Science.gov

Sample records for producing coking heat

  1. Method and apparatus for producing active coke

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.

    1980-12-30

    At least a portion of coke produced in a hearth-type furnace is fed into an activation reactor, and at least a portion of the waste gas from the hearth-type furnace is fed to the activation reactor to act as a heating gas and/or an activation gas for the coke feed. Hot waste gas from the activation reactor is passed to a waste-heat boiler. Active coke which has at least partially lost its adsorption capacity may be fed into the furnace in mixture with the coal or alone, or it may be fed directly into the activation reactor for re-activation of the coke.

  2. Effects of preheating and highly heat-conductive brick on coke quality

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Arima, T.

    1995-12-31

    In replacing the coke ovens available currently, the introduction of a combined technique of a preheated coal charging method (preheating temperature:175 C) and the use of highly heat-conductive brick is under examination for raising the productivity of coke ovens. With such background, a study of the effects of this combined technique on the coke quality, especially the coke size was conducted. The experimental results revealed that the primary size of coke produced by the combined technique is noticeably larger than that of the coke made from wet coal and after five revolutions of drum (equivalent to mechanical impact given at a time of dropping from coke oven chamber to wharf), the coke size reduces even compared with an ordinary coke. This may be due to the fact that the coke produced by the combined technique includes a lot of fissures inside the coke lump.

  3. Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-20

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

  4. Process for producing shaft furnace cokes

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, K.; Sunami, Y.

    1981-06-09

    An impregnated carbonaceous material which can be mixed with basic coal to form a mixture which, once roasted, forms an effective shaft furnace coke. The impregnated carbonaceous material is formed by finely crushing an inert carbonaceous material such as powdered coke, coal gasification char, coal liquifaction residue coal, oil coke, and semi-dry-distilled char, and mixing and impregnating the crushed carbonaceous material with an aromatic pitch such as coal tar, coal tar pitch, asphalt, and pitch obtained by heat-treating or solvent extracting an asphalt. The mixing is conducted at a temperature above the aromatic pitch melting point. The impregnated carbonaceous material contains preferably 50 to 95 parts by weight of crushed inert carbonaceous material and 5 to 50 parts by weight aromatic pitch.

  5. Process for the recovery of coke oven waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

    1981-01-20

    This invention is directed to a process for making coke and recovering the heat therefrom for preheating the firing gas to the coke oven. The process involves the use of the coke oven firing gas to extract the sensible heat from the hot coke from the coking oven to both preheat the firing gas for the coke oven and cool the hot coke. Significant economies are achieved in the two-fold function of coke production and heat recovery in accordance with the method disclosed.

  6. Experience in the study of coke battery heating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zernii, G.G.; Leibovich, R.E.; Nepomnyashchii, A.A.; Sulimova, E.I.; Robul, L.A.; Kardashova, E.F.; Starobinskii, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the distribution of coke oven gas to the heating flues of the heating wall was presented. The effects of the variation in the density of the charge on the resulting quality of the coke were also discussed. It was concluded that the heat flow should be distributed along the heating wall with consideration not only of the conical nature of the oven, but also the difference in the bulk density of the charge with length and height of the oven. This permitted an improvement on the quality of the coke and a decrease in the consumption of heating gas for charge heating.

  7. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  8. Preparation of modified semi-coke by microwave heating and adsorption kinetics of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Peng, Jin-Hui; Duan, Xin-Hui; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of modified semi-coke has been achieved, using phosphoric acid as the modifying agent, by microwave heating from virgin semi-coke. Process optimization using a Central Composite Design (CCD) design of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) technique for the preparation of modifies semi-coke is presented in this paper. The optimum conditions for producing modified semi-coke were: concentration of phosphoric acid 2.04, heating time 20 minutes and temperature 587 degrees C, with the optimum iodine of 862 mg/g and yield of 47.48%. The textural characteristics of modified semi-coke were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The BET surface area of modified semi-coke was estimated to be 989.60 m2/g, with the pore volume of 0.74 cm3/g and a pore diameter of 3.009 nm, with micro-pore volume contributing to 62.44%. The Methylene Blue monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be mg/g at K. The adsorption capacity of the modified semi-coke highlights its suitability for liquid phase adsorption application with a potential usage in waste water treatment. PMID:24779145

  9. Method for recovering and utilizing heat of coke-oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kunioka, K.; Nishio, H.; Okuyama, Y.; Shimotsuma, T.

    1981-06-02

    A method is described for recovering and utilizing heat of coke- oven gas is eliminated. Through heat exchange with a high-temperature coke-oven gas generated from a coke oven battery and containing vaporized coal tar, vaporized low boiling point substances and dust. By drying and preheating a blended raw material coal fine to be charged into coking ovens of said coke oven battery, and causing most of said coal tar contained in said coke-oven gas to condense and deposit onto the particle surfaces of said coal fine. During the process of said heat exchange, sensible heat and condensation heat of said coke-oven gas and substances contained therein are recovered and utilized, and at the same time, most of the contained coal tar from said coke-oven gas.

  10. Influence of heating rate on quality of needle coke in calcining

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmetov, M.M.; Karpinskaya, N.M.; Shipkov, N.N.

    1984-05-01

    This article examines the calcination of raw coke in hearth and chamber furnaces. Three coke samples with identical degrees of calcining were taken from each furnace. The heating rate was calculated from measurements of the coke temperature as it moved in the furnace under conditions of a stable and characteristic calcining regime. The coke temperature was measured by means of a chromel-alumel thermocouple. Electric resistivity and carbon and hydrogen contents are practically identical for the cokes calcined in the hearth and chamber furnaces. The difference between the quality indexes of the cokes is attributed to the difference in the heating rates. The results indicate that a major disadvantage of the hearth furnace is its high heating rate. It is suggested that the hearth furnace should not be used in calcining cokes that must meet rigid quality requirements.

  11. Occupational exposure to carbon/coke fibers in plants that produce green or calcined petroleum coke and potential health effects: 2. Fiber concentrations.

    PubMed

    Maxim, L Daniel; Galvin, Jennifer B; Niebo, Ron; Segrave, Alan M; Kampa, Otto A; Utell, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    We monitored exposure to various fibers among workers in eight plants operated by ConocoPhillips that produce green or calcined petroleum coke. Carbon/coke and other fibers, including calcium silicate, cellulose, gypsum, and iron silicate, were found in occupational samples. Carbon/coke fibers were found in bulk samples of calcined petroleum coke, the probable source of these fibers in occupational samples. Time-weighted average (TWA) total fiber concentrations were approximately lognormally distributed; 90% were < or = 0.1 f/ml. Although consistently low, TWA total fiber concentrations varied with plant, job (tasks), and type of coke. This was expected given the substantial differences in plant configuration, technology, and workplace practices among refineries and carbon plants. Carbon/coke fibers (identified and measured using transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) were found at all plants producing all types of calcined coke and not detected at any plant producing only green coke. Approximately 98% of all carbon/coke TWAs were < or = 0.1 f/ml. Analysis of task length average (TLA) data by various statistical techniques indicates that the average carbon/coke TLA is certainly < or = 0.05 f/ml and probably < 0.03 f/ml. PMID:16326398

  12. Process for calcining coke

    SciTech Connect

    Komi, N.; Noguchi, K.

    1981-05-05

    A process is described for calcining green coke in at least three heating stages, which comprises preheating the green coke in the first stage, preliminarily calcining the coke in the second stage, cooling the coke; and calcining the coke in the third stage, volatile matter from the second stage being burned during the third stage. The product coke is suitable for preparing graphite electrodes.

  13. Improvement on heating efficiency of fuel in coke oven at CSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, M.T.; Chen, C.W.; Shen, J.F.; Hsiao, C.H.; Hsieh, D.L.; Chung, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    A heat input management of coke oven, consisting of two subsystems respectively for setting proper coking time, diagnosing thermal state of coke oven in horizontal and longitudinal direction, was developed. It aimed to control the average oven temperature to the suitable level and to diminish the deviations of temperature between each heating walls. In subsystem 1, the measured flue temperature was corrected by a reversed cooling curve and compared with an ideal transversal profile. A precise thermal state of battery heating was therefore induced. In subsystem 2, with the measurement of gas temperature at ascending pipe, a coking completion table composed of production ratio, coal moisture and flue temperature was established for setting the target flue temperature. Since this coke oven combustion management system was adopted, the remarkable heating improvement has been achieved, for an example at Phase III, the average temperature of coke oven was decreased from 1,262 C to 1,240 C, the fuel was thus saved, the wall temperature was more even and the coke qualities were also improved.

  14. Research on coke-oven heating technology and the properties of coke as a blast-furnace fuel. [UKhIN

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Yu.S.; Semisalov, L.P.

    1980-01-01

    A fundamentally novel coke-oven system was designed at Giprokoks (underjet, with bottom gas and air regulation) on the basis of data from model experiments. In particular, when batteries of 41.6 m/sup 3/ coke ovens were developed, the results of model tests led to major modifications to the original designs for the regenerator zones, sloping ducts and flues. UKhIN investigations on hot and hydraulic models, using modern mathematical procedures and computers, were used to study the details of heat exchange and gas flow in the regenerator packings under coke ovens. Criterial equations were derived for the coefficients of heat transfer by convection and of hydraulic resistance, covering the specific features of regenerator performance in coke-oven heating systems. Much useful information for the advance of coke-oven technology has been obtained from laboratory, pilot and fullscale plant studies of the thermal properties of coals and blends. Investigations (including blast-furnace trials) in connection with the commercial adoption of dry coke cooling established that during its soaking in the storage chamber the coke undergoes changes in molecular structure, to an extent dependent on the time and temperature. Recommendations based on this research significantly improve the coke strength properties and extended the range of usable coal supplies. Traditionally, the Institute is greatly interested in the problem of coke yields, which has now become very urgent in connection with the use of higher proportions of grade G and other coals with high volatile matters. Detailed studies have been made of the effects of various processing factors on the yields of saleable and metallurgical coke.

  15. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. |

    1997-12-31

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  16. Process for producing blast furnace grade coke, a distillable product and fuel gases from a heavy, high sulfur, crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, L.D.; Sooter, M.C.; Theodore, F.W.; Wasson, G.E.

    1983-06-14

    A process for producing a distillable hydrocarbonaceous stream, fuel gases and blast furnace grade coke from a heavy, high sulfur, crude oil by producing delayed coke from at least a portion of the crude oil; crushing at least a portion of the coke to provide a finely divided coke feedstock to a briquetting operation where the finely divided coke is briquetted using crude oil or topped crude oil as a binder to produce briquettes of a size from about 3/4 inch to about 3 inches with the resulting briquettes being passed to a high temperature vertical calciner where the solids are desulfurized to produce a strong blast furnace grade coke. The distillable stream and fuel gas stream are recovered from the delayed coking operation, the vertical calciner and optionally a crude oil topping operation. In some instances coke particles in the size range from about 3/4 inch to about 3 inches may be passed directly to the calciner without crushing and briquetting. However, it is preferred to crush and briquette substantially all of the coke.

  17. Considerations concerning the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas in an industrial pilot-station

    SciTech Connect

    Paunescu, L.; Gaba, A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the conception and realization obtained by the research team at the Metallurgical Researches Institute in an industrial pilot-station on the field of the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas.

  18. Coke oven gas injection to blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, F.L.; Terza, R.R.; Sobek, T.F.; Myklebust, K.L.

    1995-12-01

    U.S. Steel has three major facilities remaining in Pennsylvania`s Mon Valley near Pittsburgh. The Clairton Coke Works operates 12 batteries which produce 4.7 million tons of coke annually. The Edgar Thomson Works in Braddock is a 2.7 million ton per year steel plant. Irvin Works in Dravosburg has a hot strip mill and a range of finishing facilities. The coke works produces 120 mmscfd of coke oven gas in excess of the battery heating requirements. This surplus gas is used primarily in steel re-heating furnaces and for boiler fuel to produce steam for plant use. In conjunction with blast furnace gas, it is also used for power generation of up to 90 MW. However, matching the consumption with the production of gas has proved to be difficult. Consequently, surplus gas has been flared at rates of up to 50 mmscfd, totaling 400 mmscf in several months. By 1993, several changes in key conditions provided the impetus to install equipment to inject coke oven gas into the blast furnaces. This paper describes the planning and implementation of a project to replace natural gas in the furnaces with coke oven gas. It involved replacement of 7 miles of pipeline between the coking plants and the blast furnaces, equipment capable of compressing coke oven gas from 10 to 50 psig, and installation of electrical and control systems to deliver gas as demanded.

  19. Western Canadian coking coals -- Thermal rheology and coking quality

    SciTech Connect

    Leeder, W.R.; Price, J.T.; Gransden, J.F.

    1997-12-31

    Methods of predicting coke strength developed from the thermal rheological properties of Carboniferous coals frequently indicate that Cretaceous coals would not make high quality coke -- yet both types of coals produce coke suitable for the iron blast furnace. This paper will discuss the reasons why Western Canadian coals exhibit lower rheological values and how to predict the strength of coke produced from them.

  20. Coke calcination levels and aluminum anode quality

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, C.; Samanos, B.; Vogt, F.

    1996-10-01

    The calcination temperature of petroleum coke for aluminum anode applications has been generally increased during the past 10 years. This change by coke suppliers has often been done at the request of anode manufacturers (smelters) who seek special quality requirements for the calcined coke. Such an increase in calcining temperatures not only affects coke properties, but also has an effect on calciner operations and may have some unexpected effects on anode quality. One high and one low sulfur coke were calcined industrially at two different levels. The four individual calcined cokes were characterized. Then laboratory scale anodes were produced with each individual calcined coke. These all-coke anodes were first evaluated for optimum pitch content. Then the anodes were baked over a range of temperatures (920 to 1,260 C) in order to evaluate the influence of this heat treatment on anode properties. The results show the influence of calcining temperature on coke properties and anode properties, including the most important influence of the anode baking level.

  1. Structure degradation of 25Cr35Ni heat-resistant tube associated with surface coking and internal carburization

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.Q.; Yang, Y.S.; Zhan, Q.; Hu, Z.Q.

    1998-10-01

    Microstructures of 25Cr35Ni heat-resistant cracking tube after service were investigated and degradation mechanism of tube material was discussed. Results reveal that three distinguished zones, that is, internal oxide, carbide free, and internally carburized zones, will gradually develop in the inner wall of a cracking tube during service. Carbide free and internally carburized zones are formed primarily in relation to the periodic spalling and regeneration of surface oxide scale, and diffusion velocity of carbon and carbide forming elements in matrix and the solubility limit of carbon in alloy. The formation and growth of filament coke can aggravate structure degradation of the inner wall of the cracking tube, while deposition of lamellar and spheroidal coke may slow structure degradation to some extent. Surface coking and decoking cycles strongly aggravate the structure degradation of tube material and damage the service life of the cracking tube.

  2. Demand for superpremium needle cokes on upswing

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, J.A.; Stockman, G.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors discuss how recent supply shortages of super-premium quality needle cokes, plus the expectation of increased shortfalls in the future, indicate that refiners should consider upgrading their operations to fill these demands. Calcined, super-premium needle cokes are currently selling for as much as $550/metric ton, fob producer, and increasing demand will continue the upward push of the past year. Needle coke, in its calcined form, is the major raw material in the manufacture of graphite electrodes. Used in steelmaking, graphite electrodes are the electrical conductors that supply the heat source, through arcing electrode column tips, to electric arc steel furnaces. Needle coke is commercially available in three grades - super premium, premium, and intermediate. Super premium is used to produce electrodes for the most severe electric arc furnace steelmaking applications, premium for electrodes destined to less severe operations, and intermediate for even less critical needs.

  3. A new technology for producing hydrogen and adjustable ratio syngas from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Shen; Zhi-zhong Wang; Huai-wang Yang; Run-sheng Yao

    2007-12-15

    About 15 billion Nm{sup 3} coke oven gas (COG) is emitted into the air in Shanxi Province in China as air pollutants. It is also a waste of precious chemical resources. In this study, COG was purified respectively by four methods including refrigeration, fiberglass, silica gel, and molecular sieve. Purified COG was separated by a prism membrane into two gas products. One consists mainly of H{sub 2} ({gt}90 vol %) and the other is rich in CH{sub 4} ({gt}60 vol %) with their exact compositions to vary with the membrane separation pressure and outlet gas flow ratio. The gas rich in CH{sub 4} was partially oxidized with oxygen in a high-temperature fixed-bed quartz reactor charged with coke particles of 10 mm size. At 1200-1300{sup o}C, a CH{sub 4} conversion of {gt}99% could be obtained. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the synthesis product gas can be adjusted in the range 0.3-1.4, very favorable for further C1 synthesis. 10 refs., 17 figs., 1t ab.

  4. Advanced processes for metallurgical coke. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, R.W.; Carsey, J.N.; von Bismarck, G.; Fujishima, C.

    1980-12-01

    Material collected in a survey of German coking plants (some in German, some in English) is presented: Ancit hot briquetting (including blast furnace tests), by-products of Ancit process, coal preparation, high volatile coking coals, preheating, briquetting blending, compacting and preheating, short coking time, wet charges, temperature control and heat consumption, supplies of coke, Solmer coke oven complex at Fos-sur-Mer, etc. (LTN)

  5. Structure of metallurgical coke

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, F.L.; Makarov, G.N.; Sidogin, V.P.; Kovalenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    Obtaining carboniferous coke satisfying the requirements of the metallurgical production processes constitutes a complicated problem determined by correctness in selecting a technological coking process and selecting the starting coals. Changes in coal charge composition, method, and systems of coking show a considerable effect on the properties of the metallurgical coke. Moreover, each technological process in which coke is used gives rise to quite well-defined requirements as regards its physicochemical properties. The general property of the carboniferous materials, on which their technological properties depend, is the reactive capability, which, in turn, depends to a large extent on the structure (macro-, micro-, and fine structure), the degree of order in the structure, the presence and sizes of crystals, and the extent of development of the system. Therefore, the structure can and must be one of the basic criteria of evaluating the quality when producing and using a specific metallurgical fuel and a reducing agent. A method of complex microscopic analysis of a carboniferous substance of carboniferous coke, iron and chemical etching methods, and optical and electronic (transmission and scanning) microscopy were used to study the structure of metallurgical coke produced by the Dnepropetrovsk Coking Plant. Coke belonging to 7 size-classes was studied microscopically: > 80, 80-60, 60-40, 40-25, 25-10, < 10, and 25-8 mm. The first size classes constitute the principal production of the plant, while the 25-8 mm class is produced to increase the quality of coke supplied to the ferroalloy plants. 5 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  6. New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Currey, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

  7. VACASULF operation at Citizens Gas and Coke Utility

    SciTech Connect

    Currey, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    Citizens Gas and Coke Utility is a Public Charitable Trust which operates as the Department of Utilities of the City of Indianapolis, Indiana. Indianapolis Coke, the trade name for the Manufacturing Division of the Utility, operates a by-products coke plant in Indianapolis, Indiana. The facility produces both foundry and blast furnace coke. Surplus Coke Oven gas, generated by the process, is mixed with Natural Gas for sale to industrial and residential customers. In anticipation of regulatory developments, beginning in 1990, Indianapolis Coke undertook the task to develop an alternate Coke Oven Gas desulfurization technology for its facility. The new system was intended to perform primary desulfurization of the gas, dramatically extending the oxide bed life, thus reducing disposal liabilities. Citizens Gas chose the VACASULF technology for its primary desulfurization system. VACASULF requires a single purchased material, Potassium Hydroxide (KOH). The KOH reacts with Carbon Dioxide in the coke Oven Gas to form Potassium Carbonate (potash) which in turn absorbs the Hydrogen Sulfide. The rich solution releases the absorbed sulfide under strong vacuum in the desorber column. Operating costs are reduced through utilization of an inherent heat source which is transferred indirectly via attendant reboilers. The Hydrogen Sulfide is transported by the vacuum pumps to the Claus Kiln and Reactor for combustion, reaction, and elemental Sulfur recovery. Regenerated potash solution is returned to the Scrubber.

  8. Advanced processes for metallurgical coke. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, R.W.; Carsey, J.N.; von Bismarck, G.; Fujishima, C.

    1980-12-01

    Material collected in a survey of German coking plants is presented (some in German; some in English): heat recovery in coke ovens and in coke cooling (both dry and wet methods); use of recovered heat to preheat charge, stamping techniques, blending coals, binders, briquetting, etc. (LTN)

  9. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2003-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world

  10. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

    2004-09-26

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world

  11. Method for calcining delayed coke

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1981-02-17

    Delayed petroleum coke is calcined in an internally-fired vertical shaft kiln. A downwardly-moving bed of green coke is preheated in the top of the kiln by rising combustion gases, then heat soaked at calcining temperatures in the intermediate section of the kiln, and finally cooled by recycle gas moving upwardly from the lower part of the kiln. Partially cooled calcined coke is recovered from the bottom of the kiln.

  12. Process for converting coal into liquid fuel and metallurgical coke

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Richard A.; Im, Chang J.; Wright, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method of recovering coal liquids and producing metallurgical coke utilizes low ash, low sulfur coal as a parent for a coal char formed by pyrolysis with a volatile content of less than 8%. The char is briquetted and heated in an inert gas over a prescribed heat history to yield a high strength briquette with less than 2% volatile content.

  13. Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, May 1--August 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-15

    The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a laser ultrasonic probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. This aim will be met by constructing an optical probe that will be tested using simulated coke deposits that are positioned inside of a bench-scale furnace. Successful development of the optical coke detector will provide industry with the only available method for on-line measurement of coke deposits. The optical coke detector will have numerous uses in the refining and petrochemical sectors including monitoring of visbreakers, hydrotreaters, delayed coking units, vacuum tower heaters, and various other heavy oil heating applications where coke formation is a problem. The coke detector will particularly benefit the olefins industry where high temperature thermal crackers are used to produce ethylene, propylene, butylene and other important olefin intermediates. The ethylene industry requires development of an on-line method for gauging the thickness of coke deposits in cracking furnaces because the current lack of detailed knowledge of coke deposition profiles introduces the single greatest uncertainty in the simulation and control of modern cracking furnaces. The laser ultrasonic coke detector will provide operators with valuable new information allowing them to better optimize the decoking turnaround schedule and therefore maximize production capacity.

  14. Trends in the automation of coke production

    SciTech Connect

    R.I. Rudyka; Y.E. Zingerman; K.G. Lavrov

    2009-07-15

    Up-to-date mathematical methods, such as correlation analysis and expert systems, are employed in creating a model of the coking process. Automatic coking-control systems developed by Giprokoks rule out human error. At an existing coke battery, after introducing automatic control, the heating-gas consumption is reduced by {>=}5%.

  15. Study on the effect of heat treatment and gasification on the carbon structure of coal chars and metallurgical cokes using fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dong; P. Alvarez; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2009-03-15

    Differences in the development of carbon structures between coal chars and metallurgical cokes during high-temperature reactions have been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. These are important to differentiate between different types of carbons in dust recovered from the top gas of the blast furnace. Coal chars have been prepared from a typical injectant coal under different heat-treatment conditions. These chars reflected the effect of peak temperature, residence time at peak temperature, heating rate and pressure on the evolution of their carbon structures. The independent effect of gasification on the development of the carbon structure of a representative coal char has also been studied. A similar investigation has also been carried out to study the effect of heat-treatment temperature (from 1300 to 2000{sup o}C) and gasification on the carbon structure of a typical metallurgical coke. Two Raman spectral parameters, the intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) and the intensity ratio of the valley between D and G bands to the G band (I{sub V}/I{sub G}), have been found useful in assessing changes in carbon structure. An increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} indicates the growth of basic graphene structural units across the temperature range studied. A decrease in I{sub V}/I{sub G} appears to suggest the elimination of amorphous carbonaceous materials and ordering of the overall carbon structure. The Raman spectral differences observed between coal chars and metallurgical cokes are considered to result from the difference in the time-temperature history between the raw injectant coal and the metallurgical coke and may lay the basis for differentiation between metallurgical coke fines and coal char residues present in the dust carried over the top of the blast furnace. 41 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. 24 CFR 3280.707 - Heat producing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat producing appliances. 3280.707... Systems § 3280.707 Heat producing appliances. (a) Heat-producing appliances and vents, roof jacks and...) Fuel-burning heat-producing appliances and refrigeration appliances, except ranges and ovens, shall...

  17. Process and apparatus for the dry cooling of coke

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Breidenbach, D.; Galow, M.; Hackler, E.; Meckel, J.; Smieskol, S.; Wagener, D.

    1983-10-04

    A process and apparatus for the dry cooling of coke involves the provision of a vessel having therein first and second zones in full communication with each other. Hot coke from a coking operation is introduced into the first zone and is passed through the first and second zones. Raw coke oven gas from the coking operation is introduced into the first zone, thereby reducing the temperature of the coke, while cleaning the raw coke oven gas to form cleaned coke oven gas. The cleaned coke oven gas is removed from the first zone, cooled, and then directly or indirectly utilized as a heat carrier gas introduced into the second zone to therein further reduce the temperature of the coke. The thereby further cooled coke is removed from the second zone.

  18. Characterization of PAHs within PM 10 fraction for ashes from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant stacks in Liaoning Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Shi, Jianwu; Lu, Bing; Qiu, Weiguang; Zhang, Baosheng; Peng, Yue; Zhang, Bowen; Bai, Zhipeng

    2011-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons within PM 10 fraction of ashes from two coke production plants, one iron smelt plant, one heating station and one power plant were analyzed with GC-MS technique in 2009. The sum of 17 selected PAHs varied from 290.20 to 7055.72 μg/g and the amounts of carcinogenic PAHs were between 140.33 and 3345.46 μg/g. The most toxic ash was from the coke production plants and then from the iron smelt plant, coal-fired power plant and heating station according to BaP-based toxic equivalent factor (BaPeq) and BaP-based equivalent carcinogenic power (BaPE). PAHs profile of the iron smelt ash was significantly different from others with coefficient of divergence value higher than 0.40. Indicatory PAHs for coke production plants, heating station and coal-fired power plant were mainly 3-ring species such as Acy, Fl and Ace. While for iron smelt plant, they were Chr and BbF. Diagnostic ratios including Ant/(Ant + Phe), Flu/(Flu + Pyr), BaA/Chr, BbF/BkF, Ind/BghiP, IND/(IND + BghiP), BaP/BghiP, BaP/COR, Pyr/BaP, BaA/(BaA + Chr), BaA/BaP and BaP/(BaP + Chr) were calculated which were mostly different from other stacks for the iron smelt plant.

  19. Six meter coke battery renovation at Great Lakes Division, National Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Sperner, F.A.; Kalinowsky, R.P. )

    1993-01-01

    In 1990, National Steel Corporation initiated the renovation of its No. 5 Battery Facility to reduce Great Lakes Division dependency on outside coke sources by producing enough coke to meet 60% of Great Lakes Division needs. The renovation of the No. 5 Coke Battery and associated By-Product Plant required work in the Battery, Oven Machinery, Coal Handling, Coke Handling and By-Product Plants No. 3 and No. 2. The paper briefly describes the scope of the renovations, then describes the equipment, modifications made, and results of modifications for the following: coal handling system, oven battery (heating, structural design, and process control), oven machinery (U-tube car, pusher machine, on spot door machine, hood car, and quench car), coke handling, and by-products plant (tar and liquor system, primary cooling, exhausters and tar precipitators, secondary gas cooling/ammonia scrubbing, light oil system, waste water treatment and benzene emission controls, and computerized control system).

  20. Developing an accelerated test of coking tendencies of alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, M.D.; Bagby, M.O.; Schwab, A.W.; Goering, C.E.; Savage, L.D.

    1988-07-01

    Burning vegetable oils in direct-injected diesel engines leads to nozzle and combustion chamber coking and eventually to engine damage. Because typical durability tests to detect coking tendencies of fuels are expensive, a one-cylinder diesel engine was instrumented and automated to enable external detection of engine coking in only 5 h. The heat release pattern revealed shifts to later burning as coke accumulated in the engine, but exhaust emissions showed little correlation with coke accumulation.

  1. Coking and gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Billimoria, Rustom M.; Tao, Frank F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved coking process for normally solid carbonaceous materials wherein the yield of liquid product from the coker is increased by adding ammonia or an ammonia precursor to the coker. The invention is particularly useful in a process wherein coal liquefaction bottoms are coked to produce both a liquid and a gaseous product. Broadly, ammonia or an ammonia precursor is added to the coker ranging from about 1 to about 60 weight percent based on normally solid carbonaceous material and is preferably added in an amount from about 2 to about 15 weight percent.

  2. High coking value pitch

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  3. Numerical modeling of the aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion of a polydisperse ensemble of coke-ash particles in ascending axisymmetric two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    B.B. Rokhman

    2009-07-15

    A two-dimensional stationary model of motion, heat and mass exchange, and chemical reaction of polydisperse coke and ash particles in ascending gas-suspension flow has been constructed with allowance for the turbulent and pseudo turbulent mechanisms of transfer in the dispersed phase. The system of equations that describes motion and heat transfer in the solid phase has been closed at the level of the equations for the second moments of velocity and temperature pulsations, whereas the momentum equations of the carrying medium have been closed using the equation for turbulent gas energy, which allows for the influence of the particles and heterogeneous reactions.

  4. Clean Production of Coke from Carbonaceous Fines

    SciTech Connect

    Craig N. Eatough

    2004-11-16

    In order to produce steel (a necessary commodity in developed nations) using conventional technologies, you must have metallurgical coke. Current coke-making technology pyrolyzes high-quality coking coals in a slot oven, but prime coking coals are becoming more expensive and slot ovens are being shut-down because of age and environmental problems. The United States typically imports about 4 million tons of coke per year, but because of a world-wide coke scarcity, metallurgical coke costs have risen from about $77 per tonne to more than $225. This coke shortage is a long-term challenge driving up the price of steel and is forcing steel makers to search for alternatives. Combustion Resources (CR) has developed a technology to produce metallurgical coke from alternative feedstocks in an environmentally clean manner. The purpose of the current project was to refine material and process requirements in order to achieve improved economic benefits and to expand upon prior work on the proposed technology through successful prototype testing of coke products. The ultimate objective of this project is commercialization of the proposed technology. During this project period, CR developed coke from over thirty different formulations that meet the strength and reactivity requirements for use as metallurgical coke. The technology has been termed CR Clean Coke because it utilizes waste materials as feedstocks and is produced in a continuous process where pollutant emissions can be significantly reduced compared to current practice. The proposed feed material and operating costs for a CR Clean Coke plant are significantly less than conventional coke plants. Even the capital costs for the proposed coke plant are about half that of current plants. The remaining barrier for CR Clean Coke to overcome prior to commercialization is full-scale testing in a blast furnace. These tests will require a significant quantity of product (tens of thousands of tons) necessitating the construction

  5. Emission and profile characteristic of volatile organic compounds emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant in Liaoning Province, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwu; Deng, Hao; Bai, Zhipeng; Kong, Shaofei; Wang, Xiuyan; Hao, Jiming; Han, Xinyu; Ning, Ping

    2015-05-15

    107 kinds of C₂-C₁₂ volatile organic compound (VOC) mass concentrations and profiles for four types of coal-fired stationary sources in Liaoning Province were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method, which are of significant importance with regard to VOC emissions in northeast of China. The results showed that there were some differences among these VOC source profiles. The total mass concentrations of analyzed 107 VOC species varied from 10,917 to 19,652 μg m(-3). Halogenated hydrocarbons exhibited higher mass percentages for the VOC source profiles of iron smelt (48.8%) and coke production plant (37.7%). Aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant in heating station plant (69.1%). Ketones, alcohols and acetates held 45.0% of total VOCs in thermal power plant. For non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), which are demanded for photochemical assessment in the USA, toluene and n-hexane were the most abundant species in the iron smelt, coke production and thermal power plant, with the mass percentages of 64.8%, 52.7% and 38.6%, respectively. Trimethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene and o,m-ethyltoluene approximately accounted for 70.0% in heating station plant. NMHCs emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant listed above presented different chemical reactivities. The average OH loss rate of NMHCs from heating station, was 4 to 5.6 times higher than that of NMHCs from iron smelt, coke production and power plant, which implies that VOCs emitted from heating station in northeast of China should be controlled firstly to avoid photochemical ozone pollution and protect human health. There are significant variations in the ratios of benzene/toluene and m, p-xylene/ethylbenzene of these coal-fired source profiles. The representativeness of the coal-fired sources studied and the VOC samples collected should be more closely examined. The accuracy of VOC source profiles related to coal-fired processes is highly dependent on

  6. Selecting the optimum coke pushing sequence

    SciTech Connect

    V.T. Krivoshein; A.V. Makarov

    2007-01-15

    The sequence of pushing coke ovens is one of the most important aspects of battery operation. The sequence must satisfy a number of technical and process conditions: (1) achieve maximum heating-wall life by avoiding destructive expansion pressure in freshly charged ovens and during pushing of the finished coke; (2) ensure uniform brickwork temperature and prevent overheating by compensating for the high thermal flux in freshly charged ovens due to accumulated heat in adjacent ovens that are in the second half of the coking cycle; (3) ensure the most favorable working conditions and safety for operating personnel; (4) provide additional opportunities for repair personnel to perform various types of work, such as replacing coke-machine rails, without interrupting coal production; (5) perform the maximum number of coke-machine operations simultaneously: pushing, charging, and cleaning doors, frames, and standpipe elbows; and (6) reduce electricity consumption by minimizing idle travel of coke machines.

  7. Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A.

    2008-02-15

    The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

  8. Method for producing micro heat panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Peterson, George P. (Inventor); Rummler, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Flat or curved micro heat pipe panels are fabricated by arranging essentially parallel filaments in the shape of the desired panel. The configuration of the filaments corresponds to the desired configuration of the tubes that will constitute the heat pipes. A thermally conductive material is then deposited on and around the filaments to fill in the desired shape of the panel. The filaments are then removed, leaving tubular passageways of the desired configuration and surface texture in the material. The tubes are then filled with a working fluid and sealed. Composite micro heat pipe laminates are formed by layering individual micro heat pipe panels and bonding them to each other to form a single structure. The layering sequence of the micro heat pipe panels can be tailored to transport heat preferentially in specific directions as desired for a particular application.

  9. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  10. Glycerol citrate polyesters produced through microwave heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of various heating methods without catalysis to prepare copolyesters from citric acid:glycerol blends were studied. In the presence of short term microwave treatments, i.e., 60 sec at 1200 W, blends of glycerol and citric acid invariably formed solid amorphous copolyesters. Fourier tra...

  11. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk Jr; Keith Wisecarver

    2005-10-01

    Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world

  12. Coking quality and caking properties of western Canadian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Mourits, F.M.; Price, J.T.; Gransden, J.F.; Leeder, W.R.

    1997-12-31

    Methods exist for predicting coke strength from the caking (thermal rheological) or petrographic properties of a metallurgical coal. These methods, which were derived for Carboniferous coals, frequently indicate that western Canadian Cretaceous coals would not make high quality coke yet both types of coals can produce excellent coke suitable for iron blast furnaces. This paper will discuss why western Canadian metallurgical coals exhibit lower thermal rheological values and how to predict the strength of the coke produced from them.

  13. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lambirth, Gene Richard

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  14. Progress toward the Hercules coke-to-methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.; Chiramoute, J.; Pack, G.E.; Patterson, J.

    1983-08-01

    A progress report is given on the Hercules coke-to-methanol plant. The plant gasifies petroleum coke in a fluidized bed to produce syngas for the methanol plant already on site and fuel gas for a combined cycle. The plant will produce 24,000 gallons of chemical grade methanol per day and will cogenerate electricity at about 10 MWe. The coke that is used as the raw feed stock is from a local refinery's fluid coker unit and is sized at minus 6 mm (0.25 inches) and has a heating value of 31 MJ/kg (14,700 Btu/lb). The coke, which is 90% carbon, is relatively unreactive, but can be economically gasified with a catalyst using TOSCO's coke gasification process at 650-850/sup 0/ C (1200-1500/sup 0/ F). This process is unique in that a catalyst reduces the gasification temperature which in turn lowers the oxygen requirements. This lower temperature prevents a slagging ash problem, so typical in other gasification processes. The process also uses less steam than other non-catalytic fluid-bed gasification processes. The capital cost of the plant is 24.2 million dollars and the operating cost is 5.24 million dollars per year. Low interest (8.8%) State of California loans for methanol production are used as well as the alcohol tax credit. The energy cost was found to be around $5/MMBtu for a 20 cent/gal tax credit and a coke feed at $20/ton.

  15. Coke dust enhances coke plant wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Burmistrz, Piotr; Rozwadowski, Andrzej; Burmistrz, Michał; Karcz, Aleksander

    2014-12-01

    Coke plant wastewater contain many toxic pollutants. Despite physico-chemical and biological treatment this specific type of wastewater has a significant impact on environment and human health. This article presents results of research on industrial adsorptive coke plant wastewater treatment. As a sorbent the coke dust, dozen times less expensive than pulverized activated carbon, was used. Treatment was conducted in three scenarios: adsorptive after full treatment with coke dust at 15 g L(-1), biological treatment enhanced with coke dust at 0.3-0.5 g L(-1) and addition of coke dust at 0.3 g L(-1) prior to the biological treatment. The enhanced biological treatment proved the most effective. It allowed additional removal of 147-178 mg COD kg(-1) of coke dust. PMID:25113994

  16. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  17. HEAT TRANSFER AND TRITIUM PRODUCING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, E.F.

    1962-06-01

    This invention related to a circulating lithium-containing blanket system in a neution source hav'ing a magnetic field associated therewith. The blanket serves simultaneously and efficiently as a heat transfer mediunm and as a source of tritium. The blanket is composed of a lithium-6-enriched fused salt selected from the group consisting of lithium nitrite, lithium nitrate, a mixture of said salts, a mixture of each of said salts with lithium oxide, and a mixture of said salts with each other and with lithium oxide. The moderator, which is contained within the blanket in a separate conduit, can be water. A stellarator is one of the neutron sources which can be used in this invention. (AEC)

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program: Coke oven gas cleaning demonstration project, Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant, Baltimore County, Maryland: Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This Assessment has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate environmental issues associated with a project that will be cost-shared by DOE and private industry under the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed action is a coke oven gas cleaning technology demonstration project proposed to be installed and operated at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Sparrows Point Plant, in Baltimore County, Maryland. Alternatives to the proposed action, which include no action, delayed action, and the use of alternate sites or technologies, are discussed. Three basic steel manufacturing operations are carried out at the Sparrows Point Plant: (1) pyrolytic conversion of coal to coke (carbon) in coke ovens; (2) combination of coke, iron ore, and limestone in a blast furnace to produce iron; and (3) refinement of iron to steel in oxygen or open-hearth furnaces. The Coke Works at the plant consists of three operational coke batteries and two Coal Chemicals plants. Bituminous coal is heated in a coke oven in the absence of air to remove its volatile components. About 70% of the coal feed is converted to coke; the remaining 30% consists of by-product gases and vapors. These by-product gases are treated in the Coal Chemicals plants to recover usable and marketable products, including coke oven gas, which is used to fuel the ovens and furnaces within the plant. The analysis concluded that no significant, environmental impacts would result from the proposed project. 12 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Modern outline for a recuperator coke oven

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Proetzl, M.; Rohde, W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a demonstration plant, and the results obtained in this, for the testing of Didier Engineering's 2-stage recuperative system. The two stages are: (I) partial recuperation using a metallic heat exchanger and making special use of radiation; (II) direct heat exchange between coke oven waste gas and coking coal for thermal treatment making special use of convection. It is concluded that this type of oven meets the requirements for economic production of coke in chamber-type ovens even after the year 2000. 4 references.

  20. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Henh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2009-10-20

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  1. Prospects for use of lean coking coal from the Kuznetsk coalfield for coking

    SciTech Connect

    Sulimov, G.I.; Agafonov, A.A.; Ol'shanetskii, L.G.

    1983-06-01

    Coals suitable for opencast working in the southern Kuzbass form a transitional stage between low-volatile caking and lean coal and have been incorporated satisfactorily in layer coking charges together with conventional coking coal. Strength tests showed a reasonably strong metallurgical product. Two collieries in particular offered promising coals with a narrow range of vitrinite contents and varying only in rank. These have been blended with a fat coal from Pechora to produce an exceptional metallurgical coke.

  2. Coking phenomena in the pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride into vinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sotowa, Chiaki; Korai, Yozo; Mochida, Isao

    1995-12-31

    Pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride (EDC) into vinyl chloride (VCM) which is the monomer for polyvinyl chloride, one of the most popular polymers, has been established commercially for quite a time. The process around 500{degrees}C has been proved to give VCM of high purity at very high selectivity about 99% and a reasonable conversion about 50%. However, the coking is a major problem in the long run, requiring decoking treatment every two months. The present paper describes features of carbons produced in the pyrolysis process. Coke of respective features was found in the reactor, the transfer line, the heat exchanger and the rapid quencher. Typical pyrolytic carbon, anisotropic coke produced in the liquid phase, isotropic carbon was produced on the reactor wall as low as 500{degrees}C. The mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

  3. Zone control of lean gas underfiring for coke ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Corbman, P.; Faber, P.V.

    1982-02-09

    A coke oven battery is disclosed of the type that is underfired with coke oven gas. A system of horizontal bus flues and valve controls is provided for controlling the supply of lean gas fuel, such as blast furnace gas or any other lean gas, selectively to the gas flues in heating zones of the coke oven chamber walls and the recirculation of waste gas therefrom, so as to achieve the optimum fuel consumption under varying bulk density conditions of the coal mass in the coke oven chamber from the coke side to the pusher side.

  4. Development and Testing of the Advanced CHP System Utilizing the Off-Gas from the Innovative Green Coke Calcining Process in Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Yaroslav; Kozlov, Aleksandr

    2013-08-15

    Green petroleum coke (GPC) is an oil refining byproduct that can be used directly as a solid fuel or as a feedstock for the production of calcined petroleum coke. GPC contains a high amount of volatiles and sulfur. During the calcination process, the GPC is heated to remove the volatiles and sulfur to produce purified calcined coke, which is used in the production of graphite, electrodes, metal carburizers, and other carbon products. Currently, more than 80% of calcined coke is produced in rotary kilns or rotary hearth furnaces. These technologies provide partial heat utilization of the calcined coke to increase efficiency of the calcination process, but they also share some operating disadvantages. However, coke calcination in an electrothermal fluidized bed (EFB) opens up a number of potential benefits for the production enhancement, while reducing the capital and operating costs. The increased usage of heavy crude oil in recent years has resulted in higher sulfur content in green coke produced by oil refinery process, which requires a significant increase in the calcinations temperature and in residence time. The calorific value of the process off-gas is quite substantial and can be effectively utilized as an “opportunity fuel” for combined heat and power (CHP) production to complement the energy demand. Heat recovered from the product cooling can also contribute to the overall economics of the calcination process. Preliminary estimates indicated the decrease in energy consumption by 35-50% as well as a proportional decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. As such, the efficiency improvement of the coke calcinations systems is attracting close attention of the researchers and engineers throughout the world. The developed technology is intended to accomplish the following objectives: - Reduce the energy and carbon intensity of the calcined coke production process. - Increase utilization of opportunity fuels such as industrial waste off-gas from the novel

  5. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  6. Method of operating horizontal coke oven batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, M.; Thiersch, F.B.

    1981-09-22

    A horizontal coke oven battery construction in which a pusher is mounted to extend into the batteries from one side and push coke out of the batteries on the opposite side, comprises a plurality of coke oven batteries disposed in a row. A first waste gas flue extends along the pusher side of the batteries and a second waste gas flue extends along the coke side. A stack flue at one end of the batteries is connected to the first and second waste gas flues. The construction includes means for directing the heating gases into each oven battery during operation so that, in respect to the pusher and coke size, approximately one-half of the batteries is heated by upward burning and the other half is heated by downward burning. For example, all odd numbered batteries may be heated in the same direction and all even numbered batteries heated in the same direction. The invention also comprises a two-section regenerative heating system having reversing winches wherein the heating on one-half or approximately one-half of the oven chambers is equipped for upward burning and the heating of the other half is equipped with downward burning. Between the two halves, a center head maybe be provided, or only one reversing winch may be provided at the end of the battery.

  7. Possibilities of coke manufacture in nonpollutant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barca, F.; Panaitescu, C.; Vidrighin, C.; Peleanu, I.; Albastroiu, P.

    1994-12-31

    The paper presents some possibilities to obtain coke briquettes from anthracite, using as binders petroleum pitch, wheat flour, cement, plaster, ashes from power-plants dried from the electrofilters. Specific thermal post-treatment were proposed for each case, such as: oxidation or heating at low temperatures (under 300 C). As a result the authors obtained coke briquettes to be used in small equipment, with no pollutant pyrogenetic treatment.

  8. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  9. Method for producing heat treated composite nuclear fuel containers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described for producing composite constructed nuclear fuel containers for service in water cooled nuclear fission reactors comprising a tubular zirconium alloy casing having a protective lining of a zirconium metal covering the inside surface of the zirconium alloy tubular casing and being metallurgically bonded thereto, consisting essentially of the steps of: heat treating a large diameter zirconium alloy tube comprising a beta-quench treatment of heating the zirconium alloy to a temperature sufficient to recrystallize the zirconium alloy to its beta phase of at least about 970 C and then rapidly cooling the thus heated and recrystallized zirconium alloy tube stock, heat treating a large diameter zirconium metal hollow liner stock comprising a beta-quench treatment of heating the zirconium metal to a temperature sufficient to recrystallize the zirconium metal to its beta phase of at least about 900 C and then rapidly cooling the thus heated and recrystallized zirconium metal hollow liner stock, assembling the heat treated zirconium alloy tube stock and heat treated lining stock with the hollow zirconium metal lining stock inserted inclose fitting contact within the tube stock, metallurgically bonding the tube and liner stocks providing a composite tubular stock unit with the tube stock surrounding the lining stock, and reducing the circumference of the assembled composite tubular stock unit down to a size suitable for service as a lined tubular container for nuclear fuel in a series of progressive reductions in circumference applied in sequence.

  10. 24 CFR 3280.707 - Heat producing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Utilization Efficiency of not less than that specified in 10 CFR part 430, Energy Conservation Program for... CFR part 430, Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat producing appliances....

  11. 24 CFR 3280.707 - Heat producing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Fuel-burning heat-producing appliances and refrigeration appliances, except ranges and ovens, shall be... appliance manufacturer's instructions. (d) Performance efficiency. (1) All automatic electric storage water... of Household Automatic Electric Storage Type Water Heaters, ANSI C72.1-1972. (2) All gas and...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.707 - Heat producing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Fuel-burning heat-producing appliances and refrigeration appliances, except ranges and ovens, shall be... appliance manufacturer's instructions. (d) Performance efficiency. (1) All automatic electric storage water... of Household Automatic Electric Storage Type Water Heaters, ANSI C72.1-1972. (2) All gas and...

  13. Carcinogen assessment of coke oven emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Coke oven workers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania and at 10 non-Allegheny County coke plants in the United States and Canada were found to be at an excess risk of mortality from cancer of all sites and from cancer of the lungs, bronchus, trachea, kidney, and prostate. An important finding of this study was the dose-response found by both length of exposure and intensity of exposure (top or side of the ovens) for mortality from cancer of the lungs, bronchus, and trachea. A study of Japanese coke oven workers also found them to be at an excess risk of lung cancer mortality. British studies of cancer mortality in coke oven workers have generally been negative, but there were weaknesses in these studies. Coke oven emissions produce positive results in mutagenicity studies. Coal tar, a condensate of coke oven emissions, and various constituents of coke oven emissions have been found to be positive in both mutagenicity and animal carcinogenicity studies.

  14. Graphitized needle cokes and natural graphites for lithium intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Spellman, L.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Goldberger, W.M.; Kinoshita, K.

    1996-05-10

    This paper examined effects of heat treatment and milling (before or after heat treatment) on the (electrochemical) intercalating ability of needle petroleum coke; natural graphite particles are included for comparison. 1 tab, 4 figs, 7 refs.

  15. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    1999-09-01

    Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and

  16. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  17. [Preliminary investigation on emission of PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs through flue gas from coke plants in China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Lu; Cheng, Gang; Lu, Yong; Wu, Chang-Min; Wu, Chang-Min; Luo, Jin-Hong

    2014-07-01

    According to the Stockholm Convention, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) are classified into unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (UP-POPs), and named dioxins. Coke production as a thermal process contains organic matters, metal and chlorine, is considered to be a potential source of dioxins. Intensive studies on the emission of dioxins from coking industry are still very scarce. In order to estimate the emission properties of dioxins through coke production, isotope dilution HRGC/HRMS technique was used to determine the concentration of dioxins through flue gas during heating of coal. Three results were obtained. First, total toxic equivalents at each stationary emission source were in the range of 3.9-30.0 pg x m(-3) (at WHO-TEQ) for dioxins which was lower than other thermal processes such as municipal solid waste incineration. Second, higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs were the dominant congeners. Third, emissions of dioxins were dependent on coking pattern. Stamping coking and higher coking chamber may lead to lower emission. PMID:25244832

  18. Analysis of laser-produces jets from locally heated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Recent simulations showed that it might be possible to produce a jet by locally heating a foil target with a high intensity laser, so as to produce a single blast wave which then drives jet formation. In contrast to many earlier experimental setups, the jets in this configuration are formed by a two stage process similar to that thought to be responsible for jets from young stellar objects. As the blast wave expands into the ambient medium it creates an inverse conical density structure. This inverse cone focuses the flow into a conically converging flow which then turns into a narrow jet. The realisation of this two step process in an experiment could make it possible to study the formation of stellar jets in the laboratory. We present new results investigating the criteria that lead to the creation of the inverse conical structure and the subsequent jet formation. The localised heating necessary for driving the jet is achieved by guiding the electrons in self generated magnetic fields at resistivity gradients. We present simulations demonstrating the geometries that lead to the localised heating suitable for jet formation. This work is funded by the European Research Council, grant STRUCMAGFAST (ERC-StG-2012).

  19. Method and apparatus for controlling crossflow in a double collector main coke oven battery

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.G.

    1986-07-08

    A method is described of controlling the crossflow of gases given off by a coal mass during the production of coke in a coke oven having a coke side collector main and a pusher side collector main comprising the steps of: (a) determining the temperature difference between the temperature in the coke side standpipe and the temperature in the pusher side standpipe, (b) determining the temperature difference between the temperature in the freespace adjacent the coke side of the coke oven and the temperature in the freespace adjacent the pusher side of the coke oven, (c) determining the temperature difference between the temperature of the heating wall of the coke oven adjacent the coke side of the coke oven and the temperature of the heating wall of the coke oven adjacent the pusher side of the coke oven, and (d) opening the coke side standpipe control valve and gooseneck damper and the pusher side standpipe control valve and gooseneck damper, if they are not in the open position, if the temperature difference of step (b) is substantially the same as the temperature difference of step (c) and the temperature difference of step (a) is greater than about 50/sup 0/F in order to control crossflow.

  20. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  1. Proposal of a novel multifunctional energy system for cogeneration of coke, hydrogen, and power - article no. 052001

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, H.G.; Sun, S.; Han, W.; Gao, L.

    2009-09-15

    This paper proposes a novel multifunctional energy system (MES), which cogenerates coke, hydrogen, and power, through the use of coal and coke oven gas (COG). In this system, a new type of coke oven, firing coal instead of COG as heating resource for coking, is adopted. The COG rich in H{sub 2} is sent to a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 80% of hydrogen first, and then the PSA purge gas is fed to a combined cycle as fuel. The new system combines the chemical processes and power generation system, along with the integration of chemical conversion and thermal energy utilization. In this manner, both the chemical energy of fuel and thermal energy can be used more effectively. With the same inputs of fuel and the same output of coking heat, the new system can produce about 65% more hydrogen than that of individual systems. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the new system is about 70%, and the exergy efficiency is about 66%. Compared with individual systems, the primary energy saving ratio can reach as high as 12.5%. Based on the graphical exergy analyses, we disclose that the integration of synthetic utilization of COG and coal plays a significant role in decreasing the exergy destruction of the MES system. The promising results obtained may lead to a clean coal technology that will utilize COG and coal more efficiently and economically.

  2. Effect of bulk density of coking coal on swelling pressure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jinfeng; Yang, Chunwang; Zhao, Zhenning; Zhong, Xiangyun; Zhang, Yaru; Xu, Jun; Xi, Bai; Liu, Hongchun

    2013-12-01

    Coking coals are the important raw materials for the iron and steel industries and play an important role on its sustainable development, especially on the stamp-charging coke making with the characteristics of increasing the bulk density. There is a significance on the reasonable usage of the coking coal resource with the reduced production cost, improved efficiency of the economy to develop the stamp-charging coke making technology. Important effects of the density of coking coal on the coking and caking properties were investigated. In the article, the maximum values of swelling pressure and variation of Laowan gas coal and Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, Longhu fat coal and Didao coking coal, which were mined at Shenyang and Qitaihe respectively, were investigated under different bulk densities during the coking. The results showed that when the values of density increased from 0.85 ton/m(3) to 1.05 ton/m(3), for the Laowan gas coal, swelling pressure variation and even the maximum value changed slightly. The swelling pressure was 3.63 KPa when the density was improved to 1.05 ton/m(3); for the Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, the values of swelling pressure changed significantly and the maximum values was 82.88 KPa with the density improved to 1.05 when the coal was heated to 600°C. The coke porosity, which was investigated by automatic microphotometer, decreased from 47.4% to 33.1% with the increasing of the density from 0.85 ton/m(3) to 1.05 ton/m(3), and the decreased value was 14.3%. Meanwhile, the pore structures of four cokes were characterized by an optical microscope. PMID:25078833

  3. Mechanisms of coke formation and fouling in thermal cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, R.K.; Rangwala, H.A.; Hsi, C.

    1995-12-31

    When heavy oil is cracked to produce distillate, coking of the reacting liquid is, in general, preceded by formation of a new, highly viscous liquid phase, rich in coke precursors. Results from pilot-scale experiments using feedstocks from Gudao (China) reported here show that inert-gas stripping of light distillates from the reacting liquid strongly inhibits coking and possibly the partition of precursors into the new phase. Heavy oil, rich in asphaltene, is often reported to have a high coking propensity. This paper provides experimental evidence to show that the asphaltene concentration is not the most critical factor in the coking propensity of heavy oil. Autoclave tests show that the liquid product could contain more than 40% of asphaltene, and yield only 60% of the coke produced by similar tests in which the liquid product contains less than 20% asphaltene. The solubility of asphaltene in the reaction liquid is the most crucial factor affecting coke yield. It controls the coking mechanisms and the fouling tendency of the resulting coke.

  4. Recycling of hazardous waste materials in the coking process.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Barriocanal, C; Díez, M A; Cimadevilla, J L G; Casal, M D; Canga, C S

    2004-03-01

    Every year the coking industry produces a significant amount of tarry and other wastes in byproducts plants. For the most part these wastes have not been put to any practical use. In addition, an integrated factory produces several waste oils which differ in composition and quantity, e.g., wastes from the steel rolling-mill process. In this work, the possibility of using such waste materials as binders in a partial briquetting process for metallurgical coke production is explored. By means of this coking procedure, a strong metallurgical coke not inferior in quality to coke from conventional coal blends is produced at pilot and semi-industrial scales. The use of such wastes, some of which are classified as hazardous materials, will avoid the need for dumping, thereby contributing to the protection of the environment as well as reducing the costs related to waste disposal. PMID:15046368

  5. Formed coke production with recovery of medium btu gas

    SciTech Connect

    Saller, E.

    1981-09-08

    In the fluidized carbonization and calcination of coal to form a reactive coal calcinate for admixture with bituminous binder for briquetting, curing, and coking to produce form coke, there is improvement in recovering medium Btu gases in the overheads by using as the fluidizing medium oxygen diluted with steam or carbon dioxide and removing the steam or carbon dioxide from the overheads.

  6. Method for removal of furfural coke from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating ship furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas with a total pressure of less than 100 psig containing molecular oxygen. The gas being at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F. (427{degrees}C.) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of about 5000 psi.

  7. Upgrading coke strength by a coal-blend-compaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Fun, F.; Brayton, W.E.; Shoenberger, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    In the continuing effort to upgrade the strength of coke made from available coal blends, US Steel is developing coal-blend compaction as an alternative method to coal preheating. In this process the coal blend is compacted to produce relatively weak compacted materials, which are subsequently degraded into controlled size fractions of intimately integrated particles of the multicomponent coal blend. The degraded blend particles are charged into conventional coke ovens for coking. Coal-blend-compaction tests conducted in the laboratory with coals from the Appalachian basin showed substantial improvement in coke strength. The encouraging laboratory results dictated a commerical scale test at US Steel's Gary Works. This plant test, in which more than 200 tons of coal blend was used, further confirmed the improvement in coke strength by the coal-blend-compaction process. Potential benefits of the process include (1) retrospective adaptation to existing coke batteries, (2) improved strength of coke from regular coal blends, (3) maintenance of same or higher coke strength with poor coal blends, and (4) economics that are competitive with or better than those of coal preheating. Continuing developments are being investigated in a compaction pilot plant and commercial coke ovens at US Steel's Clairton Works, mainly to establish engineering criteria and optimal controls for large-scale installations. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Numerical and experimental analyses of the radiant heat flux produced by quartz heating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Ash, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the radiant heat flux distribution produced by tungsten filament, tubular fused-quartz envelope heating systems with reflectors. The method is an application of Monte Carlo simulation, which takes the form of a random walk or ray tracing scheme. The method is applied to four systems of increasing complexity, including a single lamp without a reflector, a single lamp with a Hat reflector, a single lamp with a parabolic reflector, and up to six lamps in a six-lamp contoured-reflector heating unit. The application of the Monte Carlo method to the simulation of the thermal radiation generated by these systems is discussed. The procedures for numerical implementation are also presented. Experiments were conducted to study these quartz heating systems and to acquire measurements of the corresponding empirical heat flux distributions for correlation with analysis. The experiments were conducted such that several complicating factors could be isolated and studied sequentially. Comparisons of the experimental results with analysis are presented and discussed. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was obtained in all cases. This study shows that this method can be used to analyze very complicated quartz heating systems and can account for factors such as spectral properties, specular reflection from curved surfaces, source enhancement due to reflectors and/or adjacent sources, and interaction with a participating medium in a straightforward manner.

  9. Effects of Annealing on Microstructure and Microstrength of Metallurgical Coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xing; Zhang, Guangqing; Rogers, Harold; Zulli, Paul; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    Two metallurgical cokes were heat treated at 1673 K to 2273 K (1400 °C to 2000 °C) in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and microstrength of metallurgical cokes was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and ultra-microindentation. In the process of heat treatment, the microstructure of the metallurgical cokes transformed toward the graphite structure. Raman spectroscopy of reactive maceral-derived component (RMDC) and inert maceral-derived component (IMDC) indicated that the graphitisation degree of the RMDC was slightly lower than that of the IMDC in the original cokes; however graphitisation of the RMDC progressed faster than that of the IMDC during annealing, and became significantly higher after annealing at 2273 K (2000 °C). The microstrength of cokes was significantly degraded in the process of heat treatment. The microstrength of the RMDC was lower, and of its deterioration caused by heat treatment was more severe than IMDC. The degradation of the microstrength of cokes was attributed to their increased graphitisation degree during the heat treatment.

  10. Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas

    SciTech Connect

    V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich

    2009-07-15

    The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

  11. Met coke world summit 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    Papers are presented under the following session headings: industry overview and market outlook; coke in the Americas; the global coke industry; and new developments. All the papers (except one) only consist of a copy of the overheads/viewgraphs.

  12. 24 CFR 3280.707 - Heat producing appliances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... with a comfort heating system. (i) When a manufactured home is manufactured to contain a heating... oil burning comfort heating appliances shall have a flue loss of not more than 25 percent, and...

  13. Micro heat pipe panels and method for producing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor); Peterson, George P. (Inventor); Rummler, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Flat or curved micro heat pipe panels are fabricated by arranging essentially parallel filaments in the shape of the desired panel. The configuration of the filaments corresponds to the desired configuration of the tubes that will constitute the heat pipes. A thermally conductive material is then deposited on and around the filaments to fill in the desired shape of the panel. The filaments are then removed, leaving tubular passageways of the desired configuration and surface texture in the material. The tubes are then filled with a working fluid and sealed. Composite micro heat pipe laminates are formed by layering individual micro heat pipe panels and bonding them to each other to form a single structure. The layering sequence of the micro heat pipe panels can be tailored to transport heat preferentially in specific directions as desired for a particular application.

  14. Thickness Optimization for Petroleum Coke in Microwave Dehydrating Based on the Analysis of Dynamic Absorption Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobiao; Chen, Junruo; Peng, Jinhui; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Weifeng; Guo, Shenghui; Chen, Guo

    2015-07-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to optimize the thickness of petroleum coke for achieving maximum microwave power absorption in microwave heating based on analysis of reflection loss (RL). The microwave RL of the petroleum coke layer was studied over the moisture content range of 1%-5% at 20 °C and the petroleum coke (10% moisture content) in the temperature range of 20 to 100 °C at 2.45 GHz. The results show that RL depends sensitively on the thickness of the petroleum coke and the absorption peak shifts towards a larger thickness as the moisture content of the petroleum coke increases. There exists a matching thickness corresponding to the maximum microwave absorption, the maximum absorbing peak decreases when the thickness of petroleum coke exceeds the matching thickness. We also show that the absorption peak is found to move towards a smaller thickness region with increasing petroleum coke temperature.

  15. Coke oven emissions

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Coke oven emissions ; CASRN NA Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  16. Coke pushing emission control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnoski, D.; Symons, C.

    1980-07-08

    A method is described for controlling coke oven emissions comprising the steps of: (A) aligning a one-spot, open-top coke quenching car with the coke oven, (B) providing a coke guide from the coke oven to the car, (C) positioning a fume hood over the car, with the fume hood having a length about equal to the length of the car, (D) pushing hot coke from the coke oven through the coke guide and into the car, (E) withdrawing gases from the fume hood during step (D) and passing said gases to gas cleaning equipment at a gas flowrate of between about 1000 and about 3500 scfmd per ton of coke pushed under step (D), and (F) substantially upon completion of step (E) moving the car from under the fume hood to a quenching station with the hot coke in the car exposed to the atmosphere and without further withdrawal of gases from the hot coke to the gas cleaning equipment.

  17. Briquetting of coke fines for phosphorus production

    SciTech Connect

    Shpaizer, E.E.; Klimova, L.K.; Mel'nik, A.P.; Egorov, A.A.

    1988-07-20

    Large amounts of coke wastes have accumulated in phosphorus factories. For use as a carbonaceous reducing agent in phosphorus production this waste material should be agglomerated to the required size with satisfactory strength, with minimal consumption of energy and materials. The dependence of briquet strength on a number of important physicochemical factors is described by an equation obtained by least-squares computer analysis of experimental data. Addition of finely ground quartzite to the mixture raises the thermal stability of the briquets. The activation energy and order of overall interaction of phosphoric acid and the ash components of coke, E = 24.8 kJ/mole and n = 0.98, were found by the method of nonisothermal kinetics. Their results show that the reactions leading to increase of briquet strength occur at temperatures from 520 to 670 K, i.e., below the ignition point of coke. Therefore the briquets may be heat-treated in an oxidizing medium; this greatly simplifies the practical process of agglomeration of coke fines.

  18. Non-coke smelting reduction of iron ores: Process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichestapong, Pipat

    The scarcity of coking coals and the high cost entailed in minimizing the emissions from the coke-making process as well as the relative inflexibility of large production capacity of the conventional blast-furnace ironmaking are the main reasons for the development of non-coke smelting reduction processes with the economical and ecological compatibility. The main objectives of the alternative processes development are to use ordinary coals directly, extend the range of usable raw materials, and allow the operation at a small scale. While most of smelting reduction processes are still in various stages of development, only the COREX ironmaking has successfully reached the industrial application with its first 300000 tpa plant operated in Pretoria, South Africa. The COREX process is composed of two main reactors: the vertical shaft furnace for the gaseous reduction of iron ore to sponge iron, and the melter-gasifier for the gasification of coal and smelting of iron. The gasification process generates the reducing gas mixture (CO and Hsb2) for use in the reduction furnace and also produces heat for smelting of the direct reduced iron. In the present work, the operating data of the COREX process are studied and process material and energy balances are prepared. The coal consumption rate of the COREX process is found higher than the coke consumption rate of the conventional process; however, the total energy consumption for the COREX process compares well with that of the blast furnace. The COREX process also generates surplus gas of high heating value which is suitable for many applications. A reduction model employing the diffusion-limited mass-transfer coupled with virtual equilibrium at core-interface is developed to determine the reduction of iron oxide pellets. The rate of oxygen-transfer between the solid and gas phases is computed by combining the Stefan-Maxwell multi-component diffusion formalism with the iterative equilibrium constant method. The computed

  19. Organic pollution removal from coke plant wastewater using coking coal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lihui; Li, Shulei; Wang, Yongtian; Sun, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Coke plant wastewater (CPW) is an intractable chemical wastewater, and it contains many toxic pollutants. This article presents the results of research on a semi-industrial adsorption method of coking wastewater treatment. As a sorbent, the coking coal (CC) was a dozen times less expensive than active carbon. The treatment was conducted within two scenarios, as follows: (1) adsorption after biological treatment of CPW with CC at 40 g L(-1); the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was 75.66%, and the concentration was reduced from 178.99 to 43.56 mg L(-1); (2) given an adsorption by CC of 250 g L(-1) prior to the biological treatment of CPW, the eliminations of COD and phenol were 58.08% and 67.12%, respectively. The CC that adsorbed organic pollution and was returned to the coking system might have no effect on both coke oven gas and coke. PMID:26114284

  20. Design and construction of coke battery 1A at Radlin coke plant, Poland

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Kravchenko; D.P. Yarmoshik; V.B. Kamenyuka; G.E. Kos'kova; N.I. Shkol'naya; V.V. Derevich; A.S. Grankin

    2009-07-15

    In the design and construction of coke battery 1A at Radlin coke plant (Poland), coking of rammed coke with a stationary system was employed for the first time. The coke batteries are grouped in blocks. Safety railings are provided on the coke and machine sides of the maintenance areas.

  1. Coke oven door seal

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrych, G.

    1984-01-17

    A coke oven door seal in which a leaf spring is fixed to the inner end of a continuous concave seating structure which is peripherally mounted on the door frame. A terminally convex ridge structure extends endwise from the door jamb to flex the leaf spring sufficiently so as to form a continuous gas tight seal around the door. The leaf spring is flexed by the ridge by an amount that is greater than the deflection which would result only from the application of pressure on the leaf spring by coke oven gases. The leaf spring is also flexed by an amount that is less than the amount which would surpass its elastic limit. In an alternate embodiment, the leaf spring and seat structure are mounted on the door jamb while the ridge is mounted on the door frame.

  2. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: WRI COKING INDEXES

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Francis P. Miknis; Thomas F. Turner

    2003-06-01

    Pyrolysis experiments were conducted with three residua at 400 C (752 F) at various residence times. The wt % coke and gaseous products were measured for the product oils. The Western Research Institute (WRI) Coking Indexes were determined for the product oils. Measurements were made using techniques that might correlate with the Coking Indexes. These included spin-echo proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, heat capacity measurements at 280 C (536 F), and ultrasonic attenuation. The two immiscible liquid phases that form once coke formation begins were isolated and characterized for a Boscan residuum pyrolyzed at 400 C (752 F) for 55 minutes. These materials were analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS), porphyrins, and metals (Ni,V) content.

  3. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOEpatents

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  4. [Health risk assessment of coke oven PAHs emissions].

    PubMed

    Bo, Xin; Wang, Gang; Wen, Rou; Zhao, Chun-Li; Wu, Tie; Li, Shi-Bei

    2014-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced by coke oven are with strong toxicity and carcinogenicity. Taken typical coke oven of iron and steel enterprises as the case study, the dispersion and migration of 13 kinds of PAHs emitted from coke oven were analyzed using AERMOD dispersion model, the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks at the receptors within the modeling domain were evaluated using BREEZE Risk Analyst and the Human Health Risk Assessment Protocol for Hazardous Waste Combustion (HHRAP) was followed, the health risks caused by PAHs emission from coke oven were quantitatively evaluated. The results indicated that attention should be paid to the non-carcinogenic risk of naphthalene emission (the maximum value was 0.97). The carcinogenic risks of each single pollutant were all below 1.0E-06, while the maximum value of total carcinogenic risk was 2.65E-06, which may have some influence on the health of local residents. PMID:25244863

  5. Damage Diagnosis for High Temperature Coke-oven Chamber Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Masato; Sakaida, Michitaka; Fujikake, Yohichi; Irie, Keisuke

    Metallurgical coke is needed as reducing reagent and energy source in blast furnaces. Most of coke ovens in Japan have been working over 30 years and have become gradually decrepit. A coke oven consists of many coking chambers, and each chamber is 6 m high, 16 m long and 0.4m wide. Uneven damage at the chamber-wall surface such as brick erosion and carbon deposition disturbs production because the coke is pushed horizontally when discharged from the chamber. To diagnose the chamber wall which is constantly sustained at a high temperature, we have developed a water-cooling heat-resistance probe. Line scan cameras mounted in the probe obtain thermal images of the entire chamber-wall surfaces with high resolution. In addition, to measure topographical information of the wall, a laser light-section method combined with line-scan-camera imaging has been considered. It is emphasized that the diagnosis probe works under enormously severe conditions, such as at a temperature of over 1000°C and inside a width of only 0.4m. Clarifying the appearance of chamber-wall damages in operating aged coke ovens, we proposed the index relating unevenness of a chamber-wall surface to pushing load. The index is utilized for the guidance enabling effective repairs of damaged oven walls.

  6. Coke from coal and petroleum

    DOEpatents

    Wynne, Jr., Francis E.; Lopez, Jaime; Zaborowsky, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A carbonaceous coke is manufactured by the delayed coking of a slurry mixture of from about 10 to about 30 weight percent of caking or non-caking coal and the remainder a petroleum resid blended at below 50.degree. C.

  7. Some physicochemical properties of petroleum pyrolysis cokes

    SciTech Connect

    Cherednik, E.M.; Butyrin, G.M.; Ibraev, S.O.; Shipkov, N.N.; Volchkova, N.I.

    1986-08-01

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the structure and reactivity of cokes and fillers from petroleum. The tests were carried out with KNPS and KNPE petroleum pyrolysis cokes, KZI needle coke obtained on a delayed coking unit, and coke obtained from KO oxidized petroleum residue. The original cokes were subjected to a preliminary thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere and the calcined samples were then used to determine the reactivity, the ash content, the specific surface, the content of impurities, the porosity, and xray characteristics. The presented data show that suppression of the catalytic effect of the impurities by impreganation with manganese phosphate is effective for cokes with low TTT.

  8. Characterization of coal- and petroleum-derived binder pitches and the interaction of pitch/coke mixtures in pre-baked carbon anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn

    Carbon anodes are manufactured from calcined petroleum coke (i.e. sponge coke) and recycled anode butts as fillers, and coal tar pitch (SCTP) as the binder. During the manufacturing of carbon anodes, coal tar pitch is mixed with calcined petroleum coke. The mix of binder, filler and some additives is heated to about 50°C above the softening point of the pitch, typically 160°C. This temperature is sufficient to enable the pitch to wet the coke particles. The mix is then either extruded, vibrated, or pressed to form a green anode. The binding between coke and pitch is very important to the anode properties. There are different binder pitches used in this work, which were standard coal tar pitch (SCTP-2), petroleum pitch (PP-1), gasification pitch (GP-115), coal-extract pitch (WVU-5), and co-coking pitches (HTCCP and OXCCP). Petroleum pitch is a residue produced from heat-treatment and distillation of petroleum fractions. Production of coal-extract pitch involves a prehydrogenation of coal followed by extraction using a dipolar solvent. Gasification pitches are distilled by-product tars produced from the coal gasification process. Co-coking pitch was developed in this work and was obtained from the liquid distillate of co-coking process of coal and heavy petroleum residue. Understanding of composition and structures of pitches from different sources and processes would lead to greater understanding of the binding properties of pitch in carbon anodes and was one of the main focuses in this study. Characterization of pitches by using different techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS), 1H and 13C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and 13C solid-state NMR yield important chemistry and structural information. The binding, or in other words the interactions in the pitch/coke mixture, is another interest in this

  9. Re-examining the pitch/coke wetting and penetration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinan; Buckley, Alan N.; Tomsett, Alan

    2002-02-01

    To produce structurally soundcarbon anodes for use in aluminum smelting, a strong bond between filler and binder coke is necessary. Bond strength results from mechanical interlocking and adhesion of the binder coke to the filler coke. Critical for creating such bonds is the ability of the pitch to wet the coke surface and penetrate the coke porosity during mixing and forming. Wettability is normally assessed from the pitch behavior during the initial stages of a penetration test. In the test, the observed contact angle between a pitch droplet and a bed of fine coke particles is recorded as the temperature is increased. The temperature at which this contact angle becomes 90° is referred to as the wetting temperature of the pitch. The penetration test may be useful to identify pitch and coke combinations that are unlikely to produce baked anodes of acceptable quality with standard paste preparation conditions. It does not, however, provide a measure of the true wettability of a coke by a pitch. The isothermal penetration experiments reported here demonstrate that the observed contact angle of a pitch against a coke bed changes continuously from >90° to <90°, even to 0‡, at a temperature much lower than the wetting temperature derived from the penetration test. The requirements for the measurement of a true contact angle and the difference between the concepts of adhesion and wetting are discussed.

  10. Process for producing an activated carbon adsorbent with integral heat transfer apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing an integral adsorbent-heat exchanger apparatus useful in ammonia refrigerant heat pump systems. In one embodiment, the process wets an activated carbon particles-solvent mixture with a binder-solvent mixture, presses the binder wetted activated carbon mixture on a metal tube surface and thereafter pyrolyzes the mixture to form a bonded activated carbon matrix adjoined to the tube surface. The integral apparatus can be easily and inexpensively produced by the process in large quantities.

  11. New coke-sorting system at OAO Koks

    SciTech Connect

    B.Kh. Bulaevskii; V.S. Shved; Yu.V. Kalimin; S.D. Filippov

    2009-05-15

    A new coke-sorting system has been introduced at OAO Koks. It differs from the existing system in that it has no bunkers for all-purpose coke but only bunkers for commercial coke. In using this system with coke from battery 4, the crushing of the coke on conveyer belts, at roller screens, and in the commercial-coke bunkers is studied. After installing braking elements in the coke path, their effectiveness in reducing coke disintegration and improving coke screening is investigated. The granulometric composition and strength of the commercial coke from coke battery 3, with the new coke-sorting system, is evaluated.

  12. Evaluation of fly ash from co-combustion of coal and petroleum coke for use in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.N.; Thomas, M.D.A.

    2007-01-15

    An investigation of fly ash (FA) produced from various blends of coal and petroleum coke (pet coke) fired at Belledune Generating Station, New Brunswick, Canada, was conducted to establish its performance relative to FA derived from coal-only combustion and its compliance with CSA A3000. The FA samples were beneficiated by an electrostatic separation process to produce samples for testing with a range of loss-on-ignition (LOI) values. The results of these studies indicate that the combustion of pet coke results in very little inorganic residue (for example, typically less than 0.5% ash) and the main impact on FA resulting from the co-combustion of coal and up to 25% pet coke is an increase in the unburned carbon content and LOI values. The testing of FA after beneficiation indicates that FA produced from fuels with up to 25% pet coke performs as good as FA produced from the same coal without pet coke.

  13. Heat Treatment Devices and Method of Operation Thereof to Produce Dual Microstructure Superalloys Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John (Inventor); Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Kantzos, Peter T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A heat treatment assembly and heat treatment methods are disclosed for producing different microstructures in the bore and rim portions of nickel-based superalloy disks, particu- larly suited for gas turbine applications. The heat treatment assembly is capable of being removed from the furnace and disassembled to allow rapid fan or oil quenching of the disk. For solutioning heat treatments of the disk, temperatures higher than that of this solvus temperature of the disk are used to produce coarse grains in the rim of each disk so as to give maximum creep and dwell crack resistance at the rim service temperature. At the same time, solution temperature lower than the solvus temperature of the disk are provided to produce fine grain in the bore of the disk so as to give maximum strength and low cycle fatigue resistance.

  14. Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil

    SciTech Connect

    Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

    1989-12-12

    This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

  15. Production of blast furnace coke via novel briquetting system

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, F.W.; Wasson, G.E.

    1982-12-07

    A method of making high strength coke briquettes suitable for use as blast furnace coke comprising, (A) providing coal, (B) heating the coal at a temperature at or above the softening point of the coal to form partially carbonized char, (C) cooling the partially carbonized char below the softening point of the coal, (D) mixing the cooled partially carbonized char and tar to form a mixture of tar and partially carbonized char, (E) briquetting the mixture of tar and partially carbonized char to form briquettes of tar and partially carbonized char, (F) calcinating the briquettes to form high strength briquettes.

  16. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  17. Attempts to prevent injector coking with sunflower oil by engine modifications and fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    van der Walt, A.N.; Hugo, F.J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of injector tip temperature on coking propencity when sunflower oil is used as a fuel for direct injection engines, was tested. Partial retraction of the injector, the addition of a heat shield to the injector and cooling the injector with water was tried. Also, injector temperature was increased by reducing heat transferred to the cylinder head and preheating the sunflower oil. None of these measures could prevent coking of the injector tip. Coating the injector tip with Teflon and increasing the back leakage rate was also tried without success. Only a few of many additives tested, showed some promise of being able to prevent coking. 5 figures, 1 table.

  18. Vented coke oven door apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H. B.; Gerding, C. C.

    1980-08-12

    A vented coke oven door includes a door frame having a vertical face surface carrying a plug assembly having a central vertical internal opening to conduct coke oven gas generated at the bottom of a coal charge in a coke oven chamber. The plug assembly includes a plurality of u-shaped refractory plug segments arranged in an end-to-end aligned relation with leg sections of each u-shaped segment extending horizontally into an abutting relation with the face surface of the door frame. Each leg section carries either an embedded hooked end or a t-shaped head of a threaded fastener which is supported by the door frame so that the leg sections are unrestrained against movement toward and away from each other in response to a thermal gradient across the wall thickness of the refractory plug segment. A backing plug plate is fitted into a recess in the leg sections of each plug segment to provide a closure wall to the u-shaped configuration of the segments and forms the vertical passageway for conducting coke oven gas. The backing plug plate has an exposed layer of cast refractory overlying a layer of insulation used to protect the door frame. A seal strip extends about the outer periphery of the door frame to prevent emission of coke oven gas from the coking chamber.

  19. Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid

    DOEpatents

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Mo, Weijian; Muylle, Michel Serge Marie; Mandema, Remco Hugo; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-01

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

  20. Influence of the conditions of carbonizing pitches on some properties of the cokes

    SciTech Connect

    Cherednik, E.M.; Butyrin, G.M.; Zimina, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The porous structures, specific surfaces, and reactivities in relation to CO/sub 2/ of cokes of different natures - petroleum cokes and cokes from hard-coal pitch - on their carbonization and subsequent heat treatment in the bulk and in thin films have been studied. A substantial difference has been found in the reactivities and specific surfaces of the cokes according to the conditions of carbonization of the pitches, which is connected with the formation of a considerable microporosity on the carbonization of pitches in thin film, while the laws of the formation of the porous structures of cokes with equivalent radii of the pores r /SUB eq/ greater than 7 nm are identical in the carbonization of pitches under different conditions.

  1. In-situ heat system stimulates paraffinic crude producers in Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, J.P.; Kirspel, L.J.; Nguyen, H.T.; Credeur, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    A thermal stimulation process that generates downhole heat is presently being used to stimulate oil wells in the Gulf of Mexico. The crude produced from these shallow wells is highly paraffinic. Previous attempts to stimulate these wells with paraffin solvents and acid systems have been unsuccessful. The in situ heat process has yielded tenfold production rate increases and payout times of less than one week.

  2. In-situ heat system stimulates paraffinic-crude producers in Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, J.P.; Nguyen, H.T.; Credeur, D.J.; Kirspel, L.J.

    1989-05-01

    A thermal stimulation process that generates downhole heat currently is being used to stimulate oil wells in the Gulf of Mexico. The crude produced from these shallow wells is highly paraffinic. Previous attempts to stimulate these wells with paraffin solvents and acid systems have been unsuccessful. The in-situ heat process has yielded 10-fold production rate increases and payout times of less than 1 week.

  3. Heating apparatus and method and device for producing the heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Polteg, A.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a heating apparatus of the tiled stove-type having a return chamber section, a stove section providing a hearth, and a foot section. The stove section is formed by placing individual building blocks in alternate horizontal courses arranged such that the vertical joints between blocks in one course are staggered with relation to the vertical joints between blocks in adjoining courses. The improvement described here comprises: blocks for erecting the sections of the heating apparatus including: blocks for the stove section having cut-out portions to provide a central up flue gas passage extending from the hearth, two vertical down flue gas passages situated outside the central passage and two further vertical up flow gas passages also situated outside the central passage. The two down flue gas passages and the two further up flue gas passages are interconnected at their lower ends in a hearth plane, a return block for the return chamber section having cutout portions providing a return chamber interconnecting the upper ends of the central up flue gas passage and the two down flue gas passages for returning flue gasses to the stove section, the blocks for the stove section including a plurality of rear blocks for forming the upper part of the stove section. The rear blocks are successively horizontally thickened to provide a portion of the central flue gas passage inclined forwardly course to course in an upward direction for deflecting the central flue gas path towards the front part of the stove section and into the return chamber, and blocks for the return chamber section having cut-out portions to interconnect the two up flue gas passages in the return chamber section for leading the flue gasses out to a chimney stack.

  4. Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report Number 3, November 1, 1998--February 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-15

    The focus of work during this reporting period was the construction of an automated probe that will be used to measure the thickness of coke deposits in thermal cracking furnaces. A discovery was made during the last reporting period, which indicated that a conventional NDE broadband transducer could be used in conjunction with a sacrificial standoff composed of a fusible alloy to efficiently couple the transducer to a rough surface operating at high temperature. A probe was constructed that incorporates the recent discovery and initial testing of the probe is now underway. Successful development of the coke detector will provide industry with the only available method for on-line measurement of coke deposits. The coke detector will have numerous uses in the refining and petrochemical sectors including monitoring of visbreakers, hydrotreaters, delayed coking units, vacuum tower heaters, and various other heavy oil heating applications where coke formation is a problem.

  5. 46 CFR 148.04-15 - Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture). 148.04-15 Section 148.04-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-15 Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined...

  6. Zinc Accumulation and Behavior in Tuyere Coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Zhengjian; Wang, Tianqiu; Ning, Xiaojun; Zhong, Jianbo; Xu, Runsheng; Wang, Guangwei; Ren, Shan; Yang, Tianjun

    2014-10-01

    A case study of zinc oxide, which represents the first report on the occurrence, crystalline features, formation mechanism, and influence of this mineral in tuyere coke, was conducted in this study. A number of zinc oxides, some of which were in hexagonal wurtzite habit, were observed to distribute mainly in coke pores, cracks, surfaces, and around coke minerals. The accumulation of zinc in tuyere coke may enhance the degradation of coke and increase the generation and accumulation of coke fine in a blast furnace, which would cause bad effect on blast furnace operation. Investigations into zinc behavior in tuyere coke can be important for further interpretations of coke degradation in the high temperature zone of a blast furnace.

  7. The Evolution of Structural Order as a Measure of Thermal History of Coke in the Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Maria; Khanna, Rita; Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist; Sahajwalla, Veena; Björkman, Bo

    2014-04-01

    Investigations were carried out on cokes heat treated in the laboratory and on cokes extracted from the experimental blast furnace (EBF) raceway and hearth. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed to investigate changes in structural order ( L c), chemical transformations in coke ash along with comparative thermodynamic equilibrium studies and the influence of melt. Three data processing approaches were used to compute L c values as a function of temperature and time and linear correlations were established between L c and heat treatment temperatures during laboratory investigations. These were used to estimate temperatures experienced by coke in various regions of EBF and estimated raceway temperatures were seen to follow the profile of combustion peak. The MgAl2O4 spinel was observed in coke submerged in slag during laboratory studies and in cokes found further into the raceway. Coke in contact with hot metal showed XRD peaks corresponding to presence of Fe3Si. The intensity of SiO2 peak in coke ash was seen to decrease with increasing temperature and disappeared at around 1770 K (1500 °C) due to the formation of SiC. This study has shown that the evolution of structural order and chemical transformations in coke could be used to estimate its thermal history in blast furnaces.

  8. Effects of atamp-charging coke making on strength and high temperature thermal properties of coke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; Bai, Jinfeng; Xu, Jun; Zhong, Xiangyun; Zhao, Zhenning; Liu, Hongchun

    2013-12-01

    The stamp-charging coke making process has some advantages of improving the operation environment, decreasing fugitive emission, higher gas collection efficiency as well as less environmental pollution. This article describes the different structure strength and high temperature thermal properties of 4 different types of coke manufactured using a conventional coking process and the stamp-charging coke making process. The 4 kinds of cokes were prepared from the mixture of five feed coals blended by the petrography blending method. The results showed that the structure strength indices of coke prepared using the stamp-charging coke method increase sharply. In contrast with conventional coking process, the stamp-charging process improved the coke strength after reaction but had little impact on the coke reactivity index. PMID:25078828

  9. Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla

    2009-07-15

    Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Technological developments in Japanese coke-making from 1950 to the 1980s -- Memories of an old researcher

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazu, Takashi

    1994-12-31

    The author will give a brief history of the technological developments in Japanese coke-making from 1950 to the 1980s. This period may be divided as follows: (a) The Mythological Age (1950--1960) when Japan imported US heavy coking coals such as Itmann, Keystone, etc. It was believed by coke plant engineers that good metallurgical coke could not be produced without such coals, because the blending of these coals with Japanese low rank high fluidity coals yielded unbelievably excellent coke. Their feeling for such US coals was so strong as to approach a kind of religious fervor. (b) The Groping Age (1960--1970) when Japan had a few means to research coke making, such as analytical data, Gieseler Plastometer and test coking ovens. Therefore, most of the studies were repeated ``trial and error``. (c) The Take-off Age (1970--1980s) when Japan introduced the very useful weapon for research into coal and coke -- ``Petrographic Studies``. It is no exaggeration to say that the application of petrographic studies was the most important factor in the technological developments of coke-making in Japan during this period. The blending design using many kinds of coal was able to achieve the minimization of the coke cost at that time, and it would have been impossible but for the studies.

  11. Lipolytic Changes in Fermented Sausages Produced with Turkey Meat: Effects of Starter Culture and Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kolsarici, Nuray; Candoğan, Kezban

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two different commercial starter culture mixes and processing methodologies (traditional and heat process) on the lipolytic changes of fermented sausages manufactured with turkey meat were evaluated during processing stages and storage. Free fatty acid (FFA) value increased with fermentation and during storage over 120 d in all fermented sausage groups produced with both processing methodologies (p<0.05). After drying stage, free fatty acid values of traditional style and heat processed fermented sausages were between 10.54-13.01% and 6.56-8.49%, respectively. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values of traditionally processed fermented sausages were between 0.220-0.450 mg·kg-1, and TBA values of heat processed fermented sausages were in a range of 0.405-0.795 mg·kg-1. Oleic and linoleic acids were predominant fatty acids in all fermented sausages. It was seen that fermented sausage groups produced with starter culture had lower TBA and FFA values in comparison with the control groups, and heat application inhibited the lipase enzyme activity and had an improving effect on lipid oxidation. As a result of these effects, heat processed fermented sausages had lower FFA and higher TBA values than the traditionally processed groups. PMID:26760744

  12. Solid fossil-fuel recovery by electrical induction heating in situ - A proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S.

    1980-04-01

    A technique, termed electrical induction heating, is proposed for in situ processes of energy production from solid fossil fuels, such as bitumen production from underground distillation of oil sand; oil by underground distillation of oil shale; petroleum from heavy oil by underground mobilization of heavy oil, from either residues of conventional liquid petroleum deposits or new deposits of viscous oil; methane and coal tar from lignite and coal deposits by underground distillation of coal; and generation of electricity by surface combustion of low calorific-value gas from underground coke gasification by combustion of the organic residue left from the underground distillation of coal by induction heating. A method of surface distillation of mined coking coal by induction heating to produce coke, methane, and coal tar is also proposed.

  13. Heating dynamics and extreme ultraviolet radiation emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-06-28

    The impact of 1.064 mum laser absorption depth on the heating and in-band (2% bandwidth) 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emissions in Sn plasmas is investigated experimentally and numerically. In-band emission lasting longer than the laser pulse and separation between the laser absorption and in-band emission region are observed. Maximum efficiency is achieved by additional heating of the core of the plasma to allow the optimal temperature to expand to a lower and more optically thin density. This leads to higher temperature plasma that emits less in-band light as compared to CO{sub 2} produced plasma sources for the same application.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of the radiant field produced by a multiple-lamp quartz heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the radiant heat flux distribution produced by a reflected bank of tungsten-filament tubular-quartz radiant heaters. The method is correlated with experimental results from two cases, one consisting of a single lamp and a flat reflector and the other consisting of a single lamp and a parabolic reflector. The simulation methodology, computer implementation, and experimental procedures are discussed. Analytical refinements necessary for comparison with experiment are discussed and applied to a multilamp, common reflector heating system.

  15. SiC/C nanocable structure produced in silicon carbide by arc plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B. B.

    2012-01-01

    Defect-free and long SiC/C nanocables have been produced by heating SiC powder at 3000°C by employing dc arc plasma (Ar) in a specially designed configuration of graphite arc. Microstructural characterizations of the heat-treated powder carried out by TEM, HRTEM, SAED, EDS, and micro Raman spectroscopy showed the nanocables to consist of a SiC shell/sheath stuffed with wire type solid C core. A possible mechanism is discussed to explain the cable-type growth.

  16. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range. PMID:17677318

  17. Coke from small-diameter tubes analyzed

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, L.F.

    1988-08-29

    The mechanism for coke deposit formation and the nature of the coke itself can vary with the design of the ethylene furnace tube bank. In this article, coke deposits from furnaces with small-diameter pyrolysis tubes are examined. The samples were taken from four furnaces of identical design (Plant B). As in both the first and second installments of the series, the coke deposits were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX). The deposits from the small-diameter tubes are compared with the coke deposits from the furnace discussed in earlier articles. Analysis of the coke in both sets of samples are then used to offer recommendations for improved decoking procedures, operating procedures, better feed selection, and better selection of the metallurgy used in furnace tubes, to extend the operating time of the furnace tubes by reducing the amount and type of coke build up.

  18. Fuel gas main replacement at Acme Steel's coke plant

    SciTech Connect

    Trevino, O. . Chicago Coke Plant)

    1994-09-01

    ACME Steel's Chicago coke plant consists of two 4-meter, 50-oven Wilputte underjet coke-oven batteries. These batteries were constructed in 1956--1957. The use of blast furnace gas was discontinued in the late 1960's. In 1977--1978, the oven walls in both batteries were reconstructed. Reconstruction of the underfire system was limited to rebuilding the coke-oven gas reversing cocks and meter in orifices. By the early 1980's, the 24-in. diameter underfire fuel gas mains of both batteries developed leaks at the Dresser expansion joints. These leaks were a result of pipe loss due to corrosion. Leaks also developed along the bottoms and sides of both mains. A method is described that permitted pushing temperatures to be maintained during replacement of underfire fuel gas mains. Each of Acme's two, 50-oven, 4-metric Wilputte coke-oven, gas-fired batteries were heated by converting 10-in. diameter decarbonizing air mains into temporary fuel gas mains. Replacement was made one battery at a time, with the temporary 10-in. mains in service for five to eight weeks.

  19. Identification and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in wastewater treatment processes from coke production plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanhui; Wei, Chaohai; Yan, Bo; Feng, Chunhua; Zhao, Guobao; Lin, Chong; Yuan, Mengyang; Wu, Chaofei; Ren, Yuan; Hu, Yun

    2013-09-01

    Identification and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated at two coke plants located in Shaoguan, Guangdong Province of China. Samples of raw coking wastewaters and wastewaters from subunits of a coke production plant were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to provide a detailed chemical characterization of PAHs. The identification and characterization of PAH isomers was based on a positive match of mass spectral data of sample peaks with those for PAH isomers in mass spectra databases with electron impact ionization mass spectra and retention times of internal reference compounds. In total, 270 PAH compounds including numerous nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur heteroatomic derivatives were positively identified for the first time. Quantitative analysis of target PAHs revealed that total PAH concentrations in coking wastewaters were in the range of 98.5 ± 8.9 to 216 ± 20.2 μg/L, with 3-4-ring PAHs as dominant compounds. Calculation of daily PAH output from four plant subunits indicated that PAHs in the coking wastewater came mainly from ammonia stripping wastewater. Coking wastewater treatment processes played an important role in removing PAHs in coking wastewater, successfully removing 92 % of the target compounds. However, 69 weakly polar compounds, including PAH isomers, were still discharged in the final effluent, producing 8.8 ± 2.7 to 31.9 ± 6.8 g/day of PAHs with potential toxicity to environmental waters. The study of coking wastewater herein proposed can be used to better predict improvement of coke production facilities and treatment conditions according to the identification and removal of PAHs in the coke plant as well as to assess risks associated with continuous discharge of these contaminants to receiving waters. PMID:23589270

  20. Development of automatic operation system for coke oven machines at Yawata Works of Nippon Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Masao; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoji; Ishiharaguchi, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    The coke plant is a working environment involving heavy dust emissions, high heat and demanding physical labor. The labor-saving operation of the coke plant is an essential issue from the standpoints of not only improvement in working environment, but also reduction in fixed cost by enhancement of labor productivity. Under these circumstances, Nippon Steel has implemented the automation of coke oven machines. The first automatic operation system for coke oven machinery entered service at Oita Works in 1992, followed by the second system at the No. 5 coke oven battery of the coke plant at Yawata Works. The Yawata automatic operation system is characterized by the installation of coke oven machinery to push as many as 140 ovens per day within a short cycle time, such as a preliminary ascension pipe cap opening car and cycle time simulator by the manned operation of the pusher, which is advantageous from the standpoint of investment efficiency, and by the monitoring of other oven machines by the pusher. These measures helped to reduce the manpower requirement to 2 persons per shift from 4 persons per shift. The system entered commercial operation in March, 1994 and has been smoothly working with an average total automatic rate of 97%. Results from the startup to recent operation of the system are reported below.

  1. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  2. KRESS INDIRECT DRY COOLING SYSTEM, BETHLEHEM STEEL'S COKE PLANT DEMONSTRATION AT SPARROWS POINT, MARYLAND - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES G-N

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the Kress Indirect Dry Cooling (KIDC) process, an innovative system for handling and cooling coke produced from a slot-type by-product coke oven battery. The report is based on the test work and demonstration of the system at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Sp...

  3. KRESS INDIRECT DRY COOLING SYSTEM - BETHLEHEM STEEL'S COKE PLANT DEMONSTRATION AT SPARROWS POINT, MARYLAND - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES G-N

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the Kress Indirect Dry Cooling (KIDC) process, an innovative system for handling and cooling coke produced from a slot-type by-product coke oven battery. he report is based on the test work and demonstration of the system at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Spar...

  4. Coke-oven by-product modifications at National Steel's Great Lakes Div

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinowsky, R.P. . Great Lakes Division); Platts, M. )

    1994-10-01

    The rebuilt by-products plant, and coal and coke material handling facilities began operation in Nov. 1992. Coal handling facilities were reused with repairs and modifications, such as new vibrating bin bottoms, bin blasters and variable-speed belts with weigh scales for an accurate coal blend. Coke handling consists of two new fixed-blade rack and pinion drive coke plows, new conveyors and screening station. The by-products plant processes 48 million cu ft of coke-oven gas per day through two rehabilitated primary coolers, one of two rehabilitated exhausters, two new tar precipitators in parallel, two new ammonia scrubbers with secondary cooling in series and two rehabilitated light oil scrubbers in series. Environmental facilities include ammonia stills, catalytic ammonia destruction reactors with waste heat boilers and complete gas blanketing for benzene control. All facilities are PLC and DCS controlled with data trending capability. The by-product plant met all performance guarantees without any problems.

  5. Causes of {open_quotes}undercut{close_quotes} development in coke-oven brickwork

    SciTech Connect

    Krivoshein, V.T.

    1992-12-31

    By no means the least important fault that can develop in coke-oven refractories, and which lowers the productivity and shortens the life of coke-oven batteries is the development of so-called {open_quotes}undercuts,{close_quotes} whereby longitudinal fissures of variable depth and length appear in the first one or two rows of bricks form the floor. On the other hand, large-scale undercutting only develops in individual batteries, and many coking plant workers employed in the servicing and upkeep of the coke ovens are unfamiliar with the problem. No convincing explanation has yet been forthcoming, and consequently no effective measures have been laid down for its prevention. The first large-scale outbreak of undercutting in this country occurred in 1956-1957, in No. 1-4 batteries (side heating) at the Kuznetsk and Magnitogorsk II & SW-plants. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Heat shock decreases the embryonic quality of frozen-thawed bovine blastocysts produced in vitro

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Miyuki; HAYASHI, Takeshi; ISOZAKI, Yoshihiro; TAKENOUCHI, Naoki; SAKATANI, Miki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of heat shock on frozen-thawed blastocysts was evaluated using in vitro-produced (IVP) bovine embryos. In experiment 1, the effects of 6 h of heat shock at 41.0 C on fresh blastocysts were evaluated. HSPA1A expression as a reflection of stress was increased by heat shock (P < 0.05), but the expressions of the quality markers IFNT and POU5F1 were not affected. In experiment 2, frozen-thawed blastocysts were incubated at 38.5 C for 6 h (cryo-con) or exposed to heat shock at 41.0 C for 6 h (cryo-HS). Then, blastocysts were cultured at 38.5 C until 48 h after thawing (both conditions). Cryo-HS blastocysts exhibited a decreased recovery rate: HSPA1A expression was dramatically increased compared with that in fresh or cryo-con blastocysts at 6 h, and IFNT expression was decreased compared with that in cryo-con blastocysts at 6 h (both P < 0.05). Cryo-con blastocysts at 6 h also exhibited higher HSPA1A expression than fresh blastocysts (P < 0.05). At 48 h after thawing, the number of hatched blastocysts and blastocyst diameter were lower in cryo-HS blastocysts (P < 0.05). Cryo-con blastocysts showed lower POU5F1 levels at 48 h than fresh, cryo-con or cryo-HS blastocysts at 6 h (P < 0.05), but their POU5F1 levels were not different from those of cryo-HS blastocysts at 48 h. These results indicated that application of heat shock to frozen-thawed blastocysts was highly damaging. The increase in damage by the interaction of freezing-thawing and heat shock might be one reason for the low conception rate in frozen-thawed embryo transfer in summer. PMID:26096768

  7. Net Shape Fins for Compact Heat Exchanger Produced by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Corbeil, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    This work explores the manufacturability of pyramidal fin arrays produced using the cold spray process. Near-net shaped pyramidal fin arrays of various sizes and fin densities were manufactured using masks made of commercially available steel wire mesh. The feedstock powders used to produce the fins are characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Obstruction of the masks was investigated. The standoff distances between the substrate, mesh, and nozzle were empirically determined. Fin array characterization was performed using digital microscopy. The fin arrays' heat transfer performance was assessed experimentally for a range of Reynolds number relevant to the application sought. The fins produced using the cold spray process outperform traditional straight (rectangular) fins at the same fin density and it is hypothesized that this is due to increased fluid mixing and turbulence.

  8. Mathematical modeling of clearance between wall of coke oven and coke cake

    SciTech Connect

    Nushiro, K.; Matsui, T.; Hanaoka, K.; Igawa, K.; Sorimachi, K.

    1995-12-01

    A mathematical model was developed for estimating the clearance between the wall of the coke oven and the coke cake. The prediction model is based on the balance between the contractile force and the coking pressure. A clearance forms when the contractile force exceeds the coking pressure in this model. The contractile force is calculated in consideration of the visco-elastic behavior of the thermal shrinkage of the coke. The coking pressure is calculated considering the generation and dispersion of gas in the melting layer. The relaxation time off coke used in this model was obtained with a dilatometer under the load application. The clearance was measured by the laser sensor, and the internal gas pressure was measured in a test oven. The clearance calculated during the coking process were in good agreement with the experimental results, which supported the validity of the mathematical model.

  9. Selection of equipment for coke processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhodenko, N.T.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Nurlygayanova, V.M.; Petrunina, O.A.

    1984-07-01

    This article shows how the design and selection of equipment for the crushing, transportation, and storage of petroleum coke is dependent on the physicomechanical properties of the coke. The mechanical properties of petroleum coke depend on its total porosity, which is determined from true and apparent densities. Topics considered include screen composition, bulk density, the degree of compaction, coefficients of internal and external friction, segregation, and the angle of repose. A vibrating platform operating at 350 cycles per minute was used to investigate the dynamics of compaction of coke fractions during rail transport. It is emphasized that the physical properties of coke as a free-flowing material are of paramount importance in designing the processing and transportation systems and storage facilities for coking and calcining units.

  10. Equation of state studies of warm dense matter samples heated by laser produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; Guymer, T.; James, S. F.; Gumbrell, E.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M.; Morton, J.; Doyle, H.

    2012-03-01

    Heating of matter by proton beams produced by short pulse, laser-solid target interaction has been demonstrated over the last ten years by a number of workers. In the work described in this paper heating by a pulse of laser produced protons has been combined with high-resolution soft x-ray radiography to record the expansion of thin wire targets. Analysis of the radiographs yields material properties in the warm dense matter regime. These measurements imply initial temperatures in the experimental samples over a range from 14 eV up to 40 eV; the sample densities varied from solid to a tenth solid density. Assuming an adiabatic expansion after the initial proton heating phase isentropes of the aluminium sample material were inferred and compared to tabulated data from the SESAME equation of state library. The proton spectrum was also measured using calibrated magnetic spectrometers and radiochromic film. The accuracy of the technique used to infer material data is discussed along with possible future development.

  11. Application of quality improvement techniques to meet coke battery environmental regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Citizens Gas and Coke Utility operates three coke oven batteries, producing both foundry coke and blast furnace coke, under the trade name Indianapolis Coke. Active participation in the regulation negotiation process by the Vice President of Indianapolis Coke allowed the company to accurately anticipate the environmental regulations, long before they were set in law. Several improvements were put into motion that helps them meet the new environmental regulations. Better trained operators with new job positions dedicated solely to environmental compliance, an extensive environmental training program, and two innovations, a portable oven door milling and cleaning machine and three new computer applications are the result of team efforts. The focus of this paper is development of the computer applications designed to enhance three areas of environmental compliance. The three areas addressed by the applications are documentation and information deployment, problem solving, and resource allocation. Through quality improvement techniques and team oriented problem solving, new approaches to environmental data collection and analysis have helped Indianapolis Coke meet the ever tightening environmental regulations.

  12. Life Cycle Analysis of High Quality Recycled Aggregate Produced byHeating and Rubbing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Hirokazu; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Yoshida, Yoshikuni; Tateyashiki, Hisashi

    Most of demolished concrete is recycled as road subbase, but its generation is expected to increase rapidly and exceed the demand of road subbase in a near future. To promote the recycling of concrete, the technology to produce high quality recycled aggregate by the heating and rubbing method has been developed. In this method, demolished concrete is heated up to about 300°C in a heater to make cement paste brittle with its dehydration. The heated concrete is then rubbed in two mills to recover the recycled aggregate, while the paste is removed from the surface of aggregate and collected as cement fine powder. In this method, much energy is consumed to heat and rub concrete; however, the cement fine powder is utilized for a soil stabilizer and cement raw materials, so that the environmental load is reduced in cement manufacturing. The life cycle analysis of the recycled aggregate is carried out to evaluate this technology. As a result, the life cycle CO2 is a negative value because the deduction of CO2 emission in cement manufacturing by the powder is much large. This technology is proved to be very effective to reduce CO2.

  13. K2CO3 catalysis on the reactivity of top charged coke and stamp charged coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Qing-hai; Zhang, Jian-liang; Qi, Cheng-lin; Ma, Chao; Kong, De-wen; Mao, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The catalysis of K2CO3 on the reactivity of top charged coke and stamp charged coke from Pansteel in China was studied. The coke reaction index of the stamp charged coke was 1%-2% higher than that of the top charged coke. Under the catalysis of K2CO3, the coke reaction index of both cokes approximately increased by 4%, 6%, 10% and 6% at 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200°C, respectively. The reactivity of the K-enriched stamp charged coke was 1%-2% higher than that of the K-enriched top charged coke below 1100°C. However, only negligible differences were found in the temperature zone between 1100 and 1200°C. Scanning electron microscopy images illustrated that pores in the top charged coke were smaller and equally distributed, while relatively more big pores exist non-homogenously in stamp charged coke. Due to the different processes in production, the stamp charged coke was more porous and most of the pores tended to be applanate. Cracks were observed in the microstructure of the stamp charged coke during the carbon solution reaction, implying the inferior quality of the stamp charged coke to the top charged coke at high temperature. Diffusion of K during the carbon solution reaction was studied by the energy dispersive spectrometry. It is found that K gradually spreads into the center of lumpy coke with the rising of temperature and is equally distributed on the edges of pores at 1200°C. Besides, oxidation reactions of functional groups become faster with the catalysis of K.content

  14. EXTERIOR VIEW, BEE HIVE COKE OVEN DOOR. Pratt Coal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, BEE HIVE COKE OVEN DOOR. - Pratt Coal & Coke Company, Pratt Mines, Coke Ovens & Railroad, Bounded by First Street, Avenue G, Third Place, Birmingham Southern Railroad, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Coke workers' exposure to volatile organic compounds in northern China: a case study in Shanxi Province.

    PubMed

    He, Qiusheng; Yan, Yulong; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Wang, Yuhang

    2015-06-01

    China is the largest coke producer and exporter in the world, and it has been a major concern that large populations of coke workers are exposed to the associated air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study aimed to preliminarily quantify the potential exposure to VOCs emitted from two representative coking plants and assess the potential health risks. Air samples from various stages of coking were collected from the topside of coke ovens and various plant areas and then analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX). The time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations were used to quantify the coke oven emission (COE). The TWA concentrations for benzene were 705.6 and 290.4 μg m(-3) in plant A and plant B, respectively, which showed a higher exposure level than those reported in other countries. COE varied on the topside of coke ovens during charging and pushing processes, from 268.3 to 1197.7 μg m(-3) in plant A and 85.4-489.7 μg m(-3) in plant B. Our results indicate that benzene exposure from the diffusion of tar distillation also exerts significant health risks and thus should also be concerned. Charging and pushing activities accounted for nearly 70 % of benzene dose at the topside, and the benzene exposure risks to the coke oven workers in China were higher than those reported by US EPA. Compared to the reported emission sources, the weight-based ratios of average benzene to toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in different COE air samples showed unique characteristic profiles. Based on the B/T ratios from this work and from literatures on several major cities in northern China, it was evident that COE contributes significantly to the severe pollution of VOCs in the air of northern China. Future more rigorous studies are warranted to characterize VOC emission profiles in the stack gas of the coking processes in China. PMID:25975238

  16. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  17. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  18. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  19. Copyrolysis of coal with coke-oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, H.; Li, B.; Sun, C.

    1997-12-31

    To improve the economy of the hydropyrolysis process by reducing hydrogen cost, it has been suggested to use cheaper hydrogen-rich gas (such as coke-oven gas) instead of pure hydrogen. Pyrolysis of Chinese Xianfeng lignite has been carried out with real coke-oven gas (COG) as reactive gases at 0.1--5 MPa and the final temperature of 650 C with heating rate of 5--25 C/min in an 10 g fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pressure on product yields under COG were investigated in detail and compared with coal pyrolysis with hydrogen at the same conditions. The results indicate that it is possible to use COG instead of pure hydrogen in hydropyrolysis. To optimize the yields of the valuable chemicals, the experimental conditions must be adjusted.

  20. Antifouling agents for prevention of unwanted coke formation in reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Stolfa, F.

    1987-03-03

    A method is described to prevent fouling of equipment used in high temperature coke producing petroleum reactions comprising the addition of an alcoholic aqueous mixture of an antifoulant comprising a phthalocyanine compound to a hydrocarbon feedstock at reaction conditions. The addition comprises the steps of: (a) sonicating a mixture of a phthalocyanine compound with water to form an aqueous dispersion of the phthalocyanine; (b) adding an alcohol to the aqueous dispersion to form an alcoholic aqueous dispersion of the phthalocyanine compound; and, (c) adding the alcoholic aqueous dispersion of the phthalocyanine compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock in an amount sufficient to reduce fouling of equipment employed during the high temperature coke producing petroleum reaction.

  1. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  2. New designs in the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Larin; V.V. Demenko; V.L. Voitanik

    2009-07-15

    In recent Giprokoks designs for the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems, high-productivity vibrational-inertial screens have been employed. This permits single-stage screening and reduction in capital and especially operating expenditures, without loss of coke quality. In two-stage screening, >80 mm coke (for foundry needs) is additionally separated, with significant improvement in quality of the metallurgical coke (25-80 mm). New designs for the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems employ mechanical treatment of the coke outside the furnace, which offers new scope for stabilization of coke quality and permits considerable improvement in mechanical strength and granulometric composition of the coke by mechanical crushing.

  3. Regeneration of coked catalysts: The effect of aging upon the characteristics of the coke deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Royo, C.; Ibarra, J.V.; Monzon, A.; Santamaria, J. . Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente)

    1994-11-01

    The effect of aging in nitrogen upon the regeneration characteristics of the coke deposits on chromia-alumina catalysts has been investigated. To this end, the coked catalysts have been subjected to various treatments in nitrogen, and the chemical composition and reactivity of the deposits have been investigated. The results show that the process of aging in nitrogen gives rise to significant changes in both the composition and reactivity of the coke deposits, due to the stripping of the coke fractions with a higher volatility. This obviously has important consequences upon the subsequent regeneration, which are also discussed and tested in regeneration experiments using coked catalyst of different ages.

  4. [Environmental and health impacts of wood combustion to produce heat and power].

    PubMed

    Valerio, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Toxic chemicals such as benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and ultra fine particles were found in the smoke produced by wood combustion. Emission factors confirm that, to produce the same energy amount, many more pollutants are emitted by wood than by natural gas. Biomass burning produces a relevant deterioration of air quality inside and outside houses, notably due to emissions of fine and ultra fine dust (PM10, PM2.5) according to reviewed studies. Important improvements in emission quality are obtained with the use of more efficient household heating systems, both in developed and in developing countries. Numerous studies have assessed the possible health effects produced by wood smoke, providing sufficient evidence that the indoor exposure to wood smoke, even in developed countries, can have adverse effects on human health. In 2010 IARC classified wood smoke as a possible human carcinogen. In Europe, electricity generation from biomass combustion is increasing (12% each year) thanks to incentives provided to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and use of fossil fuels.Today adequate studies to assess the environmental and health effects of emissions from power plants fuelled by solid biomasses are still needed. PMID:22418798

  5. A mathematical model for the estimation of flue temperature in a coke oven

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.I.; Kim, S.Y.; Suo, J.S.; Hur, N.S.; Kang, I.S.; Lee, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    The coke plants at the Kwangyang works has adopted an Automatic Battery Control (ABC) system which consists of four main parts, battery heating control, underfiring heat and waste gas oxygen control, pushing and charging schedule and Autotherm-S that measures heating wall temperature during pushing. The measured heating wall temperature is used for calculating Mean Battery Temperature (MBT) which is average temperature of flues for a battery, but the Autotherm-S system can not provide the flue temperatures of an oven. This work attempted to develop mathematical models for the estimation of the flue temperature using the measured heating wall temperature and to examine fitness of the mathematical model for the coke plant operation by analysis of raw gas temperature at the stand pipe. Through this work it is possible to reflect heating wall temperature in calculating MBT for battery heating control without the interruption caused by a maintenance break.

  6. CARCINOGEN ASSESSMENT OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coke oven workers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania and at 10 non-Allegheny County coke plants in the United States and Canada were found to be at an excess risk of mortality from cancer of all sites and from cancer of the lungs, bronchus, trachea, kidney, and prostate. An import...

  7. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and reusable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper base alloy material adjacent to he fuel coolant. High pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics recently evaluated at Rocketdyne using stainless steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  8. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper-base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and resuable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper-base alloy material adjacent to the fuel coolant. High-pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics were recently evaluated using stainless-steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper-base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  9. Integration of Thermoelectric Generators and Wood Stove to Produce Heat, Hot Water, and Electrical Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, A. M.; Mazandarani, P.; Panahi, R.; Behsaz, H.; Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    Traditional fire stoves are characterized by low efficiency. In this experimental study, the combustion chamber of the stove is augmented by two devices. An electric fan can increase the air-to-fuel ratio in order to increase the system's efficiency and decrease air pollution by providing complete combustion of wood. In addition, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) produce power that can be used to satisfy all basic needs. In this study, a water-based cooling system is designed to increase the efficiency of the TEGs and also produce hot water for residential use. Through a range of tests, an average of 7.9 W was achieved by a commercial TEG with substrate area of 56 mm × 56 mm, which can produce 14.7 W output power at the maximum matched load. The total power generated by the stove is 166 W. Also, in this study a reasonable ratio of fuel to time is described for residential use. The presented prototype is designed to fulfill the basic needs of domestic electricity, hot water, and essential heat for warming the room and cooking.

  10. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  11. Ammonium nitrogen removal from coking wastewater by chemical precipitation recycle technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang; Xiong, Xiang

    2009-12-01

    Ammonium nitrogen removal from wastewater has been of considerable concern for several decades. In the present research, we examined chemical precipitation recycle technology (CPRT) for ammonium nitrogen removal from coking wastewater. The pyrolysate resulting from magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) pyrogenation in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution was recycled for ammonium nitrogen removal from coking wastewater. The objective of this study was to investigate the conditions for MAP pyrogenation and to characterize of MAP pyrolysate for its feasibility in recycling. Furthermore, MAP pyrolysate was characterized by scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD). The MAP pyrolysate could be produced at the optimal condition of a hydroxyl (OH(-)) to ammonium molar ratio of 2:1, a heating temperature of 110 degrees C, and a heating time of 3h. Surface characterization analysis indicated that the main component of the pyrolysate was amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate (MgNaPO(4)). The pyrolysate could be recycled as a magnesium and phosphate source at an optimum pH of 9.5. When the recycle times were increased, the ammonium nitrogen removal ratio gradually decreased if the pyrolysate was used without supplementation. When the recycle times were increased, the ammonium nitrogen removal efficiency was not decreased if the added pyrolysate was supplemented with MgCl(2).6H(2)O plus Na(2)HPO(4).12H(2)O during treatment. A high ammonium nitrogen removal ratio was obtained by using pre-formed MAP as seeding material. PMID:19850316

  12. Coking partially briquetted coal charge under industrial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhorukov, V.I.; Bezdvernyi, G.N.; Kopeliovich, L.V.; Mishchikhin, V.G.; Berkutov, A.N.; Stepanov, Y.; Abramicheva, A.I.; Topchii, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The partial briquetting of low grade coals ordinarily unsuitable for coking, has been found to allow use of these materials in the coking process under industrial conditions, with an improvement in coke quality. Coke oven capacity is increased. The binder used is medium temperature coal tar.

  13. Method of hot-briquetting mixtures of coal and coke

    SciTech Connect

    Kleisa, K.; Langhoff, J.; Lehmann, J.; Makrutzki, D.; Nashan, G.

    1980-07-08

    In a method of making briquettes in which coke and coking coal are admixed to form a briquetting mixture having a temperature in the range between about 400 to 500/sup 0/C, the improvement is described wherein the coke temperature is adjusted, prior to mixing of the coke with the coking coal, to a temperature level which will, upon mixing of the coke with the coking coal, result in the mixture having a temperature with +-5% of a predetermined briquetting temperature lying within said range.

  14. Method of charging coke ovens with coal

    SciTech Connect

    Azimov, A.A.; Davydenko, V.M.; Dorfman, G.A.; Gromov, N.F.; Kulakov, N.K.; Likhogub, E.P.; Marapulets, G.N.; Minasov, A.N.; Shestakov, V.A.; Silka, A.N.

    1982-11-23

    A method is claimed for charging coke ovens with coal by: passage of coal through charging holes and simultaneously withdrawing gases evolving from the coal charge through the middle charging holes thereof; holding the coal charge over a period of time sufficient for a coal-charging machine to deliver a next batch of said coal charge for charging the next successive coke oven; completely charging said coke oven while simultaneously charging the next successive coke oven through its extreme charging holes; withdrawing through said middle charging holes of said coke oven being completely charged, said coke-oven gases; and introducing a gas inert to said cokeoven gas in an amount of 15-20% of the total amount of the cokeoven gas being withdrawn. There is also provided a coal-charging machine for carrying out this method comprising a frame with undercarriages, hoppers for containing the coal charge, the number of hoppers corresponding to the number of the charging holes of the coke oven, coal feed devices disposed in the upper portion of the hoppers.

  15. Process for producing fluid fuel from coal

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Richard W.; Reber, Stephen A.; Schutte, August H.; Nadkarni, Ravindra M.

    1977-01-01

    Process for producing fluid fuel from coal. Moisture-free coal in particulate form is slurried with a hydrogen-donor solvent and the heated slurry is charged into a drum wherein the pressure is so regulated as to maintain a portion of the solvent in liquid form. During extraction of the hydrocarbons from the coal, additional solvent is added to agitate the drum mass and keep it up to temperature. Subsequently, the pressure is released to vaporize the solvent and at least a portion of the hydrocarbons extracted. The temperature of the mass in the drum is then raised under conditions required to crack the hydrocarbons in the drum and to produce, after subsequent stripping, a solid coke residue. The hydrocarbon products are removed and fractionated into several cuts, one of which is hydrotreated to form the required hydrogen-donor solvent while other fractions can be hydrotreated or hydrocracked to produce a synthetic crude product. The heaviest fraction can be used to produce ash-free coke especially adapted for hydrogen manufacture. The process can be made self-sufficient in hydrogen and furnishes as a by-product a solid carbonaceous material with a useful heating value.

  16. Process for utilizing the waste heat content of condensate and/or vapor produced in the manufacture of sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.; Schiweck, H.

    1981-09-22

    A process is provided for utilizing the waste heat content of condensate and/or vapor produced in the manufacture of sugar in which thin juice is cooled, subjected to one or more stages of flash evaporation to concentrate and further cool the juice, after which it is heated with condensate and/or vapor produced elsewhere in the sugar manufacturing process and with incoming thin juice thereby heating the outgoing juice to substantially its original temperature and providing the cooling of the incoming thin juice. In another embodiment completely purified thin juice is concentrated in a multiple effect evaporating plant wherein the vapor produced in the final evaporator is compressed and is returned selectively to one of the preceding evaporators of the evaporating plant for use in heating the juice.

  17. Spotlight on the microbes that produce heat shock protein 90-targeting antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Millson, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising cancer drug target as a molecular chaperone critical for stabilization and activation of several of the oncoproteins that drive cancer progression. Its actions depend upon its essential ATPase, an activity fortuitously inhibited with a very high degree of selectivity by natural antibiotics: notably the actinomycete-derived benzoquinone ansamycins (e.g. geldanamycin) and certain fungal-derived resorcyclic acid lactones (e.g. radicicol). The molecular interactions made by these antibiotics when bound within the ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90 have served as templates for the development of several synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor drugs. Much attention now focuses on the clinical trials of these drugs. However, because microbes have evolved antibiotics to target Hsp90, it is probable that they often exploit Hsp90 inhibition when interacting with each other and with plants. Fungi known to produce Hsp90 inhibitors include mycoparasitic, as well as plant-pathogenic, endophytic and mycorrhizal species. The Hsp90 chaperone may, therefore, be a prominent target in establishing a number of mycoparasitic (interfungal), fungal pathogen–plant and symbiotic fungus–plant relationships. Furthermore the Hsp90 family proteins of the microbes that produce Hsp90 inhibitor antibiotics are able to reveal how drug resistance can arise by amino acid changes in the highly conserved ADP/ATP-binding site of Hsp90. PMID:23271830

  18. A viable process for producing hydrogen synfuel using nuclear fusion heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, T. R.; Brown, L. C.

    Analytical and costing analyses of a thermochemical water splitting plant powered by a tandem mirror fusion reactor are presented. Design criteria indicated directing high quality steam to the chemical plant, where no liquid metal coolants would be used. Minimal pumping distances for high pressure He, multiple barriers between the neutron-activated blanket and the hydrogen product, and modular construction where possible are necessary. A He-Brayton topping cycle, coupled to a steam-Rankine bottoming cycle are selected. Slightly over 1111 MWt and about 720 MWe could be produced by the plant if all low grade waste heat is directed to the Rankine cycle. SO3 is used with water for the splitting process, then recombined. H2 is siphoned off as a fuel and O2 is delivered to a coal reforming plant. A 30 yr plant life is projected, operating at a 70% thermal efficiency for the splitting process and producing H2 at $10-12/GJ. The plant is expected to become economically viable in the year 2030 if debt financing is available at 12.25% per year.

  19. Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, I.C.; Greinke, R.A.

    1997-06-17

    This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (1) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (2) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns and (b) a binder. This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode. 5 figs.

  20. Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Irwin Charles; Greinke, Ronald Alfred

    1997-01-01

    This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (i) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (ii) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns. (b) a binder This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  1. 16. Coke 'fines' bin at Furnace D. After delivery to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Coke 'fines' bin at Furnace D. After delivery to the trestle bins, the coke was screened and the coke 'fines' or breeze, were transported by conveyor to the coke fines bins where it was collected and leaded into dump trucks. The coke fines were then sold for fuel to a sinter plant in Lorain, Ohio. - Central Furnaces, 2650 Broadway, east bank of Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Improving effectiveness of coke oven patching

    SciTech Connect

    Withrow, J.A.; McCollum, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    An effective patching program is essential to protect the battery against severe damage which would result from air, foul gas, and fuel gas leaks; and to keep it in operating condition for a reasonable life span. In addition to that basic purpose of patching, other areas such as heating efficiency, coke quality, and emissions performance can benefit from an effective program. Clairton Works and US Steel Research have made improvements in the patching program in several broad categories: equipment used for application of patching material, the patching material itself, and practices used in administration of the patching program. The equipment changes include a pusher machine ram-mounted roof patching unit and a new type of patching buggy for use with materials which tend to settle or cake. New materials have been formulated which develop a ceramic bond on the oven refractories and provide superior adherance. Battery Temperature Profiles, Charging Surveys, and Stack Observation Reports are used on a regular basis to identify critical areas for patching beyond those which can be identified by operating personnel on an incidental basis. This paper reviews each of these improvements in Clairton's patching program in terms of the equipment, materials, and practices per se and also discusses the results of implementing these changes.

  3. Reduced coking of fuel nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, A.A.; Sager, J.W.; Kobish, T.R.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a fuel nozzle useful for a gas turbine engine and having a nozzle face, the combination of fuel supply means on the nozzle, the fuel supply means including an annular fuel discharge body converging in a downstream direction toward a longitudinal central axis of the nozzle and terminating in a downstream fuel discharge orifice substantially on the central axis for discharging fuel from the orifice for mixing with air downstream of the nozzle face, air supply means on the nozzle for discharging air from the nozzle face, and means on the nozzle around the fuel discharge body cooperating with the air supply means for controllably discharging sufficient air flow with locally reduced swirl strength over the fuel discharge body to establish a recirculation zone spaced away from the nozzle face downstream thereof a sufficient distance to substantially reduce coking on the nozzle face.

  4. Human health risk characterization of petroleum coke calcining facility emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Davinderjit; Johnson, Giffe T; Harbison, Raymond D

    2015-12-01

    Calcining processes including handling and storage of raw petroleum coke may result in Particulate Matter (PM) and gaseous emissions. Concerns have been raised over the potential association between particulate and aerosol pollution and adverse respiratory health effects including decrements in lung function. This risk characterization evaluated the exposure concentrations of ambient air pollutants including PM10 and gaseous pollutants from a petroleum coke calciner facility. The ambient air pollutant levels were collected through monitors installed at multiple locations in the vicinity of the facility. The measured and modeled particulate levels in ambient air from the calciner facility were compared to standards protective of public health. The results indicated that exposure levels were, on occasions at sites farther from the facility, higher than the public health limit of 150 μg/m(3) 24-h average for PM10. However, the carbon fraction demonstrated that the contribution from the calciner facility was de minimis. Exposure levels of the modeled SO2, CO, NOx and PM10 concentrations were also below public health air quality standards. These results demonstrate that emissions from calcining processes involving petroleum coke, at facilities that are well controlled, are below regulatory standards and are not expected to produce a public health risk. PMID:26520182

  5. KRESS INDIRECT DRY COOLING SYSTEM, BETHLEHEM STEEL'S COKE PLANT DEMONSTRATION AT SPARROWS POINT, MARYLAND - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT AND APPENDICES A-F

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the Kress Indirect Dry Cooling (KIDC) process, an innovative system for handling and cooling coke produced from a slot-type by-product coke oven battery. he report is based on the test work and demonstration of the system at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Spar...

  6. KRESS INDIRECT DRY COOLING SYSTEM - BETHLEHEM STEEL'S COKE PLANT DEMONSTRATION AT SPARROWS POINT, MARYLAND - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT AND APPENDICES A-F

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the Kress Indirect Dry Cooling (KIDC) process, an innovative system for handling and cooling coke produced from a slot-type by-product coke oven battery. he report is based on the test work and demonstration of the system at Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Spar...

  7. Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy of catalysts: Adsorption and coke formation in zeolites and vibrational spectra of supported metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Yek Tann

    2001-10-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to study the physicochemical and catalytic properties of zeolites and supported metal oxide catalysts using UV Raman spectroscopy. In order to reduce the thermal degradation and possible photodecomposition of adsorbates by UV radiation, we have developed a novel fluidized bed method for measuring the UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The UV Raman spectra of various organic compounds adsorbed in zeolites H-USY and H-ZSM-5 are recorded. When measurements are performed on stationary and spinning samples, the Raman spectra show the presence of coke, a typical end product of heat and photochemistry. In contrast, the Raman peaks of the unreacted adsorbates dominate the spectra measured using the fluidized bed method. These results indicate that the fluidized bed technique is a good method for measuring UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The formation of coke in the methanol-to-gasoline conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 causes deactivation of the catalyst. To gain insight into the formation of coke, we have studied this reaction using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectral changes suggest coke is produced from conjugated olefins via cyclopentadiene intermediates. Aromatic compounds in gasoline may also be produced from cyclopentadienes. The adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolites may alter the molecular sieving characteristics of these materials which ultimately affect their performance as catalysts and adsorbents. We have quantified the adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolite H-RHO using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of the zeolite after the adsorption of water, methanol or acetonitrile are consistent with an increase in the average T-O-T angle of the zeolite of 5-8°. The adsorption of ammonia, on the other hand, decreases the average T-O-T angle by 5°. Because of certain advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy, recently there is a strong interest in

  8. New and revised standards for coke production

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  9. [Study on co-pyrolysis of coking-coal, plastic and dust].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongfang; Ye, Shufeng; Xie, Yusheng; Chen, Yunfa

    2003-09-01

    The co-pyrolysis processes of different proportions of coking-coal, plastic, metallurgical dust (MD) were investigated using thermal analyzer (Setaram Labsys) under a neutral atmosphere of N2 at the sweep rate of 30 mL/min, the linear heating rate and the final pyrolysis temperature were 5 degrees C/min and 1000 degrees C respectively in this study. The experimental results indicated that both the pyrolysis process of coking-coal and that of plastic were radical mechanism. In other word, within the relatively lower temperature range, a large amount of radicals were generated during their pyrolysis processes and stabilized through the intra-radical rearrangement reactions or inter-radical combination reactions. This means that sulfur containing in coal and plastic tends to formed gaseous sulfides, such as H2S, COS, CS2, etc. When co-existing with MD, these sulfides will react with metal oxides containing in MD to form metal sulfide with high stability and the cleaner coke oven gas (COG) were obtained. Within higher temperature interval of 500 degrees C-1000 degrees C, some of the gaseous products after pyrolysis (e.g. H2, CO and C) reinforce the reduction atmosphere that the coking reaction system needs and accelerate the reduction of metal oxides in MD and gasification of metal, which were conductive to the effective removal of sulfur in coke. Therefore, it is definitely feasible to adding waste plastic and MD into coking-coal to remove the sulfur in COG and coke simultaneously. PMID:14719256

  10. Special analyses reveal coke-deposit structure

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, L.F.

    1988-08-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX) have been used to obtain information that clarifies the three mechanisms of coke formation in ethylene furnaces, and to analyze the metal condition at the exit of furnace. The results can be used to examine furnace operations and develop improved ethylene plant practices. In this first of four articles on the analyses of coke and metal samples, the coking mechanisms and coke deposits in a section of tube from an actual ethylene furnace (Furnace A) from a plant on the Texas Gulf Coast are discussed. The second articles in the series will analyze the condition of the tube metal in the same furnace. To show how coke deposition and metal condition dependent on the operating parameters of an ethylene furnace, the third article in the series will show the coke deposition in a Texas Gulf Coast furnace tube (Furnace B) that operated at shorter residence time. The fourth article discusses the metal condition in that furnace. Some recommendations, based on the analyses and findings, are offered in the fourth article that could help extend the life of ethylene furnace tubes, and also improve overall ethylene plant operations.

  11. Commercial cokes and graphites as anode materials for lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Derwin, D.J.; Kinoshita, K.; Tran, T.D.; Zaleski, P.

    1998-07-01

    Several types of carbonaceous materials from Superior Graphite Co. were investigated for lithium ion intercalation. These commercially available cokes, graphitized cokes and graphites have a wide range of physical and chemical properties. The coke materials were investigated in propylene carbonate based electrolytes and the graphitic materials were studied in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl solutions to prevent exfoliation. The reversible capacities of disordered cokes are below 230 mAh/g and those for many highly ordered synthetic (artificial) and natural graphites approached 372 mAh/g (LiC{sub 6}). The irreversible capacity losses vary between 15 to as much as 200% of reversible capacities for various types of carbon. Heat treated cokes with the average particle size of 10 microns showed marked improvements in reversible capacity for lithium intercalation. The electrochemical characteristics are correlated with data obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET surface are analysis. The electrochemical performance, availability, cost and manufacturability of these commercial carbons will be discussed.

  12. Commercial cokes and graphites as anode materials for lithium - ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Derwin, D J; Kinoshita, K; Tran, T D; Zaleski, P

    2000-10-26

    Several types of carbonaceous materials from Superior Graphite Co. were investigated for lithium ion intercalation. These commercially available cokes, graphitized cokes and graphites have a wide range of physical and chemical properties. The coke materials were investigated in propylene carbonate based electrolytes and the graphitic materials were studied in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl solutions to prevent exfoliation. The reversible capacities of disordered cokes are below 230 mAh/g and those for many highly ordered synthetic (artificial) and natural graphites approached 372 mAh/g (LiC{sub 6}). The irreversible capacity losses vary between 15 to as much as 200% of reversible capacities for various types of carbon. Heat treated cokes with the average particle size of 10 microns showed marked improvements in reversible capacity for lithium intercalation. The electrochemical characteristics are correlated with data obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET surface area analysis. The electrochemical performance, availability, cost and manufacturability of these commercial carbons will be discussed.

  13. Giprokoks proposals for improvement in air quality at coke battery 1A of Radlin coke plant

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko

    2009-07-15

    Coke battery 1A, which uses rammed batch, has gone into production at Radlin coke plant (Poland), on the basis of Giprokoks designs. Up-to-date dust-trapping methods are used for the first time within the aspiration systems in the coal-preparation shop and in improving dust collection within the production buildings.

  14. Application of NMR techniques for studying coking of FCC catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonardet, J.J.; Barrage, M.C.; Fraissard, J.

    1995-12-31

    NMR occupies an important place in the study of the deactivation of zeolites by coking. Indeed, association of the resonances of several nuclei has shown that it is possible to investigate: the nature of the, carbonaceous; deposits; under certain conditions, the coke content; the mode of zeolite deactivation; the exact location of the internal coke and the evolution of its distribution with the coke content, the presence of carbonaceous; residues at the crystallite surface; the effect of zeolite structure and the nature of the reactant on coking and regeneration. It also reveals the role of extra framework aluminium species and that of certain lattice Al atoms in the coking process.

  15. H2-producing bacterial communities from a heat-treated soil inoculum.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Prabha; Bruns, Mary Ann; Zhang, Husen; Van Ginkel, Steve; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen gas (approximately 60% H(2)) was produced in a continuous flow bioreactor inoculated with heat-treated soil, and fed synthetic wastewater containing glucose (9.5 g l(-1)). The pH in the bioreactor was maintained at 5.5 to inhibit consumption of H(2) by methanogens. The objective of this study was to characterize bacterial communities in the reactor operated under two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs of 30-h and 10-h) and temperatures (30 degrees C and 37 degrees C). At 30-h HRT, the H(2) production rate was 80 ml h(-1) and yield was 0.91 mol H(2)/mol glucose. At 10-h HRT, the H(2) production rate was more than 5 times higher at 436 ml h(-1), and yield was 1.61 mol H(2)/mol glucose. Samples were removed from the reactor under steady-state conditions for PCR-based detection of bacterial populations by ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Populations detected at 30-h HRT were more diverse than at 10-h HRT and included representatives of Bacillaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae. At 10-h HRT, only Clostridiaceae were detected. When the temperature of the 10-h HRT reactor was increased from 30 degrees C to 37 degrees C, the steady-state H(2) production rate increased slightly to 463 ml h(-1) and yield was 1.8 mol H(2)/mol glucose. Compared to 30 degrees C, RISA fingerprints at 37 degrees C from the 10-h HRT bioreactor exhibited a clear shift from populations related to Clostridium acidisoli (subcluster Ic) to populations related to Clostridium acetobutylicum (subcluster Ib). PMID:15558274

  16. Estimating concentrations of heat producing elements in the crust near the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneuf, Catherine; Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    2014-05-01

    Because the concentrations of uranium and thorium in the crust must be determined precisely for the future geoneutrino observations planned at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, we investigate whether airborne radiometric surveys can be used to constrain crustal radioactivity. The regional airborne surveys cover a wide area with high spatial resolution (< 250 m), but are only sensitive to a very thin (25 cm) surficial layer. We calculate crustal heat production in the Sudbury region from airborne radiometric surveys and compare with measurements on outcrop and core samples, and with heat flow data. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, and potassium from radiometric surveys are correlated with geology, but heat production estimates are lower than values from rock samples. The radiometric surveys give a mean heat production of 0.8 ± 0.6 (σ) μW m- 3 for more than 176,000 values. The outcrop samples collected along a transect in the Superior Province yield an average heat production of 2.9 ± 2.4 (σ) μW m- 3 and core samples from drill holes yield an average of 2.5 ± 0.8 (σ) μW m- 3. The high heat production in the rock samples is consistent with surface heat flux measurements near Sudbury with a mean value that is 12 mW m- 2 higher than the average Canadian Shield. The study shows that airborne aeromagnetic surveys give useful information on lateral variations in surface heat production but are unlikely to provide the reliable values of heat production needed to calculate the crustal geoneutrino flux. Crustal heat production will be best calculated from heat flux data complemented by heat production measurements on rock samples. The high mean heat production in Sudbury Igneous Complex samples (≈ 1.5 μW m- 3) suggests that the main source of the melt sheet was the very radioactive upper crust of the Superior Province or that the melt sheet was extremely enriched relative to a lower crustal source.

  17. Highly coke-resistant ni nanoparticle catalysts with minimal sintering in dry reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Han, Joung Woo; Kim, Chanyeon; Park, Jun Seong; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2014-02-01

    Nickel catalysts are typically used for hydrogen production by reforming reactions. Reforming methane with carbon dioxide, called dry reforming of methane (DRM), is a good way to produce hydrogen or syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) from two notable greenhouse gases. However, Ni catalysts used for DRM suffer from severe coke deposition. It has been known that small Ni nanoparticles are advantageous to reduce coke formation, but the high reaction temperature of DRM (800 °C) inevitably induces aggregation of the nanoparticles, leading to severe coke formation and degraded activity. Here, we develop highly coke-resistant Ni catalysts by immobilizing premade Ni nanoparticles of 5.2 nm in size onto functionalized silica supports, and then coating the Ni/SiO2 catalyst with silica overlayers. The silica overlayers enable the transfer of reactants and products while preventing aggregation of the Ni nanoparticles. The silica-coated Ni catalysts operate stably for 170 h without any degradation in activity. No carbon deposition was observed by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy. The Ni catalysts without silica coating show severe sintering after DRM reaction, and the formation of filamentous carbon was observed. The coke-resistant Ni catalyst is potentially useful in various hydrocarbon transformations. PMID:24402833

  18. Coking wastewater increases micronucleus frequency in mouse in vivo via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Na; Li, Hongyan; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2013-10-01

    Coking wastewater has caused serious health risk in coal-producing areas of China, however its toxic effects have not been well understood. The genotoxicity induced by coking wastewater on mice in vivo and its possible oxidative mechanisms were investigated via observing the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes of mouse bone marrow, and subsequently determining the antioxidative enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase Cu, Zn-SOD, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and catalase), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance contents and protein carbonyl levels in brains and livers of mice. Results showed that the tested coking wastewater caused a significant increase of micronucleus frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, the sample increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation levels, which was accompanied by changes in antioxidative status. Interestingly, pre-treatment with an antioxidant (vitamin C) led to a statistical reduction in the micronucleus frequency caused by coking wastewater. This implies that coking wastewater induces evident genetic damage in mammalian cells, and exposure to polluted areas might pose a potential genotoxic risk to human beings; in the process, oxidative stress played a crucial role. PMID:24494500

  19. Electrical conduction phenomena in coked industrial reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, S.; Bonanos, N.

    1997-02-01

    Industrial Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalysts containing up to 26 wt% of carbon have been studied by admittance spectroscopy. Spectra obtained on heating in nitrogen in the range 200--500 C displayed low frequency relaxations, which were interpreted in terms of a network of carbon islands linked by surface ionic conduction. During subsequent cooling, these features disappeared, suggesting that they were generated by dissociation of strongly bound water. Isothermal ac measurements in nitrogen showed that the conductance was determined by the carbon content. Similar measurements made in dilute oxygen showed that the conductance decreased with burn-off of carbon. Analysis of gases evolved on heating revealed aqueous and chloride species, originating from acid sites on the catalyst support. The results suggest that electrical techniques could be used to characterize coked reforming catalysts.

  20. APPLICABILITY OF COKE PLANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES TO COAL CONVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of comparisons of process and waste stream characteristics from the Byproduct coke over process with selected gasification and liquefaction processes. It includes recommendations regarding control technologies for air, water, and solid wastes. Coke oven c...

  1. METALLURGICAL COKE INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to develop particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the metallurgical coke industry. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from metallurgical coke plants, the data were...

  2. 61. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COKE DRYER BUILDING, LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COKE DRYER BUILDING, LOOKING AT FIRE BOXES AND SILOS FOR COKE DRYERS. APRIL 22, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  3. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING TIPPLE FOR LOADING COKED COAL INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING TIPPLE FOR LOADING COKED COAL INTO RAILROAD CARS (FRONT), COAL STORAGE BIN AND TIPPLE FOR COAL TO BE CHARGED IN FURNACES (BACK) - Alverton Coke Works, State Route 981, Alverton, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF COKE WORKS LOOKING WEST, SHOWING OVENS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF COKE WORKS LOOKING WEST, SHOWING OVENS IN FOREGROUND, LARRY CAR TIPPLE TO THE RIGHT, AND COAL TIPPLE IN CENTERGROUND - Lucernemines Coke Works, 0.2 mile East of Lucerne, Lucerne Mines, Indiana County, PA

  5. 2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Left to right: coke ovens, wharf with belt conveyor, coal bunker, coke stack, brick quencher, gas holder, view framed by bracing for overhead conveyor. Looking south/southeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  6. GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH FROM COKE OVEN SITE, HEIGHT C. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH FROM COKE OVEN SITE, HEIGHT C. 20 FEET. - Pratt Coal & Coke Company, Pratt Mines, Tailings Pile, Bounded by First Street, Avenue G, Third Place, Birmingham Southern Railroad, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH FROM BEE HIVE COKE OVEN SITE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH FROM BEE HIVE COKE OVEN SITE. - Pratt Coal & Coke Company, Pratt Mines, Tailings Pile, Bounded by First Street, Avenue G, Third Place, Birmingham Southern Railroad, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. VIEW OF EIGHT COKE OVENS ON EAST SIDE OF TOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EIGHT COKE OVENS ON EAST SIDE OF TOWN OF ALVERTON, CONSTRUCTED OF YELLOW REFRACTORY BRICK. "WOODLAND M2" AND "BENEZETT - Alverton Coke Works, State Route 981, Alverton, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. 2. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING COKE MACHINE (CENTER), INTERMEDIATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING COKE MACHINE (CENTER), INTERMEDIATE TIPPLE (RIGHT), AND OVENS - Shoaf Mine & Coke Works, East side of Shoaf, off Township Route 472, Shoaf, Fayette County, PA

  10. Development of coke strength after reaction (CSR) at Dofasco

    SciTech Connect

    T.W. Todoschuk; J.P. Price; J.F. Gransden

    2004-03-01

    In order to prevent coke degradation without detrimentally affecting blast furnace service life, Dofasco initiated a project to improve coke strength after reaction. The results of the program and Dofasco's prediction model are presented. 9 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  12. Simulations of ionospheric turbulence produced by HF heating near the upper hybrid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A.; Eliasson, B.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of the ionosphere by high-frequency (HF), ordinary (O) mode electromagnetic waves can excite magnetic field-aligned density striations, associated with upper and lower hybrid turbulence and electron heating. We have used Vlasov simulations in one spatial and two velocity dimensions to study the induced turbulence in the presence of striations when the O-mode pump is mode converted to large-amplitude upper hybrid oscillations trapped in a striation. Parametric processes give rise to upper and lower hybrid turbulence, as well as to large amplitude, short wavelength electron Bernstein waves. The latter excite stochastic electron heating when their amplitudes exceed a threshold for stochasticity, leading to a rapid increase of the electron temperature by several thousands of kelvin. The results have relevance for high-latitude heating experiments.

  13. Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

  14. Preventing the overcharging of coke ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. A.

    1981-05-19

    A metod is described for preventing the overcharging of coal into a coke oven system in which preheated coal is transported from a storage container to the coke ovens by means of a substantially enclosed continuous conveyor system filled with inert gas. A portion of inert gas within the enclosed conveyor system is carried along with the coal into the coke oven itself. During filling of the oven, this inert gas is carried up and out of the oven standpipes. When the oven becomes filled, however, the standpipe escape route becomes blocked resulting in a rapid pressure buildup within the system. This rapid pressure build-up is utilized to generate a signal to stop further filling of the oven. The instant method may be employed as a primary regulating system, but is more preferably employed as a back-up to conventional sensor probes used for regulating the level of coal.

  15. Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH

    SciTech Connect

    Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Coke formation in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. 4: Modeling of coke formation in naphtha cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Reyniers, G.C.; Froment, G.F. . Lab. voor Petrochemische Techniek); Kopinke, F.D.; Zimmermann, G. . Abteilung Hochtemperaturreaktionen am Inst. fuer Technische Chemie)

    1994-11-01

    An extensive experimental program has been carried out in a pilot unit for the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. On the basis of the experimental information and the insight in the mechanisms for coke formation in pyrolysis reactors, a mathematical model describing the coke formation has been derived. This model has been incorporated in the existing simulation tools at the Laboratorium voor Petrochemische Techniek, and the run length of an industrial naphtha cracking furnace has been accurately simulated. In this way the coking model has been validated.

  17. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    SciTech Connect

    Volk Jr., Michael; Wisecarver, Keith D.; Sheppard, Charles M.

    2003-02-07

    The coking test facilities include three reactors (or cokers) and ten utilities. Experiments were conducted using the micro-coker, pilot-coker, and stirred-batch coker. Gas products were analyzed using an on-line gas chromatograph. Liquid properties were analyzed in-house using simulated distillation (HP 5880a), high temperature gas chromatography (6890a), detailed hydrocarbon analysis, and ASTM fractionation. Coke analyses as well as feedstock analyses and some additional liquid analyses (including elemental analyses) were done off-site.

  18. Heat transfer enhancement due to a longitudinal vortex produced by a single winglet in a pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Oyakawa, Kenyu; Senaha, Izuru; Ishikawa, Shuji; Hokama, Mashashige

    1999-07-01

    Longitudinal vortices were artificially generated by a single winglet vortex generator in a pipe. The purpose of this study is to analyze the motion of longitudinal vortices and their effects on heat transfer enhancement. The flow pattern was visualized by means of both fluorescein and rhodamine B as traces in a water flow. The main vortex was moved spirally along the circumference and the behavior of the other vortices was observed. Streamwise and circumferential heat transfer coefficients on the wall, wall static pressure, and velocity distribution in an overall cross section were also measured for the air flow in a range of Reynolds numbers from 18,800 to 62,400. The distributions of the streamwise heat transfer coefficient had a periodic pattern, and the peaks in the distribution were circumferentially moved due to the spiral motion of the main vortex. Lastly, the relationships between the iso-velocity distribution, wall static pressure, and heat transfer characteristics was shown. In the process of forming the vortex behind the winglet vortex generator, behaviors of both the main vortex and the corner vortex were observed as streak lines. The vortex being raised along the end of the winglet, and the vortex ring being rolled up to the main vortex were newly observed. Both patterns of the streamwise velocity on a cross-section and the static pressure on the wall show good correspondences to phenomena of the main vortex spirally flowing downstream. The increased ratio of the heat transfer is similar to that of the friction factor based on the shear stress on the wall surface of the pipe. The quantitative analogy between the heat transfer and the shear stress is confirmed except for some regions, where the effects of the down-wash or blow-away of the secondary flows is caused due to the main vortex.

  19. Analyses of alternate skirt attachments to coke drums

    SciTech Connect

    Antalffy, L.P.; Baxter, J.E.; Malek, D.W.; Bardia, K.L.; Taagepera, J.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most sensitive areas to cracking in coke drums is the skirt to shell attachment joint. The severe thermal cycling from drum heat up and quenching together with the cycling pressure stresses in the drum acting on the skirt geometry will cause large stress intensity concentrations at the skirt to shell junction. This paper investigates four types of skirt attachments to a coke drum, namely: the conventional fillet weld attachment to the drum cone; a fillet weld attachment to the outside of the vessel shell; a modified design where the skirt is attached by an externally blended weld build up with an internally radiused backing weld; and a design where the skirt is attached to the drum shell by an integral contour machined plate in which the skirt attachment stub is machined. In each case, the thermal gradient and the subsequent thermal stress intensity in the skirt are determined. A comparison of the total stress intensities in each joint is provided to evaluate the comparative advantages of each design. A determination is also made on the effects of slotting in the skirt to alleviate the total stress intensity level in the skirt.

  20. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  1. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  2. [Emission and source characterization of monoaromatic hydrocarbons from coke production].

    PubMed

    He, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Xin-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2005-09-01

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) from indigenous and industrial coking processes are studied in Shanxi province. They are sampled on the top of coke ovens and in the chimneys using stainless steel canister and determined by GC/MSD after preconcentration with liquid nitrogen. Benzene, toluene and xylene are the main components among MAHs emitted from coking processes. Benzene and the total MAHs concentrations were as high as 3421.0 microg/m3 and 4 865.9 microg/m3 in the air from indigenous coking, 548.7 microg/m3 and 1 054.8 microg/m3 in the oventop air from industrial coking, and 1 376.4 microg/m3 and 1 819.4 microg/m3 in stack gas from industrial coking, respectively. The MAHs concentrations vary greatly during the indigenous coking process, which in the prophase (from firing to 10 days) is obviously higher than in the anaphase (10 days to quenching the coke). In industrial coking the MAHs in the oventop air are highest when charging the coal and next when transferring the hot coke, but in stack gas they are highest when charging coal and lowest when transferring the coke. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in industrial coking samples show good linearity, indicating that MAHs in industrial coking might come predominantly from coal pyrolysis; but BTEX distribute dispersedly in indigenous coking samples, indicating that its emission might be affected by many factors. In all samples BTEX ratios especially high B/E ratio, is unique among MAHs sources, and might be helpful to characterize pollution from coking. PMID:16366463

  3. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Brijesh, S.; Daswani, Poonam G.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial strain using murine monocytic cell line, J774. [3H] thymidine release assay was used to evaluate the apoptotic/necrotic effect. All plants at concentrations <1% enhanced intracellular killing of the bacteria by J774 cells. However, at higher concentrations, the decoctions induced apoptosis in J774 cells. The study demonstrates that these plants could control diarrhoea caused by heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli through their immunomodulatory effect. PMID:25035535

  4. Sodium nitrate containing mixture for producing ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Meek, T.T.

    1984-10-10

    A mixture for, and method of using such a mixture, for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by the use of microwave energy are disclosed, wherein the mixture comprises a glass sealing material, a coupling agent, and an oxidizer. The seal produced exhibits greater strength due to its different microstructure. Sodium nitrate is the most preferred oxidizer.

  5. Method for producing ceramic-glass-ceramic seals by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Rodger D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1986-01-01

    Method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by the use of microwave energy, and a sealing mixture which comprises a glass sealing material, a coupling agent, and an oxidizer. The seal produced exhibits greater strength due to its different microstructure. Sodium nitrate is the most preferred oxidizer.

  6. Method for producing H.sub.2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source

    DOEpatents

    Paulson, Leland E.

    1990-01-01

    A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300.degree. to 1400.degree. F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

  7. Reducing dust emissions at OAO Alchevskkoks coke battery 10A

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Trembach; E.N. Lanina

    2009-07-15

    Coke battery 10A with rammed batch is under construction at OAO Alchevskkoks. The design documentation developed by Giprokoks includes measures for reducing dust emissions to the atmosphere. Aspiration systems with dry dust trapping are employed in the new components of coke battery 10A and in the existing coke-sorting equipment. Two-stage purification of dusty air in cyclones and bag filters is employed for the coke-sorting equipment. This system considerably reduces coke-dust emissions to the atmosphere.

  8. Characterization of heat transport dynamics in laser-produced plasmas using collective Thomson scattering: Simulation and proposed experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Camacho, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    The authors propose an experiment in which the collective Thomson scattering lineshape obtained from ion acoustic waves is used to infer the spatial structure of local heat transport parameters and collisionality in a laser-produced plasma. The peak-height asymmetry in the ion acoustic wave spectrum will be used in conjunction with a recently developed model describing the effects of collisional and Landau damping contributions on the low-frequency electron density fluctuation spectrum to extract the relative electron drift velocity. This drift arises from temperature gradients in the plasma. The local heat flux, which is proportional to the drift, can then be estimated, and the electron thermal conductivity will be inferred from the relationship between the calculated heat flux and the experimentally determined temperature gradient. Damping of the entropy wave component at zero mode frequency is shown to be an estimate of the ion thermal conductivity, and its visibility is a direct measure of the ion-ion mean free path. The authors also propose to measure thermal transport parameters under dynamic conditions in which the plasma is heated impulsively by a laser beam on a fast ({approximately}50 ps) time scale. This technique will enable the authors to study heat transport in the presence of the large temperature gradients that are generated by this local heating mechanism. Deviations of the inferred local thermal conductivity from its Spitzer-Haerm value can be used to study the transition to the nonlocal heat transport regime. The authors have constructed a simple numerical model of this proposed experiment and present the results of a simulation. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Water protection in coke-plant design

    SciTech Connect

    G.I. Alekseev

    2009-07-15

    Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

  10. 77 FR 32998 - Foundry Coke From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... The Commission instituted this review on December 1, 2011 (76 FR 74810) and determined on March 5, 2012 that it would conduct an expedited review (77 FR 15123, March 14, 2012). The Commission... COMMISSION Foundry Coke From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject...

  11. Cancer mortality among coke oven workers.

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, C K

    1983-01-01

    The OSHA standard for coke oven emissions, which went into effect in January 1977, sets a permissible exposure limit to coke oven emissions of 150 micrograms/m3 benzene-soluble fraction of total particulate matter (BSFTPM). Review of the epidemiologic evidence for the standard indicates an excess relative risk for lung cancer as high as 16-fold in topside coke oven workers with 15 years of exposure or more. There is also evidence for a consistent dose-response relationship in lung cancer mortality when duration and location of employment at the coke ovens are considered. Dose-response models fitted to these same data indicate that, while excess risks may still occur under the OSHA standard, the predicted levels of increased relative risk would be about 30-50% if a linear dose-response model is assumed and 3-7% if a quadratic model is assumed. Lung cancer mortality data for other steelworkers suggest the predicted excess risk has probably been somewhat overestimated, but lack of information on important confounding factors limits further dose-response analysis. PMID:6653539

  12. Novel carbon-rich additives preparation by degradative solvent extraction of biomass wastes for coke-making.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianqing; Li, Xian; Xiao, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Tong, Shan; Wu, Chao; Ashida, Ryuichi; Liu, Wenqiang; Miura, Kouichi; Yao, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, two extracts (Soluble and Deposit) were produced by degradative solvent extraction of biomass wastes from 250 to 350°C. The feasibilities of using Soluble and Deposit as additives for coke-making were investigated for the first time. The Soluble and Deposit, having significantly higher carbon content, lower oxygen content and extremely lower ash content than raw biomasses. All Solubles and most of Deposits can melt completely at the temperature ranged from 80 to 120°C and 140 to 180°C, respectively. The additions of Soluble or Deposit into the coke-making coal significantly improved their thermoplastic properties with as high as 9°C increase of the plastic range. Furthermore, the addition of Deposit or Soluble also markedly enhanced the coke quality through increasing coke strength after reaction (CSR) and reducing coke reactivity index (CRI). Therefore, the Soluble and Deposit were proved to be good additives for coke-making. PMID:26871958

  13. Prediction of the quality of coke obtained from vacuum residues by using spectroscopy infrared FTIR-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, A. Y.; Rodríguez, N. A.; Mejía, E.; Cabanzo, R.

    2016-02-01

    According to the trend of the heavy crudes and high demand of fuels, it is projected a considerable increase in the production of vacuum residues. With the purpose of taking advantage of these loads, the refineries have been improving conversion processes for the production of better quality distillates. However, as increasing the severity conditions and the species content of resins and asphaltenes high concentrations of coke are obtained. To provide an insight into the quality and cokes properties, in this study fifty (50) coke samples obtained from vacuum residues processed under conditions of thermal cracking and hydroconversion were selected. Each coke was analysed in detail with properties such as fixed carbon, volatile material, ash, and calorific value. Subsequently, a characterization methodology was developed to predict the properties of cokes, by using partial least squares regression, and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) in the spectral range from 4000 to 500cm-1. The models obtained by chemometrics allowed to predict the quality of the coke produced from vacuum residues with reliable responses in short periods of time.

  14. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-06-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration.

  15. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration. PMID:27270486

  16. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration. PMID:27270486

  17. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  18. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Iwamae, A; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Tobin, M; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    We have observed supersonic heat wave propagation in a low-density aerogel target ({rho} {approx} 3.2 mg/cc) irradiated at the intensity of 4 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The heat wave propagation was measured with a time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics, and the results were compared with simulations made with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code, RAICHO. Propagation velocity of the ionization front gradually decreased as the wave propagates into the target. The reason of decrease is due to increase of laser absorption region as the front propagates and interplay of hydrodynamic motion and reflection of laser propagation. These features are well reported with the simulation.

  19. Microstructured silver surfaces produced by freeze casting for enhanced phase change heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouws, G. J.; Shortt, N.

    2015-12-01

    Microporous silver surface layers were formed on copper substrates by means of a modified freeze casting method. The structure of such layers is the result of the templating action of the ice crystals and layers were found to contain a hierarchical porous structure. Three different pore morphologies were present in the microstructure with pore sizes ranging from approximately 0.5 to 200 μm. The application of these surface structures was found to considerably enhance the heat flux during the nucleate phase of pool boiling, with heat fluxes up to five times higher from a microporous surface compared to a bare copper substrate. Bubble formation and departure was found to be significantly different on the two types of surfaces, with smaller bubbles formed with a high density on the microporous surface. The enhancement in heat flux by these structures is most likely due to the combined effect of an increased surface area with high thermal conductivity, an increase in nucleation sites for bubble formation as well as effective wicking from micropores to sustain bubble growth and departure.

  20. Coking coals of Mongolia: Distribution and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh; Jargal, Luvsanchultem

    2016-04-01

    The coal deposits of Mongolia tend to become younger from west to east and can be subdivided into two provinces, twelve basins, and three areas. Main controlling factor of coal rank is the age of coal bearing sequences. Western Mongolian coal-bearing province contains mostly high rank bituminous coal in strata from Late Carboniferous. The basins in southern Mongolia and the western part of central Mongolia have low rank bituminous coal in strata from the Permian. The northern and central Mongolian basins contain mainly Jurassic subbituminous coal, whereas the Eastern Mongolian province has Lower Cretaceous lignite. Mongolian known coking coal reserves are located in western, southern and northern Mongolia and related to Carboniferous, Permian and Jurassic sequences, respectively. Pennsylvanian Nuurstkhotgor coal deposit is located in northwestern Mongolia (in Western Mongolian coal-bearing province). The coals have 1-7.5 crucible swelling number (CSN) and 0-86 G-index. Vitrinite reflectance value (Rmax in oil) varies from 0.7% to 1.2% and sulfur content is low, ranging from 0.3% to 0.6% with an average of 0.4%. Coal reserve is estimated to be 1.0 billion ton, of which half is coking coal. Upper Permian Khurengol deposit is situated in western Mongolia (in Western Mongolian coal-bearing province). CSN and G-index of coal are 8-9 and 54-99, respectively. The coals have Rmax of 1.1 to 1.7% (average 1.4%) and sulfur content of 0.2 to 0.6% (average 0.4%). Coking coal reserve of the deposit is estimated to be 340 million ton. Upper Permian Tavantolgoi, the largest coking coal deposit, lies in southern Mongolia (in South Gobi coal-bearing basin). The coals have CSN of 1 to 7.5 and Rmax of 0.7% to 1.2%. Sulfur content is low, ranging from 0.5% to 0.9%. Coal reserve is estimated to be 6.0 billion ton, of which 2.0 billion ton is accounted as coking coal. Lower-Middle Jurassic Ovoot coal is located in northern Mongolia (in Orkhon-Selenge coal-bearing area). This is one of

  1. Single Chain Variable Fragments Produced in Escherichia coli against Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Toxins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Fernanda B.; Nepomuceno, Roberto; Silva, Anderson; Munhoz, Danielle D.; Yamamoto, Bruno B.; Luz, Daniela; Abreu, Patrícia A. E.; Horton, Denise S. P. Q.; Elias, Waldir P.; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Piazza, Roxane M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is a prevalent pathological condition frequently associated to the colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, known to be endemic in developing countries. These strains can produce two enterotoxins associated with the manifestation of clinical symptoms that can be used to detect these pathogens. Although several detection tests have been developed, minimally equipped laboratories are still in need of simple and cost-effective methods. With the aim to contribute to the development of such diagnostic approaches, we describe here two mouse hybridoma-derived single chain fragment variable (scFv) that were produced in E. coli against enterotoxins of ETEC strains. Methods and Findings Recombinant scFv were developed against ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin (ST), from previously isolated hybridoma clones. This work reports their design, construction, molecular and functional characterization against LT and ST toxins. Both antibody fragments were able to recognize the cell-interacting toxins by immunofluorescence, the purified toxins by ELISA and also LT-, ST- and LT/ST-producing ETEC strains. Conclusion The developed recombinant scFvs against LT and ST constitute promising starting point for simple and cost-effective ETEC diagnosis. PMID:26154103

  2. Method for determining the end of devolatilizing in a coke oven and adjusting the coke cycle based thereon

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.G.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a process for manufacturing coke in a by-product coke oven battery. Each oven is operated over a coking cycle; each coking cycle having an aim total coke cycle time defined by a charging time and an aim push time. The aim push time has a permitted plus or minus deviation. Between the charging time and aim push time there is: (1) a devolatilizing period of estimated length, and (2) a coke soaking period immediately following the devolatilizing period. The method of determining the end of the devolatilizing period consists of: (a) in a first coking cycle, during a devolatilizing period, obtaining liquid catch condensed volatiles specimens from gas samples withdrawn from within the coke oven; (1) determining a reference light-transmitting value of the catch specimens for the devolatilizing period; (b) in a second coking cycle, as the coking cycle approaches an estimated end of the devolatilizing period, obtaining liquid catch specimens having condensed volatiles from gas samples withdrawn from within the coke oven; and (1) determining when an individual light-transmitting value of one of the specimens varies by a pre-selected amount from the reference light-transmitting value.

  3. Measurement of soil bacterial colony temperatures and isolation of a high heat-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular temperatures of microorganisms are considered to be the same as those of their surroundings because the cellular volume is too small to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. However, by forming a colony or a biofilm, microorganisms may be able to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. In this study, we measured the temperatures of bacterial colonies isolated from soils using an infrared imager and investigated the thermogenesis by a bacterium that increases its colony temperature. Results The temperatures of some colonies were higher or lower than that of the surrounding medium. A bacterial isolate with the highest colony temperature was identified as Pseudomonas putida. This bacterial isolate had an increased colony temperature when it grew at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Measurements of heat production using a microcalorimeter showed that the temperature of this extraordinary, microcalorimetrically determined thermogenesis corresponded with the thermographically observed increase in bacterial colony temperature. When investigating the effects of the energy source on this thermal behavior, we found that heat production by this bacterium increased without additional biomass production at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Conclusions We found that heat production by bacteria affected the bacterial colony temperature and that a bacterium identified as Pseudomonas putida could maintain a cellular temperature different from the ambient temperature, particularly at a sub-optimal growth temperature. The bacterial isolate P. putida KT1401 increased its colony temperature by an energy-spilling reaction when the incubation temperature limited its growth. PMID:23497132

  4. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  5. An engineered method for the repair of coke oven batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dohle, H.; Ehmke, R.

    1996-12-31

    Improved sales figures in steel making industry and the consequently higher demand for blast furnace coke more recently not only led to a lot of new plant construction projects but also to a vivid growth in repair projects. Sales problems experienced in the past combined with the reluctant attitude to invest in new battery construction projects exerted a negative influence on the age structure of coke plants worldwide. In the US, for example, 58% of the steel companies` coke ovens and 72% of the merchant coke ovens are over 20 years old. The structural status and thus the service life expectancy of a coke oven battery surely do not alone depend on the coke oven battery`s age, but in particular on its total coke production and on the operating and maintenance practice of its operators. More stringent pollution control codes and regulations call for optimum maintenance, particularly for older coke oven plants, considering both technical and economic aspects. The target is to maintain the operability of coke ovens for a lot more years by implementing the best suitable maintenance and repair methods. On condition that appropriate maintenance and repair methods are initiated in time and with care and diligence, the service life of a coke oven battery can be prolonged substantially. A selection of repair and modernization programs developed by TSOA is described and explained.

  6. DIARRHEA OUTBREAK IN PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL, ASSOCIATED WITH A HEAT-STABLE CYTOTOXIC ENTEROTOXIN PRODUCED BY Aeromonas caviae

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Ana Carolina Amaral; MARTINS, Luciano Moura; GATTI, Maria Silvia Viccari; FALAVINA DOS REIS, Cristhiane Moura; HOFER, Ernesto; YANO, Tomomasa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the present study enterotoxic and cytotoxic activities of twenty Aeromonas caviaestrains were examined. They originated from fecal specimens of patients with acute diarrhea during an outbreak in Brazil in 2004. Culture supernatants of fourteen strains (70%) caused fluid accumulation in rabbit ileal intestinal loops and in suckling mice assays, and also showed a cytotoxic activity in Vero and Caco-2 cells. The enterotoxic and cytotoxic factors were heat-stable after culture supernatants treatment at 100 ºC. The results revealed that A. caviaestrains produce a putative diarrheagenic virulence factor, a heat-stable cytotoxic enterotoxin that could be linked to the diarrhea outbreak that took place in Brazil. PMID:26422161

  7. Mutualistic fungal endophytes produce phytohormones and organic acids that promote japonica rice plant growth under prolonged heat stress*

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Ullah, Ihsan; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies the potential role in heat-stress mitigation of phytohormones and other secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Paecilomyces formosus LWL1 in japonica rice cultivar Dongjin. The japonica rice was grown in controlled chamber conditions with and without P. formosus LWL1 under no stress (NS) and prolonged heat stress (HS) conditions. Endophytic association under NS and HS conditions significantly improved plant growth attributes, such as plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, P. formosus LWL1 protected the rice plants from HS compared with controls, indicated by the lower endogenous level of stress-signaling compounds such as abscisic acid (25.71%) and jasmonic acid (34.57%) and the increase in total protein content (18.76%–33.22%). Such fungal endophytes may be helpful for sustainable crop production under high environmental temperatures. PMID:26642184

  8. Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-04

    We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

  9. Impurity Ions in a Plasma Produced by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Komori, Akio; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism of the generation of impurity ions is experimentally evidenced in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma produced with a copper Lisitano coil. It is shown that neutral copper particles are sputtered from the Lisitano coil by argon ions and are ionized by the collisions with electrons. The argon ions are accelerated by the ion sheath formed on the Lisitano coil surface, so that the plasma space potential plays an important role in producing the impurities. The impurity flux calculated by using plasma parameters and the sputtering yield of copper is found to be consistent with the observed value. The production of a pure ECR plasma is also attempted with an aluminum Lisitano coil which has a smaller sputtering yield than that of the copper Lisitano coil.

  10. Effect of Filling Type and Heating Method on Prevalence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes in Dumplings Produced in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Barbara; Dąbrowski, Waldemar

    2015-05-01

    The count of Listeria monocytogenes was determined, before and after heat treatment, in 200 samples of dumplings of 9 brands and with different types of stuffing. Analyses were conducted according to ISO 11290-1 standard and with real-time PCR method. The highest count of L. monocytogenes was found in meat dumplings (10(2) to 10(4) CFU/g), whereas products with white cheese-potato stuffing and vegetable-mushroom stuffing contained significantly less Listeria, 20 to 80 and 5 to 32 CFU/g, respectively. In cooled meat dumplings the extent of contamination depended significantly on the producer. In addition, a significant (P < 0.05) correlation was determined between contamination level and meat content in the stuffing (rho = 0.418), especially in stuffing containing pork meat (0.464), contrary to beef-containing stuffing (0.284). Heating dumplings in boiling water for 2 min completely eliminated L. monocytogenes in meat dumplings. In contrast, the microwave heating applied for 2 min at 600 W only reduced the count of L. monocytogenes by 1 to 2 logs. Hence, the microwave heating failed to reduce the risk of infection with this pathogen below the level permissible in the EU regulation, especially in the most contaminated samples. In this case, the efficacy of microwave heating was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the initial count of L. monocytogenes (rho = 0.626), then by meat content in the stuffing (0.476), and to the lowest extent--by the type of meat (0.415 to 0.425). However, no Listeria sp. and L. monocytogenes were isolated from cooked dumplings with fruits (strawberries or blueberries). PMID:25847074