electro-metallurgical treatment. To process fuel without waiting for periodic sample analyses to assess process conditions, an electrorefiner process model predicts the composition of the electrorefiner inventory and effluent streams. For the chemical equilibrium portion of the model, the two common methods for solving chemical equilibrium problems, stoichiometric and non stoichiometric, were investigated. In conclusion, the stoichiometric method produced equilibrium compositions close to the measured results whereas the non stoichiometric method did not.

DeeEarl Vaden

2005-10-01

13

Processing facility on modified oil tanker  

SciTech Connect

Now operating offshore California, a modified 50,000-d.w.t. oil tanker supports a crude oil and natural gas processing facility and temporary oil-storage tanks. A single-anchor-leg mooring (SALM) device stabilizes the tanker, which is subjected to significant roll, pitch, and heave by wind and wave forces. Natural gas, after compression on the production platform, travels by subsea pipeline to provide fuel for the facility's gas-turbine power generators. A Sulfinol treatment plant on the vessel lowers the gas's sulfur content, then a Claus sulfur-recovery unit removes essentially all of the H/sub 2/S from the acid gas.

Harper, H.S.

1982-06-21

14

Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy.

Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

1991-01-01

15

Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R & D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R & D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy.

Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

1991-12-31

16

Implementing change in the facilities planning process  

SciTech Connect

In the post-Cold War climate of reduced budgets at the national laboratories, the Sites Planning Department at Sandia National Laboratories was faced with the problem of securing funding for capital construction projects in a very competitive environment. The Department of Energy (DOE), felt that requests for new facilities were not always well coordinated with its mission needs. The Sites Planning Department needed to revolutionize the way they were doing business. To be successful in obtaining approval and funding for future facilities, they recognized the need to concentrate their efforts on project proposals that tap strategic programs at DOE. The authors developed a series of new processes to identify, evaluate, prioritize, and develop line item project proposals to request approval and obtain funding. A matrixed group of sites and facilities directors was formed to establish criteria and make preliminary recommendations to upper management. Matrixed working groups were also established at the staff level to develop and prepare projects for the prioritization process. Ultimately, similar processes will be applied to all project types, and a prioritized plan generated for each. These plans will become the blueprint for an overarching strategic site plan. What started as a means of increasing success in obtaining approval and funding of capital projects has launched a whole new approach to project development that permits incorporation of facilities planning into overall corporate strategic planning.

Williams, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Sites Planning Dept.

1995-08-01

17

Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO{sub 3}, some of the process streams that are high in F{sup {minus}} and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60{degrees}C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Barker, S.A., Schwenk, E.B. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Divine, J.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-11-01

18

Processing facility on modified oil tanker  

Microsoft Academic Search

Now operating offshore California, a modified 50,000-d.w.t. oil tanker supports a crude oil and natural gas processing facility and temporary oil-storage tanks. A single-anchor-leg mooring (SALM) device stabilizes the tanker, which is subjected to significant roll, pitch, and heave by wind and wave forces. Natural gas, after compression on the production platform, travels by subsea pipeline to provide fuel for

1982-01-01

19

Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Simulation Package Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to immobilize high level liquid radioactive waste into safe, stable, and manageable solid form. The complexity and classification of the facility requires that a performance based operator training to satisfy Department of Energy orders and guidelines. A major portion of the training program will be the application and utilization of Process Simulation Packages to assist in training the Control Room Operators on the fluctionality of the process and the application of the Distribution Control System (DCS) in operating and managing the DWPF process. The packages are being developed by the DWPF Computer and Information Systems Simulation Group. This paper will describe the DWPF Process Simulation Package Life Cycle. The areas of package scope, development, validation, and configuration management will be reviewed and discussed in detail.

Reuter, K.

1991-12-31

20

Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Simulation Package Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to immobilize high level liquid radioactive waste into safe, stable, and manageable solid form. The complexity and classification of the facility requires that a performance based operator training to satisfy Department of Energy orders and guidelines. A major portion of the training program will be the application and utilization of Process Simulation Packages to assist in training the Control Room Operators on the fluctionality of the process and the application of the Distribution Control System (DCS) in operating and managing the DWPF process. The packages are being developed by the DWPF Computer and Information Systems Simulation Group. This paper will describe the DWPF Process Simulation Package Life Cycle. The areas of package scope, development, validation, and configuration management will be reviewed and discussed in detail.

Reuter, K.

1991-01-01

21

Node 2 In Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Node 2 awaits launch in the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) since its arrival on June 1, 2003. Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Alenia built Node 2 as part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). Weighing in at approximately 30,000 pounds, the Node is more than 20-feet long and 14.5-feet wide. This centerpiece of the ISS will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station and will result in a roomier Station, allowing it to expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

2003-01-01

22

Process, optimized acidizing reduce production facility upsets  

SciTech Connect

The filtration/absorption process, coupled with optimum treatments, prevent facility upsets that increase the time and resources required for bringing a well back on-line following an acid stimulation. Surface active agents, required in acidizing to improve well productivity, can form oil/water emulsions and cause unacceptable oil and grease levels during acid flowback. But recent offshore experiences after acidizing show that operators can achieve oil and grease discharge limits without facility upsets. To minimize oil and grease, the additives need to be optimized by adding a mutual breakout solvent (MBS). MBS has the dual function of being a mutual solvent and a sludge and emulsion control additive. The paper discusses acidizing problems, acid additives, handling options, and a case history of the Main Pass A field.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); McConnell, S.B. [Schlumberger Dowell, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, M.R. [Gulf States Environmental Solutions Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-02-10

23

Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for “black box” processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

2013-09-25

24

15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy facilities likely to be located in or which...

2010-01-01

25

Defense waste processing facility startup progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high level waste produced since operation began have been consolidated into 33 million gallons by evaporation at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy has authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. Cold startup testing using simulated non-radioactive feeds is scheduled to begin in November 1992 with radioactive operation scheduled to begin in May 1994. While technical issues have been identified which can potentially affect DWPF operation, they are not expected to negatively impact the start of non-radioactive startup testing.

Iverson, D.C.; Elder, H.H.

1992-07-01

26

Defense waste processing facility startup progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950's to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high level waste produced since operation began have been consolidated into 33 million gallons by evaporation at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy has authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, prior to emplacement in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. Cold startup testing using simulated non-radioactive feeds is scheduled to begin in November 1992 with radioactive operation scheduled to begin in May 1994. While technical issues have been identified which can potentially affect DWPF operation, they are not expected to negatively impact the start of non-radioactive startup testing.

Iverson, D.C.; Elder, H.H.

1992-01-01

27

Automation in a material processing\\/storage facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling\\/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will

K. Peterson; J. Gordon

1997-01-01

28

Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities  

SciTech Connect

This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

Not Available

1986-09-01

29

Designing a Process Migration Facility: The Charlotte Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our goal in this paper is to discuss our e xperience with process migration in the Charlotte distributed operating system. We a lso dra wu pon the experience of other oper- ating systems in which migration has been implemented. Ap rocess migration facility in ad istributed operating system dynamically relocates processes among the component machines. A successful process migration facility

Yeshayahu Artsy; Raphael A. Finkel

1989-01-01

30

10 CFR 70.72 - Facility changes and change process.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Nuclear Material § 70.72 Facility changes and change process. (a) The licensee shall establish a configuration management system to evaluate, implement, and track each change to the site, structures, processes,...

2010-01-01

31

Managing the Rural School Facility Construction Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The decision to renovate or replace a school building is the starting point for a long and challenging journey with many phases: planning, development, and project delivery and construction. Each phase requires different levels of expertise, skills, and activities. The challenge of a rural facility project is to find leadership to provide guidance…

Passarelli, Angelo; Goehring, Wade; Harley, Anne

32

Application of process monitoring to verify facility design  

SciTech Connect

Process monitoring has been proposed as a safeguards measure to ensure that a facility is operating as designed, or as a surveillance measure to ensure that material is not removed from the facility in an undeclared manner. In a process-monitoring system, the facility operator monitors process operations such as tank levels, densities, and temperatures; process flows; and physical parameters such as valve positions to ensure that the operations performed are both desired and required. At many facilities (for example, Idaho), the process-monitoring system is also an important safety feature to prevent criticality. Verifying facility design is necessary for application of safeguards in a reprocessing plant. Verifying all pipes and valves through comparison of blueprints with the as-built facility is an almost impossible task with the International Atomic Energy Agency's limited inspection resources. We propose applying process monitoring for international safeguards facility design verification. By carefully selecting process-operating variables, it may be possible to verify that plant flows are as described and that key measurement points are not bypassed. 8 refs.

Hakkila, E.A.

1989-01-01

33

Integration Process for Payloads in the Fluids and Combustion Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is an ISS research facility located in the United States Laboratory (US Lab), Destiny. The FCF is a multi-discipline facility that performs microgravity research primarily in fluids physics science and combustion science. This facility remains on-orbit and provides accommodations to multi-user and Principal investigator (PI) unique hardware. The FCF is designed to accommodate 15 PI's per year. In order to allow for this number of payloads per year, the FCF has developed an end-to-end analytical and physical integration process. The process includes provision of integration tools, products and interface management throughout the life of the payload. The payload is provided with a single point of contact from the facility and works with that interface from PI selection through post flight processing. The process utilizes electronic tools for creation of interface documents/agreements, storage of payload data and rollup for facility submittals to ISS. Additionally, the process provides integration to and testing with flight-like simulators prior to payload delivery to KSC. These simulators allow the payload to test in the flight configuration and perform final facility interface and science verifications. The process also provides for support to the payload from the FCF through the Payload Safety Review Panel (PSRP). Finally, the process includes support in the development of operational products and the operation of the payload on-orbit.

Free, James M.; Nall, Marsha M.

2001-01-01

34

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-print Network

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01

35

LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities National Security  

E-print Network

- tinide chemistry; nuclear materials separation, processing, and recovery; plutonium metallurgy, preparation, casting, fabrication, and recovery; machining and metallurgy laboratories; and de- structive

36

Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience  

SciTech Connect

MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as cross-cutting industries such as welding and heat treating. MPLUS consists of four primary facilities: (1) Materials Processing, (2) Materials Joining, (3) Materials Characterization and Properties, and (4) Materials Process Modeling. Each facility provides rapid access to unique, state-of-the-art equipment, capabilities, and technical expertise necessary for solving materials processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging technologies. These capabilities include: (1) materials synthesis; (2) deformation processing; (3) materials characterization; (4) joining and mathematical modeling.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Raschke, R.A. [eds.] [comps.

1998-02-12

37

40 CFR 52.279 - Food processing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and relax the control on emissions from food processing facilities without any accompanying analyses demonstrating that these relaxations will not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (1)...

2011-07-01

38

40 CFR 52.279 - Food processing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and relax the control on emissions from food processing facilities without any accompanying analyses demonstrating that these relaxations will not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (1)...

2010-07-01

39

40 CFR 52.279 - Food processing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and relax the control on emissions from food processing facilities without any accompanying analyses demonstrating that these relaxations will not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (1)...

2013-07-01

40

40 CFR 52.279 - Food processing facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and relax the control on emissions from food processing facilities without any accompanying analyses demonstrating that these relaxations will not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (1)...

2012-07-01

41

Control System for the BCP Processing Facility at FNAL.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The surface processing is one of the key elements of superconducting RF cavity fabrication. Safety and reliability are the main requirements for the chemical surface treatment facility being developed at FNAL. Accepting the Buffered Chemical Polishing (BC...

C. Boffo, D. Connolly, L. Elementi, Y. Tereshkin

2003-01-01

42

47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and...

2013-10-01

43

47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and...

2012-10-01

44

47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and...

2011-10-01

45

47 CFR 3.42 - Location of processing facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...COMMISSION GENERAL AUTHORIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.42 Location of processing facility. Settlement of maritime mobile and...

2010-10-01

46

Receipt of the Observatory at the Orbital Processing Facility  

NASA Video Gallery

These series of photos show the receipt of the observatory at the Orbital processing facility at VAFB. The observatory was received on April 16, 2013 and transferred to its handling fixture and the...

47

Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SLDPF) quality assurance expert systems development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SLDPF) expert system prototypes have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of Spacelab and/or Attached Shuttle Payload (ASP) processed telemetry data. SLDPF functions include the capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of mission data to various user facilities. Prototypes for the two SLDPF functional elements, the Spacelab Output Processing System and the Spacelab Input Processing Element, are described. The prototypes have produced beneficial results including an increase in analyst productivity, a decrease in the burden of tedious analyses, the consistent evaluation of data, and the providing of concise historical records.

Kelly, Angelita C.; Basile, Lisa; Ames, Troy; Watson, Janice; Dallam, William

1987-01-01

48

Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SLDPF) quality assurance expert systems development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SLDPF) expert system prototypes were developed to assist in the quality assurance of Spacelab and/or Attached Shuttle Payload (ASP) processed telemetry data. The SLDPF functions include the capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of mission data to various user facilities. Prototypes for the two SLDPF functional elements, the Spacelab Output Processing System and the Spacelab Input Processing Element, are described. The prototypes have produced beneficial results including an increase in analyst productivity, a decrease in the burden of tedious analyses, the consistent evaluation of data, and the providing of concise historical records.

Kelly, Angelita C.; Basile, Lisa; Ames, Troy; Watson, Janice; Dallam, William

1987-01-01

49

Designing a process migration facility: The Charlotte experience  

E-print Network

Designing a process migration facility: The Charlotte experience Yeshayahu Artsy Raphael Finkel Systems, Process Migration, System Design Abstract Our goal in this paper is to discuss our experience with process migration in the Charlotte distributed operating system. We also draw upon the experience of other

Finkel, Raphael

50

Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

1997-12-31

51

Altering Design Decisions to Better Suit Facilities Management Processes  

E-print Network

promises. As for FM?s supportive role and non-core considerations, Hamel and Pralahad (1994; Quoted in Waheed and Fernie 2009) in their description of core and non-core organizational capabilities related to customer advantage and company...]. Van Aken, J. E. 2005. Valid knowledge for the professional design of large and complex design processes. Design Studies 26:379-404. Waheed, Z. and Fernie, S. 2009. Knowledge based facilities management. Facilities 27(7/8):258-266. Way, M...

Jawdeh, H. B.; Abudul-Malak, M. A.; Wood, G.

2010-01-01

52

NASA Construction of Facilities Validation Processes - Total Building Commissioning (TBCx)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Key Atributes include: Total Quality Management (TQM) System that looks at all phases of a project. A team process that spans boundaries. A Commissioning Authority to lead the process. Commissioning requirements in contracts. Independent design review to verify compliance with Facility Project Requirements (FPR). Formal written Commissioning Plan with Documented Results. Functional performance testing (FPT) against the requirements document.

Hoover, Jay C.

2004-01-01

53

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect

The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its nonproliferation obligations. The IAEA draws such conclusions from the evaluation of all available information. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of this “State-level” approach. Efficiently used, the Safeguards by Design (SBD) methodologies , , , now being developed can contribute to effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards. The Facility Safeguardability Assessment (FSA) introduced here supports SBD in three areas. 1. It describes necessary interactions between the IAEA, the State regulator, and the owner / designer of a new or modified facility to determine where SBD efforts can be productively applied, 2. It presents a screening approach intended to identify potential safeguard issues for; a) design changes to existing facilities; b) new facilities similar to existing facilities with approved safeguards approaches, and c) new designs, 3. It identifies resources (the FSA toolkit), such as good practice guides, design guidance, and safeguardability evaluation methods that can be used by the owner/designer to develop solutions for potential safeguards issues during the interactions with the State regulator and IAEA. FSA presents a structured framework for the application of the SBD tools developed in other efforts. The more a design evolves, the greater the probability that new safeguards issues could be introduced. Likewise, for first-of-a-kind facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, it is reasonable to expect that a number of possible safeguards issues might exist. Accordingly, FSA is intended to help the designer and its safeguards experts identify early in the design process: • Areas where elements of previous accepted safeguards approach(es) may be applied to facility modifications or new designs • Modifications of the design that could mitigate a potential safeguards issue or facilitate a more efficient application of the safeguards approach • Possible innovative ideas for more efficient application of safeguards • The potential for changes in elements of the safeguard approach that may be required by IAEA as a result of facility design features and characteristics • Other potential concerns These issues will then be presented to the IAEA and the state regulator to be resolved in a timely manner, ensuring that the planned safeguards approach is acceptable and compatible with the facility design. The proposed approach should be validated by application to suitable facilities to assess its utility, comprehensiveness, and cost-effectiveness. The approach and example application should also be reviewed by industry to confirm the conclusions reached in the DOE review.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Shirley J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2011-10-10

54

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1999-04-02

55

The Defense Waste Processing Facility: Two Years of Radioactive Operation  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC is currently immobilizing high level radioactive sludge waste in borosilicate glass. The DWPF began vitrification of radioactive waste in May, 1996. Prior to that time, an extensive startup test program was completed with simulated waste. The DWPF is a first of its kind facility. The experience gained and data collected during the startup program and early years of operation can provide valuable information to other similar facilities. This experience involves many areas such as process enhancements, analytical improvements, glass pouring issues, and documentation/data collection and tracking. A summary of this experience and the results of the first two years of operation will be presented.

Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Gee, J.T.; Sproull, J.F.

1998-05-01

56

Defense Waste Processing Facility Radioactive Operations - Year Two  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste vitrification facility. This waste (130 million liters) which has been stored in carbon steel underground tanks and is now being pretreated, melted into a highly durable borosilicate glass and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Following a ten-year construction period and nearly three-year nonradioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. The first nine months of radioactive operations have been reported previously. As with any complex technical facility, difficulties were encountered during the transition to radioactive operations. Results of the second year of radioactive operations are presented in this paper. The discussion includes: feed preparation and glass melting, resolution of the melter pouring issues, improvements in processing attainment and throughput, and planned improvements in laboratory attainment and throughput.

Occhipinti, J.E.; Carter, J.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Beck, R.S.; Iverson, D.C.

1998-03-01

57

General view from outside the Orbiter Processing Facility at the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view from outside the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center with the bay doors open as the Orbiter Discovery is atop the transport vehicle prepared to be moved over to the Vehicle Assembly Building. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

58

Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

1996-06-01

59

Code requirements for concrete repository and processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The design and construction of facilities and structures for the processing and safe long-term storage of low- and high-level radioactive wastes will likely employ structural concrete. This concrete will be used for many purposes including structural support, shielding, and environmental protection. At the present time, there are no design costs, standards or guidelines for repositories, waste containers, or processing facilities. Recently, the design and construction guidelines contained in American Concrete Institute (ACI), Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures (ACI 349), have been cited for low-level waste (LLW) repositories. Conceptual design of various high-level (HLW) repository surface structures have also cited the ACI 349 Code. However, the present Code was developed for nuclear power generating facilities and its application to radioactive waste repositories was not intended. For low and medium level radioactive wastes, concrete has a greater role and use in processing facilities, engineered barriers, and repository structures. Because of varied uses and performance/safety requirements this review of the current ACI 349 Code document was required to accommodate these special classes of structures.

Hookham, C.J. [Black & Veatch, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Palaniswamy, R. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States)

1993-04-01

60

Control system for BCP processing facility at FNAL  

SciTech Connect

The surface processing is one of the key elements of superconducting RF cavity fabrication. Safety and reliability are the main requirements for the chemical surface treatment facility being developed at FNAL. Accepting the Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) as the baseline process, a ''gravity feed and open etching tank'' approach has been chosen at this stage. This choice resulted in the introduction of a control system with a strong automation since the number of elements to be controlled at different steps of the process is rather big. In order to allow for maximum flexibility, two operational modes were defined within the control system: semi-automatic, which requires an operator's decision to move from one stage to another, and manual. This paper describes the main features of the control system for the BCP facility that is under development at FNAL.

Cristian Boffo et al.

2003-09-11

61

APET methodology for Defense Waste Processing Facility: Mode C operation  

SciTech Connect

Safe operation of SRS facilities continues to be the highest priority of the Savannah River Site (SRS). One of these facilities, the Defense Waste Processing Facility or DWPF, is currently undergoing cold chemical runs to verify the design and construction preparatory to hot startup in 1995. The DWPFF is a facility designed to convert the waste currently stored in tanks at the 200-Area tank farm into a form that is suitable for long term storage in engineered surface facilities and, ultimately, geologic isolation. As a part of the program to ensure safe operation of the DWPF, a probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF has been completed. The results of this analysis are incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for DWPF. The usual practice in preparation of Safety Analysis Reports is to include only a conservative analysis of certain design basis accidents. A major part of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment is the development and quantification of an Accident Progression Event Tree or APET. The APET provides a probabilistic representation of potential sequences along which an accident may progress. The methodology used to determine the risk of operation of the DWPF borrows heavily from methods applied to the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of SRS reactors and to some commercial reactors. This report describes the Accident Progression Event Tree developed for the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF.

Taylor, R.P. Jr.; Massey, W.M.

1995-04-01

62

Shield verification testing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory processes spent nuclear reactor fuels for recovery of usable uranium. The new Fuel Processing Facility (FPF), currently under construction, is a 400 million dollar project that will replace the aging processing facility. A Shield Testing Program is being conducted to verify that shield walls, doors, and windows meet the design criteria for radiation attenuation, and to identify defects in suspect areas that could be unacceptable during processing operations. This document provides a description of this program.

Oswald, A.J.

1991-02-26

63

Cleaner production opportunity assessment for a milk processing facility.  

PubMed

Possible cleaner production (CP) opportunities for a milk processing facility were examined in this study. The CP concept and its key tools of implementation were used to assess the potential CP opportunities in the facility studied. The general production process and its resulting environmental loads were investigated by taking possible CP opportunities as the basis of study. The methodology developed for CP opportunity assessment in the milk processing facility covered two major steps: preparation of checklists to assist auditing and CP opportunity assessment, and implementation of the mass-balance analysis. For mass-balance analysis, measurements and experimental analysis of the mass flows were utilized to determine the inputs and outputs. Prepared checklists were utilized to determine waste reduction options that could be implemented. Selected opportunities were evaluated considering their environmental benefits and economic feasibility. The results of the study indicated that 50% of the service water used, 9.3% of the current wastewater (WW) discharge, 65.36% of the chemical use and the discharge of 181.9 kg/day of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 20.7 kg/day of total suspended solids (TSS) could be eliminated and 19.6% of the service water used could be recycled/reused. PMID:16945474

Ozbay, A; Demirer, G N

2007-09-01

64

Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

Sarrack, A.G.

1999-06-22

65

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup test program: Glass characterization  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual geologic disposal. Six simulated glass compositions will be processed in the DWPF during initial startup. The glass in 86 of the first 106 full sized canisters will be sampled and characterized. Extensive glass characterization will determine the following: (1) sampling frequency for radioactive operation, (2) verification of the compositionally dependent process-product models, (3) verification of melter mixing, (4) representativeness of the glass from the canister throat sampler, and (5) homogeneity of the canister glass.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-07-01

66

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup test program: Glass characterization  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual geologic disposal. Six simulated glass compositions will be processed in the DWPF during initial startup. The glass in 86 of the first 106 full sized canisters will be sampled and characterized. Extensive glass characterization will determine the following: (1) sampling frequency for radioactive operation, (2) verification of the compositionally dependent process-product models, (3) verification of melter mixing, (4) representativeness of the glass from the canister throat sampler, and (5) homogeneity of the canister glass.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-01-01

67

The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

1998-07-01

68

D-Area Moderator Processing Facility (MPF) startup plan  

SciTech Connect

This startup plan was written for the restart of the Moderator Processing Facility (MPF). The purpose of the MPF is to remove chemical contaminants from degraded process water prior to it being processed through the Rework Unit (RW). The MPF is designed to remove oil, particular matter, and ionic impurities (with the exception of mercury). Degraded process water in 55-gallon drums is charged to the system using the charging station. The process water is filtered and charged through a de-emulsifier and a decanter to remove oil. Any oil removed is collected in a 5-gallon waste oil container. The oil-free water flows by gravity into a 250-gallon receiving tank. The MPF system pump takes a suction on the receiving tank and discharges the process water through three resin columns (two anion and one cation) in series. The ion-free water from the resin columns then flows through a conductivity cell and into a 500-gallon hold tank that stores processed water. The hold tank contents are either pumped through the RW feed manifold into a predetermined RW feed tank or back to 420-2D. In 420-2D, the water is then drained to 55-gallon product drums.

Cato, D.M.

1994-04-01

69

Tributylphosphate in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A material balance investigation and evaluation of n- tributylphosphate (TBP) recycle throughout ITP and its carryover to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was performed. Criticality and DWPF-related issues were determined to pose no adverse consequences due to TBP addition. Effects of decomposition products were also considered. Flammability of 1-butanol, a TBP decomposition product, in Tank 22 was investigated. Calculations show that Tank 22 would be ventilated with air at a rate sufficient to maintain a 1-butanol concentration (volume percent) well below 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL) for 1-butanol.

Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs, D.T.; Swingle, R.F.

1993-11-23

70

Orbiter processing facility service platform failure and redesign  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a high bay of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) at the Kennedy Space Center, technicians were preparing the space shuttle orbiter Discovery for rollout to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). A service platform, commonly referred to as an OPF Bucket, was being retracted when it suddenly fell, striking a technician and impacting Discovery's payload bay door. A critical component in the OPF Bucket hoist system had failed, allowing the platform to fall. The incident was thoroughly investigated by both NASA and Lockheed, revealing many design deficiencies within the system. The deficiencies and the design changes made to correct them are reviewed.

Harris, Jesse L.

1988-01-01

71

40 CFR 372.20 - Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities. 372.20 Section...COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...20 Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities. (a) Request...

2012-07-01

72

40 CFR 372.20 - Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities. 372.20 Section...COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...20 Process for modifying covered chemicals and facilities. (a) Request...

2013-07-01

73

Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

Lambert, D.P.

2000-03-22

74

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-01-01

75

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-12-31

76

Remote lighting systems for the defense waste processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is under construction at the Savannah River Plant. In DWPF, an immobilization process solidifies radioactive waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. The mixture of waste and glass solidifies in stainless steel containers for eventual transportation to an off-site federal repository. The DWPF contains a number of hot cell canyons that are remotely maintained using only a crane and crane-held impact wrench for replacing the equipment. In general, viewing into these canyons is accomplished through shielded windows and by the use of closed-circuit television (CCTV). Demonstration of the prototype remote light fixtures for the DWPF canyon was completed in 1984, and the actual plant equipment is scheduled for completion this year.

Heckendorn, F.M.; Divona, C.J.

1986-01-01

77

Energy determination in industrial X-ray processing facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In industrial irradiation facilities, the determination of maximum photon or electron energy is important for regulated processes, such as food irradiation, and for assurance of treatment reproducibility. With electron beam irradiators, this has been done by measuring the depth-dose distribution in a homogeneous material. For X-ray irradiators, an analogous method has not yet been recommended. This paper describes a procedure suitable for typical industrial irradiation processes, which is based on common practice in the field of therapeutic X-ray treatment. It utilizes a measurement of the slope of the exponential attenuation curve of X-rays in a thick stack of polyethylene plates. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental tests have been performed to verify the suitability and accuracy of the method between 3 MeV and 8 MeV.

Cleland, M. R.; Gregoire, O.; Stichelbaut, F.; Gomola, I.; Galloway, R. A.; Schlecht, J.

2005-12-01

78

Leonardo MPLM in the Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

(Center) The Multi-Purpose Launch Module, named Leonardo, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At left is a Rack Insertion Device. Above the Leonardo are the windows of the tour room where visitors can watch the activities in the SSPF. Scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, the Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. The Leonardo is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia Aerospazio. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

1998-01-01

79

[Design of an HACCP program for a cocoa processing facility].  

PubMed

The HACCP plan is a food safety management tool used to control physical, chemical and biological hazards associated to food processing through all the processing chain. The aim of this work is to design a HACCP Plan for a Venezuelan cocoa processing facility.The production of safe food products requires that the HACCP system be built upon a solid foundation of prerequisite programs such as Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP). The existence and effectiveness of these prerequisite programs were previously assessed.Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) audit to cocoa nibs suppliers were performed. To develop the HACCP plan, the five preliminary tasks and the seven HACCP principles were accomplished according to Codex Alimentarius procedures. Three Critical Control Points (CCP) were identified using a decision tree: winnowing (control of ochratoxin A), roasting (Salmonella control) and metallic particles detection. For each CCP, Critical limits were established, the Monitoring procedures, Corrective actions, Procedures for Verification and Documentation concerning all procedures and records appropriate to these principles and their application was established. To implement and maintain a HACCP plan for this processing plant is suggested. Recently OchratoxinA (OTA) has been related to cocoa beans. Although the shell separation from the nib has been reported as an effective measure to control this chemical hazard, ochratoxin prevalence study in cocoa beans produced in the country is recommended, and validate the winnowing step as well PMID:24020255

López D'Sola, Patrizia; Sandia, María Gabriela; Bou Rached, Lizet; Hernández Serrano, Pilar

2012-12-01

80

Waste receiving and processing facility module 1, detailed design report  

SciTech Connect

WRAP 1 baseline documents which guided the technical development of the Title design included: (a) A/E Statement of Work (SOW) Revision 4C: This DOE-RL contractual document specified the workscope, deliverables, schedule, method of performance and reference criteria for the Title design preparation. (b) Functional Design Criteria (FDC) Revision 1: This DOE-RL technical criteria document specified the overall operational criteria for the facility. The document was a Revision 0 at the beginning of the design and advanced to Revision 1 during the tenure of the Title design. (c) Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) Revision 3: This baseline criteria document prepared by WHC for DOE-RL augments the FDC by providing further definition of the process, operational safety, and facility requirements to the A/E for guidance in preparing the design. The document was at a very preliminary stage at the onset of Title design and was revised in concert with the results of the engineering studies that were performed to resolve the numerous technical issues that the project faced when Title I was initiated, as well as, by requirements established during the course of the Title II design.

Not Available

1993-10-01

81

Process Technical Basis Documentation Diagram for a solid-waste processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Process Technical Basis Documentation Diagram is for a solid-waste processing facility that could be designed to treat, package, and certify contact-handled mixed low-level waste for permanent disposal. The treatment processes include stabilization using cementitious materials and immobilization using a polymer material. The Diagram identifies several engineering/demonstration activities that would confirm the process selection and process design. An independent peer review was conducted at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company to determine the technical adequacy of the technical approach for waste form development. The peer review panel provided comments and identified documents that it felt were needed in the Diagram as precedence for Title I design. The Diagram is a visual tool to identify traceable documentation of key activities, including those documents suggested by the peer review, and to show how they relate to each other. The Diagram is divided into three sections: (1) the Facility section, which contains documents pertaining to the facility design, (2) the Process Demonstration section, which contains documents pertaining to the process engineering/demonstration work, and 3) the Regulatory section, which contains documents describing the compliance strategy for each acceptance requirement for each feed type, and how this strategy will be implemented.

Benar, C.J.; Petersen, C.A.

1994-02-01

82

Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

To prepare its members for the permitting requirements under Title 5 of the Clean Act, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) commissioned a project to develop a Title 5 applicability workbook. A critical element in the preparation of the workbook was the characterization of emissions from processes and equipment typically found in the scrap metal processing industry. This paper describes the approach to the preparation of the workbook with emphasis on characterization of specific emission units which are deemed important for Title 5. The paper describes the methodology employed for acquiring existing emissions information from equipment manufacturers, vendors, and scrap recycling facility operators. The data were aggregated and analyzed to develop a variety of emission tabulations for pollutants requiring analysis under Title 5. The project also involved a survey of numerous state and local air pollution agencies to determine regulatory requirements regarding critical issues in the scrap processing industry. The paper describes a methodology for determining Title 5 applicability with emphasis on the use of emission tabulations and example worksheets. Emissions data are presented for metal shredders to demonstrate the methodology and procedures developed during the project. Finally, the paper discusses the structure of the Title 5 applicability workbook and its dissemination to a major industry trade association.

Norco, J.E. [Versar, Inc., Lombard, IL (United States); Tyler, T. [Inst. of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31

83

Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

Baxter, R.G.

1988-12-01

84

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre-decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with hotographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael Clair

2001-09-01

85

New Waste Calcining Facility Non-Radioactive Process Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a test of the New Calcining Facility (NWCF) process decontamination system. The decontamination system test occurred in December 1981, during non-radioactive testing of the NWCF. The purpose of the decontamination system test was to identify equipment whose design prevented effective calcine removal and decontamination. Effective equipment decontamination was essential to reduce radiation fields for in-cell work after radioactive processing began. The decontamination system test began with a pre-decontamination inspection of the equipment. The pre- decontamination inspection documented the initial condition and cleanliness of the equipment. It provided a basis for judging the effectiveness of the decontamination. The decontamination consisted of a series of equipment flushes using nitric acid and water. A post-decontamination equipment inspection determined the effectiveness of the decontamination. The pre-decontamination and post-decontamination equipment inspections were documented with photographs. The decontamination system was effective in removing calcine from most of the NWCF equipment as evidenced by little visible calcine residue in the equipment after decontamination. The decontamination test identified four areas where the decontamination system required improvement. These included the Calciner off-gas line, Cyclone off-gas line, fluidizing air line, and the Calciner baffle plates. Physical modifications to enhance decontamination were made to those areas, resulting in an effective NWCF decontamination system.

Swenson, Michael C.

2001-09-30

86

Building success : the role of the state in the cultural facility development process  

E-print Network

This thesis investigates the question of what is the current role of the state in the cultural facility development process, and, in light of facility-related warnings that have been made over the years, what role should ...

Choy, Carolyn (Carolyn Anne)

2007-01-01

87

Estimating and bidding for the Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This new, unique Cost Engineering Report introduces the 800-page, C-100 government estimate for the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) and Volume IV Aerospace Construction Price Book. At the January 23, 1991, bid opening for the SSPF, the government cost estimate was right on target. Metric, Inc., Prime Contractor, low bid was 1.2 percent below the government estimate. This project contains many different and complex systems. Volume IV is a summary of the cost associated with construction, activation and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) design, estimating, fabrication, installation, testing, termination, and verification of this project. Included are 13 reasons the government estimate was so accurate; abstract of bids, for 8 bidders and government estimate with additive alternates, special labor and materials, budget comparison and system summaries; and comments on the energy credit from local electrical utility. This report adds another project to our continuing study of 'How Does the Low Bidder Get Low and Make Money?' which was started in 1967, and first published in the 1973 AACE Transaction with 10 more ways the low bidder got low. The accuracy of this estimate proves the benefits of our Kennedy Space Center (KSC) teamwork efforts and KSC Cost Engineer Tools which are contributing toward our goals of the Space Station.

Brown, Joseph A.

1993-01-01

88

Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as

G. Mackiewicz-Ludtka; R. A. Raschke

1998-01-01

89

ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper provides information on the output of the Detail Design and will reflect the progress of the design work.

Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

2003-02-27

90

Methodology for Determining Increases in Radionuclide Inventories for the Effluent Treatment Facility Process  

SciTech Connect

A study is currently underway to determine if the Effluent Treatment Facility can be downgraded from a Hazard Category 3 facility to a Radiological Facility per DOE STD-1027-92. This technical report provides a methodology to determine and monitor increases in the radionuclide inventories of the ETF process columns. It also provides guidelines to ensure that other potential increases to the ETF radionuclide inventory are evaluated as required to ensure that the ETF remains a Radiological Facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-16

91

Facility Siting and Layout Optimization Based on Process Safety  

E-print Network

CFX was employed for the dispersion study and Flame Acceleration Simulator (FLACS) for the fires and explosions. In the second phase for fire and explosion scenarios, the study is focused on finding an optimal placement for hazardous facilities...

Jung, Seungho

2012-02-14

92

THERMAL HYDRAULIC PHENOMENOLOGY FOR THE HEATING PROCESS IN A NATURAL CIRCULATION FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work describes thermal hydraulic phenomenology observed for the heating process in a natural circulation facility. Glass made circuit allows observations of the thermal hydraulic processes over several regions. Natural convection, natural circulation, nucleated sub-cooled, saturated boiling and some flow patterns such as, bubbly, slug and churn flow are observed and described. Facility heated and cooled parts are responsible for

Walmir M. Torres; Luiz A. Macedo; Roberto N. Mesquita; Paulo Henrique; F. Masotti; Maria P. Libardi; Delvonei A. Andrade; Thadeu N. Conti; Mauro F. S. Filho; Gabriel R. Melo

93

Process design of oil and gas production facilities using expert systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

An expert system known as the Automated Project Design System (APDS#8482;) has been developed to assist process and facilities engineers in performing preliminary feasibility studies, optimization studies, and provide the basic information required for the initiation of the detailed design for offshore oil and gas production facilities.Given the feedstock and product specifications, the expert system produces a preliminary process flow

Hafez Aghili; George Montgomery; Al Amlani; Jatin Shah II

1988-01-01

94

Integrating Sustainability Programs into the Facilities Capital Planning Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With detailed information about the costs and benefits of potential green investments, educational facilities can effectively evaluate which initiatives will ultimately provide the greatest results over the short and long term. Based on its overall goals, every school, college, or university will have different values and therefore different…

Buchanan, Susan

2011-01-01

95

Neural information processing and self-organizing maps as a tool in safeguarding storage facilities  

SciTech Connect

Storage facilities for nuclear materials and weapons dismantlement facilities could have a large number of sensors with the potential for generating large amounts of data. Because of the anticipated complexity and diversity of the data, efficient automatic algorithms are necessary to make interpretations and ensure secure and safe operation. New, advanced safeguards systems are needed to process the information gathered from monitors and make interpretations that are in the best interests of the facility or agency. In this paper we present a conceptual design for software to assist with processing these large quantities of data from storage facilities.

Howell, J.A.; Fuyat, C.

1993-08-01

96

Evaluation of the DYMAC demonstration program. Phase III report. [LASL Plutonium Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

An accountancy system based on the Dynamic Materials Accountability (DYMAC) System has been in operation at the Plutonium Processing Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since January 1978. This system, now designated the Plutonium Facility/Los Alamos Safeguards System (PF/LASS), has enhanced nuclear material accountability and process control at the Los Alamos facility. The nondestructive assay instruments and the central computer system are operating accurately and reliably. As anticipated, several uses of the system, notably scrap control and quality control, have developed in addition to safeguards. The successes of this experiment strongly suggest that implementation of DYMAC-based systems should be attempted at other facilities.

Malanify, J.J.; Bearse, R.C. (comps.)

1980-12-31

97

30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2011-07-01

98

30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2012-07-01

99

30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

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30 CFR 947.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2014-07-01

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30 CFR 933.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

102

30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

103

30 CFR 939.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

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30 CFR 941.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

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30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

106

30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2014-07-01

107

30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2014-07-01

108

30 CFR 939.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

109

30 CFR 939.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

110

30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

111

30 CFR 937.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing plants and Support...

2010-07-01

112

30 CFR 947.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

113

30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2011-07-01

114

30 CFR 941.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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2010-07-01

115

30 CFR 912.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2011-07-01

116

30 CFR 937.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

117

30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

118

30 CFR 933.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

119

30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2013-07-01

120

30 CFR 933.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2012-07-01

121

30 CFR 941.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

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2014-07-01

122

30 CFR 922.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2012-07-01

123

30 CFR 910.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

124

30 CFR 921.827 - Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities not located at or...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Special performance standards-coal processing plants and support facilities...827 Special performance standards—coal processing plants and support facilities...Permanent Program Performance Standards—Coal Processing Plants and Support...

2010-07-01

125

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is intended to provide the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its safeguards obligations. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of IAEA safeguards as those safeguards evolve towards a “State-Level approach.” The Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept can facilitate the implementation of these effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards (Bjornard, et al. 2009a, 2009b; IAEA, 1998; Wonder & Hockert, 2011). This report, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, introduces a methodology intended to ensure that the diverse approaches to Safeguards by Design can be effectively integrated and consistently used to cost effectively enhance the application of international safeguards.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Scott J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-08-01

126

Economic comparison of centralizing or decentralizing processing facilities for defense transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This study is part of a set of analyses under direction of the Transuranic Waste Management Program designed to provide comprehensive, systematic methodology and support necessary to better understand options for national long-term management of transuranic (TRU) waste. The report summarizes activities to evaluate the economics of possible alternatives in locating facilities to process DOE-managed transuranic waste. The options considered are: (1) Facilities located at all major DOE TRU waste generating sites. (2) Two or three regional facilities. (3) Central processing facility at only one DOE site. The study concludes that processing at only one facility is the lowest cost option, followed, in order of cost, by regional then individual site processing.

Brown, C.M.

1980-07-01

127

Zero-Release Mixed Waste Process Facility Design and Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A zero-release offgas cleaning system for mixed-waste thermal treatment processes has been evaluated through experimental scoping tests and process modeling. The principles can possibly be adapted to a fluidized-bed calcination or stream reforming process, a waste melter, a rotarykiln process, and possibly other waste treatment thermal processes. The basic concept of a zero-release offgas cleaning system is to recycle the

Richard D. Boardman; John A. Deldebbio; Robert J. Kirkham; Martin K. Clemens; Robert Geosits; Ping Wan

2004-01-01

128

RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-06-25

129

FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K.

2009-01-28

130

Association between prevalent care process measures and facility-specific mortality rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Association between prevalent care process measures and facility-specific mortality rates.BackgroundMedical communities often develop practice guidelines recommending certain care processes intended to promote better clinical outcome among patients. Conformance with those guidelines by facilities is then monitored to evaluate care quality, presuming that the process is associated with and can be used reliably to predict clinical outcome. Outcome is often monitored

Edmund G. Lowrie; Ming Teng; Eduardo Lacson; Nancy Lew; J. Michael Lazarus; William F. Owen

2001-01-01

131

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01

132

Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Facility science data processing architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper describes the architecture of the Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) at Fairbanks, being developed to generate science data products for supporting research in sea ice motion, ice classification, sea-ice-ocean interaction, glacier behavior, ocean waves, and hydrological and geological study areas. Special attention is given to the individual substructures of the ASF: the Receiving Ground Station (RGS), the SAR Processor System, and the Interactive Image Analysis System. The SAR data will be linked to the RGS by the ESA ERS-1 and ERS-2, the Japanese ERS-1, and the Canadian Radarsat.

Hilland, Jeffrey E.; Bicknell, Thomas; Miller, Carol L.

1991-01-01

133

Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Workers at an Indium Processing Facility  

PubMed Central

Two cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, including one death, occurred in workers at a facility producing indium-tin oxide (ITO), a compound used in recent years to make flat panel displays. Both workers were exposed to airborne ITO dust and had indium in lung tissue specimens. One worker was tested for autoantibodies to granulocytemacrophage–colonystimulating factor (GM-CSF) and found to have an elevated level. These cases suggest that inhalational exposure to ITO causes pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, which may occur via an autoimmune mechanism. PMID:20019344

Cummings, Kristin J.; Donat, Walter E.; Ettensohn, David B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Ingram, Peter; Kreiss, Kathleen

2010-01-01

134

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed

Angelini

2004-01-01

135

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001September 30, 2002)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed

Angelini

2004-01-01

136

Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support

R. H. Hsu; A. O. Delley; G. J. Alexander; E. A. Clark; J. S. Holder; R. N. Lutz; R. A. Malstrom; B. R. Nobles; S. D. Carson; P. K. Peterson

1997-01-01

137

Solving facilities location problem in the presence of alternative processing routes using a genetic algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facilities location problem deals with the optimization of location of manufacturing facilities like machines, departments, etc. in the shop floor. This problem greatly affects performance of a manufacturing system. It is assumed in this paper that there are multiple products to be produced on several machines. Alternative processing routes are considered for each product and the problem is to determine

Maghsud Solimanpur; Mehdi A. Kamran

2010-01-01

138

Waste management, waste resource facilities and waste conversion processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, waste management concept, waste management system, biomass and bio-waste resources, waste classification, and waste management methods have been reviewed. Waste management is the collection, transport, processing, recycling or disposal, and monitoring of waste materials. A typical waste management system comprises collection, transportation, pre-treatment, processing, and final abatement of residues. The waste management system consists of the whole

Ayhan Demirbas

2011-01-01

139

Seismic Qualification Program Plan for continued operation at DOE-SRS Nuclear Material Processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Facilities for the most part were constructed and maintained to standards that were developed by Du Pont and are not rigorously in compliance with the current General Design Criteria (GDC); DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. In addition, any of the facilities were built more than 30 years ago, well before DOE standards for design were issued. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed a program to address the evaluation of the Nuclear Material Processing (NMP) facilities to GDC requirements. The program includes a facility base-line review, assessment of areas that are not in compliance with the GDC requirements, planned corrective actions or exemptions to address the requirements, and a safety assessment. The authors from their direct involvement with the Program, describe the program plan for seismic qualification including other natural phenomena hazards for existing NMP facility structures to continue operation. Professionals involved in similar effort at other DOE facilities may find the program useful.

Talukdar, B.K.; Kennedy, W.N.

1991-01-01

140

Seismic Qualification Program Plan for continued operation at DOE-SRS Nuclear Material Processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Facilities for the most part were constructed and maintained to standards that were developed by Du Pont and are not rigorously in compliance with the current General Design Criteria (GDC); DOE Order 6430.1A requirements. In addition, any of the facilities were built more than 30 years ago, well before DOE standards for design were issued. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has developed a program to address the evaluation of the Nuclear Material Processing (NMP) facilities to GDC requirements. The program includes a facility base-line review, assessment of areas that are not in compliance with the GDC requirements, planned corrective actions or exemptions to address the requirements, and a safety assessment. The authors from their direct involvement with the Program, describe the program plan for seismic qualification including other natural phenomena hazards for existing NMP facility structures to continue operation. Professionals involved in similar effort at other DOE facilities may find the program useful.

Talukdar, B.K.; Kennedy, W.N.

1991-12-31

141

7 CFR 319.40-8 - Processing at facilities operating under compliance agreements.  

...ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Logs, Lumber, and Other Wood Articles § 319.40-8 Processing at facilities operating under compliance agreements. (a) Any person...

2014-01-01

142

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate ...

G. Byrd, L. Pounds, M. Peterson, M. C. Wiest, N. Giffen, S. Reasor

2009-01-01

143

Stochastic Programming Approaches for the Placement of Gas Detectors in Process Facilities  

E-print Network

The release of flammable and toxic chemicals in petrochemical facilities is a major concern when designing modern process safety systems. While the proper selection of the necessary types of gas detectors needed is important, appropriate placement...

Legg, Sean W

2013-05-21

144

Onboard Experiment Data Support Facility. Task 2 Report: Definition of Onboard Processing Requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The onboard experiment data support facility (OEDSF) will provide data processing support to various experiment payloads on board the space shuttle. The OEDSF study will define the conceptual design and generate specifications for an OEDSF which will meet...

1976-01-01

145

10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for processing access permittees for security facility approval. 1016.8 Section 1016.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL...SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for...

2010-01-01

146

10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for processing access permittees for security facility approval. 1016.8 Section 1016.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL...SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for...

2013-01-01

147

10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.  

...for processing access permittees for security facility approval. 1016.8 Section 1016.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL...SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for...

2014-01-01

148

10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for processing access permittees for security facility approval. 1016.8 Section 1016.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL...SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for...

2011-01-01

149

10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for processing access permittees for security facility approval. 1016.8 Section 1016.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL...SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for...

2012-01-01

150

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10

151

Plutonium production story at the Hanford site: processes and facilities history  

SciTech Connect

This document tells the history of the actual plutonium production process at the Hanford Site. It contains five major sections: Fuel Fabrication Processes, Irradiation of Nuclear Fuel, Spent Fuel Handling, Radiochemical Reprocessing of Irradiated Fuel, and Plutonium Finishing Operations. Within each section the story of the earliest operations is told, along with changes over time until the end of operations. Chemical and physical processes are described, along with the facilities where these processes were carried out. This document is a processes and facilities history. It does not deal with the waste products of plutonium production.

Gerber, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-20

152

Lax regulation of oil vessels and processing facilities continues  

SciTech Connect

Four years after the grounding of the Exxon Valdez on Bligh Reef in 1989, oil spills continue to occur with alarming frequency: In 1992 the Shoko Maru spilled more than 96,000 gallons of crude oil into the Texas City Channel and a leak at an offshore well in Louisiana spilled at least 30,000 gallons; in 1991 alone, there were 677 spills in the Port of New Orleans, 398 spills in New York Harbor, 239 spills in Port of Hampton Roads, 235 spills in Port of Philadelphia, 130 spills in Seattle, and 116 spills in Boston Harbor. The amount of oil spilled in these ports alone in one year exceeded 300,000 gallons. The recent huge spills off foreign coasts-the Shetland Islands, the coasts of Spain and Indonesia-reinforce the importance of regulation. The Oil Pollution Act, passed in August 1992 mandates that all vessels traveling in US waters and all oil transfer and storage facilities take measurable and enforceable actions to reduce spills. However, major problems remain, both with the act and with enforcing it. This article discusses both the problems and the solutions to pollution control of oil spills.

Sankovitch, N.

1993-12-31

153

10 CFR 70.72 - Facility changes and change process.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...required to be submitted in accordance with § 70...The licensee may make changes to the site, structures...Commission approval, if the change: (1) Does not...previously been described in the integrated safety...Use new processes, technologies, or control...

2012-01-01

154

10 CFR 70.72 - Facility changes and change process.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...required to be submitted in accordance with § 70...The licensee may make changes to the site, structures...Commission approval, if the change: (1) Does not...previously been described in the integrated safety...Use new processes, technologies, or control...

2011-01-01

155

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility  

E-print Network

of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to directly impact national energy security by redefining.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. #12;#12;Table

156

Grout pump selection process for the Transportable Grout Facility  

SciTech Connect

Selected low-level radioactive liquid wastes at Hanford will be disposed by grouting. Grout is formed by mixing the liquid wastes with solid materials, including Portland cement, fly ash, and clay. The mixed grouts will be pumped to disposal sites (e.g., trenches and buried structures) where the grout will be allowed to harden and, thereby, immobilize the wastes. A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) will be constructed and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to perform the grouting function. A critical component of the TGF is the grout pump. A preliminary review of pumping requirements identified reciprocating pumps and progressive cavity pumps as the two classes of pumps best suited for the application. The advantages and disadvantages of specific types of pumps within these two classes were subsequently investigated. As a result of this study, the single-screw, rotary positive displacement pump was identified as the best choice for the TGF application. This pump has a simple design, is easy to operate, is rugged, and is suitable for a radioactive environment. It produces a steady, uniform flow that simplifies suction and discharge piping requirements. This pump will likely require less maintenance than reciprocating pumps and can be disassembled rapidly and decontaminated easily. If the TGF should eventually require discharge pressures in excess of 500 psi, a double-acting duplex piston pump is recommended because it can operate at low speed, with only moderate flow rate fluctuations. However, the check valves, stuffing box, piston, suction, and discharge piping must be designed carefully to allow trouble-free operations.

McCarthy, D.; Treat, R.L.

1985-01-01

157

Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world`s largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running experiment This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The system architecture integrates high-performance array processors, matrix switches, signal conditioning amplifiers, antialiasing filter subsystems, high-precision analog-to-digital subsystems, high-performance data disks, and support equipment The hardware and software architecture with its distributed computers and distributed real-time data base, the signal processing algorithms and architecture, and the flexible user interface for facility and measurements integration are described in this paper.

Manges, W.W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J.T.; Breeding, J.E.; Jansen, J.M. Jr.; Tate, R.M.; Bentz, R.R.

1992-12-31

158

Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world's largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running experiment This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The system architecture integrates high-performance array processors, matrix switches, signal conditioning amplifiers, antialiasing filter subsystems, high-precision analog-to-digital subsystems, high-performance data disks, and support equipment The hardware and software architecture with its distributed computers and distributed real-time data base, the signal processing algorithms and architecture, and the flexible user interface for facility and measurements integration are described in this paper.

Manges, W.W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J.T.; Breeding, J.E.; Jansen, J.M. Jr.; Tate, R.M.; Bentz, R.R.

1992-01-01

159

Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

Landon, L.F. (comp.)

1980-05-01

160

Absence of high-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci isolated from meat-processing facilities.  

PubMed

Enterococci isolated from packaging areas of meat-processing facilities that produce ready-to-eat meat products were examined for high-level vancomycin resistance. A total of 406 enterococci isolates from the plants' packaging areas were examined for vancomycin resistance. High-level vancomycin resistance was not demonstrated in any enterococci isolated from 12 meat-processing plants. PMID:11747735

Bodnaruk, P W; Krakar, P J; Tompkin, R B

2001-01-01

161

Nuclear Solid Waste Processing Design at the Idaho Spent Fuels Facility  

SciTech Connect

A spent nuclear fuels (SNF) repackaging and storage facility was designed for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with nuclear solid waste processing capability. Nuclear solid waste included contaminated or potentially contaminated spent fuel containers, associated hardware, machinery parts, light bulbs, tools, PPE, rags, swabs, tarps, weld rod, and HEPA filters. Design of the nuclear solid waste processing facilities included consideration of contractual, regulatory, ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) exposure, economic, logistical, and space availability requirements. The design also included non-attended transfer methods between the fuel packaging area (FPA) (hot cell) and the waste processing area. A monitoring system was designed for use within the FPA of the facility, to pre-screen the most potentially contaminated fuel canister waste materials, according to contact- or non-contact-handled capability. Fuel canister waste materials which are not able to be contact-handled after attempted decontamination will be processed remotely and packaged within the FPA. Noncontact- handled materials processing includes size-reduction, as required to fit into INEEL permitted containers which will provide sufficient additional shielding to allow contact handling within the waste areas of the facility. The current design, which satisfied all of the requirements, employs mostly simple equipment and requires minimal use of customized components. The waste processing operation also minimizes operator exposure and operator attendance for equipment maintenance. Recently, discussions with the INEEL indicate that large canister waste materials can possibly be shipped to the burial facility without size-reduction. New waste containers would have to be designed to meet the drop tests required for transportation packages. The SNF waste processing facilities could then be highly simplified, resulting in capital equipment cost savings, operational time savings, and significantly improved ALARA exposure.

Dippre, M. A.

2003-02-25

162

Nonradioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) is to examine assay, characterize, treat, and repackage solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. WRAP 1 will contain equipment and facilities necessary for non-destructive examination (NDE) of wastes and to perform a non-destructive examination assay (NDA) of the total radionuclide content of the wastes, without opening the outer container (e.g., 55-gal drum). WRAP 1 will also be equipped to open drums which do not meet waste acceptance and shipping criteria, and to perform limited physical treatment of the wastes to ensure that storage, shipping, and disposal criteria are met. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and transuranic and low level mixed wastes (LLMW). The WRAP 1 facility will only accept contact handler (CH) waste containers. A Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (TBACT) assessment has been completed for the WRAP 1 facility (WHC 1993). Because toxic emissions from the WRAP 1 facility are sufficiently low and do not pose any health or safety concerns to the public, no controls for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and installation of HEPA filters for particulates satisfy TBACT for the facility.

Not Available

1993-02-01

163

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for Characterization of the 224-T Facility Process Cells  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for entering and characterizing the 224-T Facility process cells. The 224-T Facility is a small canyon building with six process cells separated from three levels of operating galleries by a 0.3-meter thick concrete wall. The original mission was to concentrate dilute solutions of plutonium received from the 221-T Plutonium Separation Facility from 1945 until 1956. Various shutdown activities were carried out including flushing the tanks and piping during the 1960s. During the second mission from 1975 to 1985, the operating gallery areas of the structure were converted into a storage area for plutonium-bearing scrap and liquids. The third and final mission converted the operating galleries for use as the 224-T Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (224-T TRUSAF). All stored waste from the gallery areas was removed in the late 1990s. The process cells were not considered part of the waste storage areas and were isolated from storage activities. The 224-T Facility has been excessed with no anticipated plans for further missions. The purpose of the characterization effort is to determine the condition and contents of the cells, tanks, and vessels. This information is needed to update the Facility's Authorization Basis, maintain appropriate managing practices, and ensure there is no potential threat to the public or environment. The information also will be used to establish operational criteria for the decontamination and decommissioning of this facility. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from characterization of the 224-T process cells is 7.37 E-03 millirem per year.

HOMAN, N.A.

2001-03-14

164

Onboard experiment data support facility. Task 2 report: Definition of onboard processing requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The onboard experiment data support facility (OEDSF) will provide data processing support to various experiment payloads on board the space shuttle. The OEDSF study will define the conceptual design and generate specifications for an OEDSF which will meet the following objectives: (1) provide a cost-effective approach to end-to-end processing requirements, (2) service multiple disciplines (3) satisfy user needs, (4) reduce the amount and improve the quality of data collected, stored and processed, and (5) embody growth capacity.

1976-01-01

165

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

Not Available

1994-03-01

166

How work context affects operating room processes: using data mining and computer simulation to analyze facility and process design.  

PubMed

The complexity of the operating room (OR) requires that both structural (eg, department layout) and behavioral (eg, staff interactions) patterns of work be considered when developing quality improvement strategies. In our study, we investigated how these contextual factors influence outpatient OR processes and the quality of care delivered. The study setting was a German university-affiliated hospital performing approximately 6000 outpatient surgeries annually. During the 3-year-study period, the hospital significantly changed its outpatient OR facility layout from a decentralized (ie, ORs in adjacent areas of the building) to a centralized (ie, ORs in immediate vicinity of each other) design. To study the impact of the facility change on OR processes, we used a mixed methods approach, including process analysis, process modeling, and social network analysis of staff interactions. The change in facility layout was seen to influence OR processes in ways that could substantially affect patient outcomes. For example, we found a potential for more errors during handovers in the new centralized design due to greater interdependency between tasks and staff. Utilization of the mixed methods approach in our analysis, as compared with that of a single assessment method, enabled a deeper understanding of the OR work context and its influence on outpatient OR processes. PMID:19851238

Baumgart, André; Denz, Christof; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Schleppers, Alexander

2009-01-01

167

Facilities face challenges of process safety and risk management planning rules  

SciTech Connect

Two regulatory programs--The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) process safety management standard and the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed risk management program--were developed to prevent and minimize the consequences of such catastrophic accidents as the toxic gas release in Bhopal, India. The process safety standard, issued as part of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, is designed to protect employees from workplace accidents; the risk management program, proposed under the Clean Air Act, is meant to protect the public from accidents at nearby facilities. OSHA estimates that the process safety standard will save industry $2 billion during the next 10 years by preventing accidents and reducing downtime. However, the agency also predicts that nearly 25,000 facilities in 127 industries, from petroleum and chemical facilities to pulp and paper plants, must comply with the standard at annual costs of $900 million for the first five years and $1.3 billion over 10 years. EPA estimates that about 140,000 facilities would be affected by the proposed risk management rule, which would cover facilities with threshold quantities of 77 toxic substances and 63 flammable substances.

Smith, D.; Heinold, D. (ENSR Consulting Engineering, Boston, MA (United States))

1994-08-01

168

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

SciTech Connect

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2013-01-26

169

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

SciTech Connect

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-11-09

170

Ecological survey for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes the results of field ecological surveys conducted by the Center for Integrated Environmental Technologies (CIET) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) at four candidate locations for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of these surveys was to comply with all Federal laws

Hoskinson

1994-01-01

171

A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water  

E-print Network

by the mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has opened doors for new innovations to few-layer graphene3 especially on large area substrates. These methods include reduction of graphiteA facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water Priti

Deshmukh, Mandar M.

172

Project management plan, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1, Project W-026  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Project (WRAP 1) has been established to support the retrieval and final disposal of approximately 400K grams of plutonium and quantities of hazardous components currently stored in drums at the Hanford Site.

Starkey, J.G.

1993-05-01

173

SOLVING A DISTRIBUTION FACILITY LOCATION PROBLEM USING AN ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: This paper deals with an integrated decision model for determining the location of distribution facilities. As aids in making distribution location decisions, use of decision factor analysis and the analytic hierarchy process is proposed. The location decision model includes a criterion set having 20 criteria divided in 5 groups. For this study, a questionnaire was developed and given to

Jesuk Ko

2005-01-01

174

The Impacts of Uranium and Thorium on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) vitrifies high level liquid waste (HLLW) into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal. The viscosity of the borosilicate glass melt as a function of temperature is the single most important variable affecting the melt rate and pour ability of the glass. The viscosity determines the rate of

2005-01-01

175

Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix E: Experiment M512 Materials processing facility (MSFC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses for Experiment M512, Materials Processing Facility (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditions are presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

Thomas, O. H., Jr.

1973-01-01

176

COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR SAMPLING BACTERIA AT SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report is an assessment of the field sampling methodologies used to measure concentrations of airborne bacteria and viruses in and around waste handling and processing facilities. The sampling methods are discussed as well as the problems encountered and subsequent changes ma...

177

Shield verification testing at the Idaho chemical processing plant; Fuel processing facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that a Shield Testing Program is being conducted at a new nuclear facility to verify that shield walls, doors, and windows meet the design criteria for radiation attenuation. A modified Teletherapy Unit is being utilized as a test unit. This unit has been successfully used for shield testing during the construction of two other major facilities. A collimated beam from a Co{sup 60} source is exposed on one side of the shield being tested, and the attenuated radiation is measured with a standard radiation detector. Detailed documentation is completed for each area tested. Detailed procedures are required for operation of the test unit. No significant personnel exposure has been recorded during any of the shield testing. The Co{sup 60} test method is a known, proven technique that provides the required penetration and the capability to cover relatively large areas with a single exposure.

Oswald, A.J. (Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01

178

Identification of Process Energy and Pollution Reduction Opportunities at DoD Industrial Facilities  

E-print Network

D, surveys of numerous individual installations are needed. In a recent study W researchers at the Institute for Defense Analysis (IDA) attempted to define the potential for energy reduction in DoD industrial processes with energy conservation measures... identified by the IDA study [J], which was more concerned with process facility energy savings. Table 5 shows the estimated pollution abatement associated with the savings in energy consumption resulting from the implementation ofECOs for all Do...

Lin, M. C.; Northrup, J. I.; Smith, E. D.

179

Safeguards design strategies: designing and constructing new uranium and plutonium processing facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) is transforming its outdated and oversized complex of aging nuclear material facilities into a smaller, safer, and more secure National Security Enterprise (NSE). Environmental concerns, worker health and safety risks, material security, reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy while maintaining the capability for an effective nuclear deterrence by the United States, are influencing this transformation. As part of the nation's Uranium Center of Excellence (UCE), the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, will advance the U.S.'s capability to meet all concerns when processing uranium and is located adjacent to the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF), designed for consolidated storage of enriched uranium. The HEUMF became operational in March 2010, and the UPF is currently entering its final design phase. The designs of both facilities are for meeting anticipated security challenges for the 21st century. For plutonium research, development, and manufacturing, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) building at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico is now under construction. The first phase of the CMRR Project is the design and construction of a Radiological Laboratory/Utility/Office Building. The second phase consists of the design and construction of the Nuclear Facility (NF). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) selected these two sites as part of the national plan to consolidate nuclear materials, provide for nuclear deterrence, and nonproliferation mission requirements. This work examines these two projects independent approaches to design requirements, and objectives for safeguards, security, and safety (3S) systems as well as the subsequent construction of these modern processing facilities. Emphasis is on the use of Safeguards-by-Design (SBD), incorporating Systems Engineering (SE) principles for these two projects.

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Jon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-28

180

A history of major Hanford facilities and processes involving radioactive material. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established in 1987 to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. Hanford Site operations began in 1944 to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons. This effort included fabricating fuel elements, irradiating the fuel in nuclear reactors, and separating the resulting plutonium from uranium and fission byproducts. To build a foundation for the first step in estimating radiation doses, HEDR staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory compiled and summarized historical information that describes the processes and facilities in which radioactive material was generated or used at the Hanford Site. This document categorizes nuclear operations under six processes: fuel fabrication, reactor operations, fuel separations, plutonium finishing, research and development, and tank farms and waste recovery. Historical emission controls and effluent monitoring are discussed for each process. Because Hanford Site operations used the first large-scale nuclear facilities of their kind, process development and effluent control measures evolved as knowledge about the processes improved. Over the years, facilities were added or modified to improve processes, accelerate production, and better control emissions to the environment. 25 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Ballinger, M.Y.; Hall, R.B.

1991-03-01

181

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1: Volume 6, Engineering assessments  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the ability of the WRAP Module 1 Facility to achieve the required material throughput by developing a time and motion simulation model of the facility using the WITNESS Simulation Program. Analysis of the simulation model indicated that the required throughput of 6825 drums per year based on working 5.5 hours in the Shipping Receiving and Waste Process areas and 7 hours in the NDA/NDE area for 175 days a year, as stated in the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) Rev. 1 and Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) Rev. 1, can be achieved.

Not Available

1992-03-01

182

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1: Volume 6, Engineering assessments  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the ability of the WRAP Module 1 Facility to achieve the required material throughput by developing a time and motion simulation model of the facility using the WITNESS Simulation Program. Analysis of the simulation model indicated that the required throughput of 6825 drums per year based on working 5.5 hours in the Shipping & Receiving and Waste Process areas and 7 hours in the NDA/NDE area for 175 days a year, as stated in the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) Rev. 1 and Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) Rev. 1, can be achieved.

Not Available

1992-03-01

183

Use of process monitoring for verifying facility design of large-scale reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

During the decade of the 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) faces the challenge of implementing safeguards in large, new reprocessing facilities. The Agency will be involved in the design, construction, checkout and initial operation of these new facilities to ensure effective safeguards are implemented. One aspect of the Agency involvement is in the area of design verification. The United States Support Program has initiated a task to develop methods for applying process data collection and validation during the cold commissioning phase of plant construction. This paper summarizes the results of this task. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Hakkila, E.A.; Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ehinger, M.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Franssen, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01

184

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)  

SciTech Connect

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge, while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27

185

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary User Centers including: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing including (extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, high density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials data bases. A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state of the art materials characterization capabilities, high performance computing, to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized User-submitted Proposal and a User Agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provides free of charge while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27

186

SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT & M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI!ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized.

RYAN GW

2008-04-25

187

Waste Analysis Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for dangerous, mixed, and radioactive waste accepted for confirmation, nondestructive examination (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA), repackaging, certification, and/or storage at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Mixed and/or radioactive waste is treated at WRAP. WRAP is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

TRINER, G.C.

1999-11-01

188

Electromagnetic containerless processing requirements and recommended facility concept and capabilities for space lab  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Containerless melting, reaction, and solidification experiments and processes which potentially can lead to new understanding of material science and production of new or improved materials in the weightless space environment are reviewed in terms of planning for spacelab. Most of the experiments and processes discussed are amenable to the employment of electromagnetic position control and electromagnetic induction or electron beam heating and melting. The spectrum of relevant properties of materials, which determine requirements for a space laboratory electromagnetic containerless processing facility are reviewed. Appropriate distributions and associated coil structures are analyzed and compared on the basis of efficiency, for providing the functions of position sensing, control, and induction heating. Several coil systems are found capable of providing these functions. Exchangeable modular coils in appropriate sizes are recommended to achieve the maximum power efficiencies, for a wide range of specimen sizes and resistivities, in order to conserve total facility power.

Frost, R. T.; Bloom, H. L.; Napaluch, L. J.; Stockhoff, E. H.; Wouch, G.

1974-01-01

189

A preliminary study on the safeguardability of a Korean advanced pyro-processing facility (KAPF)  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study on the safeguardability of the Korean Advanced Pyro-processing Facility (KAPF) was performed. The main processes of the facility include voloxidation, electrolytic reduction, electrorefining, electrowinning, and salt recycling with a transuranic (TRU) recovery process. The subprocesses and material flow of the conceptually designed KAPF with a unit capacity of 100 tHM/year were analysed, and subsequently, the relevant material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) were designed for material accounting. Uncertainty in material accounting was evaluated with designed MBA and KMP, together with measurement uncertainties of analytic methods identified for the KAPF. It was found that the major safeguards challenges were Pu input accountability and U/Pu inventory measurement at each subprocess. The continuous association of Pu with Cm presents measurement options in both cases. It was concluded that a safeguards system for the KAPF could be designed to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's comprehensive safeguards objective. (authors)

Lee, S.Y.; Thomas, K.E.; Marlow, J.B.; Menlove, H.O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS E-540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ko, W.I.; Yang, M.S.; Park, S.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yusong, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01

190

Do high rates of OSCAR deficiencies prompt improved nursing facility processes and outcomes?  

PubMed

Recently, some researchers have argued that high state rates of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) nursing facility deficiencies indicate stringent enforcement, leaving the impression of better-quality care soon to follow; others maintain that the rank ordering of states' quality of nursing facility care remains fairly constant, resting on deep-seated state characteristics that change slowly, so that short-term improvement in poor-quality care is unlikely. The authors examine change in the process and outcome quality of states' Medicare nursing facility long-term care programs across 1999 to 2005, using linear and two-stage least squares regression. They find that (1) nationally, process quality generally falls across this period while outcome quality generally increases; (2) neither a prominent enforcement stringency index nor state culture, a relatively stable state characteristic, exerts much influence on state process and outcome quality scores over time, but (3) the relative costs and benefits for CMS compliance appear to contribute to explaining change in states' quality of resident outcomes over time; and (4) states' process quality is much less stable than outcome quality, and outcome indices distinct from OSCAR deficiency data provide more reliable and possibly more valid measures of care quality. PMID:21985066

Klopfenstein, Kristin; Lockhart, Charles; Giles-Sims, Jean

2011-10-01

191

Bit error rate performance of Image Processing Facility high density tape recorders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Image Processing Facility at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center uses High Density Tape Recorders (HDTR's) to transfer high volume image data and ancillary information from one system to another. For ancillary information, it is required that very low bit error rates (BER's) accompany the transfers. The facility processes about 10 to the 11th bits of image data per day from many sensors, involving 15 independent processing systems requiring the use of HDTR's. When acquired, the 16 HDTR's offered state-of-the-art performance of 1 x 10 to the -6th BER as specified. The BER requirement was later upgraded in two steps: (1) incorporating data randomizing circuitry to yield a BER of 2 x 10 to the -7th and (2) further modifying to include a bit error correction capability to attain a BER of 2 x 10 to the -9th. The total improvement factor was 500 to 1. Attention is given here to the background, technical approach, and final results of these modifications. Also discussed are the format of the data recorded by the HDTR, the magnetic tape format, the magnetic tape dropout characteristics as experienced in the Image Processing Facility, the head life history, and the reliability of the HDTR's.

Heffner, P.

1981-01-01

192

Variable frequency microwave (VFM) processing facilities and application in processing thermoplastic matrix composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microwave processing of materials is a relatively new technology advancement alternative that provides new approaches for enhancing material properties as well as economic advantages through energy savings and accelerated product development. Factors that hinder the use of microwaves in materials processing are declining, so that prospect for the development of this technology seem to be very promising [1]. The two

H. S. Ku; F. Siu; E. Siores; J. A. R. Ball

2003-01-01

193

Variable Frequency Microwave (VFM) Processing Facilities and Application in Processing Thermoplastic Matrix Composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microwave processing of materials is a relatively new technology advancement alternative that provides new approaches for enhancing material properties as well as economic advantages through energy savings and accelerated product development. Factors that hinder the use of microwaves in materials processing are declining, so that prospect for the development of this technology seem to be very promising (1). The two

Faculty H S Ku; F Siu; E Siores; J A R Ball; A S Blicblau

194

Advanced technologies for maintenance of electrical systems and equipment at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enhanced maintenance program is being established to characterize and monitor cables, components, and process response at the Savannah River Site, Defense Waste Processing Facility. This facility was designed and constructed to immobilize the radioactive waste currently stored in underground storage tanks and is expected to begin operation in 1993. The plant is initiating the program to baseline and monitor

R. O. Husler; T. J. Weir

1991-01-01

195

The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

1995-03-01

196

Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

Forest, Cary B.

2013-09-19

197

Critical Protection Item Classification for a waste processing facility at Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

As a part of its compliance with the Department of Energy requirements for safety of nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) assigns functional classifications to structures, systems and components (SSCs). As a result, changes in design, operations, maintenance, testing, and inspections of SSCs are performed and backfit requirements are established. This paper describes the Critical Protection Item (CPI) Classification for waste processing facility (WPF) at SRS. The descriptions of the WPF and the processes considered are provided elsewhere. The proposed CPI classification methodology includes the evaluation of the onsite radiological consequences, and the onsite and offsite non-radiological consequences from postulated accidents at the WPF, and comparison of these consequences with allowable frequency-dependent limits. When allowable limits are exceeded, CPIs are identified for accident mitigation.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Garrett, R.J. [ABB Government Services, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-12-31

198

Payload/GSE/data system interface: Users guide for the VPF (Vertical Processing Facility)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Payload/GSE/data system interface users guide for the Vertical Processing Facility is presented. The purpose of the document is three fold. First, the simulated Payload and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Data System Interface, which is also known as the payload T-0 (T-Zero) System is described. This simulated system is located with the Cargo Integration Test Equipment (CITE) in the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF) that is located in the KSC Industrial Area. The actual Payload T-0 System consists of the Orbiter, Mobile Launch Platforms (MLPs), and Launch Complex (LC) 39A and B. This is referred to as the Pad Payload T-0 System (Refer to KSC-DL-116 for Pad Payload T-0 System description). Secondly, information is provided to the payload customer of differences between this simulated system and the actual system. Thirdly, a reference guide of the VPF Payload T-0 System for both KSC and payload customer personnel is provided.

1993-01-01

199

Integrating the analytic hierarchy process andgraph theory to model facilities layout  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a trend in the research of facilities planning away from single-objective facilitieslayout techniques to multiple-objective\\u000a methods. In this spirit, we introduce a new way ofrecognizing the multi-criteria nature of layout design. We integrate the\\u000a Analytic HierarchyProcess with a graph theoretic-based DSS for producing a scaled block plan. The paper alsoreports on the\\u000a application of this approach in designing

Les R. Foulds; Fariborz Y. Partovi

1998-01-01

200

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory has completed 10 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) on the Savannah River Site. This progress report examines water quality studies on streams peripheral to the DWPF construction site and examines the effectiveness of refuge ponds'' in ameliorating the effects of construction on local amphibians. Individual papers on these topics are indexed separately. 93 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs. (MHB)

Scott, D.E.; Pechmann, J.H.K.; Knox, J.N.; Estes, R.A.; McGregor, J.H.; Bailey, K. (ed.)

1988-12-01

201

Process-related risk of beryllium sensitization and disease in a copper-beryllium alloy facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), which primarily affects the lungs, occurs in sensitized beryllium-exposed individuals. At a copper-beryllium alloy strip and wire finishing facility we performed a cross-sectional survey to examine prevalences of beryllium sensitization and CBD, and relationships between sensitization and CBD and work areas\\/processes. Methods Current employees (185) were offered beryllium lymphocyte proliferation testing (BeLPT) for sensitization, clinical

Christine R. Schuler; Michael S. Kent; David C. Deubner; Michael T. Berakis; Michael McCawley; Paul K. Henneberger; Milton D. Rossman; Kathleen Kreiss

2005-01-01

202

Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

Shanahan, K.L.

1992-02-01

203

A process for establishing a financial assurance plan for LLW disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a process by which an effective financial assurance program can be developed for new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The report identifies examples of activities that might cause financial losses and the types of losses they might create, discusses mechanisms that could be used to quantify and ensure against the various types of potential losses identified and describes a decision process to formulate a financial assurance program that takes into account the characteristics of both the potential losses and available mechanisms. A sample application of the concepts described in the report is provided.

Smith, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). National Low-Level Waste Management Program

1993-04-01

204

DOE final report, phase one startup, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)  

SciTech Connect

This document is to validate that the WRAP facility is physically ready to start up phase 1, and that the managers and operators are prepared to safely manage and operate the facility when all pre-start findings have been satisfactorily corrected. The DOE Readiness Assessment (RA) team spent a week on-site at Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP-1) to validate the readiness for phase 1 start up of facility. The Contractor and DOE staff were exceptionally cooperative and contributed significantly to the overall success of the RA. The procedures and Conduct of Operations areas had significant discrepancies, many of which should have been found by the contractor review team. In addition the findings of the contractor review team should have led the WRAP-1 management team to correcting the root causes of the findings prior to the DOE RA team review. The findings and observations include many issues that the team believes should have been found by the contractor review and corrective actions taken. A significantly improved Operational Readiness Review (ORR) process and corrective actions of root causes must be fully implemented by the contractor prior to the performance of the contractor ORR for phase 2 operations. The pre-start findings as a result of this independent DOE Readiness Assessment are presented.

Jasen, W.G.

1998-01-07

205

Solid waste facilities location using of analytical network process and data envelopment analysis approaches.  

PubMed

Selection of the appropriate site for solid waste facilities is a complex problem and requires an extensive evaluation process, because it is very difficult to develop a selection criterion that can precisely describe the preference of one location over another. Therefore selection of these sites can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision-making or multiple attributes decision-making problem. For this purpose, we propose a technique that can effectively take managerial preferences and subjective data into consideration, along with quantitative factors. The tool proposed here relies on the use of the analytical network process (ANP) and to help integrate managerial evaluations into a more quantitatively based decision tool, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is applied. In this paper, a location selection procedure is presented to construct an undesirable facility applying ANP and DEA approaches in two stages. In the first stage ANP approach is used, results of this stage are inputs for the second stage. In this stage, DEA is applied to select the best location. Finally, to illustrate the proposed framework, at "Results and discussion" section, a total of four undesirable facility locations are evaluated. PMID:22382043

Khadivi, M R; Fatemi Ghomi, S M T

2012-06-01

206

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

SciTech Connect

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14

207

Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

2004-01-01

208

Darlington tritium removal facility and station upgrading plant dynamic process simulation  

SciTech Connect

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station has been operating a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and a D{sub 2}O station Upgrading Plant (SUP) since 1989. Both facilities were designed with a Distributed Control System (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC) for process control. This control system was replaced with a DCS only, in 1998. A dynamic plant simulator was developed for the Darlington TRF (DTRF) and the SUP, as part of the computer control system replacement. The simulator was used to test the new software, required to eliminate the PLCs. The simulator is now used for operator training and testing of process control software changes prior to field installation. Dynamic simulation will be essential for the ITER isotope separation system, where the process is more dynamic than the relatively steady-state DTRF process. This paper describes the development and application of the DTRF and SUP dynamic simulator, its benefits, architecture, and the operational experience with the simulator. (authors)

Busigin, A. [NITEK USA, Inc., 6405 NW 77 PL, Parkland, FL 33067 (United States); Williams, G. I. D.; Wong, T. C. W.; Kulczynski, D.; Reid, A. [Ontario Power Generation Nuclear, Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15

209

Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed experimental work, additional data analysis, and future modeling programs. These proposals have led to recent investigations into the mercury issue and the effect of co-precipitating noble metals which will be documented in two separate reports. SRS hydrogen generation work since 2002 will also be collected and summarized in a future report on the effect of noble metal-sludge matrix interactions on hydrogen generation. Other potential factors for experimental investigation include sludge composition variations related to both the washing process and to the insoluble species with particular attention given to the role of silver and to improving the understanding of the interaction of nitrite ion with the noble metals.

Koopman, D. C.

2004-12-31

210

First Results from the CARIBU Facility: Mass Measurements on the r-Process Path  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the Sn132 double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A=135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

Van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Bertone, P. F.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Morgan, G. E.; Orford, R.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.

2013-08-01

211

Design of a lunar propellant processing facility. NASA/USRA advanced program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mankind's exploration of space will eventually lead to the establishment of a permanent human presence on the Moon. Essential to the economic viability of such an undertaking will be prudent utilization of indigenous lunar resources. The design of a lunar propellant processing system is presented. The system elements include facilities for ore processing, ice transportation, water splitting, propellant storage, personnel and materials transportation, human habitation, power generation, and communications. The design scenario postulates that ice is present in the lunar polar regions, and that an initial lunar outpost was established. Mining, ore processing, and water transportation operations are located in the polar regions. Water processing and propellant storage facilities are positioned near the equator. A general description of design operations is outlined below. Regolith containing the ice is mined from permanently-shaded polar craters. Water is separated from the ore using a microwave processing technique, and refrozen into projectiles for launch to the equatorial site via railgun. A mass-catching device retrieves the ice. This ice is processed using fractional distillation to remove impurities, and the purified liquid water is fed to an electrolytic cell that splits the water into vaporous hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen and oxygen are condensed and stored separately in a tank farm. Electric power for all operations is supplied by SP-100 nuclear reactors. Transportation of materials and personnel is accomplished primarily using chemical rockets. Modular living habitats are used which provide flexibility for the placement and number of personnel. A communications system consisting of lunar surface terminals, a lunar relay satellite, and terrestrial surface stations provides capabilities for continuous Moon-Moon and Moon-Earth transmissions of voice, picture, and data.

Batra, Rajesh; Bell, Jason; Campbell, J. Matt; Cash, Tom; Collins, John; Dailey, Brian; France, Angelique; Gareau, Will; Gleckler, Mark; Hamilton, Charles

1993-01-01

212

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08

213

Design analysis of levitation facility for space processing applications. [Skylab program, space shuttles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Containerless processing facilities for the space laboratory and space shuttle are defined. Materials process examples representative of the most severe requirements for the facility in terms of electrical power, radio frequency equipment, and the use of an auxiliary electron beam heater were used to discuss matters having the greatest effect upon the space shuttle pallet payload interfaces and envelopes. Improved weight, volume, and efficiency estimates for the RF generating equipment were derived. Results are particularly significant because of the reduced requirements for heat rejection from electrical equipment, one of the principal envelope problems for shuttle pallet payloads. It is shown that although experiments on containerless melting of high temperature refractory materials make it desirable to consider the highest peak powers which can be made available on the pallet, total energy requirements are kept relatively low by the very fast processing times typical of containerless experiments and allows consideration of heat rejection capabilities lower than peak power demand if energy storage in system heat capacitances is considered. Batteries are considered to avoid a requirement for fuel cells capable of furnishing this brief peak power demand.

Frost, R. T.; Kornrumpf, W. P.; Napaluch, L. J.; Harden, J. D., Jr.; Walden, J. P.; Stockhoff, E. H.; Wouch, G.; Walker, L. H.

1974-01-01

214

A facile water-based process for preparation of stabilized Bi nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Stabilized bismuth nanoparticles have been prepared by reducing bismuth chloride with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of sodium oleate under a facile water-based process. The obtained samples are investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry (DTA/TG). The present results indicate that the bismuth nanoparticles are spherical, small diameter and in a high purity. In addition, measurement of water contact angle indicates that Bi samples are hydrophobic, which gives defense to samples from further oxidation, samples are steady in 6 months without obvious oxidation.

Wang Yi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yanbian University, Yanji 133000 (China); Zhao Jingzhe [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: zhaojz@mail.jlu.edu.cn; Zhao Xu; Tang Lanqin; Li Yunling; Wang Zichen [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2009-01-08

215

Migration of Beryllium via Multiple Exposure Pathways among Work Processes in Four Different Facilities.  

PubMed

Inhalation of beryllium is associated with the development of sensitization; however, dermal exposure may also be important. The primary aim of this study was to elucidate relationships among exposure pathways in four different manufacturing and finishing facilities. Secondary aims were to identify jobs with increased levels of beryllium in air, on skin, and on surfaces; identify potential discrepancies in exposure pathways, and determine if these are related to jobs with previously identified risk. Beryllium was measured in air, on cotton gloves, and on work surfaces. Summary statistics were calculated and correlations among all three measurement types were examined at the facility and job level. Exposure ranking strategies were used to identify jobs with higher exposures. The highest air, glove, and surface measurements were observed in beryllium metal production and beryllium oxide ceramics manufacturing jobs that involved hot processes and handling powders. Two finishing and distribution facilities that handle solid alloy products had lower exposures than the primary production facilities, and there were differences observed among jobs. For all facilities combined, strong correlations were found between air-surface (rp ? 0.77), glove-surface (rp ? 0.76), and air-glove measurements (rp ? 0.69). In jobs where higher risk of beryllium sensitization or disease has been reported, exposure levels for all three measurement types were higher than in jobs with lower risk, though they were not the highest. Some jobs with low air concentrations had higher levels of beryllium on glove and surface wipe samples, suggesting a need to further evaluate the causes of the discrepant levels. Although such correlations provide insight on where beryllium is located throughout the workplace, they cannot identify the direction of the pathways between air, surface, or skin. Ranking strategies helped to identify jobs with the highest combined air, glove, and/or surface exposures. All previously identified high-risk jobs had high air concentrations, dermal mass loading, or both, and none had low dermal and air. We have found that both pathways are relevant. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a file describing the forms of beryllium materials encountered during production and characteristics of the aerosols by process areas.]. PMID:25357184

Armstrong, Jenna L; Day, Gregory A; Park, Ji Young; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Stanton, Marcia L; Deubner, David C; Kent, Michael S; Schuler, Christine R; Virji, M Abbas

2014-12-01

216

Salmonella collected from nest run cart shelves in commercial shell egg processing facilities.  

PubMed

Salmonella, a member of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, may be recovered from foods and processing facilities. High levels of Enterobacteriaceae in the processing plant environment can be an indication of inadequate sanitation. This experiment was designed to determine if nest run egg carts serve as reservoirs for Salmonella. Eggs that are produced by hens not housed in buildings connected to the processing plant are referred to as nest run. Many of these eggs are transported to a central processing facility before they are washed, graded, and packed. Two plants in the Southeastern United States were sampled; one was a mixed operation and the other was an off-line operation. On each of 3 visits, 5 shelves on each of 5 carts were sampled (n = 25/visit). A 12 × 12 cm area on each shelf was swabbed with a sterile gauze pad moistened with PBS and transported on ice back to the laboratory. Each swab was preenriched in buffered peptone at 37°C for 24 h, selectively enriched using TT and Rappaport-Vassiliadis broth at 42°C overnight, then plated onto brilliant green sulfa and XLT-4 incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Presumptive colonies were transferred to lysine iron agar and triple sugar iron slants for 24 h at 37°C. Isolates with presumptive reactions were confirmed using commercial polyclonal antisera. After initial confirmation, serogrouping was performed using commercial antisera. Mixed-operation swab samples were 12% positive for Salmonella, whereas off-line samples were 36% positive for Salmonella; isolates were confirmed as serogroups B, C1, and C2. Kauffman-White serotyping was performed by a contract laboratory. Serotypes (n = 30) recovered were Anatum, Heidelberg, Infantis, Kentucky, Mbandanka, and Typhimurium. This work demonstrated that nest run egg carts may serve as reservoirs for Salmonella in the shell egg processing environment. PMID:22912478

Musgrove, M T; Shaw, J D; Harrison, M A

2012-09-01

217

Obliterative bronchiolitis in workers in a coffee-processing facility - Texas, 2008-2012.  

PubMed

Obliterative bronchiolitis, a rare, irreversible form of fixed obstructive lung disease, has been identified in workers exposed to flavoring chemicals while working in the microwave-popcorn and flavoring-manufacturing industries; the occupational risk to workers outside these industries is largely unknown. This report describes two cases of obliterative bronchiolitis identified in workers employed in a small coffee-processing facility. Both patients' illness was misdiagnosed before they received a diagnosis of work-related obliterative bronchiolitis, which had not been identified previously in the coffee-processing industry. These cases reinforce the need for exposure evaluation in all industries in which workers are exposed to flavoring chemicals. Additionally, a high index of suspicion is required when these potentially exposed workers have progressive shortness of breath. If obliterative bronchiolitis is suspected, immediate protection from further exposure is crucial to prevent further deterioration of lung function. PMID:23615673

2013-04-26

218

The low moisture eastern coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility  

SciTech Connect

A low moisture, eastern coal processing system was constructed at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide a metered and regulated supply of seeded, pulverized coal to support magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation research. The original system configuration is described as well as major modifications made in response to specific operational problems. Notable among these was the in-house development of the Moulder flow control valve which exhibited marked improvement in durability compared to previous valves used with pulverized coal. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Evans, B.R.; Washington, E.S.; Sanders, M.E.

1993-10-01

219

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah

T. Edwards; D. Click; M. Feller

2011-01-01

220

PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8

K. Fox; T. Edwards; M. Stone; D. Koopman

2010-01-01

221

Studsvik Processing Facility - A proven solution for the conservation of a National Asset  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over 7.5 years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 13.3 million pounds (4.96 million kg) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, granular activated carbon (GAC), and filter cartridges which comprised a cumulative total activity of 87,396 Curies (3.23E+09 MBq), with the highest radiation level for any incoming resin container being 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/hr). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF-Erwin) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Spent Filter Cartridges (Metal or Poly), Ion Exchange Resins (IER), powered filter media, GAC, organic solids, graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions. In 2005 Studsvik added advanced robotic technology to the SPF greatly increasing its capabilities to safely handle waste streams with radiation levels in excess of 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h), saving personnel exposure and maximizing ALARA. The most recent addition to Studsvik's capabilities is the cost and volume efficient processing of filter cartridges (both metal and poly). The SPF-Erwin employs the Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR{sup sm}) process, developed and patented by Studsvik, which utilizes pyrolysis/steam reforming technology. THOR{sup sm} reliably and safely processes these wide varieties of LLRWs in a unique, moderate temperature, pyrolysis/steam reforming, fluidized bed treatment system. The THOR{sup sm} technology is also suitable for processing hazardous, mixed, and dry active LLRW with appropriate licensing and waste feed modifications. Studsvik has proven to be an experienced and reliable source for the cost efficient disposition of LLRW for the nuclear industry. These processing concepts and capabilities have helped generators maximize the utilization of the limited available burial space - extending the Class-A, Class-B, and Class-C burial capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of this proven approach for both organic and inorganic LLRWs. A perfect example of the processors and generators working together to conserve a National Asset we have all come to know as the LLRW burial sites. (authors)

Ping, M.; Hill, M.; Harrison, J.; Wise, D. [Studsvik, Inc., Erwin, TN (United States)

2007-07-01

222

Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

1995-01-01

223

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14

224

Node 2 and Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) In Space Station Processing Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lining the walls of the Space Station Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are the launch awaiting U.S. Node 2 (lower left). and the first pressurized module of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) (upper right), named 'Kibo' (Hope). Node 2, the 'utility hub' and second of three connectors between International Space Station (ISS) modules, was built in the Torino, Italy facility of Alenia Spazio, an International contractor based in Rome. Japan's major contribution to the station, the JEM, was built by the Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo and will expand research capabilities aboard the station. Both were part of an agreement between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The Node 2 will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. Once the Japanese and European laboratories are attached to it, the resulting roomier Station will expand from the equivalent space of a 3-bedroom house to a 5-bedroom house. The Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Node program for NASA.

2003-01-01

225

Letter Report. Defense Waste Processing Facility Pour Spout Heaters - Conceptual Designs and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) identified a major task to address performance limitations and deficiencies of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) now in its sixth year of operation. Design, installation, testing, monitoring, operability, and a number of other characteristics were studied by research personnel collaboratively at a number of facilities: Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Because the potential limiting feature to the DWPF was identified as the pour spout/riser heater, researches on alternative design concepts originally proposed in the past were revisited. In the original works, finite element modeling was performed to evaluate temperature distribution and stress of the design currently used at the DWPF. Studies were also made to define the requirements of the design and to consider the approaches for remote removal/replacement. Their heater type/location, their remotely replaceable thermocouples, and their capabilities for remote handling characterized the five alternative designs proposed. Review comments on the alternative designs indicated a relatively wide range of advantages and disadvantages of the designs. The present report provides an overview of the design criteria, modeling results, and alternative designs. Based on a review of the past design optimization activities and an assessment of recent experience, recommendations are proposed for future consideration and improvement.

SK Sundaram; JM Perez, Jr.

2000-09-06

226

Improvement of the Computing - Related Procurement Process at a Government Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to develop, implement, and market value-added services through the Computing Resource Center in an effort to streamline computing-related procurement processes across the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The power of the project was in focusing attention on and value of centralizing the delivery of computer related products and services to the institution. The project required a plan and marketing strategy that would drive attention to the facility's value-added offerings and services. A significant outcome of the project has been the change in the CRC internal organization. The realignment of internal policies and practices, together with additions to its product and service offerings has brought an increased focus to the facility. This movement from a small, fractious organization into one that is still small yet well organized and focused on its mission and goals has been a significant transition. Indicative of this turnaround was the sharing of information. One-on-one and small group meetings, together with statistics showing work activity was invaluable in gaining support for more equitable workload distribution, and the removal of blame and finger pointing. Sharing monthly reports on sales and operating costs also had a positive impact.

Gittins, C.

2000-04-03

227

USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary.

WESTCOTT, J.L.; JOCHEN; PREVETTE

2007-01-02

228

USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary.

WESTCOTT, J.L.

2006-11-15

229

QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Word Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOE/WIPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

CANTALOUB, M.G.

2000-08-01

230

QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Hanford Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOEMPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

CANTALOUB, M.G.; WILLS, C.E.

2000-03-24

231

Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)  

SciTech Connect

Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya [IHI Corporation: Isogo-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa pref, 235-8501 (Japan); Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15

232

Facile fabrication processes for hydrogel-based microfluidic devices made of natural biopolymers.  

PubMed

We present facile strategies for the fabrication of two types of microfluidic devices made of hydrogels using the natural biopolymers, alginate, and gelatin as substrates. The processes presented include the molding-based preparation of hydrogel plates and their chemical bonding. To prepare calcium-alginate hydrogel microdevices, we suppressed the volume shrinkage of the alginate solution during gelation using propylene glycol alginate in the precursor solution along with sodium alginate. In addition, a chemical bonding method was developed using a polyelectrolyte membrane of poly-L-lysine as the electrostatic glue. To prepare gelatin-based microdevices, we used microbial transglutaminase to bond hydrogel plates chemically and to cross-link and stabilize the hydrogel matrix. As an application, mammalian cells (fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells) were cultivated on the microchannel surface to form three-dimensional capillary-embedding tissue models for biological research and tissue engineering. PMID:24803964

Yajima, Yuya; Yamada, Masumi; Yamada, Emi; Iwase, Masaki; Seki, Minoru

2014-03-01

233

Erosion/corrosion concerns in feed preparation systems at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950`s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to immobilize the high level radioactive waste resulting from these processes as a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF, after having undergone extensive testing, has been approved for operations and is currently immobilizing radioactive waste. To ensure reliability of the DWPF remote canyon processing equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed prior to radioactive operations to determine to what extent erosion/corrosion would impact design life of equipment. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections on critical equipment and follow-up inspections after completion of DWPF cold chemical demonstration runs. Non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques were used to assess erosion/corrosion as well as evaluation of corrosion coupon racks. These results were used to arrive at predicted equipment life for selected feed preparation equipment. It was concluded with the exception of the coil and agitator for the slurry mix evaporator (SME), which are exposed to erosive glass frit particles, all of the equipment should meet its design life.

Gee, J.T.; Chandler, C.T.; Daugherty, W.L.; Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

1997-12-31

234

Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

1992-12-01

235

Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

1992-12-01

236

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Digestion Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the digestion process of wastewater treatment facilities. This process is for reducing the volume of sludge to be treated in subsequent units and to reduce the volatile content of sludge. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for pre-startup, startup, continuous operating, shutdown,…

Schwing, Carl M.

237

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Sludge Conditioning & Dewatering Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the sludge conditioning and dewatering process of wastewater treatment facilities. In this process, sludge is treated with chemicals to make the sludge coagulate and give up its water more easily. The treated sludge is then dewatered using a vacuum filter. The guide gives step-by-step…

Schwing, Carl M.

238

ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

Best, D.

2010-08-04

239

Automation of process accountability flow diagrams at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial processes (including reprocessing activities; nuclear fuel fabrication; and material storage, measurement and transfer) make use of process flow diagrams. These flows can be used for material accountancy and for data analysis. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Technical Area (TA)-55 Plutonium Facility is home to various research and development activities involving the use of special nuclear material (SNM). A facility conducting research and development (R and D) activities using SNM must satisfy material accountability guidelines. All processes involving SNM or tritium processing, at LANL, require a process accountability flow diagram (PAFD). At LANL a technique was developed to generate PAFDs that can be coupled to a relational database for use in material accountancy. These techniques could also be used for propagation of variance, measurement control, and inventory difference analysis. The PAFD is a graphical representation of the material flow during a specific process. PAFDs are currently stored as PowerPoint files. In the PowerPoint format, the data captured by the PAFD are not easily accessible. Converting the PAFDs to an accessible electronic format is desirable for several reasons. Any program will be able to access the data contained in the PAFD. For the PAFD data to be useful in applications such as an expert system for data checking, SNM accountability, inventory difference evaluation, measurement control, and other kinds of analysis, it is necessary to interface directly with the information contained within the PAFD. The PAFDs can be approved and distributed electronically, eliminating the paper copies of the PAFDs and ensuring that material handlers have the current PAFDs. Modifications to the PAFDs are often global. Storing the data in an accessible format would eliminate the need to manually update each of the PAFDs when a global change has occurred. The goal was to determine a software package that would store the PAFDs in an accessible format that could be interfaced by various programs. After evaluating several commercial relational database and graphing software packages, VISIO Enterprise was selected. LANL is in the process of completing conversion of the existing PAFDs into VISIO Enterprise. A number of the PAFDs have been converted to VISIO Enterprise, and the data from the drawings have been exported to an ACCESS database. After the conversion has taken place, the data contained in the PAFDs will be accessible for various programs. The data that was once stored in PowerPoint will now be available for tools, including expert analysis, propagation of a variance, SNM accountability, inventory difference analysis, measurement control, and other analysis tools that have yet to be identified. Converting from the PowerPoint format to a drawing stored as a relational database will improve the ability of plant personnel to interface with the PAFD.

Knepper, P.; Whiteson, R.; Strittmatter, R.; Mousseau, K.

1999-07-01

240

Advanced Distributed Measurements and Data Processing at the Vibro-Acoustic Test Facility, GRC Space Power Facility, Sandusky, Ohio - an Architecture and an Example  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large-scale, distributed, high-speed data acquisition system (HSDAS) is currently being installed at the Space Power Facility (SPF) at NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, OH. This installation is being done as part of a facility construction project to add Vibro-acoustic Test Capabilities (VTC) to the current thermal-vacuum testing capability of SPF in support of the Orion Project s requirement for Space Environments Testing (SET). The HSDAS architecture is a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enables the system to support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and a very large system channel count. The architecture of the system is presented along with details on system scalability and measurement verification. In addition, the ability of the system to automate many of its processes such as measurement verification and measurement system analysis is also discussed.

Hill, Gerald M.; Evans, Richard K.

2009-01-01

241

L. monocytogenes in a cheese processing facility: Learning from contamination scenarios over three years of sampling.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze the changing patterns of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in a cheese processing facility manufacturing a wide range of ready-to-eat products. Characterization of L. monocytogenes isolates included genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Disinfectant-susceptibility tests and the assessment of L. monocytogenes survival in fresh cheese were also conducted. During the sampling period between 2010 and 2013, a total of 1284 environmental samples were investigated. Overall occurrence rates of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were 21.9% and 19.5%, respectively. Identical L. monocytogenes genotypes were found in the food processing environment (FPE), raw materials and in products. Interventions after the sampling events changed contamination scenarios substantially. The high diversity of globally, widely distributed L. monocytogenes genotypes was reduced by identifying the major sources of contamination. Although susceptible to a broad range of disinfectants and cleaners, one dominant L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 5 could not be eradicated from drains and floors. Significantly, intense humidity and steam could be observed in all rooms and water residues were visible on floors due to increased cleaning strategies. This could explain the high L. monocytogenes contamination of the FPE (drains, shoes and floors) throughout the study (15.8%). The outcome of a challenge experiment in fresh cheese showed that L. monocytogenes could survive after 14days of storage at insufficient cooling temperatures (8 and 16°C). All efforts to reduce L. monocytogenes environmental contamination eventually led to a transition from dynamic to stable contamination scenarios. Consequently, implementation of systematic environmental monitoring via in-house systems should either aim for total avoidance of FPE colonization, or emphasize a first reduction of L. monocytogenes to sites where contamination of the processed product is unlikely. Drying of surfaces after cleaning is highly recommended to facilitate the L. monocytogenes eradication. PMID:25136788

Rückerl, I; Muhterem-Uyar, M; Muri-Klinger, S; Wagner, K-H; Wagner, M; Stessl, B

2014-10-17

242

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) confirms applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples.1 DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO3 acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem (CC) Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). In addition to the CC method confirmation, the DWPF lab's mercury (Hg) digestion method was also evaluated for applicability to SB6 (see DWPF procedure 'Mercury System Operating Manual', Manual: SW4-15.204. Section 6.1, Revision 5, Effective date: 12-04-03). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestion of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) SRAT Receipt and SB6 SRAT Product samples. For validation of the DWPF lab's Hg method, only SRAT receipt material was used and compared to AR digestion results. The SB6 SRAT Receipt and SB6 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB6 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), to form the SB6 Blend composition. In addition to the 16 elements currently measured by the DWPF, this report includes Hg and thorium (Th) data (Th comprising {approx}2.5 - 3 Wt% of the total solids in SRAT Receipt and SRAT Product, respectively) and provides specific details of ICP-AES analysis of Th. Thorium was found to interfere with the U 367.007 nm emission line, and an inter-element correction (IEC) had to be applied to U data, which is also discussed. The results for any one particular element should not be used in any way to identify the form or speciation of a particular element without support from XRD analysis or used to estimate ratios of compounds in the sludge.

Click, D.; Jones, M.; Edwards, T.

2010-06-09

243

Qualification of the Nippon Instrumentation for use in Measuring Mercury at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system with the currently used Bacharach Mercury Analyzer. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications, spiked samples and unspiked samples. The standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The side-by-side work included the analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. With the qualification of the Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system in M-14, the DWPF lab will be able to perform a head to head comparison of a second Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 system once the system is installed. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analyzes receipt and product samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in the sludge slurry. The SRAT receipt is typically sampled and analyzed for the first ten SRAT batches of a new sludge batch to obtain an average Hg concentration. This average Hg concentration is then used to determine the amount of steam stripping required during the concentration/reflux step of the SRAT cycle to achieve a less than 0.6 wt% Hg in the SRAT product solids. After processing is complete, the SRAT product is sampled and analyzed for mercury to ensure that the mercury concentration does not exceed the 0.45 wt% limit in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The DWPF Laboratory utilizes Bacharach Analyzers to support these Hg analyses at this facility. These analyzers are more than 10 years old, and they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Due to these difficulties, the Bacharach Analyzers are to be replaced by new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems. DWPF issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist in the qualification of the new systems. SRNL prepared a task technical and quality assurance (TT&QA) plan that outlined the activities that are necessary and sufficient to meet the objectives of the TTR. In addition, TT&QA plan also included a test plan that provided guidance to the DWPF Lab in collecting the data needed to qualify the new Nippon Mercury/RA-3000 systems.

Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05

244

Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180°C), accessibility (i.e., < 50 m from potential on-site WHR applications) and minimal impact criteria on the performance and safety of existing installations, for potential waste heat recovery. The total amount of waste heat meeting these criteria were estimated at 256 MW and 289 MW at ASAB0 and ASAB1 plants, respectively, both of which are substantial. Of the 289 MW waste generated at ASAB1, approximately 173 MW are recovered by waste heat recovery steam generators (WHRSGs), leaving 116 MW unutilized. The following strategies were developed to recover the above waste heat. At ASAB0, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all five gas turbines be used to power a WHRSG. The steam generated by the WHRSG would both i) drive an absorption refrigeration unit for gas turbine inlet air cooling, which would result in additional electric or mechanical power generation, and pre-cooling of process gas, which could reduce the need for or eliminate air coolers, as well as reduce propane chiller load, and ii) serve for heating of lean gas, which would reduce furnace load. At ASAB1, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all four gas turbines be used to generate steam in WHRSG that would drive an absorption refrigeration unit for either gas turbine inlet air cooling for additional electric or mechanical power generation, or pre-cooling of process gas to eliminate air-coolers and reduce propane chiller cooling load. Considering the smaller amount of waste heat available at ASAB1 (116 MW) relative to ASAB0 (237 MW), these above two recovery options could not be implemented simultaneously at ASAB0. To permit the detailed design and techno-economic feasibility evaluation of the proposed waste heat recovery strategies in a subsequent study, the cooling loads and associated electric power consumption of ASAB0 process gas air-coolers were estimated at 21 MW and 1.9 MW, respectively, and 67 MW and 2.2 MW, respectively for ASAB1 plant. In addition, the heating loads and fuel consumption of ASAB0 furnaces used for lean gas re-generation were estimated at 24 MW and 0.0653 MMSCMD, respectively. In modeling work undertaken in parallel with this study at the Petroleum Institute, the waste heat recovery strategies proposed here were found to be thermodynamically and economically feasible, and to lead to substantial energy and cost savings, hence environmental benefits.

Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

245

Qualification of a Carbon Analyzer to Support the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The I-O Model 1030 carbon analyzer has been qualified for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The qualification was a side-by-side comparison of the Model 1030 system with the currently used Model 1010 Analyzer. This recommendation is based on side-by-side comparisons of the new unit to the currently used Model 1010 analyzer that are presented in this report. The side-by-side testing included standards and process samples. The standards, which were used for instrument calibration verifications in the measurement of total inorganic carbon (TIC) and of total organic carbon (TOC), were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The process samples included TIC analyses of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank samples and TOC analyses for Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. After the Model 1030 has been used for production reporting, DWPF should consider an investigation into the uncertainties associated with the TOC measurements to determine how far below the 18,916 ppm limit DWPF must control the average of the measurements for a set of SME samples to account for the uncertainties of the measurements from this new analyzer. Based upon the results presented in this report, it is recommended that the Model 1030 carbon analyzer is qualified for use. This recommendation is based on side-by-side comparisons of the new unit to the currently used Model 1010 analyzer that are presented in this report. The side-by-side testing included standards for instrument calibration verifications for TIC and TOC, and process samples. The standards were traceable back to NIST. The process samples included TIC analyses of SRAT Receipt samples and TOC analyses for SME samples. At some point in the future, after the Model 1030 has been used for production reporting, DWPF should consider an investigation into the uncertainties associated with the TOC measurements to determine how far below the 18,916 ppm limit DWPF must control the average of the measurements for a set of SME samples to account for the uncertainties of the measurements from this new analyzer.

Edwards, T.; Feller, M.

2011-07-05

246

DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) canister impact testing and analyses for the Transportation Technology Center  

SciTech Connect

A legal weight truck cask design has been developed for the US Department of Energy by GA Technologies, Inc. The cask will be used to transport defense high-level waste canisters produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The development of the cask required the collection of impact data for the DWPF canisters. The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) performed this work under the guidance of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Two full-scale DWPF canisters filled with nonradioactive borosilicate glass were impacted under ''normal'' and ''hypothetical'' accident conditions. Two canisters, supplied by the DWPF, were tested. Each canister was vertically dropped on the bottom end from a height of either 0.3 m or 9.1 m (for normal or hypothetical accident conditions, respectively). The structural integrity of each canister was then examined using helium leak and dye penetrant testing. The canisters' diameters and heights, which had been previously measured, were then remeasured to determine how the canister dimensions had changed. Following structural integrity testing, the canisters were flaw leak tested. For transportation flaw leak testing, four holes were fabricated into the shell of canister A-27 (0.3 m drop height). The canister was then transported a total distance of 2069 miles. During transport, the waste form material that fell from each flaw was collected to determine the amount of size distribution of each flaw release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Mishima, J.

1988-12-01

247

A facility to study the particles released by ion sputtering process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on the planetary surface erosion and planetary evolution could be enriched with the detection of the escaping material, in terms of energy and direction, caused by ions sputtering. A complete study of emitted neutral distribution from which infers the processes occurring on the impacted surface requires dedicated instrumentation, tailored on the peculiarity on the low energy profile of the sputtered signal. We propose a comprehensive facility at INAF/IFSI in Rome intended to provide the opportunity to investigate the interaction of selectable ion beam with planetary analogues through the detection of sputtered neutral atoms. The laboratory is equipped with a high volume UHV chamber, ion selectable sources in the range 0 to 10 keV, a set of 3D sample/sensor orientation motion actuation motors down to 1/100 deg resolution. The laboratory will support a set of neutral sensor heads sets derived from the Emitted for Low Energetic Neutral Atoms (ELENA) instrument under development for the ESA BepiColombo Mercury mission able to detect neutral atoms (few eV-up to 5 keV).

de Angelis, E.; di Lellis, A. M.; Vannaroni, G.; Orsini, S.; Mangano, V.; Milillo, A.; Massetti, S.; Mura, A.; Vertolli, N.

2007-08-01

248

GIS analysis of the siting criteria for the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study conducted using the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS) to analyze the criteria used for site selection for the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of the analyses was to determine, based on predefined criteria, the areas on the INEL that best satisfied the criteria. The coverages used in this study were produced by importing the AutoCAD files that produced the maps for a pre site selection draft report into the GIS. The files were then converted to Arc/Info{reg_sign} GIS format. The initial analysis was made by considering all of the criteria as having equal importance in determining the areas of the INEL that would best satisfy the requirements. Another analysis emphasized four of the criteria as ``must`` criteria which had to be satisfied. Additional analyses considered other criteria that were considered for, but not included in the predefined criteria. This GIS analysis of the siting criteria for the IWPF and MLLWTF provides a logical, repeatable, and defensible approach to the determination of candidate locations for the facilities. The results of the analyses support the location of the Candidate Locations.

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-01-01

249

Uranium Exposures in a Community near a Uranium Processing Facility: Relationship with Hypertension and Hematologic Markers  

PubMed Central

Background Environmental uranium exposure originating as a byproduct of uranium processing can impact human health. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center functioned as a uranium processing facility from 1951 to 1989, and potential health effects among residents living near this plant were investigated via the Fernald Medical Monitoring Program (FMMP). Methods Data from 8,216 adult FMMP participants were used to test the hypothesis that elevated uranium exposure was associated with indicators of hypertension or changes in hematologic parameters at entry into the program. A cumulative uranium exposure estimate, developed by FMMP investigators, was used to classify exposure. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and physician diagnoses were used to assess hypertension; and red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cell differential counts were used to characterize hematology. The relationship between uranium exposure and hypertension or hematologic parameters was evaluated using generalized linear models and quantile regression for continuous outcomes, and logistic regression or ordinal logistic regression for categorical outcomes, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Results Of 8,216 adult FMMP participants 4,187 (51%) had low cumulative uranium exposure, 1,273 (15%) had moderate exposure, and 2,756 (34%) were in the high (>0.50 Sievert) cumulative lifetime uranium exposure category. Participants with elevated uranium exposure had decreased white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and increased eosinophil counts. Female participants with higher uranium exposures had elevated systolic blood pressure compared to women with lower exposures. However, no exposure-related changes were observed in diastolic blood pressure or hypertension diagnoses among female or male participants. Conclusions Results from this investigation suggest that residents in the vicinity of the Fernald plant with elevated exposure to uranium primarily via inhalation exhibited decreases in white blood cell counts, and small, though statistically significant, gender-specific alterations in systolic blood pressure at entry into the FMMP. PMID:20889151

Wagner, Sara E.; Burch, James B.; Bottai, Matteo; Pinney, Susan M.; Puett, Robin; Porter, Dwayne; Vena, John E.; Hébert, James R.

2010-01-01

250

Do High Rates of OSCAR Deficiencies Prompt Improved Nursing Facility Processes and Outcomes?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, some researchers have argued that high state rates of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) nursing facility deficiencies indicate stringent enforcement, leaving the impression of better-quality care soon to follow; others maintain that the rank ordering of states' quality of nursing facility care remains fairly constant, resting on deep-seated state characteristics that

Kristin Klopfenstein; Charles Lockhart; Jean Giles-Sims

2011-01-01

251

A Guide for Planning Facilities for Occupational Preparation Programs in Data Processing. Interim Report. Research 25.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide lists a series of pivotal questions about the educational program to be offered, and the answers to these questions bear directly on the numbers and kinds of instructional areas needed in the contemplated facilities. Much of the material is presented in a checklist format which allows for consideration of alternatives in facility

McIntosh, William A.

252

Briefing as a process of cultural knowledge exchange in a hospital partnering project from a Facilities Management perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outsourced Facilities Management (FM) has been noted to be problematic in terms of understanding clients' needs, especially in the hospital sector. This paper argues that an understanding of hospital's needs inevitably requires an understanding of the hospital's organisational culture, where the 'value' for FM rests. Using a hospital partnering project as a case study, it investigates the process of learning

Venny Chandra

253

Mines and Mineral Processing Facilities in the Vicinity of the March 11, 2011, Earthquake in Northern Honshu, Japan  

E-print Network

................................................................... 2 2. Composite color image produced from satellite data captured at 10:07 UTC on March 9, 2011...................... 6 3. Composite color image produced from satellite data captured at 9:30 UTC on March 12, 2011Mines and Mineral Processing Facilities in the Vicinity of the March 11, 2011, Earthquake

Torgersen, Christian

254

A process-oriented analysis of facility management services in hospitals as a basis for strategic planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe research which investigated the interdependencies between facility management performance and costs, and primary processes in hospitals. Through the implementation of the German diagnosis related grouping (DRG) system and the resulting cost pressure, the need for optimized use and operation of the spatial resources in hospitals is growing. In the DRG

Karin Diez; Kunibert Lennerts

2009-01-01

255

Mechanical design and fabrication of a prototype facility for processing NaK using a chlorine reaction method  

SciTech Connect

A prototype facility has been built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to dispose of 180 gal(0.68 m{sup 3}) of radioactively contaminated NaK (sodium-potassium) that have been stored on site for 35 years. The NaK was used as primary coolant for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) at the INEL and was contaminated during a meltdown of the Mark II core in November 1955. The NaK then was transferred to four containers for temporary storage. The facility process will react the NaK with elemental chlorine using a batch process to produce chemically stable sodium chloride and potassium chloride salts. The first use of the facility will be on a prototype level to verify the method. If results are favorable, the facility will be modified to eventually dispose of the EBR-I NaK. The design and intended operation of the prototype facility are described. 2 figs.

Dafoe, R.; Keller, D.; Stoll, F.

1990-01-01

256

Integration of the bio-ethanol process in a network of facilities for heat and power production from renewable sources using process simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The economic competitiveness of ethanol as a liquid fuel strongly depends on the amount of energy used during the production. To a sustainable production of fuel ethanol contributes also the use of energy from renewable sources. Process simulation is used to integrate a bio-ethanol plant in a network of facilities for heat and power production from residues of ethanol and

Walter Wukovits; Martin Pfeffer; Bettina Liebmann; Anton Friedl

2007-01-01

257

Analysis of the process applied to end-of-life vehicles in Authorised Treatment Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Authorised treatment facilities (ATFs) play a key role in the process undergone by vehicles when they reach their end of life (EoL) within the context of Directive 2000/53/EC. Whenever an EoL vehicle is received at an ATF, a certificate of destruction is issued. The process continues with the depollution of hazardous waste materials from the vehicle and dismantling of parts that will be reused or recycled. Finally, the remaining parts of the vehicle are transported to a shredding plant. Directive 2000/53/EC sets a number of environmental goals regarding the reuse and recycling of vehicle parts and the recovery of waste materials at the EoL of vehicles. These goals will condition the evolution of ATFs as they gradually become more restrictive. As of today, the goals set by Directive 2000/53/EC for the year 2006 are being met (1). However, it would be necessary to assess the situation of those parts that comprise the fraction of the vehicle that is not recycled, reused or recovered in order to predict the degree of compliance with the goals set for the year 2015 (recycling, reusing or recovering 95% by weight of EoL vehicles). The use of lighter materials-light alloys and reinforced plastics-as a vehicle weight-reducing strategy should be coordinated with the process carried out at ATFs in order to ensure compliance with the aforementioned goals. The results of our study seem to indicate that the most usual EoL scenario today-that in which practically all of the ferrous and non-ferrous metals are recycled and the lightweight fraction of vehicles and remaining inert materials are sent to a landfill-should be revised in order to reach the environmental goals set for the year 2015. To that avail, new strategies will have to be developed to allow for an adequate treatment-recycling, reuse or recovery-of those vehicle components that are presently sent to a landfill.

Muñoz, C.; Garraín, D.; Franco, V.; Royo, M.; Justel, D.; Vidal, R.

2009-11-01

258

Airborne concentrations of chrysotile asbestos in serpentine quarries and stone processing facilities in Valmalenco, Italy.  

PubMed

Asbestos may be naturally present in rocks and soils. In some cases, there is the possibility of releasing asbestos fibres into the atmosphere from the rock or soil, subsequently exposing workers and the general population, which can lead to an increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases. In the present study, air contaminated with asbestos fibres released from serpentinites was investigated in occupational settings (quarries and processing factories) and in the environment close to working facilities and at urban sites. The only naturally occurrence of asbestos found in Valmalenco area was chrysotile; amphibole fibres were never detected. An experimental cut-off diameter of 0.25 ?m was established for distinguishing between Valmalenco chrysotile and antigorite single fibres using selected area electron diffraction analyses. Air contamination from chrysotile fibres in the examined occupational settings was site-dependent as the degree of asbestos contamination of Valmalenco serpentinites is highly variable from place to place. Block cutting of massive serpentinites with multiple blades or discs and drilling at the quarry sites that had the highest levels of asbestos contamination generated the highest exposures to (i.e. over the occupational exposure limits) asbestos. Conversely, working activities on foliated serpentinites produced airborne chrysotile concentrations comparable with ambient levels. Environmental chrysotile concentrations were always below the Italian limit for life environments (0.002 f ml(-1)), except for one sample collected at a quarry property boundary. The present exposure assessment study should encourage the development of an effective and concordant policy for proper use of asbestos-bearing rocks and soils as well as for the protection of public health. PMID:22213048

Cattaneo, Andrea; Somigliana, Anna; Gemmi, Mauro; Bernabeo, Ferruccio; Savoca, Domenico; Cavallo, Domenico M; Bertazzi, Pier A

2012-07-01

259

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was built on the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the mid-1980's. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 12 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Research conducted by the SREL has focused primarily on four questions related to these wetlands: (1) Prior to construction, what fauna and flora were present at the DWPF site and at similar, yet undisturbed, alternative sites (2) By comparing the Carolina bay at the DWPF site (Sun Bay) with an undisturbed control Carolina bay (Rainbow Bay), what effect is construction having on the organisms that inhabited the DWPF site (3) By comparing control streams with streams on the periphery of the DWPF site, what effect is construction having on the peripheral streams (4) How effective have efforts been to lessen the impacts of construction, both with respect to erosion control measures and the construction of refuge ponds'' as alternative breeding sites for amphibians that formerly bred at Sun Bay Through the long-term census-taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has begun to evaluate the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. Similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive Orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10CFR1022).

Pechmann, J.H.K.; Scott, D.E.; McGregor, J.H.; Estes, R.A.; Chazal, A.C.

1993-02-01

260

The Shock Compression Laboratory at Harvard: A New Facility for Planetary Impact Processes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Shock Compression Laboratory in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard is a new facility for the study of impact and collisional phenomena. The following describes the experimental capabilities of the laboratory.

Stewart, S. T.

2004-01-01

261

Remote crane control techniques and closed circuit television for the US Deparment of Energy, Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), South Carolina is a nuclear waste facility being built to vitrify and containerize high level radioactive waste product. DWPF has a unique requirement for an unmanned crane system to install and replace equipment in the high humidity, high radiation and harsh chemical environment of permanently inaccessible processing cells. A radio control system is provided to control a 117 ton capacity bridge crane that is equipped with various power tools for remote handling of crane replaceable and maintained equipment. High resolution black and white Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) assemblies mounted on the crane and on the walls of the various processing cells are provided for viewing the equipment during normal operations and maintenance.

DaSilva, D.A.

1988-01-01

262

Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments is to be a phased effort. This effort is to be supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-13 ICS-3000 instrument. With the successful qualification of this first ICS-3000, plans will be developed for the installation of the second 'rad' system in the M-14 Lab module later in fiscal year 2009. When the second 'rad' ICS-3000 system is installed, the DX-500 systems will be removed and retired from service.

Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

2011-07-05

263

Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System  

SciTech Connect

CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation system. The in-cell crane in CA-5 was renovated to increase driving efficiency. At the renovation for the in-cell crane, full scale mockup test and 3D simulation test had been executed in advance. After the renovation, hot tests in the CPF had been resumed from JFY 2002. New equipments such as dissolver, extractor, electrolytic device, etc. were installed in CA-3 conformably to the new design laid out in order to ensure the function and space. Glove boxes in the analysis laboratory were renewed in order to let it have flexibility from the viewpoint of conducting basic experiments (ex. U crystallization). Glove boxes and hoods were newly installed in the laboratory A for basic research and analysis, especially on MA chemistries. One laboratory (the laboratory C) was established to research about dry reprocessing. The renovation of the CPF has been executed in order to contribute to the development on the advanced fast reactor fuel cycle system, which will give us many sort of technical subject and experimental theme to be solved in the 2. Generation of the CPF.

Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency:4-33, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki pref, 319-1194 (Japan)

2008-01-15

264

DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY ANALYTICAL METHOD VERIFICATION FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO3 acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestion of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) SRAT Receipt and SB5 SRAT Product samples. The SB5 SRAT Receipt and SB5 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB5 Batch composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), to form the SB5 Blend composition. The results for any one particular element should not be used in any way to identify the form or speciation of a particular element in the sludge or used to estimate ratios of compounds in the sludge. A statistical comparison of the data validates the use of the DWPF CC method for SB5 Batch composition. However, the difficulty that was encountered in using the CC method for SB4 brings into question the adequacy of CC for the SB5 Blend. Also, it should be noted that visible solids remained in the final diluted solutions of all samples digested by this method at SRNL (8 samples total), which is typical for the DWPF CC method but not seen in the other methods. Recommendations to the DWPF for application to SB5 based on studies to date: (1) A dissolution study should be performed on the WAPS sample by SRNL which consists of the final composition of the sludge (the SB5 Blend); (2) Given the heel of SB4 in Tank 40, the DWPF lab should monitor the aluminum concentration in the first 10 SRAT Receipt batches of SB5 using both CC and sodium peroxide/hydroxide fusion to evaluate the adequacy of aluminum recovery by the CC method for this sludge batch; and (3) SRNL and the DWPF lab should investigate if comparisons between the elemental concentrations of the SME product glass (adjusted for frit addition) obtained by the mixed acid and peroxide fusion digestion and the SRAT Receipt and SRAT Product elemental concentrations obtained via the DWPF CC method provide insight into the adequacy of the CC method for analysis of the SRAT Product. The DWPF lab would need to calcine the SRAT product at 1050 C for the best comparison. If a consistent difference in elemental concentrations is revealed, another type of digestion (i.e. sodium peroxide/hydroxide fusion) should be used to determine the concentration of the element in question. Particular emphasis should be placed on monitoring the aluminum concentration in SB5.

Click, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Henry Ajo, H

2008-07-25

265

QUALIFICATION OF THE SECOND ICS-3000 ION CHROMATOGRAPH FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification testing was a head to head comparison of the second ICS-3000 with the initial ICS-3000 system that was installed in 221-S M-13. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has recently replaced the Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems that had been used since 1998 by the first of two new ICS-3000 systems. The replacement effort was necessary due to the vendor of the DX-500 systems no longer supporting service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments was a phased effort. This effort was supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) [1] and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [2]. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan [2], and the instrument was qualified for use at the DWPF Lab as documented in [3]. As part of that evaluation, a recommendation was made that the second ICS-3000 be installed in the M-14 module and that qualification testing of that system be conducted. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-14 ICS-3000 instrument.

Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

2009-12-03

266

Chemical hazards database and detection system for Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility (MMPF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ability to identify contaminants associated with experiments and facilities is directly related to the safety of the Space Station. A means of identifying these contaminants has been developed through this contracting effort. The delivered system provides a listing of the materials and/or chemicals associated with each facility, information as to the contaminant's physical state, a list of the quantity and/or volume of each suspected contaminant, a database of the toxicological hazards associated with each contaminant, a recommended means of rapid identification of the contaminants under operational conditions, a method of identifying possible failure modes and effects analysis associated with each facility, and a fault tree-type analysis that will provide a means of identifying potential hazardous conditions related to future planned missions.

Steele, Jimmy; Smith, Robert E.

1991-01-01

267

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01

268

STEELDAY EVENT: INDUSTRIAL GALVANIZERS TAMPA FACILITY TOUR Visitors will learn about steel corrosion and how to prevent it using hot-dip galvanizing. They will also tour the facility and see the hot-dip galvanizing process first  

E-print Network

corrosion and how to prevent it using hot-dip galvanizing. They will also tour the facility and see the hotSTEELDAY EVENT: INDUSTRIAL GALVANIZERS TAMPA FACILITY TOUR Visitors will learn about steel-dip galvanizing process first hand. No high heels or open-toed shoes please. About your host Industrial

Arslan, Hüseyin

269

Compressed Air System Renovation Project Improves Production at a Food Processing Facility: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the food processing facility project.

Wogsland, J.

2001-06-18

270

Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

1992-03-01

271

Gmsh (a three-dimensional finite element mesh generator with built-in pre-and post-processing facilities)  

E-print Network

Gmsh (a three-dimensional finite element mesh generator with built-in pre- and post-processing facilities) Link: http://geuz.org/gmsh/ · 2d/3d meshing + postprocessing, unstructed meshes · tip: tutorials.geo · export meshe do fenicsu: konverzí do .xml pomocí píkazu: dolfin-convert pokus.msh pokus.xml · nactení sít

Cerveny, Vlastislav

272

10 CFR 95.15 - Approval for processing licensees and others for facility clearance.  

...NRC classified information. Also included are others who require access to classified information in connection with NRC regulated activities but do not require use, storage, or possession of classified information outside of NRC facilities. However, it is not necessary for a licensee, certificate holder, or other person to request...

2014-01-01

273

7 CFR 319.40-8 - Processing at facilities operating under compliance agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...necessary to prevent spread of plant pests from the facility, requirements...method effectively destroys plant pests, and the requirements...appeal shall state all of the facts and reasons upon which...

2011-01-01

274

7 CFR 319.40-8 - Processing at facilities operating under compliance agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...necessary to prevent spread of plant pests from the facility, requirements...method effectively destroys plant pests, and the requirements...appeal shall state all of the facts and reasons upon which...

2010-01-01

275

INVITED EDITORIAL: Health effects of radiation exposure at uranium processing facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial public and scientific interest in the health consequences of exposures to ionising radiation in nuclear installations, in particular at nuclear fuels enrichment and production facilities. In this issue of Journal of Radiological Protection, McGeoghegan and Binks report on the follow-up of a cohort of over 19 000 uranium fuel and uranium hexafluoride production workers employed at the

Elisabeth Cardis; David Richardson

2000-01-01

276

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

SciTech Connect

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06

277

IMPACT OF URANIUM AND THORIUM ON HIGH TIO2 CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focused on the potential impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The

K. Fox; T. Edwards

2012-01-01

278

Struvite control through process and facility design as well as operation strategy.  

PubMed

Struvite deposition is a common problem in municipal wastewater treatment plants and can be significant if not anticipated, but struvite deposits are completely manageable if properly addressed. This paper summarises experiences from a number of facilities that have dealt successfully with struvite problems, elaborates on the interrelations between secondary treatment and anaerobic digestion, and outlines an approach to control struvite and available alternatives. PMID:14982181

Neethling, J B; Benisch, M

2004-01-01

279

Ecological survey for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of field ecological surveys conducted by the Center for Integrated Environmental Technologies (CIET) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) at four candidate locations for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of these surveys was to comply with all Federal laws and Executive Orders to identify and evaluate any potential environmental impacts because of the project. The boundaries of the candidate location were marked with blaze-orange lath survey marker stakes by the project management. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the marker stakes were made, and input to the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS). Field surveys were conducted to assess any potential impact to any important species, important habitats, and to any environmental study areas. The GIS location data was overlayed onto the INEL vegetation map and an analysis of vegetation classes on the locations was done. Results of the field surveys indicate use of Candidate Location {number_sign}1 by pygmy rabbits (Sylvilagus idahoensis) and expected use by them of Candidate Locations {number_sign}3 and {number_sign}9. Pygmy rabbits are categorized as a C2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Two other C2 species, the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) and the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) would also be expected to frequent the candidate locations. Candidate Location {number_sign}5 at the north end of the INEL is in the winter range of a large number of pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana).

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-05-01

280

The Impacts of Uranium and Thorium on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) vitrifies high level liquid waste (HLLW) into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal. The viscosity of the borosilicate glass melt as a function of temperature is the single most important variable affecting the melt rate and pour ability of the glass. The viscosity determines the rate of melting of the raw feed, the rate of glass bubble release (foaming and fining), the rate of homogenization, the adequacy of heat transfer, the devitrification rate, and thus, the quality (in terms of glass homogeneity) of the final glass product. If the viscosity is too low, excessive convection currents can occur during melting, increasing corrosion/erosion of the melter materials of construction (refractory and electrodes) and making control of the melter more difficult. The lowest glass viscosities allowed in the DWPF melter have, therefore, been determined to be approximately 20 poise. DWPF glasses must pour continuously into a large steel canister for ultimate storage in a geologic repository, but glasses with a viscosity greater than or equal to 500 poise do not readily pour. Moreover, too high a viscosity can reduce product quality by causing voids in the final glass. A conservative range of 20-110 poise at a melt temperature, Tmelt or Tm, of 1150 degrees C was, therefore, established for DWPF production. In summary, a uranium term is not needed in the DWPF viscosity model as long as the U3O8 concentrations of the glasses being melted are less than or equal to 5.76 wt percent, the maximum value examined in this study. The fact that a U-plus-6 term is not needed in the DWPF viscosity model is consistent with the fact that U-plus-6 has four bridging and two non-bridging oxygen bonds. Therefore, the impact of the number of bridging and non-bridging oxygens is approximately equal at U3O8 concentrations of less than or equal to 5.76 wt percent. Uranium may not have an impact at higher U3O8 concentrations but this would have to be demonstrated since the effects of the 0.66:0.33 BO to NBO ratio may become more significant as the U3O8 content increases. While U-plus-6 appears to have little to no impact on glass viscosity, this may or may not be true for U-plus-4 and U-plus-5 in glass since these species were not examined in this study. This is of especial note since the DWPF is currently operating at a REDOX target of 0.2 where 45 percent of the uranium is U-plus-6, 45 percent is U-plus-5, and 10 percent is U-plus-4. An additional 26 glasses for which 98 viscosity-temperature measurements were available indicate disparate roles for ThO2 depending on the U3O8 concentration and the Al2O3 concentration of the glasses measured. For the data generated on three DWPF glasses at SRNL where the ThO2 content and U3O8 content were each in the 2.5-3.0 wt percent range, the presence of ThO2 made the melts more fluid. This is consistent with what is known from the literature about the coordination chemistry of Th-plus-4 in glass, e.g. that it may act as a weak network modifier. However, twenty two West Valley mixed uranium-thorium glasses with U3O8 approximately 0.6-0.7 wt percent and ThO2 of 3.5-3.6 wt percent, demonstrate a trend toward more polymerized melts (higher viscosities). The West Valley glasses are much higher in Al2O3 than the glasses measured at SRNL although they are in the range of the DWPF viscosity model. This indicates that there may be a synergistic interaction between ThO2, U3O8, and Al2O3 that needs further investigation.

CAROL, JANTZEN

2005-02-28

281

Using the ABLE facility to observe urbanization effects on planetary boundary layer processes  

SciTech Connect

The Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility, located in south central Kansas, east of Wichita, is devoted primarily to investigations of and within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), including the dynamics of the mixed layer during both day and night; effects of varying land use and landform; the interactive role of precipitation, runoff, and soil moisture; storm development; and energy budgets on scales of 10 to 100 km. With an expected lifetime of 10--15 years, the facility is well situated to observe the effects of gradual urbanization on PBL dynamics and structure as the Wichita urban area expands to the east and several small municipalities located within the study area expand. Combining the continuous measurements of ABLE with (1) ancillary continuous measurements of, for example, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and the Global Energy Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) programs and with (2) shorter, more intensive studies within ABLE, such as the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Studies (CASES) Program, allows hypothesized features of urbanization, including heat island effects, precipitation enhancement, and modification of the surface energy budget partitioning, to be studied.

Coulter, R.L.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Shannon, J.D.; Sisterson, D.L.; Wesely, M.L.

1998-12-31

282

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Runs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently

1993-01-01

283

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Runs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently

1993-01-01

284

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

K. Winterholler

2007-01-31

285

Multiple-episode conjunctivitis outbreak among workers at a nut-processing facility.  

PubMed

Workers in a Kern County almond and pistachio nut-packing facility sought medical care for eye irritation (conjunctivitis) on three separate occasions in 1987 and 1988. These incidents were investigated by the California Department of Health Services to identify the agent responsible for the eye irritation outbreak and to suggest possible remediation. The eye irritation incidents involved only the 30 to 35 workers in the preprocessor shed. Each of the three eye irritation incidents followed phosphine (Gastoxin) fumigation. Four plausible hypotheses were tested as explanations of the outbreaks of eye irritation: phosphine gas exposure, ammonia gas exposure, aluminum hydroxide dust exposure, and almond cleaning and hulling dust exposure, with or without contamination by propargite residues (Omite 6-E). None of these hypotheses received enough consistent support to be viewed as a probable cause for the illness outbreaks. PMID:2037905

Ames, R G

1991-04-01

286

Financial scenario generation for stochastic multi-stage decision processes as facility location problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quality of multi-stage stochastic optimization models as they appear in asset liability management, energy planning, transportation, supply chain management, and other applications depends heavily on the quality of the underlying scenario model, describing the uncertain processes influencing the profit\\/cost function, such as asset prices and liabilities, the energy demand process, demand for transportation, and the like. A common approach

Ronald Hochreiter; Georg Ch. Pflug

2007-01-01

287

75 FR 71733 - Requirements for Measurement Facilities Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This notice provides information regarding the responsibilities of lessees, operators, and lessees' representatives with respect to the measurement of Federal production at gas processing plants when royalty is reported and paid on processed gas at or downstream of the plant tailgate under 30 CFR 1206.153. This equipment includes any metering, sampling, or recording devices associated with the......

2010-11-24

288

Intensive Archeological Survey of the Proposed Saltcrete Area of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Research Manuscript Series 172.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An intensive archeological survey of the proposed Saltcrete (200-Z) area of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina was conducted. The purpose was to locate, describe and assess the archeological res...

R. D. Brooks

1981-01-01

289

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27

290

Minimizing work-in-process and material handling in the facilities layout problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the plant layout problem for a job shop environment. This problem is generally treated as the quadratic assignment problem with the objective of minimizing material handling costs. Here we investigate the relationship between material handling costs and average work-in-process. Under restrictive assumptions, an open queueing network model can be used to show that the problem of minimizing work-in-process

MICHAEL C. FU; BHARAT K. KAKU

1997-01-01

291

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter.

J. Zamecnik; A. Choi

2010-01-01

292

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU`s to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU`s. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01

293

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Refining and upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The refinery and upgrade process development unit (PDU) is designed to upgrade liquid hydrocarbon products from the direct and indirect liquefaction PDU's to transportation fuels. The refinery will comprise of the following reactor systems: (a) Hydrotreating (b) Hydrocracking (c) Reforming. The three reactor systems will share common feed preparation, product separation and fractionation sections. The refinery is being designed to operate independently of the other PDU's. The use of common feed and product handling systems will permit operation of one process reactor system at a time in the refinery. In addition, the hydrotreater and hydrocracker will be operable in series. The process is designed to utilize intermediate storage and maximize the use of equipment.

Not Available

1991-09-01

294

Implementation of an Interdisciplinary Psychotropic Drug Review Process for Community-Based Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a continuing psychotropic drug review process at a community-based agency serving individuals with mental retardation. The goals of establishing data-based interdisciplinary team review, utilizing concurrent alternative treatments, and prescribing psychotropic medication at the lowest effective dosage only to those individuals…

Lepler, Steven; And Others

1993-01-01

295

APPLICATIONS OF MULTICOMPONENT ASSEMBLY PROCESSES TO THE FACILE SYNTHESES OF DIVERSELY FUNCTIONALIZED NITROGEN HETEROCYCLES‡  

PubMed Central

Several multicomponent assembly processes have been developed for the synthesis of intermediates that may be elaborated by a variety of cyclizations to generate a diverse array of highly functionalized heterocycles from readily-available starting materials. The overall approach enables the efficient preparation of libraries of small molecules derived from fused, privileged scaffolds. PMID:22451742

Donald, James R.; Granger, Brett A.; Hardy, Simon; Sahn, James J.; Martin, Stephen F.

2012-01-01

296

ASSESSMENT OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF COMPOST FROM A YARD WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Citizen concern over possible pathogenic microorganism contamination in compost and in a runoff collection pond prompted a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) investigation. ne out of eight samples collected from the distribution pile at a yard waste compost processing fac...

297

ASSESSMENT OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF COMPOST FROM A YARD WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Citizen concern over possible pathogenic microorganism contamination in compost and in a runoff collection pond prompted a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) investigation. One out of eight samples collected from the distribution pile at a yard waste compost processing f...

298

The LHEA PDP 11/70 graphics processing facility users guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation of all necessary and useful information needed to allow the inexperienced user to program on the PDP 11/70. Information regarding the use of editing and file manipulation utilities as well as operational procedures are included. The inexperienced user is taken through the process of creating, editing, compiling, task building and debugging his/her FORTRAN program. Also, documentation on additional software is included.

1978-01-01

299

Figure-of-merit analysis for a TRU waste processing facility at INEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten systems potentially applicable to the processing of TRU wastes at INEL were evaluated. The three candidates found to be superior to the rest were: (1) a system with two parallel slagging pyrolysis incinerators, each with a capacity of about 70,000 kg\\/d (kilograms per day), (2) a system with a single slagging pyrolysis incinerator with a capacity of 200,000 kg\\/d,

N. D. Cox; W. H. Burgus; H. E. Hootman; R. L. Nebeker; D. C. Nelson; L. S. Richardson; R. J. Stouky; T. K. Thompson

1978-01-01

300

Facile Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticle-Titanium Oxide Alternate Assemblies by Surface Sol-Gel Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multistructured assemblies consisting of gold nanoparticles and titanium oxide were alternately fabricated by a surface sol-gel process. First, a quartz glass substrate was immersed into an organic solution of titanium butoxide [Ti(OBu)4]. Then, the substrate was rinsed with water, and dried in air, giving ultra-thin titanium oxide [Ti(O)]-modified quartz glass substrate. This modified glass substrate was immersed into an aqueous

Taichi Arakawa; Tomoaki Kawahara; Tsuyoshi Akiyama; Sunao Yamada

2007-01-01

301

Risk-Based Decision Process for Accelerated Closure of a Nuclear Weapons Facility  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Site) resulted in contamination of soil and underground systems and structures with hazardous substances, including plutonium, uranium and hazardous waste constituents. The Site was placed on the National Priority List in 1989. There are more than 370 Individual Hazardous Substance Sites (IHSSs) at RFETS. Accelerated cleanup and closure of RFETS is being achieved through implementation and refinement of a regulatory framework that fosters programmatic and technical innovations: (1) extensive use of ''accelerated actions'' to remediate IHSSs, (2) development of a risk-based screening process that triggers and helps define the scope of accelerated actions consistent with the final remedial action objectives for the Site, (3) use of field instrumentation for real time data collection, (4) a data management system that renders near real time field data assessment, and (5) a regulatory agency consultative process to facilitate timely decisions. This paper presents the process and interim results for these aspects of the accelerated closure program applied to Environmental Restoration activities at the Site.

Butler, L.; Norland, R. L.; DiSalvo, R.; Anderson, M.

2003-02-25

302

Facile Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticle-Titanium Oxide Alternate Assemblies by Surface Sol-Gel Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multistructured assemblies consisting of gold nanoparticles and titanium oxide were alternately fabricated by a surface sol-gel process. First, a quartz glass substrate was immersed into an organic solution of titanium butoxide [Ti(OBu)4]. Then, the substrate was rinsed with water, and dried in air, giving ultra-thin titanium oxide [Ti(O)]-modified quartz glass substrate. This modified glass substrate was immersed into an aqueous colloidal solution of gold nanoparticles (AuPs) that were stabilized with citrate ions, giving a AuP-Ti(O)-modified glass substrate. By repeating these surface sol-gel processes, the multistructured assemblies of AuPs and Ti(O), [AuP/Ti(O)]n/Glass (n=1--4) were fabricated. Plasmon band intensity increased with the number of surface sol-gel process cycles. The resultant assemblies were stable even after 11 days, or after treatment with an aqueous electrolyte solution. The alternate assembling of AuPs and Ti(O) was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements and absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Accordingly, we have succeeded in the preparation of stable AuP-Ti(O) composite films on the substrates.

Arakawa, Taichi; Kawahara, Tomoaki; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Sunao

2007-04-01

303

The Challenges of Preserving Historic Resources During the Deactivation and Decommissioning of Highly Contaminated Historically Significant Plutonium Process Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Manhattan Project was initiated to develop nuclear weapons for use in World War II. The Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) was established in eastern Washington State as a production complex for the Manhattan Project. A major product of the HEW was plutonium. The buildings and process equipment used in the early phases of nuclear weapons development are historically significant because of the new and unique work that was performed. When environmental cleanup became Hanford's central mission in 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) prepared for the deactivation and decommissioning of many of the old process facilities. In many cases, the process facilities were so contaminated, they faced demolition. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to evaluate the historic significance of properties under their jurisdiction for eligibility for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places before altering or demolishing them so that mitigation through documentation of the properties can occur. Specifically, federal agencies are required to evaluate their proposed actions against the effect the actions may have on districts, sites, buildings or structures that are included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. In an agreement between the DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL), the Washington State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), the agencies concurred that the Hanford Site Historic District is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and that a Site-wide Treatment Plan would streamline compliance with the NHPA while allowing RL to manage the cleanup of the Hanford Site. Currently, many of the old processing buildings at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) are undergoing deactivation and decommissioning. RL and Fluor Hanford project managers at the PFP are committed to preserving historical artifacts of the plutonium production process. They must also ensure the safety of workers and the full decontamination of buildings or artifacts if they are to be preserved. This paper discusses the real time challenges of working safely, decontaminating process equipment, preserving historical structures and artifacts and documenting their history at PFP. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Minette, M.; Sorenson, D.; Heineman, R.; Gerber, M. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., PO Box 1000 Richland WA 99352 (United States); Charboneau, S. [US Department of Energy PO Box 550, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Bond, F. [Washington State Department of Ecology, WDOE 3100 Port of Benton Blvd., Richland WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01

304

Investment generation process in hospital facilities: the response of supply to capacity utilization measures.  

PubMed

Hospital investment behavior is commonly explained by means of either supply or demand factors. The inherent limitations of these models have led to ambiguous conclusions. This study applies a different approach, whereby investment generation is explained by means of a stock adjustment model. The model is empirically tested on a sample of New York City hospitals. Relative investment is found to be directly related to occupancy rate, indicating rationality in the hospital investment process. Scalar factors are also shown to be significant, implying the concept of preferred hospital size. PMID:521295

Arbel, A; Grier, P

1979-01-01

305

Investigation of cosmic-ray muon induced processes by the MIREDO facility.  

PubMed

The MIREDO (Muon Induced Rare Event Dynamic Observatory) spectrometer system is primarily developed for the study of cosmic muon induced processes in different materials. Exploration of such interactions can be important for ultra-low background experiments. The system is based on the 100% relative efficiency ultra-low-background HPGe spectrometer. With the addition of two plastic scintillators and a fast-slow coincidence circuit, the coincidence events between the plastic detectors and the HPGe spectrometer have been investigated. First results derived for a CaO powder sample, placed in a Marinelli beaker, are presented and discussed. PMID:24332344

Bikit, K; Mrdja, D; Bikit, I; Veskovic, M

2014-05-01

306

Standard for metal/nonmetal mining and metal mineral processing facilities. 2004 ed.  

SciTech Connect

This standard addresses the protection of diesel-powered equipment and the storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids at these specialized sites. The 2004 edition consolidates requirements from NFPA 122 and 121 : Standard on Fire Protection for Self-Propelled and Mobile Surface Mining Equipment. Major changes include a new chapter on fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. The Standard is also revised to emphasize the use of a fire risk assessment when determining fire protection criteria. Chapter headings are: Administration; Referenced publications; Definitions; General; Fire risk assessment and risk reduction; Fire detection and suppression equipment; Fire protection for diesel-powered equipment in underground mines; Transfer of flammable or combustible liquids in underground mines; Flammable liquid storage in underground mines; Combustible liquid storage in underground mines; Fire suppression for flammable or combustible liquid storage areas in underground mines; Fire protection of surface mobile and self-propelled equipment; and Fire protection of surface metal mineral processing plants. 3 annexes.

NONE

2004-07-01

307

A facile processing way of silica needle arrays with tunable orientation by tube arrays fabrication and etching method  

SciTech Connect

A simple method to fabricate silica micro/nano-needle arrays (SNAs) is presented based on tube-etching mechanism. Using silica fibers as templates, highly aligned and free-standing needle arrays are created over large area by simple processes of polymer infiltration, cutting, chemical etching and polymer removal. Their sizes and orientations can be arbitrarily and precisely tuned by simply selecting fiber sizes and the cutting directions, respectively. This technique enables the needle arrays with special morphology to be fabricated in a greatly facile way, thereby offers them the potentials in various applications, such as optic, energy harvesting, sensors, etc. As a demonstration, the super hydrophobic property of PDMS treated SNAs is examined. - Graphical abstract: Silica needle arrays are fabricated by tube arrays fabrication and etching method. They show super hydrophobic property after being treated with PDMS.

Zhu Mingwei; Gao Haigen; Li Hongwei; Xu Jiao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen Yanfeng, E-mail: yfchen@nju.edu.c [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-03-15

308

Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

1990-03-01

309

DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and a lightweight robotic arm for operation of the remote tools. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and tested multiple tools to perform the gasket replacement tasks. Separate pneumatic snap-ring removal tools that use the connector skirt as a reaction surface were developed for removal of the snap ring and spent gasket on both vertical and horizontal Hanford connectors. A pneumatic tool that clamps and centers on the jumper pipe ID was developed to simultaneously install the new gasket and snap ring. A pneumatic snap-ring-loading tool was developed that compresses the snap ring and places it in a groove in the installation tool. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and vents the tools as needed. The entire system has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Deployment of the entire system is expected during FY08. The Hanford connector gasket replacement tooling has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Nitric acid is used in many of the decontamination processes performed in the REDC, where the tooling will be deployed. Although most of the tool components were fabricated/purchased with nitric acid and radioactive service in mind, some of the prototype parts must be replaced with parts that are more compatible with nitric acid/radioactive service. Several modifications to the various tools are needed to facilitate maintenance and replacement of failed components. Development of installation tools for replacement of 1-inch, 2-inch and multi-hole gaskets is being considered. Deployment of the existing system in the DWPF REDC is expected during FY08.

Krementz, D

2007-11-27

310

Spacelab data processing facility (SLDPF) quality assurance (QA)/data accounting (DA) expert systems - Transition from prototypes to operational systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SLDPF is responsible for the capture, quality monitoring processing, accounting, and shipment of Spacelab and/or Attached Shuttle Payloads (ASP) telemetry data to various user facilities. Expert systems will aid in the performance of the quality assurance and data accounting functions of the two SLDPF functional elements: the Spacelab Input Processing System (SIPS) and the Spacelab Output Processing System (SOPS). Prototypes were developed for each as independent efforts. The SIPS Knowledge System Prototype (KSP) used the commercial shell OPS5+ on an IBM PC/AT; the SOPS Expert System Prototype used the expert system shell CLIPS implemented on a Macintosh personal computer. Both prototypes emulate the duties of the respective QA/DA analysts based upon analyst input and predetermined mission criteria parameters, and recommended instructions and decisions governing the reprocessing, release, or holding for further analysis of data. These prototypes demonstrated feasibility and high potential for operational systems. Increase in productivity, decrease of tedium, consistency, concise historical records, and a training tool for new analyses were the principal advantages. An operational configuration, taking advantage of the SLDPF network capabilities, is under development with the expert systems being installed on SUN workstations. This new configuration in conjunction with the potential of the expert systems will enhance the efficiency, in both time and quality, of the SLDPF's release of Spacelab/AST data products.

Basile, Lisa

1988-01-01

311

Spacelab data processing facility (SLDPF) Quality Assurance (QA)/Data Accounting (DA) expert systems: Transition from prototypes to operational systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SLDPF is responsible for the capture, quality monitoring processing, accounting, and shipment of Spacelab and/or Attached Shuttle Payloads (ASP) telemetry data to various user facilities. Expert systems will aid in the performance of the quality assurance and data accounting functions of the two SLDPF functional elements: the Spacelab Input Processing System (SIPS) and the Spacelab Output Processing System (SOPS). Prototypes were developed for each as independent efforts. The SIPS Knowledge System Prototype (KSP) used the commercial shell OPS5+ on an IBM PC/AT; the SOPS Expert System Prototype used the expert system shell CLIPS implemented on a Macintosh personal computer. Both prototypes emulate the duties of the respective QA/DA analysts based upon analyst input and predetermined mission criteria parameters, and recommended instructions and decisions governing the reprocessing, release, or holding for further analysis of data. These prototypes demonstrated feasibility and high potential for operational systems. Increase in productivity, decrease of tedium, consistency, concise historial records, and a training tool for new analyses were the principal advantages. An operational configuration, taking advantage of the SLDPF network capabilities, is under development with the expert systems being installed on SUN workstations. This new configuration in conjunction with the potential of the expert systems will enhance the efficiency, in both time and quality, of the SLDPF's release of Spacelab/AST data products.

Basile, Lisa

1988-01-01

312

Final deactivation report on the Radioactive Gas Processing Facility, Building 3033, and the Actinide Fabrication Facility, Building 3033A, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Buildings 3033 and 3033A, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Buildings 3033 and 3033A prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Buildings 3033 and 3033A will require access to facilitate required S and M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Buildings 3033 and 3033A were stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S and M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S and M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S and M. All materials have been removed from the building, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated.

NONE

1997-09-01

313

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13

314

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28

315

3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of hydrostratigraphy and uranium and nitrate contamination in groundwater at a former nuclear materials processing facility in Oklahoma were undertaken employing 3-dimensional (3D) geospatial modeling software. Models constructed played an important role in the regulatory decision process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because they enabled visualization of temporal variations in contaminant concentrations and plume geometry. Three aquifer systems occur at the site, comprised of water-bearing fractured shales separated by indurated sandstone aquitards. The uppermost terrace groundwater system (TGWS) aquifer is composed of terrace and alluvial deposits and a basal shale. The shallow groundwater system (SGWS) aquifer is made up of three shale units and two sandstones. It is separated from the overlying TGWS and underlying deep groundwater system (DGWS) aquifer by sandstone aquitards. Spills of nitric acid solutions containing uranium and radioactive decay products around the main processing building (MPB), leakage from storage ponds west of the MPB, and leaching of radioactive materials from discarded equipment and waste containers contaminated both the TGWS and SGWS aquifers during facility operation between 1970 and 1993. Constructing 3D geospatial property models for analysis of groundwater contamination at the site involved use of EarthVision (EV), a 3D geospatial modeling software developed by Dynamic Graphics, Inc. of Alameda, CA. A viable 3D geohydrologic framework model was initially constructed so property data could be spatially located relative to subsurface geohydrologic units. The framework model contained three hydrostratigraphic zones equivalent to the TGWS, SGWS, and DGWS aquifers in which groundwater samples were collected, separated by two sandstone aquitards. Groundwater data collected in the three aquifer systems since 1991 indicated high concentrations of uranium (>10,000 micrograms/liter) and nitrate (> 500 milligrams/liter) around the MPB and elevated nitrate (> 2000 milligrams/ liter) around storage ponds. Vertical connectivity was suggested between the TGWS and SGWS, while the DGWS appeared relatively isolated from the overlying aquifers. Lateral movement of uranium was also suggested over time. For example, lateral migration in the TGWS is suggested along a shallow depression in the bedrock surface trending south-southwest from the southwest corner of the MPB. Another pathway atop the buried bedrock surface, trending west-northwest from the MPB and partially reflected by current surface topography, suggested lateral migration of nitrate in the SGWS. Lateral movement of nitrate in the SGWS was also indicated north, south, and west of the largest storage pond. Definition of contaminant plume movement over time is particularly important for assessing direction and rate of migration and the potential need for preventive measures to control contamination of groundwater outside facility property lines. The 3D geospatial property models proved invaluable for visualizing and analyzing variations in subsurface uranium and nitrate contamination in space and time within and between the three aquifers at the site. The models were an exceptional visualization tool for illustrating extent, volume, and quantitative amounts of uranium and nitrate contamination in the subsurface to regulatory decision-makers in regard to site decommissioning issues, including remediation concerns, providing a perspective not possible to achieve with traditional 2D maps. The geohydrologic framework model provides a conceptual model for consideration in flow and transport analyses.

Stirewalt, G. L.; Shepherd, J. C.

2003-12-01

316

Comparative risk assessments for the production and interim storage of glass and ceramic waste forms: defense waste processing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for immobilizing nuclear high level waste (HLW) is scheduled to be built at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). High level waste is produced when SRP reactor components are subjected to chemical separation operations. Two candidates for immobilizing this HLW are borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic, either being contained in weld-sealed stainless steel canisters. A number of technical analyses are being conducted to support a selection between these two waste forms. The present document compares the risks associated with the manufacture and interim storage of these two forms in the DWPF. Process information used in the risk analysis was taken primarily from a DWPF processibility analysis. The DWPF environmental analysis provided much of the necessary environmental information. To perform the comparative risk assessments, consequences of the postulated accidents are calculated in terms of: (1) the maximum dose to an off-site individual; and (2) the dose to off-site population within 80 kilometers of the DWPF, both taken in terms of the 50-year inhalation dose commitment. The consequences are then multiplied by the estimated accident probabilities to obtain the risks. The analyses indicate that the maximum exposure risk to an individual resulting from the accidents postulated for both the production and interim storage of either waste form represents only an insignificant fraction of the natural background radiation of about 90 mrem per year per person in the local area. They also show that there is no disaster potential to the off-site population. Therefore, the risks from abnormal events in the production and the interim storage of the DWPF waste forms should not be considered as a dominant factor in the selection of the final waste form.

Huang, J C; Wright, W V

1982-04-01

317

Photocatalytic activities of Bi2S3/BiOBr nanocomposites synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bi2S3/BiOBr nanocomposites with various weight percents of Bi2S3 were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal process at 433 K, and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectra (UV-vis DRS) and nitrogen physisorption studies. The UV and visible photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared Bi2S3/BiOBr samples were evaluated by the photo-degradation of methyl orange (MO) in an aqueous solution. The results showed that the photocatalytic activity of the Bi2S3/BiOBr samples was greatly enhanced, compared with that over pure Bi2S3 and BiOBr. The enhanced photocatalytic activities could be mainly attributed to the effective transfer of the photogenerated electrons and holes at the heterojunction interface of Bi2S3 and BiOBr, which reduced the recombination of electron-hole pairs, and the mechanism of photocatalytic activity enhancement was discussed.

Cui, Yumin; Jia, Qingfeng; Li, Huiquan; Han, Jingyu; Zhu, Liangjun; Li, Shigang; Zou, Ying; Yang, Jie

2014-01-01

318

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site. Annual report, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) on the Savannah River Site (SRS) began during FY-1984. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 15 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Through the long-term census taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has been evaluating the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR 1022).

NONE

1994-11-01

319

Facile low-temperature polyol process for LiFePO4 nanoplate and carbon nanotube composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystalline LiFePO4 nanoplates were incorporated with 5 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via a facile low temperature polyol process, in one single step without any post heat treatment. The CNTs were embedded into the LiFePO4 particles to form a network to enhance the electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 electrode for lithium-ion battery applications. The structural and morphological characters of the LiFePO4-CNT composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and charge/discharge tests. Primary results showed that well crystallized olivine-type structure without any impurity phases was developed, and the LiFePO4-CNT composites exhibited good electrochemical performance, with a reversible specific capacity of 155 mAh g-1 at the current rate of 10 mA g-1, and a capacity retention ratio close to 100% after 100 cycles.

Wu, Guan; Zhou, Yingke; Gao, Xuefeng; Shao, Zongping

2013-10-01

320

LEACHATE GENERATION AND MIGRATION AT SUBTITLE D FACILITIES: A SUMMARY AND REVIEW OF PROCESSES AND MATHEMATICAL MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently promulgated revisions to the Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). hese revisions create a need for tools to predict the performance of facilities regulated u...

321

Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility.  

E-print Network

PROPRIETARY INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May... Improvements ? Cost-savings initiatives ? Increasing environmental awareness ? Increasing throughput by debottlenecking processes ? Increasing government mandates 2May 2013 Energy Costs for a 200kBPD Complex refinery Typically, energy efficiency programs...

Hoyle, A.

2013-01-01

322

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the New York City Department of Sanitation (NYCDOS) intended to solicit proposals for a City-based recycling facility using mixed waste paper. Because Amoco was interested in manufacturing ethanol from biomass, it proposed to do a siting screen in NYC, after which the study was expanded to include upstate locations as well. The objective was to identify and evaluate two sites in New York City and three sites in other New York State urban centers that would be appropriate for construction and long-term operation of a financially attractive and environmentally sound waste biomass-to-ethanol production facility using Amoco`s biomass conversion technology (the `Amoco Process`).

Gastwirth, H.

1995-08-01

323

18 CFR 157.21 - Pre-filing procedures and review process for LNG terminal facilities and other natural gas...  

...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation of the requisite NEPA document. (9) For natural gas facilities other than LNG terminal...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation...

2014-04-01

324

18 CFR 157.21 - Pre-filing procedures and review process for LNG terminal facilities and other natural gas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation of the requisite NEPA document. (9) For natural gas facilities other than LNG terminal...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation...

2012-04-01

325

18 CFR 157.21 - Pre-filing procedures and review process for LNG terminal facilities and other natural gas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation of the requisite NEPA document. (9) For natural gas facilities other than LNG terminal...which Commission staff may make a selection to assist in the preparation...

2013-04-01

326

Literature Review of Boric Acid Solubility Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system replaces the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with 0.01 M boric acid. This ...

E. A. Kyser, K. P. Crapse

2011-01-01

327

Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations. Savannah River Site 200-S Area  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; ``Just-in-Time`` precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

Randall, D. [ed.; Marek, J.C.

1992-03-01

328

An overview of the waste handling and packaging plant, a major processing facility for remote-handled transuranic waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is a FY 1991 line item project proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the facility is to receive, package, certify and ship remote-handled (RH) and special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The scope of the

D. W. Turner; R. C. Stewart; S. P. du Mont

1988-01-01

329

An overview of the ORNL waste handling and packaging plant, a major processing facility for remote-handled transuranic waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is identified as a key element in the US Department of Energy's transuranic (TRU) waste program for both remote handled (RH) and special case (SC) waste. The mission of the facility is to retrieve, receive, repackage, certify, and ship TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

C. H. Jr. Brown; J. B. Berry; D. W. Turner

1989-01-01

330

Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase 3: Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The facility consists of 1068 sq m of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value.

Brink, D. F.; Kendall, J. M.; Youngblood, S. B.

1981-03-01

331

New Instrumental Facilities to study High Energy Processes in the Sun, Interplanetary Space and their Effects in the Earth Atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new instrumental facility to study the physical mechanisms of high-energy releases taking place in solar quiet and explosive active regions, and their signatures in the Earth's atmosphere. These facilities will be installed in the CASLEO (2550 m asl) observatory, and complement solar flare diagnostic obtained there at millimeter waves (45 and 90 GHZ), submillimeter waves (212 and 405 GHz), IR (30 THz), as well as X-ray radiation imprints in the ionosphere (VLF subionospheric propagation), and of energetic charged particles in Earth's atmosphere (Cosmic Ray CARPET sensor).Specifically, we propose to complement these existing instrumental facilities with a new detector of solar and atmospheric neutrons, a gamma-ray scintillation device, and ELF/VLF wave sensors. The main objectives are: (i) to better characterize the high-frequency radio and high-energy photon flare spectra, in order to provide new clues on the emission mechanism resulting in submillimeter and THz radiation which are still unexplained; (ii) to provide a continuous monitoring of solar energetic phenomena and investigate if they are more frequent than what we do observe nowadays; (iii) to investigate the causal relationship between atmospheric phenomena as lightning occurrence, high-energy photon and neutron production, Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, and cosmic ray fluxes.

Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Makhmutov, Vladimir

332

An engineering and economic evaluation of wet and dry pre-fractionation processes for dry-grind ethanol facilities.  

PubMed

An engineering-economic model was developed to compare the profitability of the wet fractionation process, a generic dry fractionation process, and the conventional dry grind process. Under market conditions as of January 2011, only fractionation processes generated a positive cash flow. Reduced unit manufacturing costs and increased ethanol production capacity were two major contributions. Corn and ethanol price sensitivity analysis showed that the wet fractionation process always outperformed a generic dry fractionation process at any scenario considered in this research. A generic dry fractionation process would provide better economic performance than the conventional dry grind process if corn price was low and ethanol price was high. All three processes would perform more resiliently if the DDGS price was determined by its composition. PMID:21778050

Lin, Tao; Rodríguez, Luis F; Li, Changying; Eckhoff, Steven R

2011-10-01

333

Reconfigured, close-coupled reconfigured, and Wyodak coal integrated two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville facility: Chemical and toxicological evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of process materials sampled during the operation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, AL) in the reconfigured, integrated (RITSL run No. 247), the close-coupled, reconfigured, integrated (CCRITSL run No. 249), and the Wyodak coal integrated (ITSL run No. 246) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Chemical methods of analysis included proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption column chromatography, high resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. Toxicological evaluation of the process materials included a histidine reversion assay for microbial mutagenicity, an initiation/promotion assay for tumorigenicity in mouse skin, and an aquatic toxicity assay using Daphnia magna. The results of these analyses and tests are compared to the previously reported results derived from the Illinois No. 6 coal ITSL and nonintegrated two-stage liquefaction (NTSL) process materials from the Wilsonville facility. 21 refs., 13 figs., 21 tabs.

Wright, C.W.

1987-03-01

334

Associations between oil- and gas-well sites, processing facilities, flaring, and beef cattle reproduction and calf mortality in western Canada.  

PubMed

From the fall of 1992 through calving 1996, detailed cow breeding outcome records were maintained actively for seven large cow-calf herds in western Canada. The numbers of mature females in the study for the breeding seasons beginning in 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995 were 1122, 1177, 1251, and 1236, respectively. Outcomes included pregnancy status, calving interval, and the occurrence of twins, abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality. Information also was collected on other risk factors known to influence beef-herd health and productivity. Detailed maps of active and inactive oil and natural-gas sites, batteries, compressor stations and processing plants were verified. Records of flaring activity at each facility were obtained from the government regulatory agency. Each flaring site then was classified as sour or sweet based on the presence or absence of hydrogen sulfide in the flared gas. A detailed inventory was prepared itemizing the type and number of facilities within 1.6 km (1 mile) of the center of each quarter section used for pasture. The total volume of gas flared within 1.6 km of the center of each pasture was determined for each month of the study. Appropriate risk periods where specified for each outcome and a cumulative exposure calculated for each breeding female (using detailed individual-animal records of cow movements between pastures and herd-management groups). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the association between exposure and outcome and to adjust for potential confounders and clustering of binomial outcomes within herd. Increased risk of non-pregnancy was sometimes associated with exposure to one or more of the following facility types: sour-gas flaring battery facilities, all battery-flaring sites, active gas wells, and larger field facilities. The associations were not, however, consistent among years or even among risk periods for the same year. Facility proximity and flaring were not associated with increased abortion risk. Volume of flared sour gas from battery sites was associated with increased risk of stillbirth. Finally, sour-gas flaring was associated with increased calf-mortality risk for the 1992-1993 calf crop. Several examples of associations between exposure and increased productivity also were found (most of which involved either oil wells or all well sites). PMID:11448492

Waldner, C L; Ribble, C S; Janzen, E D; Campbell, J R

2001-07-19

335

Required precision of mass and half-life measurements for r-process nuclei planned at future RI-beam facilities  

E-print Network

In order to understand the r-process nucleosynthesis, we suggest precision required for mass and beta-decay half-life measurements planned at future RI-beam facilities. To satisfy a simple requirement that we put on nuclear model predictions, it is concluded that the detectors for the mass measurements must have a precision of 1sigma ~half-life measurements demand a precision of 1sigma ~half-life measurements. This analysis aims to provide a first rough guide for ongoing detector developments.

Y. Motizuki; T. Tachibana; S. Goriely; H. Koura

2004-06-12

336

Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1995-04-01

337

Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-07-31

338

Facilities maintenance handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and develop management information in order to statistically identify and analyze variances from those plans. It will also add credibility to the NASA facilities maintenance budgeting process. The key to a successful maintenance program is the understanding and support of the senior Center managers.

1991-01-01

339

Use of strategic environmental assessment in the site selection process for a radioactive waste disposal facility in Slovenia.  

PubMed

The benefits of strategic environmental considerations in the process of siting a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) are presented. The benefits have been explored by analyzing differences between the two site selection processes. One is a so-called official site selection process, which is implemented by the Agency for radwaste management (ARAO); the other is an optimization process suggested by experts working in the area of environmental impact assessment (EIA) and land-use (spatial) planning. The criteria on which the comparison of the results of the two site selection processes has been based are spatial organization, environmental impact, safety in terms of potential exposure of the population to radioactivity released from the repository, and feasibility of the repository from the technical, financial/economic and social point of view (the latter relates to consent by the local community for siting the repository). The site selection processes have been compared with the support of the decision expert system named DEX. The results of the comparison indicate that the sites selected by ARAO meet fewer suitability criteria than those identified by applying strategic environmental considerations in the framework of the optimization process. This result stands when taking into account spatial, environmental, safety and technical feasibility points of view. Acceptability of a site by a local community could not have been tested, since the formal site selection process has not yet been concluded; this remains as an uncertain and open point of the comparison. PMID:20846780

Dermol, Urška; Konti?, Branko

2011-01-01

340

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Primary Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the primary sedimentation process of wastewater treatment plants. The primary sedimentation process involves removing settleable and suspended solids, in part, from wastewater by gravitational forces, and scum and other floatable solids from wastewater by mechanical means. Step-by-step…

Charles County Community Coll., La Plata, MD.

341

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Tertiary Multimedia Filtration Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes the standard operating job procedures for the tertiary multimedia filtration process of wastewater treatment plants. The major objective of the filtration process is the removal of suspended solids from the reclaimed wastewater. The guide gives step-by-step instructions for pre-start up, start-up, continuous operation, and…

Petrasek, Al, Jr.

342

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Pump Station Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a guide for standard operating job procedures for the pump station process of wastewater treatment plants. Step-by-step instructions are given for pre-start up inspection, start-up procedures, continuous routine operation procedures, and shut-down procedures. A general description of the equipment used in the process is given. Two…

Perley, Gordon F.

343

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Grit Removal Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the grit removal process of wastewater treatment plants. Step-by-step instructions are given for pre-start up inspection, start-up, continuous operation, and shut-down procedures. A description of the equipment used in the process is given. Some theoretical material is presented. (BB)

Deal, Gerald A.; Montgomery, James A.

344

Proof of Concept Experiments of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: An Online, Nondestructive, Near Real-Time Monitor for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near-real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel approach to safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of {+-} 1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

2012-04-21

345

300 Area process sewer piping upgrade and 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility discharge to the City of Richland Sewage System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by constructing and operating a new process sewer collection system that would discharge to the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The DOE is also considering the construction of a tie-line from the TEDF to the 300 Area Sanitary Sewer for discharging the process wastewater to the City of Richland Sewage System. The proposed action is needed because the integrity of the old piping in the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System is questionable and effluents might be entering the soil column from leaking pipes. In addition, the DOE has identified a need to reduce anticipated operating costs at the new TEDF. The 300 Area Process Sewer Piping Upgrade (Project L-070) is estimated to cost approximately $9.9 million. The proposed work would involve the construction and operation of a new process sewer collection system. The new system would discharge the effluents to a collection sump and lift station for the TEDF. The TEDF is designed to treat and discharge the process effluent to the Columbia River. The process waste liquid effluent is currently well below the DOE requirements for radiological secondary containment and is not considered a RCRA hazardous waste or a State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act dangerous waste. A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination, System (NPDES) permit has been obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for discharge to the Columbia River. The proposed action would upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by the construction and operation of a new combined gravity, vacuum, and pressurized process sewer collection system consisting of vacuum collection sumps, pressure pump stations, and buried polyvinyl chloride or similar pipe. Two buildings would also be built to house a main collection station and a satellite collection station.

NONE

1995-05-01

346

The multi-isotope process monitor: Non-destructive, near-real-time nuclear safeguards monitoring at a reprocessing facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IAEA will require advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at envisioned large scale nuclear reprocessing plants. This dissertation describes results from simulations and experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel safeguards approach for process monitoring in reprocessing plants. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams, nondestructively and in near-real time (NRT). Three different models were used to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate chemical distribution during separation, and simulate spectra from a variety of gamma detectors in product and raffinate streams for processed fuel. This was done for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Experiments were performed to validate the results from the model. Three segments of commercial spent nuclear fuel with variations in burnup and cooling time were dissolved and subjected to a batch PUREX method to separate the uranium and plutonium from fission and activation products. Gamma spectra were recorded by high purity germanium (HPGe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were applied to spectra from both model and experiment to investigate spectral variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup level and cooling time. Partial Least Squares was utilized to extract quantitative information about process variables, such as acid concentration or burnup. The MIP Monitor was found to be sensitive to the induced variations of the process and was capable of extracting quantitative process information from the analyzed spectra.

Orton, Christopher Robert

347

Facile and rapid synthesis of pyrochlore W2O6 x H2O nanoplate via a fluorinion-assisted hydrothermal process.  

PubMed

Pyrochlore W2O6 x H2O were successfully prepared via a facile and rapid hydrothermal process in the presence of fluorinion. It is worth noting that our developed method can efficiently overcome the tedious process in the preparation of nanostructured tungstic oxide in the previous reports. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Results showed the morphologies of the samples were nanoplate and the thickness of the plate was estimated at about several nanometers. TEM image further revealed that the plates were trigonal-like with equal lengths of about 300 nm. Furthermore the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern taken from a single nanoplate indicated that the nanoplates were the single crystals with a preferential growth direction along the [011] direction. The effect of the additive ions on the formation has also been discussed. It was found that the fluorinion played a key role in the formation of W2O6 x H2O nanoplates. It is hoped that our work could provide a new insight into the facile and rapid preparation of metal oxide nanomaterials. PMID:24745265

Zheng, Huarong; Liang, Shijing; Wu, Weiming; Ding, Zhengxin; Wu, Ling

2014-03-01

348

Facilities Automation and Energy Management  

E-print Network

Computerized facilities automation and energy management systems can be used to maintain high levels of facilities operations efficiencies. The monitoring capabilities provides the current equipment and process status, and the analysis...

Jen, D. P.

1983-01-01

349

Education Leaders' Decision-Making Processes about Educational Facilities in a University Multiple Stakeholder Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research is a retrospective case study designed to document and analyze the process of decision-making by educational leaders and stakeholders at a four-year university. For this study, educational leaders and key stakeholders agreed to extensive interviews about the decisions made during the design, construction, and post-occupancy phases of…

Kelting, Scott

2011-01-01

350

78 FR 33605 - Process for a Designated Contract Market or Swap Execution Facility To Make a Swap Available to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...manner, and time as specified...the Public of Available To Trade Determinations...notice and a copy of the rule submission...criteria for a made available-to-trade...the Swap Data Repository (SDR) rules...Removing Made Available-to-Trade...process lacks any logical or legal...

2013-06-04

351

Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to

D. P. Baldwin; D. S. Zamzow

1998-01-01

352

Spectroscopic On-Line Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams in Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The current book chapter presents preliminary work toward the use of spectroscopic on-line monitoring for process control and safeguarding of radiochemical streams. Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining U(VI), nitrate, and nitric acid, while visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy was demonstrated as a method for determining Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI) and Nd(III). This method has been established using fuel reprocessing solution stimulants under dynamic flow conditions and on commercial spent nuclear fuel samples. Partial least squares (PLS) models for each analyte were prepared, and the fits of the data presented. A brief review of literature relevant to the use of vibrational spectroscopy and physicochemical measurements for process monitoring of nuclear fuel solutions is reported.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Lines, Amanda M.; Thomas, Elizabeth M.

2011-03-01

353

Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1: Maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) decontamination and cleanup estimates. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1, a 1991 Line Item, is planned for completion and start of operations in the spring of 1997. WRAP Module 1 will have the capability to characterize and repackage newly generated, retrieved and stored transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed, and suspect TRU waste for shipment to the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, the WRAP Facility Module 1 will have the capability to characterize low-level mixed waste for treatment in WRAP Module 2A. This report documents the assumptions and cost estimates for decontamination and clean-up of a maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) as defined by DOE Order 5480.7A, FIRE PROTECTION. The Order defines MPFL as the value of property, excluding land, within a fire area, unless a fire hazards analysis demonstrates a lesser (or greater) loss potential. This assumes failure of both automatic fire suppression systems and manual fire fighting efforts. Estimates were developed for demolition, disposal, decontamination, and rebuilding. Total costs were estimated to be approximately $98M.

Hinkle, A.W.; Jacobsen, P.H.; Lucas, D.R.

1994-06-30

354

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility  

E-print Network

, and laser metal deposition for unlimited design flexibility and rapid prototyping · Composites and Carbon for innovative processing using ORNL's unique prototyping materials and evaluation facility ORNL 2013-G00529/aas

355

Conical scan impact study. Volume 1: General central data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument was studied in terms of: (1) design modifications required in framing and continuous image recording devices; and (2) changes in configurations of an all-digital precision image processor. A baseline system was defined to provide the framework for comparison, and included pertinent spacecraft parameters, a conical MSS, a linear MSS, an image recording system, and an all-digital precision processor. Lateral offset pointing of the sensors over a range of plus or minus 20 deg was considered. The study addressed the conical scan impact on geometric, radiometric, and aperture correction of MSS data in terms of hardware and software considerations, system complexity, quality of corrections, throughput, and cost of implementation. It was concluded that: (1) if the MSS data are to be only film recorded, then there is only a nomial concial scan impact on the ground data processing system; and (2) if digital data are to be provided to users on computer compatible tapes in rectilinear format, then there is a significant conical scan impact on the ground data processing system.

Ebert, D. H.; Eppes, T. A.; Thomas, D. J.

1973-01-01

356

Conical scan impact study. Volume 2: Small local user data processing facility. [multispectral band scanner design alternatives for earth resources data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impact of a conical scan versus a linear scan multispectral scanner (MSS) instrument on a small local-user data processing facility was studied. User data requirements were examined to determine the unique system rquirements for a low cost ground system (LCGS) compatible with the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system. Candidate concepts were defined for the LCGS and preliminary designs were developed for selected concepts. The impact of a conical scan MSS versus a linear scan MSS was evaluated for the selected concepts. It was concluded that there are valid user requirements for the LCGS and, as a result of these requirements, the impact of the conical scanner is minimal, although some new hardware development for the LCGS is necessary to handle conical scan data.

Ebert, D. H.; Chase, P. E.; Dye, J.; Fahline, W. C.; Johnson, R. H.

1973-01-01

357

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RF) saltcrete processing. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments during this report period for waste cementation/processing operations are summarized. During this report period, the team completed an important site visit to the Rocky Flats Facility (RF). This visit focused on extensive interaction with DOE contract personnel about microstructural and phase characterization of saltcrete. A copy of the trip report prepared by the WES team is enclosed. The team prepared a document detailing procedures for sample preparation and analysis to enhance the usefulness of results of the forensic work underway at RF. A copy of this document is enclosed. A proposal was prepared for additional short-term tasks to contribute significantly to gaining the most benefit from data gathered during forensic analyses of saltcrete, and waste-treatment studies, by EG and G. A copy of this proposal was forwarded to RF at the end of May, and it is included.

NONE

1994-07-26

358

Requalification of the 235-F Metallograph Facility gloveboxes for use in the 773-A Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory and plutonium ``Can in Can`` demonstrations  

SciTech Connect

The proposed use for these gloveboxes are: (1) to utilize the Pu metal glovebox system for the primary containment associated with the Pre-Processing/Re-Processing Laboratory for obtaining radioactive glass compound viscometer analysis, and (2) to utilize the Pu oxide glovebox system for primary containment associated with the Pu Can in Can Demonstration for proof of principle testing specific to long term Pu immobilization and storage technology. This report presents objective evidence that supports the engineering judgment indicating the existing gloveboxes can be requalified for the proposed uses indicated above. SRS has the ability to duplicate the test parameters, with site forces, that will meet or exceed the identical acceptance criteria established to qualify the existing gloveboxes. The qualification effort will be a documented procedure using the leak test criteria characteristic of the original glovebox purchase. Two equivalent tests will be performed, one for post modification leak test acceptance and one for post installation leak test acceptance. Assurance of this approach is substantiated by thorough reviews of glovebox, leak test and weld standard guidance documents, as well as review of historical Project 3253 design and vendor information specific to the existing gloveboxes. Reuse of these gloveboxes will eliminate the need for competitive procurement of new gloveboxes.

Hinds, S.; Hidlay, J.

1997-04-16

359

NASA/NOAA implementation of the USAID-sponsored satellite ground station and data processing facility for Bangladesh  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of a project to transfer multiple environmental satellite data reception, processing, and interpretation capabilities from the U.S. to Bangladesh. The goal of the project is to improve the management of resources related primarily to agriculture, water development, forestry, and fisheries. It is also hoped to improve the existing cyclone/storm surge warning system. An account is given of the interagency and international cooperation underlying the project. The remote-sensing installation in Dhaka, Bangladesh, is described, and the most likely system applications are summarized. Attention is also given to the special requirements concerning this type of technology transfer, and an assessment is made of the project's practical value to Bangladesh.

Dodge, J. C.; Vermillion, C. H.

1983-01-01

360

Alternative facility layouts for semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities are widely acknowledged to be among the most complicated industrial systems from a production planning and control point of view. The design of most wafer fabrication facilities has followed the process layout, where similar machines are located together. This feeds to complex, reentrant product flows through the facility. In this paper, we examine the effects on

Christopher D. Geiger; Rieko Hase; Christos G. Takoudis; Reha Uzsoy

1997-01-01

361

A facile dip-coating process for preparing highly durable superhydrophobic surface with multi-scale structures on paint films.  

PubMed

Superhydrophobic surfaces with multi-scale nano/microstructures have been prepared on epoxy paint surfaces using a feasible dip-coating process. The microstructures with 5-10 microm protuberances were first prepared on epoxy paint surface by sandblast. Then the nanostructures were introduced on the microstructure surface by anchoring 50-100 nm SiO(2) particles (nano-SiO(2)) onto the sandblasted paint surface, which was completed by dip-coating with a nano-SiO(2)/epoxy adhesive solution (M1). At last the surface was further modified for enhancing hydrophobicity by another dip-coating with a solution of a low surface energy polymer, aminopropyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (ATPS) modified epoxy adhesive (M2). The water contact angle of the as-prepared samples reached as high as 167.8 degrees and the sliding angle was 7 degrees. The prepared superhydrophobic surface exhibited excellent durability to the high speed scouring test and high stability in neutral and basic aqueous solutions and some common organic solvents. In addition, this method can be adopted to fabricate large scale samples with a good homogeneity of the whole surface at very low cost. PMID:19552913

Cui, Zhe; Yin, Long; Wang, Qingjun; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin

2009-09-15

362

Tritium recycling (processing) facility design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maintenance of a nuclear weapons capability requires the periodic replacement of tritium contained in each of the weapons in the nuclear weapons stockpile because the radioactive decay of tritium reduces its quantity by about 5.5 percent per year. The Tritium Recycling Plant (TRP) performs the activities necessary to recover, purify, and recycle tritium returned from the field. Tritium is

J. Metzler; T. Le

1995-01-01

363

Nuclear Facilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order to produce nuclear weapons, each country must have facilities to produce and refine the nuclear materials, conduct research on weapon design, and store the completed weapons. The interactives in this collection allow you to explore the nuclear facilities of the nuclear powers (both declared and undeclared).

Griffith, Christopher

364

FEASIBILITY EVALUATION AND RETROFIT PLAN FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER DEPLOYMENT IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 8118  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 KHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 C to 200 C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined Joule heated melters. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and increase heat transfer to the slurry fed High Level Waste (HLW) sludge, the CCIM may be equipped with bubblers and/or water cooled mechanical agitators. The DWPF could benefit from use of CCIM technology, especially in light of our latest projections of waste volume to be vitrified. Increased waste loading and increased throughput could result in substantial life cycle cost reduction. In order to significantly surpass the waste throughput capability of the currently installed Joule Heated Melter, it may be necessary to install two 950 mm CCIMs in the DWPF Melt Cell. A cursory evaluation of system design requirements and modifications to the facility that may be required to support installation and operation of two 950 mm CCIMs was performed. Based on this evaluation, it appears technically feasible to position two CCIMs in the Melt Cell of the DWPF within the existing footprint of the current melter. Interfaces with support systems and controls including Melter Feed, Power, Melter Cooling Water, Melter Off-gas, and Canister Operations must be designed to support dual CCIM operations.

Barnes, A; Dan Iverson, D; Brannen Adkins, B

2007-11-15

365

Feasibility Evaluation and Retrofit Plan for Cold Crucible Induction Melter Deployment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Cold crucible induction melters (CCIM) have been proposed as an alternative technology for waste glass melting at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as for other waste vitrification facilities. Proponents of this technology cite high temperature operation, high tolerance for noble metals and aluminum, high waste loading, high throughput capacity, and low equipment cost as the advantages over existing Joule Heated Melter (JHM) technology. The CCIM uses induction heating to maintain molten glass at high temperature. A water-cooled helical induction coil is connected to an AC current supply, typically operating at frequencies from 100 kHz to 5 MHz. The oscillating magnetic field generated by the oscillating current flow through the coil induces eddy currents in conductive materials within the coil. Those oscillating eddy currents, in turn, generate heat in the material. In the CCIM, the induction coil surrounds a 'Cold Crucible' which is formed by metal tubes, typically copper or stainless steel. The tubes are constructed such that the magnetic field does not couple with the crucible. Therefore, the field generated by the induction coil couples primarily with the conductive medium (hot glass) within. The crucible tubes are water cooled to maintain their temperature between 100 deg. C to 200 deg. C so that a protective layer of molten glass and/or batch material, referred to as a 'skull', forms between them and the hot, corrosive melt. Because the protective skull is the only material directly in contact with the molten glass, the CCIM doesn't have the temperature limitations of traditional refractory lined JHM. It can be operated at melt temperatures in excess of 2000 deg. C, allowing processing of high waste loading batches and difficult-to-melt compounds. The CCIM is poured through a bottom drain, typically through a water-cooled slide valve that starts and stops the pour stream. To promote uniform temperature distribution and increase heat transfer to the slurry fed High Level Waste (HLW) sludge, the CCIM may be equipped with bubblers and/or water cooled mechanical agitators. The DWPF could benefit from use of CCIM technology, especially in light of our latest projections of waste volume to be vitrified. Increased waste loading and increased throughput could result in substantial life cycle cost reduction. In order to significantly surpass the waste throughput capability of the currently installed JHM, it may be necessary to install two 950 mm CCIMs in the DWPF Melt Cell. A cursory evaluation of system design requirements and modifications to the facility that may be required to support installation and operation of two 950 mm CCIMs was performed. Based on this evaluation, it appears technically feasible to position two CCIMs in the Melt Cell of the DWPF within the existing footprint of the current melter. Interfaces with support systems and controls including Melter Feed, Power, Melter Cooling Water, Melter Off-gas, and Canister Operations must be designed to support dual CCIM operations. This paper describes the CCIM technology and identifies technical challenges that must be addressed in order to implement CCIMs in the DWPF. (authors)

Barnes, A.B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D.C.; Adkins, B.J. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA NC Inc., Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01

366

Use of historical uranium air sampling data to estimate worker exposure potential to airborne radioactive particulate in a uranium processing facility.  

PubMed

Historical industrial hygiene monitoring records from a uranium processing plant were collected and analyzed to characterize exposure potential to airborne radioactive particulate. More than 2,100 samples were collected during the period of 1954-1968. The data was organized by job title, plant number, and year of measurement. Laboratory analysis of air samples indicated a wide range of potential exposures to the alpha-emitting particulate. Logarithmic transformation of the data was necessary to approximate Gaussian distributions. Geometric Mean (GM) values were used as the measure of central tendency within years. GM values ranged from 23-49 disintegrations per minute per cubic meter of air sampled (dpm/m3) with the years 1963 and 1964 being significantly higher than other years (ANOVA: p < 0.05). When comparing exposure potential across plants, GM ranged from 20-68 dpm/m3, with plants 5 and 8 being significantly higher than the others (ANOVA: p < 0.05). Exposure potential for specific job titles across the plants varied widely. GM for clerks was the lowest (11 dpm/m3) while furnace operators were the highest (235 dpm/m3). Other job titles with potentially high exposures were chemical operators, forklift operators, machine operators, and furnace operators. This analysis indicates the magnitude and distributions of worker exposure to alpha-emitting airborne particulate. Additional analysis and epidemiologic studies are planned for this facility. PMID:11783876

Methner, M M; Feng, H A; Utterback, D F

2001-12-01

367

FULL-SCALE LABORATORY SIMULATION FACILITY TO TEST PARTICULATE AND ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM A THIRD WORLD RESIDENTIAL COMBUSTION PROCESS. I. FACILITY DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS OF TESTS OF THREE RURAL CHINA RESIDENTIAL COALS, A U.S. COAL, AND WOOD  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of a series of 12 tests for 3 coals from a rural area of China with abnormally high lung cancer rates, a U. S. coal, and pine wood fuel. It also discusses a residential combustion simulator, built at EPA's Research Triangle Park, NC, facility to conduct em...

368

School Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the building designs of eight school athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

Athletic Business, 2002

2002-01-01

369

Health Facilities  

MedlinePLUS

Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

370

Business Planning Core Facilities  

PubMed Central

Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

Itzkowitz, G.N.

2014-01-01

371

Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

372

Ecological studies related to construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Site. FY 1989--1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was built on the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the mid-1980`s. The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has completed 12 years of ecological studies related to the construction of the DWPF complex. Prior to construction, the 600-acre site (S-Area) contained a Carolina bay and the headwaters of a stream. Research conducted by the SREL has focused primarily on four questions related to these wetlands: (1) Prior to construction, what fauna and flora were present at the DWPF site and at similar, yet undisturbed, alternative sites? (2) By comparing the Carolina bay at the DWPF site (Sun Bay) with an undisturbed control Carolina bay (Rainbow Bay), what effect is construction having on the organisms that inhabited the DWPF site? (3) By comparing control streams with streams on the periphery of the DWPF site, what effect is construction having on the peripheral streams? (4) How effective have efforts been to lessen the impacts of construction, both with respect to erosion control measures and the construction of ``refuge ponds`` as alternative breeding sites for amphibians that formerly bred at Sun Bay? Through the long-term census-taking of biota at the DWPF site and Rainbow Bay, SREL has begun to evaluate the impact of construction on the biota and the effectiveness of mitigation efforts. Similarly, the effects of erosion from the DWPF site on the water quality of S-Area peripheral streams are being assessed. This research provides supporting data relevant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Executive Orders 11988 (Floodplain Management) and 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and United States Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10CFR1022).

Pechmann, J.H.K.; Scott, D.E.; McGregor, J.H.; Estes, R.A.; Chazal, A.C.

1993-02-01

373

Use of Air Modeling to Reduce Facility Demolition Costs  

Microsoft Academic Search

DOE faces the problem of decommissioning facilities contaminated with plutonium, uranium, and beryllium. The standard process has been to remove the contaminated process equipment from a facility, and then decontaminate the residual radiological and hazardous contamination from the facility structure to an ''unconditional release'' level. The facility would then be taken down as a clean demolition. Several beryllium-contaminated facilities were

Dennis Smith; Peter Sanford; Duane A. Parsons

2003-01-01

374

Low Gravity Freefall Facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Composite of Marshall Space Flight Center's Low-Gravity Free Fall Facilities.These facilities include a 100-meter drop tower and a 100-meter drop tube. The drop tower simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.2 seconds for containerless processing experiments, immiscible fluids and materials research, pre-flight hardware design test and flight experiment simulation. The drop tube simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.6 seconds and is used extensively for ground-based microgravity convection research in which extremely small samples are studied. The facility can provide deep undercooling for containerless processing experiments that require materials to remain in a liquid phase when cooled below the normal solidification temperature.

1981-01-01

375

Facilities Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find a pressing…

Bete, Tim, Ed.

1998-01-01

376

Accreditation for Indoor Climbing Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To ensure that the rapidly growing climbing gym industry maintains the excellent safety record established so far, the Climbing Gym Association (CGA) has developed the Peer Review and Accreditation Program, a process of review between qualified and experienced CGA reviewers and a climbing facility operator to assess the facility's risk management…

Mayfield, Peter

377

Facility model for the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Plutonium Facility contains more than sixty unit processes and handles a large variety of nuclear materials, including many forms of plutonium-bearing scrap. The management of the Plutonium Facility is supporting the development of a computer model of the facility as a means of effectively integrating the large amount of information required for material control, process planning, and facility development. The model is designed to provide a flexible, easily maintainable facility description that allows the faciltiy to be represented at any desired level of detail within a single modeling framework, and to do this using a model program and data files that can be read and understood by a technically qualified person without modeling experience. These characteristics were achieved by structuring the model so that all facility data is contained in data files, formulating the model in a simulation language that provides a flexible set of data structures and permits a near-English-language syntax, and using a description for unit processes that can represent either a true unit process or a major subsection of the facility. Use of the model is illustrated by applying it to two configurations of a fictitious nuclear material processing line.

Coulter, C.A.; Thomas, K.E.; Sohn, C.L.; Yarbro, T.F.; Hench, K.W.

1986-01-01

378

Safe design of healthcare facilities  

PubMed Central

The physical environment has a significant impact on health and safety; however, hospitals have not been designed with the explicit goal of enhancing patient safety through facility design. In April 2002, St Joseph's Community Hospital of West Bend, a member of SynergyHealth, brought together leaders in healthcare and systems engineering to develop a set of safety?driven facility design recommendations and principles that would guide the design of a new hospital facility focused on patient safety. By introducing safety?driven innovations into the facility design process, environmental designers and healthcare leaders will be able to make significant contributions to patient safety. PMID:17142606

Reiling, J

2006-01-01

379

From Seismic Characterization to Coupled Process Testing Along Drifts at LSBB as an Example of Establishing an International Facility for a Worldwide Network of Underground Research Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel France is a French National Instrumented Infrastructure, CNRS, dedicated to inter-Disciplinary Underground Science and Technology. The underground galleries and the surrounding carbonate rock formations are well characterized by seismic imaging studies obtained with sensors both along the ridges and underground along the drifts. The facility is horizontally accessible with the main

S. Gaffet; J. S. Wang

2009-01-01

380

CSAR 79-034 ADDENDUM 2, storing the man-basket in the process cell in 236-Z Building, Plutonium Finishing Plant/Plutonium Reclamation Facility  

SciTech Connect

The man-basket is stored in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility canyon area and this addendum reports on a technical evaluation for the storage inside the canyon to ensure consistency with the requirements of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual, WHC-CM-4-29.

Chiao, T.

1994-10-25

381

Fifty cell test facility  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design of a facility capable of the simultaneous testing of up to 50 high-temperature (400 to 500/sup 0/C) lithium alloy/iron sulfide cells; this facility is located in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The emphasis will be on the lifetime testing of cells fabricated by ANL and industrial contractors to acquire statistical data on the performance of cells of various designs. A computer-based data-acquisition system processes the cell performance data generated from the cells on test. The terminals and part of the data-acquisition equipment are housed in an air-conditioned enclosure adjacent to the testing facility; the computer is located remotely.

Arntzen, J. D.; Kolba, V. M.; Miller, W. E.; Gay, E. C.

1980-07-01

382

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2009-03-25

383

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2010-08-18

384

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31

385

Medical Image Analysis Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

1978-01-01

386

A continuous silicon-coating facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Automatic continuous silicon-coating facility is used to process 100 by 10 cm graphite-coated ceramic substrates for silicon solar cells. Process reduces contamination associated with conventional dip-coating processes, improving material service life.

Butter, C.; Heaps, J. D.

1979-01-01

387

Real-time radiographic inspection facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A real time radiographic inspection facility has been developed for nondestructive evaluation applications. It consists of an X-ray source, an X-ray sensitive television imaging system, an electronic analog image processing system, and a digital image processing system. The digital image processing system is composed of a computer with the necessary software to drive the overall facility. Descriptions are given of the design strategy, the facility's components, and its current capabilities.

Roberts, E., Jr.

1977-01-01

388

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RF) saltcrete processing. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Accomplishments during this report period for waste cementation/processing operations are summarized. The principal effort of this report period was a review of two documents. These were (1) Sampling and Analysis Plan for Saltcrete Process Inputs and (2) ...

1994-01-01

389

National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) promotes its two main programs, Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), at this website. Individuals can view images, animations, and short movies of crystal growth, the Optics Processing Laboratory, Beamline Operations, and additional NIF-related projects and science. Researchers can discover the science and successes of NIF, including setting the world record for high-energy laser performance. Students can discover the fundamental concepts about laser operations.

390

Concept and safety studies of an integrated pyroprocess facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing pyroprocess facilities for the dry processing research of spent fuel for over 10 years since 1997. A hot cell facility, named the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), for the demonstration of a head-end part of pyroprocess was developed in November 2005. An inactive demonstration facility for the integrated

Gil-Sung You; il-Je Cho; Won-Myung Choung; Eun-Pyo Lee; Dong-Hee Hong; Won-Kyung Lee; Jeong-Hoe Ku

2011-01-01

391

Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Facilities Utilization Program Implementation Handbook (FUPIH) prescribes procedures for the review and the reporting on the utilization of NASA facilities. The Directors of NASA Field Installations should designate an Installation Official responsible for coordinating the assignment of buildings space and implementing the facilities utilization reviews and annual report preparation. The individual designated shall be known as the 'Facilities Utilization Officer (FUO).' Functional responsibilities of the FUO are detailed in NASA Management Instruction (NMI) 7234.1. It is recognized that titles used in the implementation of the Facilities Utilization Program may vary between field installations. The Facilities Utilization Program (FUP) is designed to provide a uniform and orderly process for meeting or addressing the following objectives: the establishment of sound facilities requirements to meet NASA's programmatic and institutional needs; the optimum allocation of available facilities and related resources to meet these requirements; and the early identification and request for required additional facilities resources. The detailed review and reporting system enacted by NMI 7234.1 should encourage more comprehensive utilization planning for all NASA facilities and ensure, to the maximum extent practicable, that all such facilities are put to their highest and best use consistent with NASA programmatic and institutional priorities. A principal purpose of the FUP is the early identification of NASA facilities which may be or may become underutilized or excess to NASA needs and to provide a timely reference point from which corrective actions (i.e., consolidation, elimination of duplication, improved utilization of disposal) may be taken. Because the supply of this handbook is limited, distribution should be controlled at the field installation level.

1987-01-01

392

Dalhousie University Facilities Management  

E-print Network

Dalhousie University Facilities Management Interior Signage Guidelines 2012 #12;Facilities Management Interior Signage Standard Providing Excellence in Facilities Management 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS: Construction SECTION 6: Installation APPENDICES #12;Facilities Management Interior Signage Standard Providing

Brownstone, Rob

393

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01

394

Strategic facility planning improves capital decision making.  

PubMed

A large, Midwestern IDS undertook a strategic facility-planning process to evaluate its facility portfolio and determine how best to allocate future investments in facility development. The IDS assembled a facility-planning team, which initiated the planning process with a market analysis to determine future market demands and identify service areas that warranted facility expansion. The team then analyzed each of the IDS's facilities from the perspective of uniform capacity measurements, highest and best use compared with needs, building condition and investment-worthiness, and facility growth and site development opportunities. Based on results of the analysis, the strategy adopted entailed, in part, shifting some space from inpatient care to ambulatory care services and demolishing and replacing the 11 percent of facilities deemed to be in the worst condition. PMID:11258269

Reeve, J R

2001-03-01

395

Cathode Life Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cathode Life Test Facility (CLTF) has been in operation for ten years and has tested ten different cathode types for a total of approximately 2.0 million hours of life test data. As part of the defense management review (DMR) process, Rome Laboratory (RL) has eliminated internal research efforts pertaining to cathode life testing. Based on this directive, the CLTF was moved to the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) at Crane, Indiana. This report summarizes the process of moving the CLTF from RL to the NSWC.

Jardieu, Ronald J.

1994-10-01

396

310 Facility chemical specifications  

SciTech Connect

The 300 area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) was designed and built to treat the waste water from the 300 area process sewer system. Several treatment technologies are employed to remove the trace quantities of contaminants in the stream, including iron coprecipitation, clarification, filtration, ion exchange, and ultra violet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation of organics. The chemicals that will be utilized in the treatment process are hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and ferric chloride. This document annotates the required chemical characteristics of TEDF bulk chemicals as well as the criteria that were used to establish these criteria. The chemical specifications in appendix B are generated from this information.

Hagerty, K.J.

1997-05-21

397

{sup 99m}Tc generators for clinical use based on zirconium molybdate gel and (n, gamma) produced {sup 99}Mo: Indian experience in the development and deployment of indigenous technology and processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Indian pursuit of gel generator technology for {sup 99m}Tc was driven mainly by three considerations, namely, (i) well-established and ease of reliable production of (n, gamma)-based {sup 99}Mo in several tens of GBq quantities in the research reactors in Trombay/Mumbai, India, (ii) need for relatively low-cost alternate technology to replace the solvent (MEK) extraction generator system in use in India since 1970s and (iii) minimize dependency on weekly import of fission-produced {sup 99}Mo raw material required for alumina column generator. Extensive investigations on process standardisation for zirconium molybdate gel (ZMG) led to a steady progress, achieved both in terms of process technology and final performance of {sup 99m}Tc gel generators. The {sup 99m}Tc final product purity from the Indian gel system was comparable to that obtained from the gold-standard alumina column generators. Based on the feasibility established for reliable small-scale production, as well as satisfactory clinical experience with a number of gel generators used in collaborating hospital radiopharmacies, full-fledged mechanised processing facilities for handling up to 150 g of ZMG were set up. The indigenous design and development included setting up of shielded plant facilities with pneumatic-driven as well as manual controls and special gadgets such as, microwave heating of the zirconium molybdate cake, dispenser for gel granules, loading of gel columns into pre-assembled generator housing etc. Formal review of the safety features was carried out by the regulatory body and stage-wise clearance for processing low and medium level {sup 99}Mo activity was granted. Starting from around 70 GBq {sup 99}Mo handling, the processing facilities have since been successfully operated at a level of 740 GBq {sup 99}Mo, twice a month. In all 18 batches of gel have been processed and 156 generators produced. The individual generator capacity was 15 to 30 GBq with an elution yield of nearly 75%. 129 generators were supplied to 11 user hospitals and the estimated number of clinical studies done is well over 5000. The salient aspects of the Indian experience have been reported in many a forum and shared with the IAEA through the on-going CRP. The detailed process know-how is available for technology transfer from BRIT, India. (author)

Saraswathy, P.; Dey, A.C.; Sarkar, S.K.; Kothalkar, C.; Naskar, P.; Arjun, G.; Arora, S.S.; Kohli, A.K. [Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), BARC Vashi Complex, Navi Mumbai 400705 (India); Meera, V.; Venugopal, V. [Radiochemistry and Isotope Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai 400085 (India); Ramamoorthy, N. [Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2008-07-15

398

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report CSER-96-019 for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Processing and Storage Facilities Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)  

SciTech Connect

This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially built baskets containing a maximum of either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the cask-MCO, operation at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility,a nd storage in the Canister Storage Building. Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the K{sub eff} = 0.95 criticality safety limit. This revision incorporates the analyses for the sampling/weld station in the Canister Storage Building and additional analysis of the MCO during the draining at CVDF. Additional discussion of the scrap basket model was added to show why the addition of copper divider plates was not included in the models.

KESSLER, S.F.

1999-10-20

399

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RF) saltcrete processing. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes work authorized for technical and scientific support to waste cementation and saltcrete processing operations. During this report period, tasks described in amendment M003 were initiated, some were completed, and an additional task ...

1995-01-01

400

Phased Demolition of an Occupied Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. government constructed the K-1401 facility in the late 1940's as a support building for various projects supporting the uranium gaseous diffusion process. In 2004 the U.S. Department of Energy authorized Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to decontaminate and demolish the facility. The K-1401 facility was used for a variety of industrial purposes supporting the gaseous diffusion process. Many

Lawrence M. Brede; Merl J. Lauterbach; Brandon W. Witt; James McCague

2008-01-01

401

Scale-Up of Palladium Powder Production Process for Use in the Tritium Facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC\\/Summary of FY99FY01 Results for the Preparation of Palladium Using the Sandia\\/LANL Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palladium used at Savannah River (SR) for process tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to understand the processes involved in preparing this material, SR is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material. The material specifications are shown in Table 1. An improved understanding of the chemical processes should help to guarantee

David P. Baldwin; Daniel S. Zamzow; R. Dennis Vigil; Jesse T. Pikturna

2001-01-01

402

Facilities Planning & Management FACILITIES PLANNING & MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

Facilities Planning & Management FACILITIES PLANNING & MANAGEMENT Associate Executive Director Geoffrey Ellazar Shuttle Drivers Budget Manager Caren Johnson Admin.Analyst I Mikki Comstock Senior Property Manager Deborah Collet Mike Johnson Rick Sims Building Maintenance Workers Admin. Support Asst. I

Ponce, V. Miguel

403

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Wiegand, D.L.

1994-09-01

404

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

1993-12-01

405

Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan  

E-print Network

Texas Facilities Commission?s Facility Management Strategic Plan Jorge A. Ramirez Deputy Executive Director Building Operations & Plant Management ESL-IC-09-11-12 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations..., Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Facility Strategic Plan ?High Performance Building Approach ? Envelope ? Load Reduction ? (Re)Design ? Advanced Tactics ?Building Automation ? Sub-metering ? Controls ?Commissioning ? Assessment ? Continuous ?Facility...

Ramirez, J. A.

406

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) support to Department of Energy Rocky Flats Facility (DOE RFO) saltcrete processing. Progress report, April 15--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work authorized for technical and scientific support to waste cementation and saltcrete processing operations. During this report period, the remaining tasks described in the agreement were completed and the project was closed. Accomplishments are summarized. The bulk of this report is a paper entitled ``Salt related expansion reactions in portland-cement-based waste forms.``

NONE

1996-04-29

407

THE APPLICATION OF NEURAL NETWORKS, IMAGE PROCESSING AND CAD BASED ENVIRONMENTS FACILITIES IN AUTOMATIC ROAD EXTRACTION AND VECTORIZATION FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article a new procedure that was designed to extract road centerline from high resolution satellite images, is presented. The results (road Networks) are fully structured in vector formed in Computer Aided Design (CAD) based system that could be used in Geographical Information System (GIS) with minimum edit. The designed procedure is the combination of image processing algorithms and

F. Farnood Ahmadi; M. J. Valadan Zoej; H. Ebadi; M. Mokhtarzadea

408

Hydrogen generation during melter feed preparation of Tank 42 sludge and salt washed loaded CST in the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of these scoping tests was to measure the rate of hydrogen generation in a series of experiments designed to duplicate the expected SRAT and SME processing conditions in laboratory scale vessels. This document details the testing performed to determine the maximum hydrogen generation expected with a coupled flowsheet of sludge, loaded CST [crystalline silicotitanate], and frit.

Daniel, W.E.

1999-12-08

409

High quality self-assembly magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) chain-like core-shell nanowires with luminescence synthesized by a facile one-pot hydrothermal process.  

PubMed

Large scale synthesis of uniform self-assembly Fe(3)O(4)@phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR) core-shell nanowires with 80-100 nm in diameter and 20-30 microm in length can be realized by a one-pot hydrothermal process. The optical and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized Fe(3)O(4) nanostructures have been investigated. PMID:20376393

Gong, Junyan; Li, Shanzhong; Zhang, Dongen; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Chao; Tong, Zhiwei

2010-05-28

410

A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Tertiary Chemical Treatment - Lime Precipitation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes the standard operating job procedures for the tertiary chemical treatment - lime precipitation process of wastewater treatment plants. Step-by-step instructions are given for pre-start up, start-up, continuous operation, and shut-down procedures. In addition, some theoretical material is presented along with some relevant…

Petrasek, Al, Jr.

411

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01

412

Future-oriented maintenance strategy based on automated processes is finding its way into large astronomical facilities at remote observing sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With expanding sizes and increasing complexity of large astronomical observatories on remote observing sites, the call for an efficient and recourses saving maintenance concept becomes louder. The increasing number of subsystems on telescopes and instruments forces large observatories, like in industries, to rethink conventional maintenance strategies for reaching this demanding goal. The implementation of full-, or semi-automatic processes for standard service activities can help to keep the number of operating staff on an efficient level and to reduce significantly the consumption of valuable consumables or equipment. In this contribution we will demonstrate on the example of the 80 Cryogenic subsystems of the ALMA Front End instrument, how an implemented automatic service process increases the availability of spare parts and Line Replaceable Units. Furthermore how valuable staff recourses can be freed from continuous repetitive maintenance activities, to allow focusing more on system diagnostic tasks, troubleshooting and the interchanging of line replaceable units. The required service activities are decoupled from the day-to-day work, eliminating dependencies on workload peaks or logistic constrains. The automatic refurbishing processes running in parallel to the operational tasks with constant quality and without compromising the performance of the serviced system components. Consequentially that results in an efficiency increase, less down time and keeps the observing schedule on track. Automatic service processes in combination with proactive maintenance concepts are providing the necessary flexibility for the complex operational work structures of large observatories. The gained planning flexibility is allowing an optimization of operational procedures and sequences by considering the required cost efficiency.

Silber, Armin; Gonzalez, Christian; Pino, Francisco; Escarate, Patricio; Gairing, Stefan

2014-08-01

413

A facile route to modify ferrous phosphate and its use as an iron-containing resource for LiFePO4 via a polyol process.  

PubMed

This study introduces an economical and environmentally friendly way of synthesizing LiFePO4/C to be used as cathode material in lithium ion batteries via two processes: (1) the synthesis of LiFePO4/C cathode material using a low cost divalent precursor ferrous phosphate, Fe3 (PO4)2·8H2O, as iron source in a polyol process and (2) the modification of the morphology of this precursor by varying the reaction time in a coprecipitation process. The study examines the effects of different structures and morphologies of the precursor on the structure and electrochemical performance of the as-synthesized LiFePO4/C. The LiFePO4/C shows an excellent rate capability and cycle performance, with initial discharge capacities of 153, 128, and 106 mA h g(-1) at 1 C, 5 C, and 10 C. The capacity retention is respectively 98.7%, 98.2%, and 98.7%, after 10 cycles at the corresponding rates. The capacity retention remains at 97% even after 300 cycles at the rate of 10 C. The outstanding electrochemical performance can be attributed to the improved rate of Li(+) diffusion and the excellent crystallinity of synthesized LiFePO4/C powders through the modified precursor. Therefore, this is an economical and environmentally friendly way of synthesizing LiFePO4/C to be used as cathode material in lithium ion batteries. PMID:24858212

Li, Shaomin; Liu, Xichuan; Mi, Rui; Liu, Hao; Li, Yinchuan; Lau, Woon-min; Mei, Jun

2014-06-25

414

Facile preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid polymeric ionic liquid monolithic column with a one-pot process for protein separation in capillary electrochromatography.  

PubMed

An organic-inorganic hybrid monolithic column based on 1-vinyl-3-dodecylimidazolium bromide (VC12Im(+)Br(-)) has been prepared in a single step by combining radical copolymerization with a non-hydrolytic sol-gel (NHSG) process. The NHSG process was significantly shortened to 6 h by using formic acid as catalyst. For comparison, we also prepared polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) monolithic columns by hydrolytic sol-gel and organic polymeric process, respectively. The resulting monolithic columns were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. Under the capillary electrochromatography mode, these columns were applied to separate alkylbenzenes, anilines, and proteins, respectively. The results indicated that the NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column exhibited the highest column efficiency among the three types of columns; organic solvent, commonly required by the traditional columns to achieve satisfactory separation efficiency for proteins, was absent in the NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column because of the biocompatibility of the VC12Im(+)Br(-), which was beneficial to analysis of protein containing samples. In order to demonstrate its application potential, the developed NHSG-based hybrid PIL monolithic column was also employed to separate egg white sample. PMID:25277101

Liu, Cuicui; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Feng, Xue; Qian, Hailong; Wang, Shuo

2014-11-01

415

Facile passivation of solution-processed InZnO thin-film transistors by octadecylphosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers at room temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple passivation method is developed to overcome the water susceptibility of solution-processed InZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) by utilizing octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The unpassivated InZnO TFTs exhibit large hysteresis in their electrical characteristics due to the adsorbed water at the semiconductor surface. Formation of a SAM of ODPA on the top of InZnO removes water molecules weakly absorbed at the back channel and prevents water diffusion from the surroundings. Therefore, the passivated devices exhibit significantly reduced hysteretic characteristics.

Xu, Wangying; Liu, Danqing; Wang, Han; Ye, Lei; Miao, Qian; Xu, Jian-Bin

2014-04-01

416

Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

1995-12-31

417

Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

1995-02-01

418

Assessment of the quality of groundwater and the Little Wind River in the area of a former uranium processing facility on the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, 1987 through 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2010, the U.S Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Wind River Environmental Quality Commission (WREQC), began an assessment of the effectiveness of the existing monitoring network at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site. The USGS used existing data supplied by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The study was to determine (1) seasonal variations in the direction of groundwater flow in the area of the former uranium processing facility toward the Little Wind River, (2) the extent of contaminated groundwater among the aquifers and between the aquifers and the Little Wind River, (3) whether current monitoring is adequate to establish the effectiveness of natural attenuation for the contaminants of concern, and (4) the influence of groundwater discharged from the sulfuric-acid plant on water quality in the Little Wind River.

Ranalli, Anthony J.; Naftz, David L.

2014-01-01

419

Introduction to Computing Facilities  

E-print Network

a problem: #12;SCS Facilities Groups #12;Accounts & Passwords · SCS Account · Andrew Account · You shouldIntroduction to Computing Facilities August, 2013 Tod Pike #12;Getting Help · SCS Computing Facilities · CMU Computing Facilities · Building/Office Management #12;Contacting Us · Help Desk (9am-5pm

Sadeh, Norman M.

420

Size and shape controllable synthesis and luminescent properties of BaGdF5:Ce3+/Ln3+ (Ln = Sm, Dy, Eu, Tb) nano/submicrocrystals by a facile hydrothermal process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we present a facile and environmentally-friendly hydrothermal process to synthesize BaGdF5: 2.5 mol% Ce3+/2.5 mol% Ln3+ (Ln = Sm, Dy, Eu and Tb) nano/submicroparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as photoluminescence (PL) spectra are used to characterize the resulting samples. The size, shape, and composition of the products could be tuned just by varying the organic additives and the pH values of the initial reaction solutions. The morphologies for the products include nanospheres, submicrospheres, peanut-like particles, as well as the spindle-like and star-like aggregates. Moreover, the size of the samples can be tuned from 50 nm to 150 nm. Additionally, we systematically investigate the luminescence properties of different lanthanide ions in BaGdF5 host. Under single-wavelength excitation at 260 nm, the samples doped with different lanthanide ions show intensive multicolor visible emissions depending on the doped Ln3+ ions. The luminescence process can be attributed to the strong absorption of UV irradiation by Ce3+ ions, followed by energy transfer to Gd3+ ions, from which the energy is transferred to Ln3+, resulting in the emission from the luminescent Ln3+ centers. The Gd3+ ions play an intermediate role in this process.

Yang, Dongmei; Kang, Xiaojiao; Shang, Mengmeng; Li, Guogang; Peng, Chong; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun

2011-06-01

421

Size and shape controllable synthesis and luminescent properties of BaGdF5:Ce3+/Ln3+ (Ln = Sm, Dy, Eu, Tb) nano/submicrocrystals by a facile hydrothermal process.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a facile and environmentally-friendly hydrothermal process to synthesize BaGdF(5): 2.5 mol% Ce(3+)/2.5 mol% Ln(3+) (Ln = Sm, Dy, Eu and Tb) nano/submicroparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as photoluminescence (PL) spectra are used to characterize the resulting samples. The size, shape, and composition of the products could be tuned just by varying the organic additives and the pH values of the initial reaction solutions. The morphologies for the products include nanospheres, submicrospheres, peanut-like particles, as well as the spindle-like and star-like aggregates. Moreover, the size of the samples can be tuned from 50 nm to 150 nm. Additionally, we systematically investigate the luminescence properties of different lanthanide ions in BaGdF(5) host. Under single-wavelength excitation at 260 nm, the samples doped with different lanthanide ions show intensive multicolor visible emissions depending on the doped Ln(3+) ions. The luminescence process can be attributed to the strong absorption of UV irradiation by Ce(3+) ions, followed by energy transfer to Gd(3+) ions, from which the energy is transferred to Ln(3+), resulting in the emission from the luminescent Ln(3+) centers. The Gd(3+) ions play an intermediate role in this process. PMID:21505713

Yang, Dongmei; Kang, Xiaojiao; Shang, Mengmeng; Li, Guogang; Peng, Chong; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun

2011-06-01

422

Estimating Fire Risks at Industrial Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a wide variety of nuclear production facilities that include chemical processing facilities, machine shops, production reactors, and laboratories. Current safety documentation must be maintained for the nuclear facilities at SRS. Fire Risk Analyses (FRAs) are used to support the safety documentation basis. These FRAs present the frequency that specified radiological and chemical consequences will be exceeded. The consequence values are based on mechanistic models assuming specific fire protection features fail to function as designed.

Coutts, D.A.

1999-07-12

423

Technical requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process has been developed and applied to the technical planning of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology. The process involves: (1) characterization of issues; (2) quantification of testing requirements; (3) evaluation of facilities; and (4) development of a test plant to identify the role, timing, characteristics, and costs of major experiments and facilities. The nuclear subsystems addressed are:

M. A. Abdou; P. J. Gierszewski; M. S. Tillack; J. Grover; R. Puigh; D. K. Sze; D. Berwald

1986-01-01

424

Developing a Shared Research Facility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Planning, creation, and current operation of the Transgenic Mouse Research Facility at the New York University Kaplan Cancer Center are discussed. The university considered need, space, funding, supervision, and marketing and followed a logical and structured management process embodying both scientific and administrative input. (Author/MSE)

Goodman, Ira S.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

1990-01-01

425

Operating Costs of Educational Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The references included were drawn from the documents received and processed to date by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities, and are organized into the following sections--(1) school business, (2) maintenance and operations, (3) insurance programs, (4) property accounting, (5) purchasing, and (6) food service. (FS)

Isler, Norman P.

426

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.F.3 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for Occupational Health Monitoring Program 1. Purpose: a. This SOP details the process and testing requirements at UB who have contact with lab animals or their tissues/fluids for the purpose of teaching or research

Krovi, Venkat

427

National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

1995-05-31

428

Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation  

SciTech Connect

RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively.

Lebaron, G.J.

1997-09-07

429

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01

430

Satellite remote sensing facility for oceanograhic applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The project organization, design process, and construction of a Remote Sensing Facility at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at LaJolla, California are described. The facility is capable of receiving, processing, and displaying oceanographic data received from satellites. Data are primarily imaging data representing the multispectral ocean emissions and reflectances, and are accumulated during 8 to 10 minute satellite passes over the California coast. The most important feature of the facility is the reception and processing of satellite data in real time, allowing investigators to direct ships to areas of interest for on-site verifications and experiments.

Evans, R. H.; Kent, S. S.; Seidman, J. B.

1980-01-01

431

Transport Reactor Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently evaluating hot gas desulfurization (HGD)in its on-site transport reactor facility (TRF). This facility was originally constructed in the early 1980s to explore advanced gasification processes with an entrained reactor, and has recently been modified to incorporate a transport riser reactor. The TRF supports Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems, one of METC`s advanced power generation systems. The HGD subsystem is a key developmental item in reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of the IGCC concept. The TRF is a unique facility with high-temperature, high-pressure, and multiple reactant gas composition capability. The TRF can be configured for reacting a single flow pass of gas and solids using a variety of gases. The gas input system allows six different gas inputs to be mixed and heated before entering the reaction zones. Current configurations allow the use of air, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen, steam, or any mixture of these gases. Construction plans include the addition of a coal gas input line. This line will bring hot coal gas from the existing Fluidized-Bed Gasifier (FBG) via the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) after filtering out particulates with ceramic candle filters. Solids can be fed either by a rotary pocket feeder or a screw feeder. Particle sizes may range from 70 to 150 micrometers. Both feeders have a hopper that can hold enough solid for fairly lengthy tests at the higher feed rates, thus eliminating the need for lockhopper transfers during operation.

Berry, D.A.; Shoemaker, S.A.

1996-12-31

432

Analysis of facility-monitoring data  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses techniques for analysis of data collected from nuclear-safeguards facility-monitoring systems. These methods can process information gathered from sensors and make interpretations that are in the best interests of the facility or agency, thereby enhancing safeguards while shortening inspection time.

Howell, J.A.

1996-09-01

433

Facility response plan  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90) strengthened and increased the requirements on ships and facilities handling, storing, and transporting oil. One of those requirements is the preparation of Facility Response Plans (FRPs) by ships or facilities which meet specific operating capacities. The Facility Response Plan is intended to be an all-inclusive guide for responding to and cleaning up any size spill, including a facilitys's or ship's worst case discharge. Although Navy ships are exempt from preparing FRPs, Navy facilities are required to submit plans. The requirements for the FRPs were expanded and clarified in four separate regulations which address different types of facilities. Since most Navy facilities are affected by at least one set of FRP regulations, a comprehensive guidebook detailing all of the requirements streamlines preparation of a facility's FRP.

Addison, I.; McCarthy, K.

1992-10-06

434

Reservoir sedimentation at hydropower facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the effects of reservoir sedimentation on hydropower facilities and remedies employed. The main focus is to provide a basic understanding of the causes and impacts of reservoir sedimentation with a perspective on hydropower facilities. After having established the scope of the sedimentation problem, alternatives used to rectify this problem are discussed. The alternatives include both preventative and remedial measures. Included in the discussion of alternatives are; a general description, advantages, and disadvantages of the different measures are presented. The paper is intended to present generalities and not explain the theory governing the processes discussed.

McCallan, R.M. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-12-31

435

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-print Network

is a critical facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supporting environmental, nuclear, national and environmental remediation researching, testing, and validating process flowsheets designing, installingRadiochemical Processing Laboratory #12;Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Housed within the U

436

Grout Facilities standby plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford`s 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made.

Claghorn, R.D.; Kison, P.F.; Nunamaker, D.R.; Yoakum, A.K.

1994-09-29

437

Research and test facilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

1993-01-01

438

Study on Influence Caused by Design and Operation Factors of Contact Aeration Tank on Effluent ATU-BOD·N-BOD Concentrations from Sedimentation Tank in Rural Sewerage Facilities with Biofilm Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design and operation factors on the effluent ATU-BOD·N-BOD concentrations in sedimentation tank were investigated by using observed data in the rural sewerage facilities with biofilm processes. It was found that the effluent N-BOD accounted for approximate 50 percent of the effluent BOD concentration in sedimentation tank because of the effluent ATU-BOD decrease(about 70 percent) and the effluent N-BOD increase (about 4 times) by treatment processes of contact aeration tank. It was recognized that the effluent ATU-BOD concentration in sedimentation tank was influenced by the design and operation factors such as influent ATU-BOD concentration, specific surface area of contact filter for fixed bed submerged filter, and average DO in contact aeration tank. The effluent ATU-BOD concentration in sedimentation tank was assumed to be governed by first-order function with complete-mix system of biological treatment processes. The effluent ATU-BOD concentration in sedimentation tank was found to be predicted by the empirical formula of hydraulic retention time, influent ATU-BOD concentration, specific surface area of contact filter for fixed bed submerged filter, and average DO in contact aeration tank. It was recognized that the peak effluent N-BOD concentration in sedimentation tank occurred in the around 10?15 hour of hydraulic retention time under the influence of biological nitrification reaction and nitrogenous compound. The effluent N-BOD concentration in sedimentation tank was also influenced by the effluent SS concentration in sedimentation tank.

Nakano, Takuji

439

Graph algorithms experimentation facility  

E-print Network

We provide a facility to experiment with graph algorithms. The facility is implemented as a client to XAGE, a software environment developed under the direction of Dr. James Abello. XAGE allows a user to visually animate algorithmic actions...

Sonom, Donald George

2012-06-07

440

Facility safety study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

1979-01-01