Science.gov

Sample records for product monolith formation

  1. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2006-09-13

    The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability

  2. Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) monolith formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2007-07-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or 'mineralized' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydro-ceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2 g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydro-ceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form. (authors)

  3. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  4. Polymer-based monolithic columns in capillary format tailored by using controlled in situ polymerization.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken

    2009-02-01

    This review introduces to the readers our new perspectives of polymer-based monolithic column with a high performance for small solutes such as drug candidates, illustrating the fabrication of LC columns in capillary. First, we briefly reviewed the status quo of polymer-based monolithic columns, comparing with silica monoliths. The miniaturization of LC system with higher throughput (shorter analytical time) was stressed conceptually, along with a fine permeable bicontinuous monolithic structure with submicron domain size (skeletal thickness + pore size) for higher performance. Second, from these perspectives, our column preparation was described, while our specially designed porogenic solvents were introduced as a controller of the monolithic morphology via reaction-induced phase separation. Specifically, monolithic columns were exemplified in two polymer formats, that is, one monolith prepared by free radical polymerization of glycerin 1,3-dimethacrylate, GDMA, and the other prepared by stepwise polymerization of newly introduced multifunctional epoxy and diamino monomers. Both monolithic columns in capillary format demonstrated a fine bicontinuous structure, affording a good compatibility of the efficiency (H) and permeability (D). Especially, the epoxy-based column showed an excellent separation impedance, E (=H(2)/D). Our micro-HPLC data were discussed along with a prototyped wired chip device. PMID:19142909

  5. Westerlund 1: monolithic formation of a starburst cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Clark, J. Simon; Ritchie, Ben; Goodwin, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Westerlund 1 is in all likelihood the most massive young cluster in the Milky Way, with a mass on the order of 105 Msol. We have been observing its massive star population for ten years, measuring radial velocity changes for a substantial fraction of its OB stars and evolved supergiants. The properties of the evolved population are entirely consisting with a single burst of star formation, in excellent agreement with the results of studies based on the lower-mass population.Here we will present two new studies of the cluster: 1) A direct measurement of its average radial velocity and velocity dispersion based on individual measurements for several dozen stars with constant radial velocity and 2) A search for massive stars in its immediate neighbourhood using multi-object spectroscopy.The results of these two studies show that Westerlund 1 is decidedly subvirial and has a systemic radial velocity significantly different from that of nearby gas, which was assumed to provide a dynamical distance by previous authors. Moreover, the dynamical distance is inconsistent with the properties of the high-mass stellar population. In addition, we find that the cluster is completely isolated, with hardly any massive star in its vicinity that could be associated in terms of distance modulus or radial velocity. The cluster halo does not extend much further than five parsec away from the centre. All these properties are very unusual among starburst clusters in the Local Universe, which tend to form in the context of large star-forming regions.Westerlund 1 is thus the best example we have of a starburst cluster formed monolithically.

  6. Initial results for the silicon monolithically interconnected solar cell product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Shreve, K. P.; Cotter, J. E.; Barnett, A. M.

    1995-10-01

    This proprietary technology is based on AstroPower's electrostatic bonding and innovative silicon solar cell processing techniques. Electrostatic bonding allows silicon wafers to be permanently attached to a thermally matched glass superstrate and then thinned to final thicknesses less than 25 micron. These devices are based on the features of a thin, light-trapping silicon solar cell: high voltage, high current, light weight (high specific power) and high radiation resistance. Monolithic interconnection allows the fabrication costs on a per watt basis to be roughly independent of the array size, power or voltage, therefore, the cost effectiveness to manufacture solar cell arrays with output powers ranging from milliwatts up to four watts and output voltages ranging from 5 to 500 volts will be similar. This compares favorably to conventionally manufactured, commercial solar cell arrays, where handling of small parts is very labor intensive and costly. In this way, a wide variety of product specifications can be met using the same fabrication techniques. Prototype solar cells have demonstrated efficiencies greater than 11%. An open-circuit voltage of 5.4 volts, fill factor of 65%, and short-circuit current density of 28 mA/sq cm at AM1.5 illumination are typical. Future efforts are being directed to optimization of the solar cell operating characteristics as well as production processing. The monolithic approach has a number of inherent advantages, including reduced cost per interconnect and increased reliability of array connections. These features make this proprietary technology an excellent candidate for a large number of consumer products.

  7. Initial results for the silicon monolithically interconnected solar cell product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Shreve, K. P.; Cotter, J. E.; Barnett, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    This proprietary technology is based on AstroPower's electrostatic bonding and innovative silicon solar cell processing techniques. Electrostatic bonding allows silicon wafers to be permanently attached to a thermally matched glass superstrate and then thinned to final thicknesses less than 25 micron. These devices are based on the features of a thin, light-trapping silicon solar cell: high voltage, high current, light weight (high specific power) and high radiation resistance. Monolithic interconnection allows the fabrication costs on a per watt basis to be roughly independent of the array size, power or voltage, therefore, the cost effectiveness to manufacture solar cell arrays with output powers ranging from milliwatts up to four watts and output voltages ranging from 5 to 500 volts will be similar. This compares favorably to conventionally manufactured, commercial solar cell arrays, where handling of small parts is very labor intensive and costly. In this way, a wide variety of product specifications can be met using the same fabrication techniques. Prototype solar cells have demonstrated efficiencies greater than 11%. An open-circuit voltage of 5.4 volts, fill factor of 65%, and short-circuit current density of 28 mA/sq cm at AM1.5 illumination are typical. Future efforts are being directed to optimization of the solar cell operating characteristics as well as production processing. The monolithic approach has a number of inherent advantages, including reduced cost per interconnect and increased reliability of array connections. These features make this proprietary technology an excellent candidate for a large number of consumer products.

  8. Formation of porous epoxy monolith via concentrated emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Xiang, Aiming; Li, Hangquan

    2008-09-15

    Step polymerization was introduced into the concentrated emulsion templating method and was illustrated with the preparation of porous epoxy monolith. A solution of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA), its curing agent low molecular weight polyamide resin, and surfactant nonyl phenol polyoxyethylene ether in 4-methyl-2-pentanon as a solvent was used as the continuous phase, an aqueous suspension of colloidal silica as the dispersed phase of the concentrated emulsion. After the continuous phase polymerized and the dispersed phase removed, a porous material is obtained. The key point in this work is to find a compromise between the rates of curing and phase separating and thus achieve a kinetic stability of the concentrated emulsion. The effects of loading of colloidal silica, the pre-curing of the epoxy precursors, and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase were systematically investigated. PMID:18571192

  9. Formation of bimodal porous silica-titania monoliths by sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzimuradov, O. N.

    2011-10-01

    Silica-titania monoliths with micrometer-scale macroporous and nanometer-scale mesoporous structure and high titania contents are prepared by sol-gel process and phase separation. Titanium alkoxide precursor was not effective in the preparation of high titania content composites because of strong decrease in phase separation tendency. Bimodal porous gels with high titania content were obtained by using inorganic salt precursors such as titanium sulfate and titanium chloride. Various characterization techniques, including SEM, XRD, Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption have been carried out to investigate the formation process and physical-chemical properties of silica-titania monoliths. The characterization results show that the silica-titania monoliths possess a bimodal porous structure with well-dispersed titania inside silica network. The addition of titania in silica improves the thermal stability of both macroporous and mesoporous structures.

  10. Production of aligned microfibers and nanofibers and derived functional monoliths

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Michael Z.; DePaoli, David W.; Kuritz, Tanya; Omatete, Ogbemi

    2007-08-14

    The present invention comprises a method for producing microfibers and nanofibers and further fabricating derived solid monolithic materials having aligned uniform micro- or nanofibrils. A method for producing fibers ranging in diameter from micrometer-sized to nanometer-sized comprises the steps of producing an electric field and preparing a solid precipitative reaction media wherein the media comprises at least one chemical reactive precursor and a solvent having low electrical conductivity and wherein a solid precipitation reaction process for nucleation and growth of a solid phase occurs within the media. Then, subjecting the media to the electric field to induce in-situ growth of microfibers or nanofibers during the reaction process within the media causing precipitative growth of solid phase particles wherein the reaction conditions and reaction kinetics control the size, morphology and composition of the fibers. The fibers can then be wet pressed while under electric field into a solid monolith slab, dried and consolidated.

  11. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  12. Bioethanol production by reusable Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in a macroporous monolithic hydrogel matrices.

    PubMed

    Mulko, Lucinda; Rivarola, Claudia R; Barbero, Cesar A; Acevedo, Diego F

    2016-09-10

    Performance of yeasts on industrial processes can be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalyst. The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inside monolithic macroporous hydrogels were produced by in-situ polymerization of acrylamide around a live yeast suspension under cryogelation conditions. Preculture of the yeasts was not necessary and this innovative and simple procedure is amenable to scaling-up to industrial production. The yeasts were efficiently retained in monolithic hydrogels, presenting excellent mechanical properties and high cell viability. Macroporous hydrogels showed a fast mass transport allowing the hydrogel-yeast complexes achieved similar ethanol yield and productivity than free yeasts, which is larger than those reached with yeasts immobilized in compact hydrogels. Moreover, the same yeasts were able to maintain its activity by up to five reaction cycles with a cell single batch during fermentation reactions. PMID:27396938

  13. Chemistry of cobalt(II) confined in the pores of ordered silica monoliths: from the formation of the monolith to the CoFe Prussian blue analogue nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Aouadi, Merwen; Fornasieri, Giulia; Briois, Valérie; Durand, Pierrick; Bleuzen, Anne

    2012-02-27

    Recently we conceived of an original strategy that allows the precipitation of Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) in the ordered pores of silica monoliths to lead to photomagnetic CoFe PBA-silica nanocomposites. To determine the critical parameters and fully control the synthesis of the photoactive CoFe PBA in the pores of the silica matrix, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed at the cobalt K-edge. This study showed that cobalt cation chemistry is the keystone of the entire process. The local environment and the electronic structure of the cobalt cation undergo several modifications during the formation process: first the incorporation of the cation as an octahedral complex into the ordered block copolymer phase, then the deprotonation by thermohydrolysis to give a fourfold-coordinated deprotonated lowly condensed species and finally the formation of the 3D coordination network of CoFe PBA in acidic conditions through a rapid reprotonation followed by nucleophilic substitution accompanied by the electronic transfer, thus leading to the photomagnetic Co(III)(LS)-Fe(II)(LS) (LS=low spin) pairs. PMID:22278956

  14. Interactions of bupivacaine with a molecularly imprinted polymer in a monolithic format studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Julien; Fischer, Gerd; Schauff, Siri; Albert, Klaus; Irgum, Knut

    2006-01-15

    A trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate-based monolith of dimensions carefully chosen to fit exactly in a standard 4-mm solid-state CP/MAS NMR rotor was photopolymerized and subsequently molecularly imprinted with bupivacaine using a grafting protocol with methacrylic acid and ethylene dimethacrylate as monomers. As no crushing or grinding of the monolith was necessary, additional unspecific surface area was not created. This procedure ascertains that differences observed between imprinted and nonimprinted polymers are due only to graft imprinted surfaces and give therefore better results in NMR spectroscopy due to less unspecific interactions between analyte and monolith. This improves the comparability to chromatographic evaluations where uncrushed monolithic columns are also used. To track interactions between analyte and stationary phase, the saturation transfer difference (STD) technique was applied on the polymer in the suspended state using the same solvent as in the chromatographic evaluation. This relatively new NMR method has to our knowledge not been used on chromatographic materials before. By using STD NMR on pristine monoliths, it was possible to measure large differences between the imprinted or nonimprinted polymers and the analyte indicating significant differences in the interaction mechanisms. These could be directly correlated with retention differences observed in chromatographic evaluations. PMID:16408943

  15. Comparison of freeform manufacturing techniques in the production of monolithic lens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregg E.; Roblee, Jeffrey W.; Hedges, Alan R.

    2009-08-01

    Monolithic lens arrays are used in applications such as hyper-spectral imaging, Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, and lens replication molds, where lens-to-lens registration is critical. Traditionally, monolithic lens arrays are produced by diamond turning one lens at a time on axis. This process requires the substrate to be shifted to a new position before the next lens is machined. This intermediate step increases production time and makes it difficult to achieve lens-to-lens registration accuracy. Freeform diamond machining allows lens arrays to be produced in a single setup. Since there are no intermediate shifts of the substrate, the lens-to-lens registration is inherent to the program and machine accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to compare different freeform manufacturing processes in the production of a three-element germanium lens array. Freeform machining technologies including Slow Tool Servo (STS), Fast Tool Servo (FTS) and Diamond Micro-Milling (DMM) will be used to produce this lens array. The results for process times, figure, and finish characteristics will be compared across all three techniques.

  16. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  17. Ballistic Performance Model of Crater Formation in Monolithic, Porous Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Deighton, K. D.

    2014-01-01

    Porous monolithic ablative systems insulate atmospheric reentry vehicles from reentry plasmas generated by atmospheric braking from orbital and exo-orbital velocities. Due to the necessity that these materials create a temperature gradient up to several thousand Kelvin over their thickness, it is important that these materials are near their pristine state prior to reentry. These materials may also be on exposed surfaces to space environment threats like orbital debris and meteoroids leaving a probability that these exposed surfaces will be below their prescribed values. Owing to the typical small size of impact craters in these materials, the local flow fields over these craters and the ablative process afford some margin in thermal protection designs for these locally reduced performance values. In this work, tests to develop ballistic performance models for thermal protection materials typical of those being used on Orion are discussed. A density profile as a function of depth of a typical monolithic ablator and substructure system is shown in Figure 1a.

  18. A monolithic lipase reactor for biodiesel production by transesterification of triacylglycerides into fatty acid methyl esters

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Jiri; Svec, Frantisek; Fréchet, Jean M.J.

    2011-01-01

    An enzymatic reactor with lipase immobilized on a monolithic polymer support has been prepared and used to catalyze the transesterification of triacylglycerides into the fatty acid methyl esters commonly used for biodiesel. A design of experiments procedure was used to optimize the monolithic reactor with variables including control of the surface polarity of the monolith via variations in the length of the hydrocarbon chain in alkyl methacrylate monomer, time of grafting of 1-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone used to activate the monolith, and time used for the immobilization of porcine lipase. Optimal conditions involved the use of a poly(stearyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith, grafted first with vinylazlactone, then treated with lipase for 2 h to carry out the immobilization of the enzyme. Best conditions for the transesterification of glyceryl tributyrate included a temperature of 37°C and a 10 min residence time of the substrate in the bioreactor. The reactor did not lose its activity even after pumping through it a solution of substrate equaling 1,000 reactor volumes. This enzymatic reactor was also used for the transesterification of triacylglycerides from soybean oil to fatty acid methyl esters thus demonstrating the ability of the reactor to produce biodiesel. PMID:21915852

  19. Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lawal, Adeniyi

    2012-09-29

    We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a demonstration size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

  20. Monolithic Domes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanham, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the energy savings, low cost, and near-absolute protection from tornadoes provided by monolithic domes is starting to appeal to school districts for athletic and other facilities, including the Italy (Texas) Independent School District. Provides an overview of monolithic dome construction. (EV)

  1. Miniature fuel cell with monolithically fabricated Si electrodes - Alloy catalyst formation -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Daiki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Katayama, Noboru; Dowaki, Kiyoshi; Hayase, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    A novel Pd-Pt catalyst formation process was proposed for reduction of Pt usage. In our miniature fuel cells, porous Pt was used as the catalyst, and the Pt usage was quite high. To reduce the Pt usage, we have attempted to deposit Pt on porous Pd by galvanic replacement, and relatively large output was demonstrated. In this study, in order to reduce more Pt usage and explore the alloy catalyst formation process, atomic layer deposition by UPD-SLRR (Under Potential Deposition - Surface Limited Redox Replacement) was applied to the Pd-Pt catalyst formation. The new process was verified at each process steps by EDS elemental analysis, and the expected spectra were obtained. Prototype cells were constructed by the new process, and cell output was raised to 420mW/cm2 by the Pd-Pt catalyst from 125mW/cm2 with Pd catalyst.

  2. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  3. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  4. A rapid HPLC method for determination of zolpidem and its degradation product in tablets using a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Rezaee Zavareh, Elham; Kiani, Azin; Sheikholeslam, Zahra; Shafaati, Alireza; Tabatabai, Sayyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    A simple, accurate reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method, utilizing a monolithic silica column, for determination of zolpidem hemitartrate and its degradation product in tablet dosage form was developed. Analysis was achieved on the monolithic, C18 (100 mm, 3.9 mm) column, in isocratic mode with acetonitrile-NaH2PO4 (pH 7.0; 0.01 M; 35:65, v/v) as mobile phase and a flow rate of 2.5 mL/min at room temperature with UV detection at 245 nm. Diazepam was applied as an internal standard. The retention time of zolpidem and its degradation product was 2.14 and 1.89, respectively. Calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.12-5 µg/mL and the recovery values were found to be 97-101%. The limit of quantitation was determined 0.12 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation values of intraday and interday studies were calculated as 0.13-1.1% and 0.54-1.3%, respectively. PMID:25754693

  5. Effect of the presence of an ordered micro-pillar array on the formation of silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Detobel, Frederik; Eghbali, Hamed; De Bruyne, Selm; Terryn, Herman; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert

    2009-10-30

    We report on the synthesis of siloxane-based monoliths in the presence of a two-dimensional, perfectly ordered array of micro-pillars. Both methyltrimethoxysilane- and tetramethoxysilane-based monoliths were considered. The obtained structures were analyzed using scanning-electron microscopy and can be explained from the general theory of surface-directed phase separation in confined spaces. The formed structures are to a large extent nearly exclusively determined by the ratio between the bulk domain size of the monolith on the one hand and the distance between the micro-pillars on the other hand. When this ratio is small, the presence of the pillars has nearly no effect on the morphology of the produced monoliths. However, when the ratio approaches unity and ascends above it, some new types of monolith morphologies are induced, two of which appear to have interesting properties for use as novel chromatographic supports. One of these structures (obtained when the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio is around unity) is a 3D network of linear interconnections between the pillars, organized such that all skeleton branches are oriented perpendicular to the micro-pillar surface. A second interesting structure is obtained at even higher values of the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio. In this case, each individual micro-pillar is uniformly coated with a mesoporous shell. PMID:19321168

  6. Monolithic Optoelectronic Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Walters, Wayne; Gustafsen, Jerry; Bendett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) receives single digitally modulated input light signal via optical fiber and converts it into 16-channel electrical output signal. Potentially useful in any system in which digital data must be transmitted serially at high rates, then decoded into and used in parallel format at destination. Applications include transmission and decoding of control signals to phase shifters in phased-array antennas and also communication of data between computers and peripheral equipment in local-area networks.

  7. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Ceramic Monolith-Structured Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2009-04-19

    This paper reports recent research results about impact of different catalyst bed configurations on FT reaction product distribution. A CoRe/γ-alumina catalyst is prepared in bulk particle form and tested in the packed bed reactor at a size of 60 to 100 mesh. The same catalyst is ball milled and coated on a ceramic monolith support structure of channel size about 1mm. The monolith catalyst module is tested in two different ways, as a whole piece and as well-defined channels. Steady-state reaction conversion is measured at various temperatures under constant H2/CO feed ratio of 2 and reactor pressure of 25 bar. Detailed product analysis is performed. Significant formation of wax is evident with the packed particle bed and with the monolith catalyst that is improperly packed. By contrast, the wax formation is not detected in the liquid product by confining the reactions inside the monolith channel. This study presents an important finding about the structured catalyst/reactor system that the product distribution highly depends on the way how the structured reactor is set up. Even if the same catalyst and same reaction conditions (T, P, H2/oil ratio) are used, hydrodynamics (or flow conditions) inside a structured channel can have a significant impact on the product distribution.

  8. Elastic and optical anisotropy of the single-coal monolithic high-temperature (HT) carbonization products obtained on a laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Marta Krzesinska; Slawomira Pusz; Andrzej Koszorek

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the directional dependences of the elastic and optical properties of monolithic single-coal high-temperature (HT) carbonization products obtained on a laboratory scale (with very slow heating rate) from coals of different caking propensity. Sixteen monolithic HT carbonization products, mainly cokes, were produced in the Jenkner retort furnace using 16 various types of coals of varying rank (from 83.1 wt % carbon to 98.3 wt % carbon) with a Roga index (RI) in the range of 0-76. Coals were carbonized in the form of monolithic blocks. The physical parameters such as true density, porosity, ultrasonic velocity, and dynamic elastic moduli, as well as optical reflectance parameters (R{sub max}, R{sub min}, R{sub am}), were determined for the resultant products. The elastic and optical properties of the HT carbonization products were related to their porosity and the rank of the parent coals. It was determined that the HT carbonization products exhibit the different directional properties of the studied parameters, and they can be divided into three groups, with respect to the observed differences. The properties of these groups were related to the parent coal rank and the caking propensity (i.e., to the RI value). Anisotropy of the coke matrix structure was determined to be important for discussion about the anisotropic properties of cokes. 50 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Application of a Burkholderia cepacia lipase-immobilized silica monolith to batch and continuous biodiesel production with a stoichiometric mixture of methanol and crude Jatropha oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The enzymatic production of biodiesel through alcoholysis of triglycerides has become more attractive because it shows potential in overcoming the drawbacks of chemical processes. In this study, we investigate the production of biodiesel from crude, non-edible Jatropha oil and methanol to characterize Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized in an n-butyl-substituted hydrophobic silica monolith. We also evaluate the performance of a lipase-immobilized silica monolith bioreactor in the continuous production of biodiesel. Results The Jatropha oil used contained 18% free fatty acids, which is problematic in a base-catalyzed process. In the lipase-catalyzed reaction, the presence of free fatty acids made the reaction mixture homogeneous and allowed bioconversion to proceed to 90% biodiesel yield after a 12 hour reaction time. The optimal molar ratio of methanol to oil was 3.3 to 3.5 parts methanol to one part oil, with water content of 0.6% (w/w). Further experiments revealed that B. cepacia lipase immobilized in hydrophobic silicates was sufficiently tolerant to methanol, and glycerol adsorbed on the support disturbed the reaction to some extent in the present reaction system. The continuous production of biodiesel was performed at steady state using a lipase-immobilized silica monolith bioreactor loaded with 1.67 g of lipase. The yield of 95% was reached at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/h, although the performance of the continuous bioreactor was somewhat below that predicted from the batch reactor. The bioreactor was operated successfully for almost 50 days with 80% retention of the initial yield. Conclusions The presence of free fatty acids originally contained in Jatropha oil improved the reaction efficiency of the biodiesel production. A combination of B. cepacia lipase and its immobilization support, n-butyl-substituted silica monolith, was effective in the production of biodiesel. This procedure is easily applicable to the design of a continuous flow

  10. Monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  11. Monolith electroplating process

    DOEpatents

    Agarrwal, Rajev R.

    2001-01-01

    An electroplating process for preparing a monolith metal layer over a polycrystalline base metal and the plated monolith product. A monolith layer has a variable thickness of one crystal. The process is typically carried in molten salts electrolytes, such as the halide salts under an inert atmosphere at an elevated temperature, and over deposition time periods and film thickness sufficient to sinter and recrystallize completely the nucleating metal particles into one single crystal or crystals having very large grains. In the process, a close-packed film of submicron particle (20) is formed on a suitable substrate at an elevated temperature. The temperature has the significance of annealing particles as they are formed, and substrates on which the particles can populate are desirable. As the packed bed thickens, the submicron particles develop necks (21) and as they merge into each other shrinkage (22) occurs. Then as micropores also close (23) by surface tension, metal density is reached and the film consists of unstable metal grain (24) that at high enough temperature recrystallize (25) and recrystallized grains grow into an annealed single crystal over the electroplating time span. While cadmium was used in the experimental work, other soft metals may be used.

  12. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  13. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  14. Monolithic freeform element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiontke, Sven R.

    2015-09-01

    For 10 years there has been the asphere as one of the new products to be accepted by the market. All parts of the chain design, production and measurement needed to learn how to treat the asphere and what it is helpful for. The aspheric optical element now is established and accepted as an equal optical element between other as a fast growing part of all the optical elements. Now we are focusing onto the next new element with a lot of potential, the optical freeform surface. Manufacturing results will be shown for fully tolerance optic including manufacturing, setup and optics configurations including measurement setup. The element itself is a monolith consisting of several optical surfaces that have to be aligned properly to each other. The freeform surface is measured for surface form tolerance (irregularity, slope, Zernike, PV).

  15. Amadori products formation in emulsified systems.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Berton-Carabin, Claire C; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-05-15

    The formation of Amadori products (APs) is the key step determining the development of the Maillard reaction (MR). The information on the chemical behaviour of the reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars in emulsions during thermal treatments is scanty and mainly focused on volatile compounds. The aim of this work was to investigate the formation of APs from glucose and two amino acids with different partition coefficients (phenylalanine and leucine) in emulsions. Two submicron oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions consisting of water, tricaprylin and Tween 20 were prepared, thermally treated and the formation of fructose-phenylalanine (Fru-Phe) and fructose-leucine (Fru-Leu) was monitored by mass spectrometry. The concentration of Fru-Phe in submicron emulsions was similar to that in water, while Fru-Leu was reduced up to 47% in the emulsions. These data indicated that partition coefficient of amino acids, determining the reactants location, can substantially influence the MR and the final quality of foods. PMID:26775943

  16. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    DOEpatents

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  17. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics. PMID:25777338

  18. Making Online Products More Tangible: The Effect of Product Presentation Formats on Product Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Tibert; Vonkeman, Charlotte; van Dolen, Willemijn

    2016-07-01

    Although several studies have looked at the effects of online product presentations on consumer decision making, no study thus far has considered a potential key factor in online product evaluations: tangibility. The present study aims at filling this gap by developing and testing a model that relates different online product presentation formats to the three-dimensional concept of product tangibility. We test how the three tangibility dimensions influence perceived diagnosticity and, eventually, online purchase intentions. A between-subjects lab experiment (n = 366) was used to test the hypothesized effects of three common online product presentation formats (pictures vs. 360 spin rotation vs. virtual mirror). The results showed that out of these formats, virtual mirrors were superior in providing a sense of product tangibility, followed by the 360-spin rotation format and static pictures. Furthermore, in terms of predictive validity, two of the three tangibility dimensions significantly increased perceived diagnosticity, which, in turn, positively and strongly affected purchase intentions. Overall, our results add to previous works studying the relationships between online product presentation formats and consumer decision making. Also, they hold value for online practitioners by highlighting the potential benefits of applying technologically advanced product presentation formats such as the virtual mirror. PMID:27326724

  19. Scaling up of continuous-flow, microwave-assisted, organic reactions by varying the size of Pd-functionalized catalytic monoliths

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Fletcher, Paul D I; Kelly, Stephen M; Mansfield, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Summary A product-scalable, catalytically mediated flow system has been developed to perform Suzuki–Miyaura reactions under a microwave heating regime, in which the volumetric throughput of a Pd-supported silica monolith can be used to increase the quantity of the product without changing the optimal operating conditions. Two silica monoliths (both 3 cm long), with comparable pore diameters and surface areas, were fabricated with diameters of 3.2 and 6.4 mm to give volumetric capacities of 0.205 and 0.790 mL, respectively. The two monoliths were functionalized with a loading of 4.5 wt % Pd and then sealed in heat-shrinkable Teflon® tubing to form a monolithic flow reactor. The Pd-supported silica monolith flow reactor was then placed into the microwave cavity and connected to an HPLC pump and a backpressure regulator to minimize the formation of gas bubbles. The flow rate and microwave power were varied to optimize the reactant contact time and temperature, respectively. Under optimal reaction conditions the quantity of product could be increased from 31 mg per hour to 340 mg per hour simply by changing the volumetric capacity of the monolith. PMID:21915220

  20. Optical coupling to monolithic integrated photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palen, Edward

    2007-02-01

    Methods of coupling optical fiber and light sources to monolithic integrated photonic circuits are needed to expand future photonics communications markets. Requirements are low cost, high coupling efficiencies, and scalability to high volume production rates. Key features of the different optical coupling options will be discussed along with implementation examples. Requirements for low cost optical coupling and high volume production scalability will be shared.

  1. Fibrous monoliths: Economic ceramic matrix composites from powders [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rigali, Mark; Sutaria, Manish; Mulligan, Anthony; Creegan, Peter; Cipriani, Ron

    1999-05-26

    The project was to develop and perform pilot-scale production of fibrous monolith composites. The principal focus of the program was to develop damage-tolerant, wear-resistant tooling for petroleum drilling applications and generate a basic mechanical properties database on fibrous monolith composites.

  2. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  3. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  4. [Formation of nitrosamines in cheese products].

    PubMed

    Klein, D; Keshavarz, A; Lafont, P; Hardy, J; Debry, G

    1980-01-01

    Several strains of micromycetes used as fermentation agents in the cheese industry or having led to accidents during cheese making are able to favor the formation of nitrosamines in 60% of the cases. The concentrations observed are similar to those found by other authors with other microorganisms. The results obtained in a semi-synthetic medium are checked during the ripening of experimental camembert type cheese made from milk containing nitrates and cultured with a strain of Penicillium camemberti, which favors very much the synthesis of nitrosamines. The amount of nitrosodimethylamine formed in this cheese increases from 5 to 20 ppb during ripening. A tentative explanation of the mechanism of formation is outlined. PMID:7258908

  5. Embedded-monolith armor

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; Groves, Scott E; Moffet, Mitchell L.; Martin, Louis P.

    2016-07-19

    A lightweight armor system utilizing a face section having a multiplicity of monoliths embedded in a matrix supported on low density foam. The face section is supported with a strong stiff backing plate. The backing plate is mounted on a spall plate.

  6. Brevetoxin Degradation and By-Product Formation via Natural Sunlight

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron C.; Cooper, William J.; Bourdelais, Andrea J.; Gardinali, Piero; Baden, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of solar radiation on brevetoxin (PbTx2). Our findings suggest that natural sunlight mediates brevetoxin (PbTx2) degradation and results in brevetoxin by-product formation via photochemical processes. PMID:26436141

  7. ORGANOHALIDE FORMATION ON CHLORINATION OF ALGAL EXTRACELLULAR PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When certain chemical and physical parameters were controlled during chlorination of algal extracellular products (ECP), organohalide formation was modified. In general, decreases in temperature and contact time decreased the generation of purgeable (POX), nonpurgeable (NPOX), an...

  8. Monolithic Continuous-Flow Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Kornfield, Julia A.; Voecks, Gerald A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic matrices containing many small flow passages useful as continuous-flow bioreactors. Ceramic matrix containing passages made by extruding and firing suitable ceramic. Pores in matrix provide attachment medium for film of cells and allow free movement of solution. Material one not toxic to micro-organisms grown in reactor. In reactor, liquid nutrients flow over, and liquid reaction products flow from, cell culture immobilized in one set of channels while oxygen flows to, and gaseous reaction products flow from, culture in adjacent set of passages. Cells live on inner surfaces containing flowing nutrient and in pores of walls of passages. Ready access to nutrients and oxygen in channels. They generate continuous high yield characteristic of immobilized cells, without large expenditure of energy otherwise incurred if necessary to pump nutrient solution through dense biomass as in bioreactors of other types.

  9. Formative Evaluation of PREL's Regional Educational Laboratory Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    A formative evaluation was conducted to determine the types and amount of dissemination and services the Pacific Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) provided to its constituency in the first 9 months of 1999. The evaluation also studied how recipients of REL products and services perceived the usefulness and quality of the products and services…

  10. A monolithically three-dimensional flow-focusing device for formation of single/double emulsions in closed/open microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Tan, Wei-Heong; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2006-11-01

    This paper proposes a design concept and fabrication method of a planar three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic flow-focusing device (MFFD) that can produce monodisperse single/double emulsions in a closed/open microfluidic system. The device consists of three layers of SU-8 resist structures to form coaxial embedded orifices at the center of the microchannel with dimensions ranging from 50 µm to 200 µm by means of the black photoresist shadow method. Two or three immiscible fluids can be focused through the coaxial orifices, producing monodispersed droplets with a coefficient of variance (CV) of less than 4.1%. At the orifice, the inner liquid thread stays confined to the central axis of the microchannel, surrounded by the continuous phase. As the dispensed phase (inner fluid thread) does not wet channel walls, our proposed 3D MFFD can produce single emulsions for both water-in-oil (W/O) and oil-in-water (O/W) droplets utilizing the same device. The droplet diameter ranges from 50 µm to 300 µm. Also, double emulsions containing one to several internal droplets were successfully produced in the closed channel configuration. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of forming W/O droplets and polymer particles in an open channel configuration by withdrawing the fluid from the outlet channel. W/O droplets and polymer particles, smaller than 10 µm and 40 µm, respectively, were successfully produced. In contrast to the closed channel configuration where the droplet size decreases with an increasing flow rate, in an open channel configuration, the droplet size increases with an increasing withdrawal rate. The unique fabrication of the monolithic 3D MFFD device utilizing SU-8 resist overcomes problems regarding orifice sizes/shapes, alignment and assembly for current axisymmetric flow-focusing devices (AFFD) based on capillary microtubes, and provides flexibility for the future development of an integrated miniaturized lab-on-a-chip microsystem.

  11. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  12. Tailoring the macroporous structure of monolithic silica-based capillary columns with potential for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laschober, Stefan; Sulyok, Michael; Rosenberg, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The present work aims at the optimisation of the synthesis of methyl-silsesquioxane monolithic capillary columns using a sol-gel based protocol. The influence of reaction conditions such as temperature, reaction mixture composition and catalyst concentration has been examined. The morphology of the products was studied by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. Monolithic capillary columns were obtained with a skeleton-like structure with open pores. Pore diameters vary from 0.8 to 15 microm, diameters of the xerogel network vary from 0.4 to 12 microm, respectively. Specific surface areas up to 334 m2/g have been observed, however, many materials did not possess areas above few m2/g which represents the limit of detection of the nitrogen porosimetry measurements. Excellent adhesion to the capillary wall was observed in all cases, and drying was possible at ambient conditions without the formation of cracks. PMID:17241639

  13. Development of oxide fibrous monolith systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K. C.

    1999-03-02

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics generally have a cellular structure that consists of a strong cell surrounded by a weaker boundary phase [1-5]. Fibrous monoliths (FMs) are produced from powders by conventional ceramic fabrication techniques, such as extrusion [1,2]. When properly engineered, they exhibit fail gracefully [3-5]. Several compositions of ceramics and cermets have been processed successfully in fibrous monolithic form [4]. The most thoroughly investigated fibrous monolith consists of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cells and a BN cell-boundary phase [3-5]. Through appropriate selection of initial powders and extrusion and hot-pressing parameters, very tough final products have been produced. The resultant high toughness is due primarily to delamination during fracture along textured platelike BN grains. The primary objectives of our program are to develop: (1) Oxide-based FMs, including new systems with improved properties; (2) FMs that can be pressureless sintered rather than hot-pressed; (3) Techniques for continuous extrusion of FM filaments, including solid freeform fabrication (SFF) for net-shape fabrication of FMs; (4) Predictive micromechanical models for FM design and performance; and (5) Ties with industrial producers and users of FMs.

  14. Monolithic solid electrolyte oxygen pump

    DOEpatents

    Fee, Darrell C.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Easler, Timothy E.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-layer oxygen pump having a one-piece, monolithic ceramic structure affords high oxygen production per unit weight and volume and is thus particularly adapted for use as a portable oxygen supply. The oxygen pump is comprised of a large number of small cells on the order of 1-2 millimeters in diameter which form the walls of the pump and which are comprised of thin, i.e., 25-50 micrometers, ceramic layers of cell components. The cell components include an air electrode, an oxygen electrode, an electrolyte and interconnection materials. The cell walls form the passages for input air and for exhausting the oxygen which is transferred from a relatively dilute gaseous mixture to a higher concentration by applying a DC voltage across the electrodes so as to ionize the oxygen at the air electrode, whereupon the ionized oxygen travels through the electrolyte and is converted to oxygen gas at the oxygen electrode.

  15. Biomimetic superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Liu, Jeffery Z; Chang, Shery L Y; Wu, Yanzhe; Li, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Many applications proposed for graphene require multiple sheets be assembled into a monolithic structure. The ability to maintain structural integrity upon large deformation is essential to ensure a macroscopic material which functions reliably. However, it has remained a great challenge to achieve high elasticity in three-dimensional graphene networks. Here we report that the marriage of graphene chemistry with ice physics can lead to the formation of ultralight and superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths. Mimicking the hierarchical structure of natural cork, the resulting materials can sustain their structural integrity under a load of >50,000 times their own weight and can rapidly recover from >80% compression. The unique biomimetic hierarchical structure also provides this new class of elastomers with exceptionally high energy absorption capability and good electrical conductivity. The successful synthesis of such fascinating materials paves the way to explore the application of graphene in a self-supporting, structurally adaptive and 3D macroscopic form. PMID:23212370

  16. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  17. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  18. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  19. Exploring transverse pattern formation in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser and generating a 25-GHz sub-picosecond vortex beam via gain competition.

    PubMed

    Chang, M T; Liang, H C; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2016-04-18

    Formation of transverse modes in a dual-polarization self-mode-locked monolithic Yb: KGW laser under high-power pumping is thoroughly explored. It is experimentally observed that the polarization-resolved transverse patterns are considerably affected by the pump location in the transverse plane of the gain medium. In contrast, the longitudinal self-mode-locking is nearly undisturbed by the pump position, even under the high-power pumping. Under central pumping, a vortex beam of the Laguerre-Gaussian LGp,l mode with p = 1 and l = 1 can be efficiently generated through the process of the gain competition with a sub-picosecond pulse train at 25.3 GHz and the output power can be up to 1.45 W at a pump power of 10.0 W. Under off-center pumping, the symmetry breaking causes the transverse patterns to be dominated by the high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes. Numerical analyses are further performed to manifest the symmetry breaking induced by the off-center pumping. PMID:27137309

  20. Progress on monolithic integration of cheap IR FPAs of polycrystalline PbSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, M. T.; Vergara, G.; Lozano, M.; Santander, J.; Torquemada, M. C.; Gomez, L. J.; Villamayor, V.; Alvarez, M.; Verdu, M.; Almazan, R.; Plaza, J.; Rodriguez, P.; Catalan, I.; Diezhandino, J.; Montojo, M. T.

    2005-05-01

    Although IR detectors are old and well known devices, at present they have not reached the status of a mass-market product. The main reason is directly related to their lack of affordability. Fifteen years ago the latest generation of thermal infrared (IR) detectors, as large format focal plane arrays (FPA), appeared with very promising expectation. They have been called low cost detectors because they do not need cooling and, as a consequence, prices are sensitively lower. However, they are currently still not affordable. Issues related to packaging and processing are limiting the potential affordability of these type of devices. Meanwhile, the technology of uncooled photonic detectors such as polycrystalline lead salt detectors are evolving fast and now they are a real alternative in the field of cheap detectors. CIDA owns an innovative technology for processing low density polycrystalline PbSe FPAs. This technology presents some advantages compared to the standard technology, mainly for processing more complex devices, such as 2D arrays or multicolor detectors. Mass production and prices decrease depend strongly on the monolithic integration between detectors and read out electronics. The method developed makes possible to process monolithic devices without any fundamental limitation. This work presents the latest results obtained during a study of monolithic integration viability carried out in our laboratories. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) test circuitry was designed, processed and submitted to all PbSe processing with promising results. The next phase will consist of designing a proper CMOS circuitry and process sensors on top.

  1. Monolithic microfluidic concentrators and mixers

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M.; Svec, Frantisek; Yu, Cong; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-05-03

    Microfluidic devices comprising porous monolithic polymer for concentration, extraction or mixing of fluids. A method for in situ preparation of monolithic polymers by in situ initiated polymerization of polymer precursors within microchannels of a microfluidic device and their use for solid phase extraction (SPE), preconcentration, concentration and mixing.

  2. Subsetting and Formatting Landsat-7 LOR ETM+ and Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Processing System (LPS) processes Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) instrument data into large, contiguous segments called "subintervals" and stores them in Level OR (LOR) data files. The LPS processed subinterval products must be subsetted and reformatted before the Level I processing systems can ingest them. The initial full subintervals produced by the LPS are stored mainly in HDF Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS) format which is an extension to the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). The final LOR products are stored in native HDF format. Primarily the EOS Core System (ECS) and alternately the DAAC Emergency System (DES) subset the subinterval data for the operational Landsat-7 data processing systems. The HDF and HDF-EOS application programming interfaces (APIs) can be used for extensive data subsetting and data reorganization. A stand-alone subsetter tool has been developed which is based on some of the DES code. This tool makes use of the HDF and HDFEOS APIs to perform Landsat-7 LOR product subsetting and demonstrates how HDF and HDFEOS can be used for creating various configurations of full LOR products. How these APIs can be used to efficiently subset, format, and organize Landsat-7 LOR data as demonstrated by the subsetter tool and the DES is discussed.

  3. Primordial black holes formation from particle production during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfani, Encieh

    2016-04-01

    We study the possibility that particle production during inflation can source the required power spectrum for dark matter (DM) primordial black holes (PBH) formation. We consider the scalar and the gauge quanta production in inflation models, where in the latter case, we focus in two sectors: inflaton coupled i) directly and ii) gravitationally to a U(1) gauge field. We do not assume any specific potential for the inflaton field. Hence, in the gauge production case, in a model independent way we show that the non-production of DM PBHs puts stronger upper bound on the particle production parameter. Our analysis show that this bound is more stringent than the bounds from the bispectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio derived by gauge production in these models. In the scenario where the inflaton field coupled to a scalar field, we put an upper bound on the amplitude of the generated scalar power spectrum by non-production of PBHs. As a by-product we also show that the required scalar power spectrum for PBHs formation is lower when the density perturbations are non-Gaussian in comparison to the Gaussian density perturbations.

  4. Monolithic ballasted penetrator

    DOEpatents

    Hickerson, Jr., James P.; Zanner, Frank J.; Baldwin, Michael D.; Maguire, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

  5. Monolithic THz Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, N. R.; Narayanan, G.; Grosslein, R. M.; Martin, S.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, P.; Coulomb, M.; DeMartinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    Frequency multipliers are required as local oscillator sources for frequencies up to 2.7 THz for FIRST and airborne applications. Multipliers at these frequencies have not previously been demonstrated, and the object of this work was to show whether such circuits are really practical. A practical circuit is one which not only performs as well as is required, but also can be replicated in a time that is feasible. As the frequency of circuits is increased, the difficulties in fabrication and assembly increase rapidly. Building all of the circuit on GaAs as a monolithic circuit is highly desirable to minimize the complexity of assembly, but at the highest frequencies, even a complete monolithic circuit is extremely small, and presents serious handling difficulty. This is compounded by the requirement for a very thin substrate. Assembly can become very difficult because of handling problems and critical placement. It is very desirable to make the chip big enough to that it can be seen without magnification, and strong enough that it may be picked up with tweezers. Machined blocks to house the chips present an additional challenge. Blocks with complex features are very expensive, and these also imply very critical assembly of the parts. It would be much better if the features in the block were as simple as possible and non-critical to the function of the chip. In particular, grounding and other electrical interfaces should be done in a manner that is highly reproducible.

  6. Monolithic microchannel heatsink

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Beach, R.J.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1996-08-20

    A silicon wafer has slots sawn in it that allow diode laser bars to be mounted in contact with the silicon. Microchannels are etched into the back of the wafer to provide cooling of the diode bars. To facilitate getting the channels close to the diode bars, the channels are rotated from an angle perpendicular to the diode bars which allows increased penetration between the mounted diode bars. This invention enables the fabrication of monolithic silicon microchannel heatsinks for laser diodes. The heatsinks have low thermal resistance because of the close proximity of the microchannels to the laser diode being cooled. This allows high average power operation of two-dimensional laser diode arrays that have a high density of laser diode bars and therefore high optical power density. 9 figs.

  7. Monolithic microchannel heatsink

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon wafer has slots sawn in it that allow diode laser bars to be mounted in contact with the silicon. Microchannels are etched into the back of the wafer to provide cooling of the diode bars. To facilitate getting the channels close to the diode bars, the channels are rotated from an angle perpendicular to the diode bars which allows increased penetration between the mounted diode bars. This invention enables the fabrication of monolithic silicon microchannel heatsinks for laser diodes. The heatsinks have low thermal resistance because of the close proximity of the microchannels to the laser diode being cooled. This allows high average power operation of two-dimensional laser diode arrays that have a high density of laser diode bars and therefore high optical power density.

  8. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  9. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  10. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  11. SOI monolithic pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Ikemoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tauchi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detector using fully-depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel process technology. The SOI substrate is high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions and another layer is a low resistivity silicon for SOI-CMOS circuitry. Tungsten vias are used for the connection between two silicons. Since flip-chip bump bonding process is not used, high sensor gain in a small pixel area can be obtained. In 2010 and 2011, high-resolution integration-type SOI pixel sensors, DIPIX and INTPIX5, have been developed. The characterizations by evaluating pixel-to-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency (QE), dark noise, and energy resolution were done. A phase-contrast imaging was demonstrated using the INTPIX5 pixel sensor for an X-ray application. The current issues and future prospect are also discussed.

  12. Formation and Stability of Radiation Products in Europa's Icy Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.; Carlson, R. W.; Ferrante, R. F.

    2004-01-01

    Spectra of Europa reveal a surface dominated by water-ice along with hydrated materials and minor amounts of SO2, CO2, and H2O2. Jovian magnetospheric ions (protons, sulfur, and oxygen) and electrons produce significant chemical modifications of the surface on time scales of a few years at micrometer depths. Our laboratory studies examine the formation and stability of radiation products in H2O-rich ices relevant to Europa. Infrared (IR) spectra of ices before and after irradiation reveal the radiation destruction of molecules and the formation of products at 86 - 132 K. In addition, spectra of ices during warming track thermal evolution due to chemical changes and sublimation processes. IR-identified radiation products in 86 - 132 K irradiated H2O + SO2 ices are the bisulfate ion, HSO4(-), sulfate ion, SO4(2-) and the hydronium ion, H3O(+). Warming results in the formation of a residual spectrum similar to liquid sulfuric acid, H2SO4, for H2O:SO2 ratios of 30:1, whereas hydrated sulfuric acid, H2SO4 4 H2O, forms for ratios of 30:1. Radiation products identified for irradiated H2O + H2S ices at 86 K are H2S2 and SO2. When irradiated at 110 and 132 K, ices with H2O:H2S ratios if either 3:1 or 30:1 show the formation of H2SO4 4 H2O on warming to 175 K. We have also examined the radiation stability of H2SO4. Addition of CO2 to H2O + SO2 ices results in the formation of CO3 at 2046 cm (sup -1) (4.89 m). This is the strongest band from a carbon-containing product in the mid-IR spectral region, and it is also seen when either pure CO2 or H2O + CO2 ice is irradiated. Experiments with CH4 added to H2O + SO2 + CO2 ices addressed the question of methane's use as a marker of methanogens in an irradiated ice environment. New results on the near-IR spectrum of pure H2O2 will be included in this presentation. Interpretations of near-IR water bands, with H2O2 present, will be discussed. Irradiations of H2O2 and H2O + H2O2 mixtures, to examine the possibility of O2 and O3

  13. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Tanya Y.; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  14. Nonlinear flow model for well production in an underground formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. C.; Nie, R. S.

    2013-05-01

    Fluid flow in underground formations is a nonlinear process. In this article we modelled the nonlinear transient flow behaviour of well production in an underground formation. Based on Darcy's law and material balance equations, we used quadratic pressure gradients to deduce diffusion equations and discuss the origins of nonlinear flow issues. By introducing an effective-well-radius approach that considers skin factor, we established a nonlinear flow model for both gas and liquid (oil or water). The liquid flow model was solved using a semi-analytical method, while the gas flow model was solved using numerical simulations because the diffusion equation of gas flow is a stealth function of pressure. For liquid flow, a series of standard log-log type curves of pressure transients were plotted and nonlinear transient flow characteristics were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The effect of nonlinearity upon pressure transients should not be ignored. For gas flow, pressure transients were simulated and compared with oil flow under the same formation and well conditions, resulting in the conclusion that, under the same volume rate production, oil wells demand larger pressure drops than gas wells. Comparisons between theoretical data and field data show that nonlinear models will describe fluid flow in underground formations realistically and accurately.

  15. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 6: (Products)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabat, F.

    1981-01-01

    Four basic product types are generated from the raw thematic mapper (TM) and multispectral scanner (MSS) payload data by the NASA GSFC LANDSAT 4 data management system: (1) unprocessed data (raw sensor data); (2) partially processed data, which consists of radiometrically corrected sensor data with geometric correction information appended; (3) fully processed data, which consists of radiometrically and geometrically corrected sensor data; and (4) inventory data which consists of summary information about product types 2 and 3. High density digital recorder formatting and the radiometric correction process are described. Geometric correction information is included.

  16. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1992-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  17. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1994-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  18. Monolithic microcircuit techniques and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussions of the techniques used to make dielectric and metal thin film depositions for monolithic circuits are presented. Silicon nitride deposition and the properties of silicon nitride films are discussed. Deposition of dichlorosilane and thermally grown silicon dioxide are reported. The deposition and thermal densification of borosilicate, aluminosilicate, and phosphosilicate glasses are discussed. Metallization for monolithic circuits and the characteristics of thin films are also included.

  19. Optoelectronic devices toward monolithic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergia, V.

    1992-12-01

    Starting from the present state of tl art of discrete devices up to the on going realization of monolithic semicorxtuctor integrated prototypes an overview ofoptoelectronic devices for telecom applications is given inchiding a short classification of the different kind of integrated devices. On the future perspective of IBCN distribution network some economica of hybrid and monolithic forms of integration are attempted. lnaflyashoitpresentationoftheactivitiesperformedintbefieldofmonolithic integration by EEC ESPR1T and RACE projects is reported. 1.

  20. Low nanopore connectivity limits gas production in Barnett formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Rowe, Harold D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas-producing wells in the Barnett Formation show a steep decline from initial production rates, even within the first year, and only 12-30% of the estimated gas in place is recovered. The underlying causes of these production constraints are not well understood. The rate-limiting step in gas production is likely diffusive transport from matrix storage to the stimulated fracture network. Transport through a porous material such as shale is controlled by both geometry (e.g., pore size distribution) and topology (e.g., pore connectivity). Through an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, this work finds that the Barnett Formation has sparsely connected pores. Evidence of low pore connectivity includes the sparse and heterogeneous presence of trace levels of diffusing solutes beyond a few millimeters from a sample edge, the anomalous behavior of spontaneous water imbibition, the steep decline in edge-accessible porosity observed in tracer concentrations following vacuum saturation, the low (about 0.2-0.4% by volume) level presence of Wood's metal alloy when injected at 600 MPa pressure, and high tortuosity from mercury injection capillary pressure. Results are consistent with an interpretation of pore connectivity based on percolation theory. Low pore connectivity of shale matrix limits its mass transfer interaction with the stimulated fracture network from hydraulic fracturing and serves as an important underlying cause for steep declines in gas production rates and a low overall recovery rate.

  1. Pore volume accessibility of particulate and monolithic stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jiří

    2015-05-29

    A chromatographic characterization of pore volume accessibility for both particulate and monolithic stationary phases is presented. Size-exclusion calibration curves have been used to determine the pore volume fraction that is accessible for six alkylbenzenes and twelve polystyrene standards in tetrahydrofuran as the mobile phase. Accessible porosity has been then correlated with the size of the pores from which individual compounds are just excluded. I have determined pore volume accessibility of commercially available columns packed with fully and superficially porous particles, as well as with silica-based monolithic stationary phase. I also have investigated pore accessibility of polymer-based monolithic stationary phases. Suggested protocol is used to characterize pore formation at the early stage of the polymerization, to evaluate an extent of hypercrosslinking during modification of pore surface, and to characterize the pore accessibility of monolithic stationary phases hypercrosslinked after an early termination of polymerization reaction. Pore volume accessibility was also correlated to column efficiency of both particulate and monolithic stationary phases. PMID:25892635

  2. Preparation and characterization of grafted imprinted monolith for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ze-Hui; Mu, Li-Na; Pang, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coating grafted to a trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) core material for CEC was reported. The core monolith was prepared with a solution of 20% (w/w) TRIM in a mixture of porogen and a polymerization precursor, which can generate a stable electroosmotic flow due to the formation of ionizable groups after postpolymerization hydrolization. Graft polymerization took place on the resultant TRIM monolith with a mixture of template, methacrylic acid, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Strong recognition ability (selectivity factor was 5.83) for S-amlodipine and resolution of enatiomers separation (up to 7.99) were obtained on the resulting grafted imprinted monolith in CEC mode. The influence of CEC conditions on chiral separation, including the composition of mobile phase, pH value, and the operating voltages was studied. These results suggest that the method of grafted polymerization reported here allows a rapid development of MIP monolith once core materials with desired properties are available, and is a good alternative to prepare CEC-based monolithic MIPs. PMID:22996033

  3. Monolithic afocal telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An afocal monolithic optical element formed of a shallow cylinder of optical material (glass, polymer, etc.) with fast aspheric surfaces, nominally confocal paraboloids, configured on the front and back surfaces. The front surface is substantially planar, and this lends itself to deposition of multi-layer stacks of thin dielectric and metal films to create a filter for rejecting out-of-band light. However, an aspheric section (for example, a paraboloid) can either be ground into a small area of this surface (for a Cassegrain-type telescope) or attached to the planar surface (for a Gregorian-type telescope). This aspheric section of the surface is then silvered to create the telescope's secondary mirror. The rear surface of the cylinder is figured into a steep, convex asphere (again, a paraboloid in the examples), and also made reflective to form the telescope's primary mirror. A small section of the rear surface (approximately the size of the secondary obscuration, depending on the required field of the telescope) is ground flat to provide an unpowered surface through which the collimated light beam can exit the optical element. This portion of the rear surface is made to transmit the light concentrated by the reflective surfaces, and can support the deposition of a spectral filter.

  4. Theoretical aspects of product formation from the NCO + NO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; He, Y. ); Melius, C.F. )

    1993-09-09

    The reaction of NCO with NO, an important elementary process involved in the reduction of NO[sub x] by HNCO, has been studied theoretically using the BAC-MP4 technique in conjunction with RRKM calculations. The computed molecular structures and thermochemical data for various intermediates and transition states suggest that the reaction takes place primarily via the singlet, ground electronic state OCNNO molecule according to the following mechanism; (step a) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] N[sub 2]O + CO; (step b) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] c-OCNNO[minus] N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2]. The formation of N[sub 2]O + CO occurs by the fragmentation of the singlet OCNNO intermediate step (a), whereas the production of N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2] by cyclization-fragmentation occurs via step b. The tight transition states leading to the formation of these products, coupled with the loose entrance channel, give rise to the experimentally observed strong negative temperature dependence which can be quantitatively accounted for by the results of RRKM calculations based on the BAC-MP4 data. The experimentally measured product branching ratio for channels a and b could be accounted for theoretically by lowering the calculated energy barrier for step a by 3.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to about 15% of the barrier height. 22 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Hyperosmotic Stress Reduces Melanin Production by Altering Melanosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Park, Kyuhee; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues of the human body encounter hyperosmotic stress. The effect of extracellular osmotic changes on melanin production has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we determined that hyperosmotic stress induced by organic osmolytes results in reduced melanin production in human melanoma MNT-1 cells. Under hyperosmotic stress, few pigmented mature melanosomes were detected, but there was an increase in swollen vacuoles. These vacuoles were stained with an anti-M6PR antibody that recognizes late endosomal components and with anti-TA99 and anti-HMB45 antibodies, implying that melanosome formation was affected by hyperosmotic stress. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the M6PR-positive swollen vacuoles were multi-layered and contained melanized granules, and they produced melanin when L-DOPA was applied, indicating that these vacuoles were still capable of producing melanin, but the inner conditions were not compatible with melanin production. The vacuolation phenomenon induced by hyperosmotic conditions disappeared with treatment with the PI3K activator 740 Y-P, indicating that the PI3K pathway is affected by hyperosmotic conditions and is responsible for the proper formation and maturation of melanosomes. The microarray analysis showed alterations of the vesicle organization and transport under hyperosmotic stress. Our findings suggest that melanogenesis could be regulated by physiological conditions, such as osmotic pressure. PMID:25170965

  6. Purification of large plasmids with methacrylate monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Smrekar, Franci; Cerne, Jasmina; Raspor, Peter; Modic, Martina; Krgovic, Danijela; Strancar, Ales; Podgornik, Ales

    2009-08-01

    The rapid evolution of gene therapy and DNA vaccines results in an increasing interest in producing large quantities of pharmaceutical grade plasmid DNA. Most current clinical trials involve plasmids of 10 kb or smaller in size, however, future requirements for multigene vectors including extensive control regions may require the production of larger plasmids, e. g., 20 kb and bigger. The objective of this study was to examine certain process conditions for purification of large plasmids with the size of up to 93 kb. Since there is a lack of knowledge about production and purification of bigger plasmid DNA, cell lysis and storage conditions were investigated. The impact of chromatographic system and methacrylate monolithic column on the degradation of plasmid molecules under nonbinding conditions at different flow rates was studied. Furthermore, capacity measurements varying salt concentration in loading buffer were performed and the capacities up to 13 mg of plasmid per mL of the monolithic column were obtained. The capacity flow independence in the range from 130 to 370 cm/h was observed. Using high resolution monolithic column the separation of linear and supercoiled isoforms of large plasmids was obtained. Last but not least, since the baseline separation of RNA and pDNA was achieved, the one step purification on larger CIM DEAE 8 mL tube monolithic column was performed and the fractions were analyzed by CIM analytical monolithic columns. PMID:19598166

  7. Kinetics, products, and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources are oxidized by reactions with OH radicals, O(3), NO(3) radicals, or Cl atoms to form less volatile products that subsequently partition into aerosol particles. Once in particles, these organic compounds can undergo heterogenous/multiphase reactions to form more highly oxidized or oligomeric products. SOA comprises a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol mass and can have significant effects on atmospheric chemistry, visibility, human health, and climate. Previous articles have reviewed the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of atmospheric VOC reactions and the general chemistry and physics involved in SOA formation. In this article we present a detailed review of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase chemistry as they apply to SOA formation, with a focus on the effects of VOC molecular structure on the kinetics of initial reactions with the major atmospheric oxidants, the subsequent reactions of alkyl, alkyl peroxy, and alkoxy radical intermediates, and the composition of the resulting products. Structural features of reactants and products discussed include compound carbon number; linear, branched, and cyclic configurations; the presence of C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bonds and aromatic rings; and functional groups such as carbonyl, hydroxyl, ester, hydroxperoxy, carboxyl, peroxycarboxyl, nitrate, and peroxynitrate. The intention of this review is to provide atmospheric chemists with sufficient information to understand the dominant pathways by which the major classes of atmospheric VOCs react to form SOA products, and the further reactions of these products in particles. This will allow reasonable predictions to be made, based on molecular structure, about the kinetics, products, and mechanisms of VOC and heterogeneous/multiphase reactions, including the effects of important variables such as VOC, oxidant, and NO

  8. Production enhancement through aggressive flowback procedures in the Codell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.J.; Ashton, P.J.N.; Lang, J.; Samuelson, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Proppant flowback following fracture stimulation treatments continues to be a major concern in many wells around the world. The current trend towards more tip screen out (TSO) and reverse screenout designs has increased the need for better control of proppant flowback under increasingly severe drag force conditions. Recent studies in the Codell formation have indicated a correlation between load water and polymer recovery on fracture cleanup and subsequent gas production. This paper describes a subsequent twenty-five well study of the specific effects of combining forced closure/reverse gravel packs along with varying flowback rates and choke schedules on load water recovery and normalized gas and condensate production. One of the key issues addressed is the use of aggressive flowback schedules while maintaining proppant flowback control.

  9. Less common applications of monoliths: IV. Recent developments in immobilized enzyme reactors for proteomics and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Krenkova, Jana; Svec, Frantisek

    2009-01-01

    Use of monolithic supports for enzyme immobilization rapidly expanded since we published the previous part in this series concerned with this topic almost three years ago. Many groups worldwide realized the benefits of applying monolith as a support and used a variety of techniques to immobilize many different enzymes. Although some of these new developments are a refinement of the methods developed previously, some notable new approaches have also been reported. This review summarizes the literature published since 2006 and demonstrates the broad variability of reactive monolith prepared from silica as well as from organic polymers in shapes of disks, columns, and capillaries. All these monoliths were prepared using direct formation from reactive precursors or activation of preformed inactive structures. Interestingly, most of the applications of monolithic enzyme reactors targets proteolytic digestion of proteins for proteomic analysis. PMID:19194973

  10. Disinfection by-product formation during seawater desalination: A review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Amy, Gary L; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-09-15

    Due to increased freshwater demand across the globe, seawater desalination has become the technology of choice in augmenting water supplies in many parts of the world. The use of chemical disinfection is necessary in desalination plants for pre-treatment to control both biofouling as well as the post-disinfection of desalinated water. Although chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in desalination plants, its reaction with organic matter produces various disinfection by-products (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes [THMs], haloacetic acids [HAAs], and haloacetonitriles [HANs]), and some DBPs are regulated in many countries due to their potential risks to public health. To reduce the formation of chlorinated DBPs, alternative oxidants (disinfectants) such as chloramines, chlorine dioxide, and ozone can be considered, but they also produce other types of DBPs. In addition, due to high levels of bromide and iodide concentrations in seawater, highly cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP species (i.e., brominated and iodinated DBPs) may form in distribution systems, especially when desalinated water is blended with other source waters having higher levels of organic matter. This article reviews the knowledge accumulated in the last few decades on DBP formation during seawater desalination, and summarizes in detail, the occurrence of DBPs in various thermal and membrane plants involving different desalination processes. The review also identifies the current challenges and future research needs for controlling DBP formation in seawater desalination plants and to reduce the potential toxicity of desalinated water. PMID:26099832

  11. Nursing Doctorates in Brazil: research formation and theses production

    PubMed Central

    Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva; Padilha, Katia Grillo; Padovani, Nátali Artal; Munari, Denize Bouttelet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the formation of nursing doctorates in Brazil, from theses production, disciplines and other strategies focusing on research offered by courses. METHOD: a descriptive and analytical study of the performance of 18 doctoral courses in nursing, running from 1982 to 2010, and defended their theses between 2010-2012. RESULTS: 502 theses were defended in this period, most linked to the online research process of health and nursing care. There are gaps in the knowledge of theoretical and philosophical foundations of care, nursing history and ethics. There are also weaknesses in the methodological design of the theses, with a predominance of descriptive and/or exploratory studies. This was consistent with international standards set with regards to the proposition of research of disciplines and complementary strategies in forming the doctorate. CONCLUSION: despite the efforts and advances in research formation, it is essential to expand to more robust research designs with a greater impact on production knowledge that is incorporated into practice. PMID:26312630

  12. Rationally engineered synthetic coculture for improved biomass and product formation.

    PubMed

    Santala, Suvi; Karp, Matti; Santala, Ville

    2014-01-01

    In microbial ecosystems, bacteria are dependent on dynamic interspecific interactions related to carbon and energy flow. Substrates and end-metabolites are rapidly converted to other compounds, which protects the community from high concentrations of inhibitory molecules. In biotechnological applications, pure cultures are preferred because of the more straight-forward metabolic engineering and bioprocess control. However, the accumulation of unwanted side products can limit the cell growth and process efficiency. In this study, a rationally engineered coculture with a carbon channeling system was constructed using two well-characterized model strains Escherichia coli K12 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. The directed carbon flow resulted in efficient acetate removal, and the coculture showed symbiotic nature in terms of substrate utilization and growth. Recombinant protein production was used as a proof-of-principle example to demonstrate the coculture utility and the effects on product formation. As a result, the biomass and recombinant protein titers of E. coli were enhanced in both minimal and rich medium simple batch cocultures. Finally, harnessing both the strains to the production resulted in enhanced recombinant protein titers. The study demonstrates the potential of rationally engineered cocultures for synthetic biology applications. PMID:25470793

  13. Method of monolithic module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Morgan, William P.; Worobey, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Methods for "monolithic module assembly" which translate many of the advantages of monolithic module construction of thin-film PV modules to wafered c-Si PV modules. Methods employ using back-contact solar cells positioned atop electrically conductive circuit elements affixed to a planar support so that a circuit capable of generating electric power is created. The modules are encapsulated using encapsulant materials such as EVA which are commonly used in photovoltaic module manufacture. The methods of the invention allow multiple cells to be electrically connected in a single encapsulation step rather than by sequential soldering which characterizes the currently used commercial practices.

  14. Allyl-silica Hybrid Monoliths For Chromatographic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjuan

    Column technology continues to be the most investigated topics in the separation world, since the column is the place where the chromatographic separation happens, making it the heart of the separation system. Allyl-silica hybrid monolithic material has been exploited as support material and potential stationary phases for liquid chromatography; the stationary phase anchored to the silica surface by Si-C bond, which is more pH stable than traditional stationary phase. First, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the sol in the synthesis of allyl-silica hybrid monoliths. Allyl-trimethoxysilane (allyl-TrMOS), dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMOS) and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) have been served as co-precursors in the sol-gel synthesis of organo-silica hybrid monolithic columns for liquid chromatography (LC). 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were employed to monitor reaction profiles for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and initial condensation reactions of the individual precursor and the hybrid system. 29Si-NMR has also been used to identify different silane species formed during the reactions. The overall hydrolysis rate has been found to follow the trend DMDMOS > allyl-TrMOS > TMOS, if each precursor is reacted individually (homo-polymerization). Precursors show different hydrolysis rate when reacted together in the hybrid system than they are reacted individually. Cross-condensation products of TMOS and DMDMOS (QD) arise about 10 minutes of initiation of the reaction. The allyl-silica monolithic columns for capillary liquid chromatography can only be prepared in capillaries with 50 im internal diameter with acceptable performance. One of the most prominent problems related to the synthesis of silica monolithic structures is the volume shrinkage. The synthesis of allylfunctionalized silica hybrid monolithic structures has been studied in an attempt to reduce the volume shrinkage during aging, drying and heat treatment

  15. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  16. In situ Fabrication of Monolithic Copper Azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wu, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication and characterization of monolithic copper azide were performed. The monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) with interconnected pores and nanoparticles was prepared by decomposition and sintering of the ultrafine copper oxalate. The preferable monolithic NPC can be obtained through decomposition and sintering at 400°C for 30 min. Then, the available monolithic NPC was in situ reacted with the gaseous HN3 for 24 h and the monolithic NPC was transformed into monolithic copper azide. Additionally, the copper particles prepared by electrodeposition were also reacted with the gaseous HN3 under uniform conditions as a comparison. The fabricated monolithic copper azide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  17. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  18. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  19. Palaeoenvironmental Indications of Enhanced Primary Productivity During Pliocene Sapropel Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.; Hopmans, E. C.; Schouten, S.; van Bergen, P. F.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Cores taken during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 160 in the eastern Mediterranean basin revealed periodic, laminated intervals with high organic contents, i.e. sapropels (Emeis et al., 1996). These include Pliocene sediments showing cyclic variations in organic matter deposition strongly correlated to the precession cyclicity of the Earth's orbit (e.g. Rossignol-Strick, 1985; Lourens et al., 1996a). The two main causes for sapropel formation are either climate-related enhanced organic matter productivity and/or increased preservation due to oxygen depletion of the bottom waters (e.g. Calvert et al., 1992; Canfield, 1994). Increased productivity is suggested to be the driving force in generating euxinic conditions leading to sapropel deposition (e.g. Passier et al., 1999). Photic zone euxinia was most probably triggered by large-scale input of nutrients from the Nile and other rivers leading to enhanced primary productivity and consequently high organic matter fluxes. This was based on concentrations of isorenieratene, a biomarker of photic zone euxinia, studied in three lateral time-equivalent Pliocene sapropels (subm. Menzel et al., 2001). Photic zone euxinia was more pronounced at the central and western part of the eastern Mediterranean basin, when compared with the most eastern part, where a deepening of the chemocline resulted from the increased delivery of fresh water. Using additional biomarkers will provide detailed insights in palaeoenvironmental changes that caused high organic matter deposition. The quantitative analysis of compounds specific for phytoplankton classes, e.g. isololiolides and loliolides reflecting Bacillariophyta, C37 - C39 alkenones indicative of Prymnesiophyta etc., will result in reconstruction of compositions of the standing crop and changes thereof at the time of deposition. The quantitative analysis of long-chain n-alkanes, indicating higher land plants, could reveal river input into the basin. Carbon isotope compositions of

  20. Sol-gel synthesis of monolithic materials with hierarchical porosity.

    PubMed

    Feinle, A; Elsaesser, M S; Hüsing, N

    2016-06-13

    The development of synthetic routes to hierarchically organized porous materials containing multiple, discrete sets of pores having disparate length scales is of high interest for a wide range of applications. One possible route towards the formation of multilevel porous architectures relies on the processing of condensable, network forming precursors (sol-gel processes) in the presence of molecular porogens, lyotropic mesophases, supramolecular architectures, emulsions, organic polymers, or ice. In this review the focus is on sol-gel processing of inorganic and organic precursors with concurrently occurring microscopic and/or macroscopic phase separation for the formation of self-supporting monoliths. The potential and the limitations of the solution-based approaches is presented with special emphasis to recent examples of hierarchically organized silica, metal oxides and phosphates as well as carbon monoliths. PMID:26563577

  1. Minimization of the formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed I; Gad-Allah, Tarek A; Ali, Mohamed E M; Yoon, Yeoman

    2012-09-01

    The drinking water industry is required to minimize DBPs levels while ensuring adequate disinfection. In this study, efficient and appropriate treatment scheme for the reduction of disinfection by-product (DBPs) formation in drinking water containing natural organic matter has been established. This was carried out by the investigation of different treatment schemes consisting of enhanced coagulation, sedimentation, disinfection by using chlorine dioxide/ozone, filtration by sand filter, or granular activated carbon (GAC). Bench scale treatment schemes were applied on actual samples from different selected sites to identify the best conditions for the treatment of water. Samples were collected from effluent of each step in the treatment train in order to analyze pH, UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA(254)), specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA(254)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). The obtained results indicated that using pre-ozonation/enhanced coagulation/activated carbon filtration treatment train appears to be the most effective method for reducing DBPs precursors in drinking water treatment. PMID:22591848

  2. Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Product Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Sun, JS; Adams, MWW

    2012-02-24

    Microorganisms growing near the boiling point have enormous biotechnological potential but only recently have molecular engineering tools become available for them. We have engineered the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100 degrees C, to switch its end products of fermentation in a temperature-controlled fashion without the need for chemical inducers. The recombinant strain (LAC) expresses a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase from the moderately thermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii (optimal growth temperature [T-opt] of 78 degrees C) controlled by a "cold shock" promoter that is upregulated when cells are transferred from 98 degrees C to 72 degrees C. At 98 degrees C, the LAC strain fermented sugar to produce acetate and hydrogen as end products, and lactate was not detected. When the LAC strain was grown at 72 degrees C, up to 3 mM lactate was produced instead. Expression of a gene from a moderately thermophilic bacterium in a hyperthermophilic archaeon at temperatures at which the hyperthermophile has low metabolic activity provides a new perspective to engineering microorganisms for bioproduct and biofuel formation. IMPORTANCE Extremely thermostable enzymes from microorganisms that grow near or above the boiling point of water are already used in biotechnology. However, the use of hyperthermophilic microorganisms themselves for biotechnological applications has been limited by the lack of their genetic accessibility. Recently, a genetic system for Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 degrees C, was developed in our laboratory. In this study, we present the first heterologous protein expression system for a microorganism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C, a first step towards the potential expression of genes involved in biomass degradation or biofuel production in hyperthermophiles. Moreover, we developed the first system for specific gene induction in P. furiosus. As the cold shock promoter

  3. Monolithic-integrated microlaser encoder.

    PubMed

    Sawada, R; Higurashi, E; Ito, T; Ohguchi, O; Tsubamoto, M

    1999-11-20

    We have developed an extremely small integrated microencoder whose sides are less than 1 mm long. It is 1/100 the size of conventional encoders. This microencoder consists of a laser diode, monolithic photodiodes, and fluorinated polyimide waveguides with total internal reflection mirrors. The instrument can measure the relative displacement between a grating scale and the encoder with a resolution of the order of 0.01 microm; it can also determine the direction in which the scale is moving. By using the two beams that were emitted from the two etched mirrors of the laser diode, by monolithic integration of the waveguide and photodiodes, and by fabrication of a step at the edge of the waveguide, we were able to eliminate conventional bulky optical components such as the beam splitter, the quarter-wavelength plate, bulky mirrors, and bulky photodetectors. PMID:18324228

  4. Formation of alteration products during dissolution of vitrified ILW in a high-pH calcium-rich solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utton, C. A.; Hand, R. J.; Hyatt, N. C.; Swanton, S. W.; Williams, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    To simulate the possible disposition of a vitrified intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a cementitious environment within a geological disposal facility (GDF), the durability of a laboratory simulant ILW vitrified in a borosilicate glass in a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution (pH ˜12.5) was measured. Both a low surface area to volume (SA/V) ratio (˜10 m-1) Materials Characterisation Center test 1 (MCC-1) and a high SA/V ratio (˜10,000 m-1) product consistency test type B (PCT-B) were used at 50 °C for up to 170 days. The formation of alteration layers and products was followed. The surfaces of the monoliths were analysed using SEM/EDX and showed the formation of magnesium-rich precipitates and distinct calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) precipitates. Cross sections showed the development of a calcium-rich alteration layer, which was observed from 14 days. The altered layer was up to 5 μm thick after 170 days and showed accumulation of zirconium, iron and magnesium and to a lesser extent aluminium, along with calcium and silicon. Based on comparison of the rate data, it is suggested that the presence of this layer may offer some protection to the underlying glass. However, the high SA/V ratio experiments showed resumed alteration after 56 days, indicating that the altered layer may not be protective in the long term (under accelerated conditions). The formation of a magnesium-containing smectite clay (likely saponite) in addition to CSH(II), a jennite-like CSH phase, were identified in the high SA/V experiment by X-ray diffraction after 170 days. These results suggest that calcium and magnesium have important roles in both the long and shorter-term durability of vitrified wastes exposed to high pH. This is higher than the value of 63 kJ mol-1 reported by Abraitis [21]. This appears to originate from a mathematical error in calculating the activation energy, given the underlying data reported, reproduced here in Table 3.

  5. Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Clark; N. P. Hallinan; J. F. Jue; D. D. Keiser; J. M. Wight

    2006-05-01

    The pursuit of a high uranium density research reactor fuel plate has led to monolithic fuel, which possesses the greatest possible uranium density in the fuel region. Process developments in fabrication development include friction stir welding tool geometry and cooling improvements and a reduction in the length of time required to complete the transient liquid phase bonding process. Annealing effects on the microstructures of the U-10Mo foil and friction stir welded aluminum 6061 cladding are also examined.

  6. Monolithic pattern-sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2000-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet light (EUV) is detected using a precisely defined reference pattern formed over a shallow junction photodiode. The reference pattern is formed in an EUV absorber preferably comprising nickel or other material having EUV- and other spectral region attenuating characteristics. An EUV-transmissive energy filter is disposed between a passivation oxide layer of the photodiode and the EUV transmissive energy filter. The device is monolithically formed to provide robustness and compactness.

  7. Characterization of polyacrylamide based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Plieva, Fatima M; Andersson, Jonatan; Galaev, Igor Yu; Mattiasson, Bo

    2004-07-01

    Supermacroporous monolithic polyacrylamide (pAAm)-based columns have been prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization (copolymerization in the moderately frozen system) of acrylamide with functional co-monomer, allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), and cross-linker N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) directly in glass columns (ID 10 mm). The monolithic columns have uniform supermacroporous sponge-like structure with interconnected supermacropores of pore size 5-100 microm. The monoliths can be dried and stored in the dry state. High mechanical stability of the monoliths allowed sterilization by autoclaving. Column-to-column reproducibility of pAAm-monoliths was demonstrated on 5 monolithic columns from different batches prepared under the same cryostructuration conditions. PMID:15354560

  8. Titanium-scaffolded organic-monolithic stationary phases for ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Rudy J; Vaast, Axel; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2014-09-12

    Organic-polymer monoliths with overall dimensions larger than one millimetre are prone to rupture - either within the monolith itself or between the monoliths and the containing wall - due to the inevitable shrinkage accompanying the formation of a cross-linked polymeric network. This problem has been addressed by creating titanium-scaffolded poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (S-co-DVB) monoliths. Titanium-scaffolded monoliths were successfully used in liquid chromatography at very high pressures (up to 80MPa) and using gradients spanning the full range of water-acetonitrile compositions (0 to 100%). The kinetic-performance of (50-mm long) titanium-scaffolded monoliths was compared to that of similar monolith created in 1-mm i.d. glass-lined tubing at pressures up to 50MPa. The peak capacities obtained with the titanium-scaffolded column was about 30% lower. An increased Eddy-diffusion, due to the pillar-structure, and a decreased permeability are thought to be the main reasons for this reduced kinetic-performance. No decrease in performance was observed when the titanium-scaffolded columns were operated at pressures of 80MPa for up to 12h. The column-to-column repeatability (n=5) was acceptable in terms of observed peak widths at half heights (RSD ca. 10%) The run-to-run repeatability (n=135) in terms of retention times and peak widths at half height were found to be good. Titanium-scaffolded columns coupled in series up to a combined length of (200mm) were used for the analyses of a complex Escherichia coli protein sample. Our experiments demonstrate that columns based on titanium-scaffolded organic-polymer monolith can be operated under strenuous conditions without loss in performance. The titanium-scaffolded approach makes it feasible to create organic-polymer monoliths in wide-bore columns with accurate temperature control. PMID:25086753

  9. A novel surface modification technique for forming porous polymer monoliths in poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    A new method of surface modification is described for enabling the in situ formation of homogenous porous polymer monoliths (PPMs) within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels that uses 365 nm UV illumination for polymerization. Porous polymer monolith formation in PDMS can be challenging because PDMS readily absorbs the monomers and solvents, changing the final monolith morphology, and because PDMS absorbs oxygen, which inhibits free-radical polymerization. The new approach is based on sequentially absorbing a non-hydrogen-abstracting photoinitiator and the monomers methyl methacrylate and ethylene diacrylate within the walls of the microchannel, and then polymerizing the surface treatment polymer within the PDMS, entangled with it but not covalently bound. Four different monolith compositions were tested, all of which yielded monoliths that were securely anchored and could withstand pressures exceeding the bonding strength of PDMS (40 psi) without dislodging. One was a recipe that was optimized to give a larger average pore size, required for low back pressure. This monolith was used to concentrate and subsequently mechanical lyse B lymphocytes. PMID:22685511

  10. Counterflow isotachophoresis in a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingwen; Cong, Yongzheng; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2014-09-01

    This study describes stationary counterflow isotachophoresis (ITP) in a poly(acrylamide-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) monolithic column as a means for improving ITP processing capacity and reducing dispersion. The flow profile in the monolith was predicted using COMSOL's Brinkman Equation application mode, which revealed that the flow profile was mainly determined by monolith permeability. As monolith permeability decreases, the flow profile changes from a parabolic shape to a plug shape. An experimental monolithic column was prepared in a fused-silica capillary using an ultraviolet-initiated polymerization method. A monolithic column made from 8% (wt.) monomer was chosen for the stationary counterflow ITP experiments. Counterflow ITP in the monolithic column showed undistorted analyte zones with significantly reduced dispersion compared to the severe dispersion observed in an open capillary. Particularly, for r-phycoerythrin focused by counterflow ITP, its zone width in the monolithic column was only one-third that observed in an open capillary. These experiments demonstrate that stationary counterflow ITP in monoliths can be a robust and practical electrofocusing method. PMID:24935025

  11. Particle Formation and Product Formulation Using Supercritical Fluids.

    PubMed

    Knez, Željko; Knez Hrnčič, Maša; Škerget, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for solids processing involve either high temperatures, necessary for melting or viscosity reduction, or hazardous organic solvents. Owing to the negative impact of the solvents on the environment, especially on living organisms, intensive research has focused on new, sustainable methods for the processing of these substances. Applying supercritical fluids for particle formation may produce powders and composites with special characteristics. Several processes for formation and design of solid particles using dense gases have been studied intensively. The unique thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic properties of supercritical fluids can be used also for impregnation of solid particles or for the formation of solid powderous emulsions and particle coating, e.g., for formation of solids with unique properties for use in different applications. We give an overview of the application of sub- and supercritical fluids as green processing media for particle formation processes and present recent advances and trends in development. PMID:26091976

  12. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  13. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  14. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  15. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  16. Monolithic 20-GHz Transmitting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, T.; Kaelin, G.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    20-GHz monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) with amplification and phase-shift (time-delay) capabilities developed. Use of MMIC module technology promises to make feasible development of weight- and cost-effective phased-array antenna systems, identified as major factor in achieving minimum cost and efficient use of frequency and orbital resources of future generations of communication satellite systems. Use of MMIC transmitting modules provides for relatively simple method for phase-shift control of many separate radio-frequency (RF) signals required for phased-array antenna systems.

  17. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    DOEpatents

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  18. Improved monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1991-04-23

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surf ace of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  19. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  20. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  1. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

  2. Formative Research in the Production of Television for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Edward L.

    The Children's Television Workshop (CTW), responsible for the programs "Sesame Street" and "The Electric Company", conducted extensive research into the systematic use of television to promote the social, emotional, and intellectual growth of young children. Working without precedents in the field of formative research practice, CTW was able to…

  3. "Smart" molecularly imprinted monoliths for the selective capture and easy release of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liyin; Tan, Xinyi; Sun, Qi; Svec, Frantisek; Lv, Yongqin

    2016-08-01

    A new thermally switchable molecularly imprinted monolith for the selective capture and release of proteins has been designed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith reacted with ethylenediamine followed by functionalization with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to introduce the initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization. Subsequently, a protein-imprinted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) layer was grafted onto the surface of the monolithic matrix by atom transfer radical polymerization. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the cross-sections of imprinted monoliths confirmed the formation of dense poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes on the pore surface. The imprinted monolith exhibited high specificity and selectivity toward its template protein myoglobin over competing proteins and a remarkably large maximum adsorption capacity of 1641 mg/g. Moreover, this "smart" imprinted monolith featured thermally responsive characteristics that enabled selective capture and easy release of proteins triggered only by change in temperature with water as the mobile phase and avoided use of stronger organic solvents or change in ionic strength and pH. PMID:27352958

  4. Preparation of porous polymer monoliths featuring enhanced surface coverage with gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yongqin; Alejandro, Fernando Maya; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths with enhanced coverage of pore surface with gold nanoparticles has been developed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was reacted with cystamine followed by the cleavage of its disulfide bonds with tris(2-carboxylethyl)phosphine which liberated the desired thiol groups. Dispersions of gold nanoparticles with sizes varying from 5 to 40 nm were then pumped through the functionalized monoliths. The materials were then analyzed using both energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. We found that the quantity of attached gold was dependent on the size of nanoparticles, with the maximum attachment of more than 60 wt% being achieved with 40 nm nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of all the monoliths revealed the formation of a non-aggregated, homogenous monolayer of nanoparticles. The surface of the bound gold was functionalized with 1-octanethiol and 1-octadecanethiol, and these monolithic columns were used successfully for the separations of proteins in reversed phase mode. The best separations were obtained using monoliths modified with 15, 20, and 30 nm nanoparticles since these sizes produced the most dense coverage of pore surface with gold. PMID:22542442

  5. Microbial methanol formation: A major end product of pectin metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Schink, B.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Various pectinolytic strains of Clostridium, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas species produced methanol as a major end product during growth on pectin but not on glucose of polygalacturonic acid. Pectin metabolism of Clostridium butyricum strain 4PI correlated with a final product concentration of 16 mM at the end of growth, and a 1:1 stoichiometry for methanol production and percent initial substrate methoxylation. Growth on pectin was associated with high activity of pectin methylesterase and the absence of methanol consumption. The ecological significance of pectin metabolism and the establishment of microbial methylotrophic metabolism in nature is discussed.

  6. Formation and elution of toxic compounds from sterilized medical products: methylenedianiline formation in polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Shintani, H

    1995-07-01

    The formation of a toxic and carcinogenic compound, methylenedianiline (MDA), in sterilized medical use polyurethane (PU) is discussed. Due to good biocompatibility and biostability, PU is widely used for blood-containing devices. There are two types of PU currently available for medical use. One is chain-extended thermoplastic PU, the other is thermosetting PU used for potting material connecting fibers and modules in artificial dialyzers and plasma separators. Both gamma-ray irradiation and autoclave sterilization are predominantly used for the sterilization of these devices. MDA formation in sterilized PUs by gamma-ray irradiation and by autoclave treatment is compared. The Delany clause in the USA prohibits the manufacture of medical devices producing any toxic compound during fabrication and sterilization, therefore, the formation and elution of MDA and other toxic compounds should be seriously considered. Although MDA formation at a concentration of a few to a few hundred ppb in autoclaved chain-extended thermoplastic PU has been reported, there have been no papers describing MDA formation in autoclaved thermosetting PU potting material, or describing MDA formation in gamma-ray irradiated chain-extended thermoplastic PU and thermosetting PU. We elected to determine whether MDA was in fact produced in Pus sterilized by gamma-ray irradiation or by autoclave sterilization. Our objective was to estimate the risk factor to the human patients or recipient. Our conclusion is to confirm which sterilization of gamma-ray or autoclave is more appropriate. No formation of MDA was observed in autoclaved thermosetting PU potting material at 121 degrees C for 60 min. A few ppm of MDA was formed in irradiated potting material. MDA formation increased with increasing irradiation doses. MDA formed in irradiated potting material at 2.5 Mrad (less than one ppm) is not a significant risk to the recipient. The estimated cancer causing risk factor when absorbing one mg MDA/kg body

  7. Acrylamide: formation, occurrence in food products, detection methods, and legislation.

    PubMed

    Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Dionisopoulou, Niki

    2014-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the most recent updates in the field of acrylamide (AA) formation (mechanism, conditions) and the determination of AA in a number of foods (fried or baked potatoes, chips, coffee, bread, etc). The methods applied for AA detection [Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry (CE-MS), Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis (NACE), High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS), Pressurized Fluid Extraction (PFE), Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion (MSPD), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Solid-Phase MicroExtraction-Gas Chromatography (SPME-GC), Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), and MicroEmulsion ElectroKinetic Chromatography (MEEKC) are presented and commented. Several informative figures and tables are included to show the effect of conditions (temperature, time) on the AA formation. A section is also included related to AA legislation in EU and US. PMID:24345045

  8. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of a continuous particles creation processes on the linear and nonlinear matter clustering, and its consequences on the weak lensing effect induced by structure formation. We study the line of sight behavior of the contribution to the bispectrum signal at a given angular multipole l, showing that the scale where the nonlinear growth overcomes the linear effect depends strongly of particles creation rate.

  9. FORMATION AND CONTROL OF PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygenated organic products of incomplete combustion, including oxygenated PAHs and phthalates, have been found in combustor emissions. Some have substantial health effects and significantly influence the risk assessment calculations. Others are found that may or may not be a...

  10. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  11. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  12. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  13. Oxidative product formation in irradiated neutrophils. A flow cytometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolber, R.A.; Duque, R.E.; Robinson, J.P.; Oberman, H.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of irradiation on neutrophil oxidative function was evaluated using a flow cytometric assay of intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) production. This assay quantitates the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-dependent conversion of the nonfluorescent compound, 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH), into fluorescent 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) on a single-cell basis. Intracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production in response to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate was not affected by neutrophil irradiation at doses up to 2500 rad. In addition, irradiation of intracellular DCFH and aqueous 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) resulted in DCF production, which suggested that oxidative molecules produced by aqueous radiolysis were detected by this assay. This study indicates that radiation doses of 1500 to 2500 rad, which are sufficient to prevent induction of graft-versus-host disease by transfused blood components, are not deleterious to neutrophil oxidative metabolism.

  14. Overview of Devonian Duperow formation production, Billings anticline, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Randolph B.

    1989-01-01

    Oil exploration on the Billings anticline began in earnest in 1978, which is a north-plunging structure in the north central part of southwestern North Dakota. Forty-two fields are included in the Billings anticline area. This paper discusses the following features of the Billings anticline: structure, lithology, Duperow production, and some conservative economic scenarios.

  15. PREDICTING THE FORMATION OF CHLORINATED AND BROMINATED BY-PRODUCTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although disinfection has been and continues to be one of the major public health advances in the 20th century, the disinfectants themselves may react with naturally-occurring materials in treated water to form unintended by-products which may themselves pose risks. This is of p...

  16. A fluorous porous polymer monolith photo-patterned chromatographic column for the separation of a flourous/fluorescently labeled peptide within a microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenpo; Oleschuk, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    A fluorous porous polymer stationary phase is photo-patterned within a glass microfluidic chip to conduct CEC. During free radical-initiated polymerization, extraneous polymer forms and contributes to excessive microfluidic channel clogging. Nitrobenzene is explored as free radical quencher to limit clogging by minimizing extraneous polymer formation and a number of initiator to quencher ratios are explored with a 0.5:1 quencher (nitrobenzene): initiator (benzoin methyl ether) molar ratio shown to be optimal. The microchip patterned with a fluorous monolith was used to carry out the electrochromatographic analysis of a mixture containing fluorescent and fluorous labeling products. The fluorous monolithic column shows fluorous selectivity for compounds labeled with perfluoromethylene tags and a custom peptide is synthesized that possesses functional groups that can be both fluorescently and fluorously labeled. MALDI MS was used to identify the labeled fragments and microchip based electrochromatography was used to analyze the resulting labeling mixture. This is the first report to our knowledge that uses fluorous porous polymer monolith within a microchip to separate analytes using fluorous-fluorous interactions. PMID:24170603

  17. Monolithic cells for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Rongé, Jan; Bosserez, Tom; Martel, David; Nervi, Carlo; Boarino, Luca; Taulelle, Francis; Decher, Gero; Bordiga, Silvia; Martens, Johan A

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid energy generation models based on a variety of alternative energy supply technologies are considered the best way to cope with the depletion of fossil energy resources and to limit global warming. One of the currently missing technologies is the mimic of natural photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into chemical fuel using sunlight. This idea has been around for decades, but artificial photosynthesis of organic molecules is still far away from providing real-world solutions. The scientific challenge is to perform in an efficient way the multi-electron transfer reactions of water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction using holes and single electrons generated in an illuminated semiconductor. In this tutorial review the design of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells that combine solar water oxidation and CO2 reduction is discussed. In such PEC cells simultaneous transport and efficient use of light, electrons, protons and molecules has to be managed. It is explained how efficiency can be gained by compartmentalisation of the water oxidation and CO2 reduction processes by proton exchange membranes, and monolithic concepts of artificial leaves and solar membranes are presented. Besides transferring protons from the anode to the cathode compartment the membrane serves as a molecular barrier material to prevent cross-over of oxygen and fuel molecules. Innovative nano-organized multimaterials will be needed to realise practical artificial photosynthesis devices. This review provides an overview of synthesis techniques which could be used to realise monolithic multifunctional membrane-electrode assemblies, such as Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), and porous silicon (porSi) engineering. Advances in modelling approaches, electrochemical techniques and in situ spectroscopies to characterise overall PEC cell performance are discussed. PMID:24526085

  18. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  19. LABORATORY AND COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF KEY OXIDATION PRODUCTS CONTROLLING TROPOSPHERIC OZONE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major uncertainties remain in our ability to identify the key reactions and primary oxidation products of volatile hydrocarbons that contribute to ozone formation in the troposphere. To reduce these uncertainties, computational chemistry, mechanistic and process analysis techniqu...

  20. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  1. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPS) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacentonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along with ...

  2. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  3. Monolithically integrated distributed bragg reflector laser

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, K.

    1984-08-07

    In a heterostructure distributed Bragg reflector laser, at least one multilayer waveguide substantially comprised of a silicon dielectric compound is monolithically integrated with an active semiconductor heterostructure medium. Bragg reflectors are properly disposed within the waveguide.

  4. Monolithic solid-state lasers for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Merritt, Scott; Glebov, Leonid; Glebova, Larissa; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vadim; Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    A new solution for building high power, solid state lasers for space flight is to fabricate the whole laser resonator in a single (monolithic) structure or alternatively to build a contiguous diffusion bonded or welded structure. Monolithic lasers provide numerous advantages for space flight solid-state lasers by minimizing misalignment concerns. The closed cavity is immune to contamination. The number of components is minimized thus increasing reliability. Bragg mirrors serve as the high reflector and output coupler thus minimizing optical coatings and coating damage. The Bragg mirrors also provide spectral and spatial mode selection for high fidelity. The monolithic structure allows short cavities resulting in short pulses. Passive saturable absorber Q-switches provide a soft aperture for spatial mode filtering and improved pointing stability. We will review our recent commercial and in-house developments toward fully monolithic solid-state lasers.

  5. Monolithic Active-Pixel Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Staller, Craig O.

    1995-01-01

    Monolithic arrays of active-pixel junction field-effect (JFET) devices made from InGaAs proposed for use as imaging sensors sensitive to light in visible and short-wavelength infrared parts of electromagnetic spectrum. Each pixel of such array comprises photodetector monolithically integrated with JFET output-amplifier circuit of source-follower type - structure similar to charge-coupled device (CCD). Sizes of instruments reduced because large cooling systems not needed.

  6. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  7. Monolithic ceramic capacitors for high reliability applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornley, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Monolithic multi-layer ceramic dielectric capacitors are widely used in high reliability applications in spacecraft, launch vehicles, and military equipment. Their relatively low cost, wide range of values, and package styles are attractive features that result in high usage in electronic circuitry in these applications. Design and construction of monolithic ceramic dielectric capacitors, defects that can lead to failure, and methods for defect detection that are being incorporated in military specifications are discussed.

  8. Production data in media systems and press front ends: capture, formats and database methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karttunen, Simo

    1997-02-01

    The nature, purpose and data presentation features of media jobs are analyzed in relation to the content, document, process and resource management in media production. Formats are the natural way of presenting, collecting and storing information, contents, document components and final documents. The state of the art and the trends in the media formats and production data are reviewed. The types and the amount of production data are listed, e.g. events, schedules, product descriptions, reports, visual support, quality, process states and color data. The data exchange must be vendor-neutral. Adequate infrastructure and system architecture are defined for production and media data. The roles of open servers and intranets are evaluated and their potential roles as future solutions are anticipated. The press frontend is the part of print media production where large files dominate. The new output alternatives, i.e. film recorders, direct plate output (CTP and CTP-on-press) and digital, plateless printing lines need new workflow tools and very efficient file and format management. The paper analyzes the capture, formatting and storing of job files and respective production data, such as the event logs of the processes. Intranet, browsers, Java applets and open web severs will be used to capture production data, especially where intranets are used anyhow, or where several companies are networked to plan, design and use documents and printed products. The user aspects of installing intranets is stressed since there are numerous more traditional and more dedicated networking solutions on the market.

  9. Automation of the Technological Process to Produce Building Frame-Monolithic Modules Based on Fluoranhydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchuk, J.; Sadenova, M.; Rusina, O.

    2016-01-01

    The paper first proposes the automation of the technological process to produce building frame-monolithic modules from production wastes, namely technogenic anhydrite and fluoranhydrite. A functional diagram of the process automation is developed, the devices to perform control and maintenance with account of the production characteristics are chosen.

  10. Large format ink-jet poster production: a case report.

    PubMed

    Harris, R

    1998-03-01

    To complement the services offered by the Medical Illustration Department of Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, we decided to look at the possibility of producing posters using the ink-jet process. Our designers wanted to use the full scope of their computers and software to expand their design talents. The method of cutting and pasting sheets of paper onto card seemed old fashioned and denied clients the benefit of the exciting techniques that have become available. After seeking sponsorship, a drug company gave 8000 Pounds towards setting up the department's poster printing service. A Kodak DS1000 printer was installed together with Posterjet and Posterworks software and we went into production, servicing not only our hospital but others in the area who gave their support for the service. High quality photographic reproduction was achieved and clients and consultants were very pleased with the results. The designers were happy that their skills were being used and interest in this and other services in the department have increased. The resulting increased income has helped finance other projects. The printer has enabled us also to see output proofs before sending work off to be offset printed--a very useful tool and a cost-saving process. PMID:9764518

  11. Monolithic integrated-optic TDLAS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Scherer, David R.; Wainner, Richard T.; Allen, Mark G.; Shankar, Raji; Loncar, Marko

    2012-06-01

    We are developing prototype chip-scale low-power integrated-optic gas-phase chemical sensors based on infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS). TDLAS is able to sense many gas phase chemicals with high sensitivity and selectivity. Using semiconductor fabrication and assembly techniques, the low-cost integrated optic TDLAS technology will permit mass production of sensors that have wide ranging industrial, medical, environmental, and consumer applications. Novel gas sensing elements using low-loss resonant photonic crystal cavities or waveguides will permit monolithic integration of a laser source, sampling elements, and detector on a semiconductor materials system substrate. Practical challenges to fabricating these devices include: a) selecting and designing the high-Q micro-resonator sensing element appropriate for the selected analyte; and b) device thermal management, especially stabilizing laser temperature with the precision needed for sensitive spectroscopic detection. In this paper, we analyze the expected sensitivity of micro-resonator-based structures for chemical sensing, and demonstrate a novel approach for exploiting laser waste heat to stabilize the laser temperature.

  12. IN VIVO FORMATION OF HALOGENATED REACTION PRODUCTS FOLLOWING PERORAL SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date the principal concern of the disinfection of potable water has centered on the formation of halogenated organic reaction products and the adverse health effects that these products may have. However, an additional area for concern relating to water disinfection is the pot...

  13. Electron transfer pathways of formate-driven H2 production in Desulfovibrio.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Mourato, Cláudia; Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2016-09-01

    The potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as biocatalysts for H2 production from formate was recently demonstrated, but the electron transfer pathways involved were not described. In the present work, we analyzed the H2 production capacity of five Desulfovibrio strains: Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio alaskensis, Desulfovibrio fructosivorans, and Desulfovibrio gigas. D. vulgaris showed the highest H2 productivity (865 mL Lmedium (-1)), and D. gigas the lowest one (374 mL Lmedium (-1) of H2). The electron transfer pathways involved in formate-driven H2 production by these two organisms were further investigated through the study of deletion mutants of hydrogenases (Hases) and formate dehydrogenases (Fdhs). In D. vulgaris, the periplasmic FdhAB is the key enzyme for formate oxidation and two pathways are apparently involved in the production of H2 from formate: a direct one only involving periplasmic enzymes and a second one that involves transmembrane electron transfer and may allow energy conservation. In the presence of selenium, the Hys [NiFeSe] Hase is the main periplasmic enzyme responsible for H2 production, and the cytoplasmic Coo Hase is apparently involved in the ability of D. vulgaris to grow by converting formate to H2, in sparging conditions. Contrary to D. vulgaris, H2 production in D. gigas occurs exclusively by the direct periplasmic route and does not involve the single cytoplasmic Hase, Ech. This is the first report of the metabolic pathways involved in formate metabolism in the absence of sulfate in SRB, revealing that the electron transfer pathways are species-specific. PMID:27270746

  14. Fractionation, characterization and C-, N-disinfection byproduct formation of soluble microbial products in MBR processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Meng, Yingjie; Xia, Chufan; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Soluble microbial products are heterogeneous organic materials generated during microbial growth and decay, which are the major soluble organic matters in MBR effluents and are the primary precursors forming disinfection by-products (DBPs). In this study, biomass associated products (BAP) and utilization associated products (UAP) were separately produced to investigate their physical chemical characteristics and disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation during chlorination in the presence of ammonia. BAP had higher formation reactivity of halogenated carbonaceous and nitrogenous DBPs including trihalomethanes, haloketones, haloacetonitriles and trichloronitromethane due to their higher percentage of large molecular weight (MW) materials and humic substances compared with UAP. However, the nonhalogenated species N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) yield of UAP was twice higher than that of BAP because UAP contained more nitrogenous organic matters with MW<500Da including aromatic polypeptide/amino acid-like materials and secondary amines, which have been proved to have high NDMA formation potential. PMID:26409108

  15. Affinity monolith chromatography: A review of principles and recent analytical applications

    PubMed Central

    Pfaunmiller, Erika L.; Paulemond, Marie Laura; Dupper, Courtney M.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Affinity monolith chromatography (AMC) is a type of liquid chromatography that uses a monolithic support and a biologically-related binding agent as a stationary phase. AMC is a powerful method for the selective separation, analysis or studies of specific target compounds in a sample. This review discusses the basic principles of AMC and recent developments or applications of this method, with particular emphasis being given to work that has appeared in the last five years. Various materials that have been used to prepare columns for AMC are examined, including organic monoliths, silica monoliths, agarose monoliths and cryogels. These supports have been used in AMC for formats that have ranged from traditional columns to disks, microcolumns and capillaries. Many binding agents have also been employed in AMC, such as antibodies, enzymes, proteins, lectins, immobilized metal-ions and dyes. Some applications that have been reported with these binding agents in AMC are bioaffinity chromatography, immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoextraction, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, dye-ligand affinity chromatography, chiral separations and biointeraction studies. Examples are presented from fields that include analytical chemistry, pharmaceutical analysis, clinical testing and biotechnology. Current trends and possible future directions in AMC are also discussed. PMID:23187827

  16. Structure for monolithic optical circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evanchuk, Vincent L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method for making monolithic optical circuits, with related optical devices as required or desired, on a supporting surface (10) consists of coating the supporting surface with reflecting metal or cladding resin, spreading a layer of liquid radiation sensitive plastic (12) on the surface, exposing the liquid plastic with a mask (14) to cure it in a desired pattern of light conductors (16, 18, 20), washing away the unexposed liquid plastic, and coating the conductors thus formed with reflective metal or cladding resin. The index of refraction for the cladding (22) is selected to be lower than for the conductors so that light in the conductors will be reflected by the interface with the cladding. For multiple level conductors, as where one conductor must cross over another, the process may be repeated to fabricate a bridge with columns (24, 26) of conductors to the next level, and conductor (28) between the columns. For more efficient transfer of energy over the bridge, faces at 45.degree. may be formed to reflect light up and across the bridge.

  17. Porous polymer monoliths with large surface area and functional groups prepared via copolymerization of protected functional monomers and hypercrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Svec, Frantisek

    2013-11-22

    A new approach to the preparation of porous polymer monoliths possessing both large surface area and functional groups has been developed. The chloromethyl groups of poly(styrene-co-4-acetoxystyrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-divinylbenzene) monolith enable post-polymerization hypercrosslinking catalyzed by ferric chloride in dichloroethane leading to a multitude of small pores thus enhancing the surface area. The acetoxy functionalities are easily deprotected using hydrazine to produce polar phenolic hydroxyl groups, which would be difficult to obtain by direct copolymerization of hydroxyl-containing monomers. The hypercrosslinking and deprotection reactions as well as their sequence were studied in detail with bulk polymer monoliths containing up to 50% 4-acetoxystyrene and its progress monitored by infrared spectrometry and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. No significant difference was found for both possible successions. All monoliths were also prepared in a capillary column format, then deprotected and hypercrosslinked. Capillary columns were tested for the separation of small molecules using reversed phase and normal phase chromatographic modes. For polymer monoliths containing 50% deprotected 4-acetoxystyrene, column efficiencies of 40,000 plates/m for benzene in reversed phase mode and 31,800 plates/m for nitrobenzene in normal phase mode, were obtained. The percentage of hydroxyl groups in the monoliths enables modulation of polarity of the stationary phase. They also represent functionalities that are potentially suitable for further modifications and formation of new types of stationary phases for liquid chromatography. PMID:23910448

  18. New monolithic chromatographic supports for macromolecules immobilization: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Calleri, E; Ambrosini, S; Temporini, C; Massolini, G

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review reports on some recent advances in the field of immobilized protein employing both silica and polymer-based monoliths as supports, and their application in affinity chromatography and immobilized enzyme reactors (IMERs) developments. The major emphasis is put on some interesting challenges and opportunities related to the development of new monolithic affinity supports based on biofriendly sol-gel inorganic monoliths with entrapped proteins and on organic monolithic supports with improved hydrophilicity for IMERs development in proteomic studies. The ease of preparation of monoliths and the multitude of functionalization techniques, make monoliths interesting for an increasing number of biochemical and medical applications. PMID:22386208

  19. Effect of ammonia on ozone-initiated formation of indoor secondary products with emissions from cleaning products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Lee, Shun Cheng; Ho, Kin Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Nanying; Cheng, Yan; Gao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from cleaning products and air fresheners indoors are prone to oxidation resulting in the formation of secondary pollutants that can pose health risks on residents. Ammonia (NH3) is ubiquitous in ambient and indoor environments. In this study, we investigated the effect of ammonia (NH3) on secondary pollutants formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from cleaning products including floor cleaner (FC), kitchen cleaner (KC) and dishwashing detergent (DD) in a large environmental chamber. Our results demonstrated that the presence of NH3 (maximum concentration is 240 ppb) could significantly enhance secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formation from the ozonolysis of all the three categories of cleaning products. For example, for the FC sample, the maximum total particle concentration was up to 2.0 × 104 # cm-3 in the presence of NH3, while it was 1.3 × 104 # cm-3 which was 35% lower without NH3. However, it was found that the extent of NH3 effect on SOAs formation from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emissions was component-dependent. The presence of NH3 in the reaction systems could increase the consumptions of d-limonene that is the dominant BVOC species as identified in cleaning products. The percent yields (%) of secondary carbonyl compounds generated from the ozonolysis of BVOCs emitted from three categories of cleaning products were identified in the presence and absence of NH3, respectively. The increase in SOAs particle number concentration can be attributed to the formation of condensable salts from reactions between NH3 and organic compounds generated from the BVOCs ozonolysis processes. By investigating the NH3 effect on the ozonolysis of BVOCs mixtures in contrast to the chemistry of individual compounds, a better assessment can be made of the overall impact cleaning products have on real indoor environments.

  20. The formation and control of emerging disinfection by-products of health concern.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W

    2009-10-13

    When drinking water treatment plants disinfect water, a wide range of disinfection by-products (DBPs) of health and regulatory concern are formed. Recent studies have identified emerging DBPs (e.g. iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and acids, haloacetonitriles, halonitromethanes (HNMs), haloacetaldehydes, nitrosamines) that may be more toxic than some of the regulated ones (e.g. chlorine- and bromine-containing THMs and haloacetic acids). Some of these emerging DBPs are associated with impaired drinking water supplies (e.g. impacted by treated wastewater, algae, iodide). In some cases, alternative primary or secondary disinfectants to chlorine (e.g. chloramines, chlorine dioxide, ozone, ultraviolet) that minimize the formation of some of the regulated DBPs may increase the formation of some of the emerging by-products. However, optimization of the various treatment processes and disinfection scenarios can allow plants to control to varying degrees the formation of regulated and emerging DBPs. For example, pre-disinfection with chlorine, chlorine dioxide or ozone can destroy precursors for N-nitrosodimethylamine, which is a chloramine by-product, whereas pre-oxidation with chlorine or ozone can oxidize iodide to iodate and minimize iodinated DBP formation during post-chloramination. Although pre-ozonation may increase the formation of trihaloacetaldehydes or selected HNMs during post-chlorination or chloramination, biofiltration may reduce the formation potential of these by-products. PMID:19736234

  1. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth rate of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.

  2. The Influence of Surface Topography and Surface Chemistry on the Anti-Adhesive Performance of Nanoporous Monoliths.

    PubMed

    Eichler-Volf, Anna; Xue, Longjian; Dornberg, Gregor; Chen, He; Kovalev, Alexander; Enke, Dirk; Wang, Yong; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Steinhart, Martin

    2016-08-31

    We designed spongy monoliths allowing liquid delivery to their surfaces through continuous nanopore systems (mean pore diameter ∼40 nm). These nanoporous monoliths were flat or patterned with microspherical structures a few tens of microns in diameter, and their surfaces consisted of aprotic polymer or of TiO2 coatings. Liquid may reduce adhesion forces FAd; possible reasons include screening of solid-solid interactions and poroelastic effects. Softening-induced deformation of flat polymeric monoliths upon contact formation in the presence of liquids enhanced the work of separation WSe. On flat TiO2-coated monoliths, WSe was smaller under wet conditions than under dry conditions, possibly because of liquid-induced screening of solid-solid interactions. Under dry conditions, WSe is larger on flat TiO2-coated monoliths than on flat monoliths with a polymeric surface. However, under wet conditions, liquid-induced softening results in larger WSe on flat monoliths with a polymeric surface than on flat monoliths with an oxidic surface. Monolithic microsphere arrays show antiadhesive properties; FAd and WSe are reduced by at least 1 order of magnitude as compared to flat nanoporous counterparts. On nanoporous monolithic microsphere arrays, capillarity (WSe is larger under wet than under dry conditions) and solid-solid interactions (WSe is larger on oxide than on polymer) dominate contact mechanics. Thus, the microsphere topography reduces the impact of softening-induced surface deformation and screening of solid-solid interactions associated with liquid supply. Overall, simple modifications of surface topography and chemistry combined with delivery of liquid to the contact interface allow adjusting WSe and FAd over at least 1 order of magnitude. Adhesion management with spongy monoliths exploiting deployment (or drainage) of interfacial liquids as well as induction or prevention of liquid-induced softening of the monoliths may pave the way for the design of artificial

  3. The Mechanisms of Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products Formation through Polyphenols in Hyperglycemic Condition.

    PubMed

    Khangholi, Shahpour; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Berwary, Najat Jabbar Ahmed; Ahmad, Farediah; Aziz, Ramlan Bin Abd

    2016-01-01

    Glycation, the non-enzymatic binding of glucose to free amino groups of an amino acid, yields irreversible heterogeneous compounds known as advanced glycation end products. Those products play a significant role in diabetic complications. In the present article we briefly discuss the contribution of advanced glycation end products to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and wound healing. Then we mention the various mechanisms by which polyphenols inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products. Finally, recent supporting documents are presented to clarify the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on the formation of advanced glycation end products. Phytochemicals apply several antiglycation mechanisms, including glucose metabolism, amelioration of oxidative stress, scavenging of dicarbonyl species, and up/down-regulation of gene expression. To utilize polyphenols in order to remedy diabetic complications, we must explore, examine and clarify the action mechanisms of the components of polyphenols. PMID:26550791

  4. Formation of distinct soluble microbial products by activated sludge: kinetic analysis and quantitative determination.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-02-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) released by microorganisms in bioreactors are classified into two distinct groups according to their different chemical and degradation kinetics: utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP). SMP are responsible for effluent chemical oxygen demand or for membrane fouling of membrane bioreactor. Here an effective and convenient approach, other than the complicated chemical methods or complex models, is developed to quantify the formation of UAP and BAP together with their kinetics in activated sludge process. In this approach, an integrated substrate utilization equation is developed and used to determine UAP and their production kinetics. On the basis of total SMP measurements, BAP formation is determined with an integrated BAP formation equation. The fraction of substrate electrons diverted to UAP, and the content of BAP derived from biomass can then be calculated. Dynamic quantification data are obtained for UAP and BAP separately and conveniently. The obtained kinetic parameters are found to be reasonable as they are generally bounded and comparable to the literature values. The validity of this approach is confirmed by independent SMP production tests in six different activated sludge systems, which demonstrates its applicability in a wide range of engineered system regarding SMP production. This work provides a widely applied approach to determine the formation of UAP and BAP conveniently, which may offer engineers with basis to optimize bioreactor operation to avoid a high effluent soluble organics from SMP or SMP-based membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors. PMID:22185635

  5. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K. C. Kwon

    2006-09-30

    syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40

  6. Cytotoxical products formation on the nanoparticles heated by the pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Boris Ya.; Titov, Andrey A.; Rakitin, Victor Yu.; Kvacheva, Larisa D.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2006-02-01

    Cytotoxical effect of a pulsed laser irradiation in presence of nanoparticles of carbon black, sulphuretted carbon and fullerene-60 on death of human uterus nick cancer HeLa and mice lymphoma P 388 cells was studied in vitro. Bubbles formation as result of "microexplosions" of nanoparticles is one of possible mechanisms of this effect. Other possible mechanism is cytotoxical products formation in result of pyrolysis of nanoparticles and biomaterial which is adjoining. The cytotoxical effect of addition of a supernatant from the carbon nanoparticles suspensions irradiated by the pulsed laser was studied to test this assumption. Analysis using gas chromatograph determined that carbon monoxide is principal gaseous product of such laser pyrolysis. This is known as cytotoxical product. Efficiency of its formation is estimated.

  7. Factors influencing inclusion body formation in the production of a fused protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, L; Enfors, S O

    1991-01-01

    Different parameters that influenced the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli during production of a fused protein consisting of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and beta-galactosidase from E. coli were examined. The intracellular expression of the fused protein was controlled by the pR promoter and its temperature-sensitive repressor. The induction temperature, the pH of the cultivation medium, and changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between protein A and beta-galactosidase had a profound effect on the formation of inclusion bodies. At 42 degrees C, inclusion bodies were formed only during the first hours after induction, and thereafter all the recombinant protein that was further produced appeared in a soluble and active state. Production at 39 and 44 degrees C resulted in inclusion body formation throughout the production period with 15 to 20% of the produced recombinant protein appearing as inclusion bodies. Cultivating cells without control of pH caused inclusion body formation throughout the induction period, and inclusion body formation increased with decreasing pH, and at least part of the insoluble protein was formed from the pool of soluble fusion protein within the cell. Changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between the two parts of the fusion protein abolished inclusion body formation. PMID:1908208

  8. DOE data exchange format specification, mechanical products/drafting: Version 1. 3, CADCAM-045

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Data Exchange Format (DEF) has been developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) effort to integrate the Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) activities throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). A primary objective of this effort is to provide a capability for the exchange of digital data between dissimilar CAD/CAM systems within the NWC. This specification is the result of a collective effort of the DOE Data Exchange Format Group charged with the task of defining a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) to be used as the data exchange format for the mechanical products/drafting application.

  9. DOE data exchange format specification, mechanical products/drafting: Version 1. 2. 2: CADCAM-045

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The Data Exchange Format (DEF) has been developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) effort to integrate the Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) activities throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). A primary objective of this effort is to provide a capability for the exchange of digital data between dissimilar CAD/CAM systems within the NWC. This specification is the result of a collective effort of the DOE Data Exchange Format Group charged with the task of defining a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) to be used as the data exchange format for the mechanical products/drafting application.

  10. Effects of nutrition label format and product assortment on the healthfulness of food choice.

    PubMed

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Grunert, Klaus G; van Trijp, Hans C M; Bialkova, Svetlana; Raats, Monique M; Hodgkins, Charo; Wasowicz-Kirylo, Grazyna; Koenigstorfer, Joerg

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to find out whether front-of-pack nutrition label formats influence the healthfulness of consumers' food choices and important predictors of healthful choices, depending on the size of the choice set that is made available to consumers. The predictors explored were health motivation and perceived capability of making healthful choices. One thousand German and Polish consumers participated in the study that manipulated the format of nutrition labels. All labels referred to the content of calories and four negative nutrients and were presented on savoury and sweet snacks. The different formats included the percentage of guideline daily amount, colour coding schemes, and text describing low, medium and high content of each nutrient. Participants first chose from a set of 10 products and then from a set of 20 products, which was, on average, more healthful than the first choice set. The results showed that food choices were more healthful in the extended 20-product (vs. 10-product) choice set and that this effect is stronger than a random choice would produce. The formats colour coding and texts, particularly colour coding in Germany, increased the healthfulness of product choices when consumers were asked to choose a healthful product, but not when they were asked to choose according to their preferences. The formats did not influence consumers' motivation to choose healthful foods. Colour coding, however, increased consumers' perceived capability of making healthful choices. While the results revealed no consistent differences in the effects between the formats, they indicate that manipulating choice sets by including healthier options is an effective strategy to increase the healthfulness of food choices. PMID:23891558

  11. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide increases biofilm formation by inducing exopolysaccharide production in Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1

    PubMed Central

    Jang, In-Ae; Kim, Jisun; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated differentially expressed proteins in Acinetobacter oleivorans cells during planktonic and biofilm growth by using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We focused on the role of oxidative stress resistance during biofilm formation using mutants defective in alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) because its production in aged biofilms was enhanced compared to that in planktonic cells. Results obtained using an ahpC promoter-gfp reporter vector showed that aged biofilms expressed higher ahpC levels than planktonic cells at 48 h. However, at 24 h, ahpC expression was higher in planktonic cells than in biofilms. Deletion of ahpC led to a severe growth defect in rich media that was not observed in minimal media and promoted early biofilm formation through increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) and EPS gene expression. Increased endogenous H2O2 production in the ahpC mutant in rich media enhanced biofilm formation, and this enhancement was not observed in the presence of antioxidants. Exogenous addition of H2O2 promoted biofilm formation in wild type cells, which suggested that biofilm development is linked to defense against H2O2. Collectively, our data showed that EPS production caused by H2O2 stress enhances biofilm formation in A. oleivorans. PMID:26884212

  12. Taking a Large Monolith to Use for Teaching Soil Morphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, B. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a technique for taking a large monolith for the purpose of teaching soil structure. Materials and procedures are detailed. A survey of 93 students indicated that the larger monolith was preferred over the commonly used narrow ones. (CW)

  13. GaAs monolithic RF modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  14. Formation and degradation of valuable intermediate products during wet oxidation of municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Baroutian, Saeid; Gapes, Daniel J; Sarmah, Ajit K; Farid, Mohammed M; Young, Brent R

    2016-04-01

    The current study investigated the formation of organic acids and alcohols as major intermediate products of wet oxidation of municipal sludge. Municipal sludge was subjected to 60-min wet oxidation at temperatures ranging from 220 to 240°C, with 20bar oxygen partial pressure. Acetic acid was the main intermediate compound produced in this study, followed by propionic, n-butyric, iso-butyric and pentanoic acids and methanol. It was found that the process severity has a significant influence on the formation and degradation of these intermediate products. PMID:26832394

  15. Increased fracture penetration and productivity using xanthan gelled acid in massive carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Molon, J.P.; Fox, K.B.

    1983-03-01

    A measurable improvement in productivity can be achieved using xanthan gelled acid to stimulate carbonate formations. Well productivity results were compared to conventional acid fracture treatments. The significant improvements over classical acid fracturing techniques are due to the improved control of acid leakoff rates, retarded reaction rate and improved fracture width maintenance. The difficulties involved in acid fracturing massive Middle East carbonate formations are discussed and solutions are proposed using gelled acid technology. Some limitations in computer predictions of acid fracturing results are also discussed.

  16. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  17. Monolithic and mechanical multijunction space solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Flood, D.J. )

    1993-05-01

    High-efficiency, lightweight, radiation-resistant solar cells are essential to meet the large power requirements of future space missions. Single-junction cells are limited in efficiency. Higher cell efficiencies could be realized by developing multijunction, multibandgap solar cells. Monolithic and mechanically stacked tandem solar cells surpassing single-junction cell efficiencies have been fabricated. This article surveys the current status of monolithic and mechanically stacked multibandgap space solar cells, and outlines problems yet to be resolved. The monolithic and mechanically stacked cells each have their own problems related to size, processing, current and voltage matching, weight, and other factors. More information is needed on the effect of temperature and radiation on the cell performance. Proper reference cells and full-spectrum range simulators are also needed to measure efficiencies correctly. Cost issues are not addressed, since the two approaches are still in the developmental stage.

  18. Monolithic and mechanical multijunction space solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Flood, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    High-efficiency, lightweight, radiation-resistant solar cells are essential to meet the large power requirements of future space missions. Single-junction cells are limited in efficiency. Higher cell efficiencies could be realized by developing multijunction, multibandgap solar cells. Monolithic and mechanically stacked tandem solar cells surpassing single-junction cell efficiencies have been fabricated. This article surveys the current status of monolithic and mechanically stacked multibandgap space solar cells, and outlines problems yet to be resolved. The monolithic and mechanically stacked cells each have their own problems related to size, processing, current and voltage matching, weight, and other factors. More information is needed on the effect of temperature and radiation on the cell performance. Proper reference cells and full-spectrum range simulators are also needed to measure efficiencies correctly. Cost issues are not addressed, since the two approaches are still in the developmental stage.

  19. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  20. Monolithic and mechanical multijunction space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    High-efficiency, lightweight, radiation-resistant solar cells are essential to meet the large power requirements of future space missions. Single-junction cells are limited in efficiency. Higher cell efficiencies could be realized by developing multijunction, multibandgap solar cells. Monolithic and mechanically stacked tandem solar cells surpassing single-junction cell efficiencies have been fabricated. This article surveys the current status of monolithic and mechanically stacked multibandgap space solar cells, and outlines problems yet to be resolved. The monolithic and mechanically stacked cells each have their own problems related to size, processing, current and voltage matching, weight, and other factors. More information is needed on the effect of temperature and radiation on the cell performance. Proper reference cells and full-spectrum range simulators are also needed to measure efficiencies correctly. Cost issues are not addressed, since the two approaches are still in the developmental stage.

  1. Designing Catalytic Monoliths For Closed-Cycle CO2 Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Keith; Herz, Richard K.; Goldblum, Seth; Noskowski, ED

    1992-01-01

    LASCAT (Design of Catalytic Monoliths for Closed-Cycle Carbon Dioxide Lasers) computer program aids in design of catalyst in monolith by simulating effects of design decisions on performance of laser. Provides opportunity for designer to explore tradeoffs among activity and dimensions of catalyst, dimensions of monolith, pressure drop caused by flow of gas through monolith, conversion of oxygen, and other variables. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    DOEpatents

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2006-06-20

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  3. Glucose metabolism in sediments of a eutrophic lake: tracer analysis of uptake and product formation.

    PubMed

    King, G M; Klug, M J

    1982-12-01

    The uptake of glucose and the formation of end products from glucose catabolism have been measured for sediments of eutrophic Wintergreen Lake with a combination of tritiated and C-labeled tracers. Time course analyses of the loss of [H]glucose from sediments were used to establish rate constants for glucose uptake at natural substrate concentrations. Turnover times from these analyses were about 1 min for littoral and profundal sediments. No seasonal or site differences were noted in turnover times. Time course analyses of [U-C]glucose uptake and C-labeled end product formation indicated that glucose mass flow could not be calculated from end product formation since the specific activity of added [C]glucose was significantly diluted by pools of intracellular glucose and glucose metabolites. Mass flow could only be accurately estimated by use of rates of uptake from tracer studies. Intermediate fermentation end products included acetate (71%), propionate (15%), lactate (9%), and only minor amounts of butyrates or valerates. Addition of H(2) to sediments resulted in greater production of lactate (28%) and decreased formation of acetate (50%), but did not affect glucose turnover. Depth profiles of glucose uptake indicated that rates of uptake decreased with depth over the 0- to 18-cm interval and that glucose uptake accounted for 30 to 40% of methanogenesis in profundal sediments. PMID:16346148

  4. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Growth Coupled to Formate-Driven H2 Production.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Mourato, Cláudia; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-12-15

    Formate is recognized as a superior substrate for biological H2 production by several bacteria. However, the growth of a single organism coupled to this energetic pathway has not been shown in mesophilic conditions. In the present study, a bioreactor with gas sparging was used, where we observed for the first time that H2 production from formate can be coupled with growth of the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris in the absence of sulfate or a syntrophic partner. In these conditions, D. vulgaris had a maximum growth rate of 0.078 h(-1) and a doubling time of 9 h, and the ΔG of the reaction ranged between -21 and -18 kJ mol(-1). This is the first report of a single mesophilic organism that can grow while catalyzing the oxidation of formate to H2 and bicarbonate. Furthermore, high volumetric and specific H2 production rates (125 mL L(-1) h(-1) and 2500 mL gdcw(-1) h(-1)) were achieved in a new bioreactor designed and optimized for H2 production. This high H2 production demonstrates that the nonconventional H2-producing organism D. vulgaris is a good biocatalyst for converting formate to H2. PMID:26579558

  5. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauhahn, P.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, V.; Contolatis, T.

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year progress is described on a program to develop a 27.5 to 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne-communication antenna feed array applications, and to deliver submodules for experimental evaluation. Program goals include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. Submicron gate length single and dual gate FETs are described and applied in the development of monolithic gain control amplifiers and low noise amplifiers. A two-stage monolithic gain control amplifier based on ion implanted dual gate MESFETs was designed and fabricated. The gain control amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 29 GHz with a gain control range of over 13 dB. A two-stage monolithic low noise amplifier based on ion implanted MESFETs which provides 7 dB gain with 6.2 dB noise figure at 29 GHz was also developed. An interconnected receive module containing LNA, gain control, and phase shifter submodules was built using the LNA and gain control ICs as well as a monolithic phase shifter developed previously under this program. The design, fabrication, and evaluation of this interconnected receiver is presented. Progress in the development of an RF/IF submodule containing a unique ion implanted diode mixer diode and a broadband balanced mixer monolithic IC with on-chip IF amplifier and the initial design of circuits for the RF portion of a two submodule receiver are also discussed.

  6. Combining monolithic zirconia crowns, digital impressioning, and regenerative cement for a predictable restorative alternative to PFM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jack D

    2013-03-01

    Advances in indirect esthetic materials in recent years have provided the dental profession higher levels of strength and esthetics than ever before with products like lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide. Providing excellent fit and versatile performance, and because there is no porcelain to delaminate, chip, or fracture, monolithic zirconia crowns have the potential to outperform other layered restorations such as porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM). This review of monolithic zirconia highlights a clinical case in which all-zirconia restorations were combined with CAD/CAM technology for a successful esthetic restorative outcome. PMID:23931266

  7. Polymer network/carbon layer on monolith support and monolith catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to an improved monolith catalytic reactor and a monolith support. The improvement in the support resides in a polymer network/carbon coating applied to the surface of a porous substrate and a catalytic metal, preferably a transition metal catalyst applied to the surface of the polymer network/carbon coating. The monolith support has from 100 to 800 cells per square inch and a polymer network/carbon coating with surface area of from 0.1 to 15 m.sup.2 /gram as measured by adsorption of N.sub.2 or Kr using the BET method.

  8. Experimental characterization of the transport phenomena, adsorption, and elution in a protein A affinity monolithic medium.

    PubMed

    Herigstad, M Omon; Dimartino, Simone; Boi, Cristiana; Sarti, Giulio C

    2015-08-14

    A commercially available convective interaction media (CIM) Protein A monolithic column was fully characterized in view of its application for the affinity capture of IgG in monoclonal antibody production processes. By means of moment analysis, the interstitial porosity and axial dispersion coefficient were determined. The frontal analysis method of characteristic points was employed, for the first time with monolithic media, to determine the dynamic binding capacity. The effects of the flow rate and pH on the total recovery of polyclonal IgG and elution profile were evaluated. A comparison with literature data for Protein A chromatography beads demonstrate the superior bed utilization of monolithic media, which gave better performance at lower residence times. PMID:26143608

  9. Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, D.P. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  10. Preparation and evaluation of rigid porous polyacrylamide-based strong cation-exchange monolithic columns for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Ou, Junjie; Dong, Xiaoli; Wu, Renan; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2007-11-01

    A CEC monolithic column with strong cation-exchange (SCX) stationary phase based on hydrophilic monomers was prepared by in situ polymerization of acrylamide, methylenebisacrylamide, and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) in a complete organic binary porogenic solvent consisting of DMSO and dodecanol. The sulfonic groups provided by the monomer AMPS on the surface of the stationary phase generate an EOF from anode to cathode, and serve as an SCX stationary phase at the same time. The monolithic stationary phase exhibited normal-phase chromatographic behavior for neutral analytes. For charged analytes, electrostatic interaction/repulsion with the monolith was observed. The strong SCX monolithic column has been successfully employed in the electrochromatographic separation of basic drugs, peptides, and alkaloids extracted from natural products. PMID:17924588

  11. A regression-based approach to tolerance values forecasting in micro/meso-scale for micro non-monolithic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Wei, Xingping; Li, Jun; Zhao, Shiping

    2013-10-01

    Compared to the function-oriented tolerancing rules for micro monolithic components, the lack of specific tolerancing rules for micro non-monolithic ones results in difficulties in bulk production and quality assurance. In order to regulate micro non-monolithic components in micro/meso-scale, a mathematical model of power function is adopted to forecast the tolerance values of nominal sizes in 10~10,000 microns by the linearized regression analysis. The goodness-of-fit qualifies the regression with the power function model and the forecasting results are reasonable in the view of relative accuracy. It is hoped that the improved numerical value table of tolerance can provide some beneficial proposals for the establishment of new tolerancing rules for micro non-monolithic components in micro/meso-scale.

  12. Monolithic and integrated phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubert, Daniel H.; Pozar, David M.

    Some of the problems relevant to the design of monolithic and integrated arrays are examined. In particular, attention is given to electrical and mechanical design considerations, restrictions they impose on the choice of elements and architecture of integrated arrays, and elements that can alleviate one or more of these restrictions. Monolithic array designs are compared with some multiple-layer and two-sided designs using such criteria as scan range, bandwidth, substrate size and configuration, polarization, and feed line radiation. Broadside radiating elements, such as microstrip dipoles and patches, as well as end-fire radiating slots are considered.

  13. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  14. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  15. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization. PMID:22750091

  16. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  17. Development of large-area monolithically integrated silicon-film photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. A.; Cotter, J. E.; Ingram, A. E.; Ruffins, T. R.; Shreve, K. P.; Hall, R. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film (trademark) Product 3 into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product 3 structure is a thin (less than 100 micron) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achievable with the use of light trapping and a passivated back surface. The long-term goal for the product is a 1200 sq cm, 18%-efficient, monolithic array. The short-term objectives are to improve material quality and to fabricate 100 sq cm monolithically interconnected solar cell arrays. Low minority-carrier diffusion length in the silicon film and series resistance in the interconnected device structure are presently limiting device performance. Material quality is continually improving through reduced impurity contamination. Metallization schemes, such as a solder-dipped interconnection process, have been developed that will allow low-cost production processing and minimize R(sub s) effects. Test data for a nine-cell device (16 sq cm) indicated a V(sub oc) of 3.72 V. These first-reported monolithically interconnected multicrystalline silicon-on-ceramic devices show low shunt conductance (less than 0.1 mA/sq cm) due to limited conduction through the ceramic and no process-related metallization shunts.

  18. The role of phytoplankton as pre-cursors for disinfection by-product formation upon chlorination.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Adam; Drikas, Mary; Brookes, Justin D

    2016-10-01

    Water quality remains one of the greatest concerns with regards to human health. Advances in science and technology have resulted in highly efficient water treatment plants, significantly reducing diseases related to waterborne pathogenic microorganisms. While disinfection is critical to mitigate pathogen risk to humans, the reactions between the disinfectant and dissolved organic compounds can lead to the formation of chemical contaminants called disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been related to numerous health issues including birth defects and cancer. The formation of disinfection by-products occurs due to the reaction of oxidants and natural organic matter. DBP precursors are derived from anthropogenic sources including pharmaceuticals and chemical waste, the breakdown of vegetation from external catchment sources (allochthonous) and internally derived sources including phytoplankton (autochthonous). Current literature focuses on the contribution of allochthonous sources towards the formation of DBPs, however, the recalcitrant nature of hydrophilic phytoplankton derived organic matter indicates that autochthonous derived organic carbon can significantly contribute to total DBP concentrations. The contribution of phytoplankton to the formation of DBPs is also influenced by cellular exudation rates, chemical composition, environmental conditions and the physical and chemical conditions of the solution upon disinfection. Formation of DBPs is further influenced by the presence of cyanobacteria phyla due to their notoriety for forming dense blooms. Management of DBP formation can potentially be improved by reducing cyanobacteria as well as DBP precursors derived from other phytoplankton. PMID:27348195

  19. Engineering Hydrogen Gas Production from Formate in a Hyperthermophile by Heterologous Production of an 18-Subunit Membrane-bound Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Nixon, William J.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24318960

  20. Gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol formation from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of myrcene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böge, Olaf; Mutzel, Anke; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Kahnt, Ariane; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial vegetation releases a great variety of volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. Monoterpenes, like myrcene, contribute significantly to this global biogenic VOC emission. In the atmosphere, monoterpenes rapidly undergo oxidation reactions by OH radicals (mainly during the daytime), NO3 radicals (mainly during the nighttime) and O3 to form multifunctional oxidation products. The products of these reactions are likely to be of low volatility and hence might lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In the present study, we report results from a series of chamber experiments performed in the LEAK chamber at TROPOS in which the gas-phase products and SOA yields obtained from myrcene O3 reactions with and without an OH radical scavenger as well as from the myrcene OH radical reaction in the presence of NOx have been measured. During the experiments the consumption of myrcene as well as the formation of gas-phase products was monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Ozone concentration was measured by an O3 monitor and the mixing ratios of nitrogen oxides were measured by a NOx monitor. Particle size distributions between 3-900 nm were monitored every 11 min using a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) system. In addition to the products observed by means of the PTR-MS by their m/z values, an identification of carbonylic compounds by their DNPH derivatives was performed. Beside low molecular mass products the formation of 4-vinyl-4-pentenal with a yield of 55 % in myrcene ozonolysis has been observed. The further oxidation of this major first generation product lead to the formation of two dicarbonylic products with m/z 113 and to SOA formation. The influence of the continuing oxidation of 4-vinyl-4-pentenal on SOA formation will be discussed in detail. The emergence of the gas-phase product hydroxyacetone as direct result of the myrcene ozone reaction will be mooted, because hydroxyacetone seems to

  1. [Formation of Halogenated By-products in Co²⁺ Activated Peroxymonosulfate Oxidation Process].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo; Jin, Hao; Dong, Wei; Ji, Yue-fei; Lu, Jun-he

    2016-05-15

    Sulfate radicals (SO₄·⁻) generated by Co²⁺ catalyzed activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) are highly oxidative and can be applied to degrade various organic pollutants. It was revealed in this research that bromide could be transformed in this process to reactive bromine species which reacted with phenol subsequently, leading to the formation of bromophenols and brominated by-products such as bromoform and dibromoacetic acid. The formation of the brominated by-products first increased and then decreased. The maximum yields of bromoform (10.3 µmol · L⁻¹) and dibromoacetic acid (14.6 µmol · L⁻¹) occurred at approximately 8 h with initial phenol, PMS, Br⁻, Co²⁺, concentrations of 0.05, 1.0, 0.2, and 5 µmol · L⁻¹, respectively. Formation of the brominated by-products decreased with increasing pH. With constant total halides, increasing Cl⁻/Br⁻ ratio decreased the total formation of halogenated by- products but generated more chlorinated byproducts. The findings of this research can provide valuable information in assessing the feasibility of SO₄·⁻ based oxidation technologies in real practice. PMID:27506036

  2. PIC (PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION) FORMATION UNDER PYROLYTIC AND STARVED AIR CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive program of laboratory studies based on the non-flame mode of thermal decomposition produced much data on PIC (Products of Incomplete Combustion) formation, primarily under pyrolytic and starved air conditions. Most significantly, laboratory results from non-flame ...

  3. Stereodefined Acyclic Polysubstituted Silyl Ketene Aminals: Asymmetric Formation of Aldol Products with Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Nairoukh, Zackaria; Marek, Ilan

    2015-11-23

    The regio- and stereoselective formation of stereodefined polysubstituted silyl ketene aminals is easily achieved through selective combined carbometalation-oxidation-silylation reactions. These substrates are ideal candidates for Mukaiyama aldol reactions with aliphatic aldehydes as they give the aldol products with a quaternary carbon stereocenter α to the carbonyl groups in outstanding diastereoselectivities. PMID:26448575

  4. FORMATION OF PICS (PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION) FROM THE COMBUSTION OF CHLORINATED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of unwanted Products of Incomplete Combustion (PICs) from the incineration of hazardous wastes under sub-optimal conditions must be avoided if incineration is to be effectively used to treat hazardous wastes. Studies of the thermal behavior of chlorinated C1s (metha...

  5. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  6. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINED OZONATION AND FILTRATION ON DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION. (R830908)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of combined ozonation and membrane filtration on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. Ozonation/filtration resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ...

  7. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2). PMID:25747363

  8. Tight gas sand production from the Almond Formation, Washakie Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, W.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Gas production from the Almond Formation in the Standard Draw trend can only be accounted for by draining numerous layers of tight gas sands via the permeable upper bar sand. Discovery of this field originally focused upon production from this bar sand. But continued development cannot be explained simply by considering depletion of a 30 foot sand. Gas volumetrics verify the need to include lower sands in reservoir analysis. Core obtained from the Almond bar sand confirm petrophysical constants used in the authors` models. Their results imply that economic levels of gas production should be possible wherever a similar horizontal conduit can be tied into gas saturated layers through massive hydraulic fracturing.

  9. Formation of naturally occurring pigments during the production of nitrite-free dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    De Maere, Hannelore; Fraeye, Ilse; De Mey, Eveline; Dewulf, Lore; Michiels, Chris; Paelinck, Hubert; Chollet, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the potential of producing red coloured dry fermented sausages without the addition of nitrite and/or nitrate. Therefore, the formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX (Zn(II)PPIX) as naturally occurring pigment, and the interrelated protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and heme content were evaluated during nitrite-free dry fermented sausage production at different pH conditions. Zn(II)PPIX was only able to form in dry fermented sausages at pH conditions higher than approximately 4.9. Additionally, the presence of Zn(II)PPIX increased drastically at the later phase of the production process (up to day 177), confirming that in addition to pH, time is also a crucial factor for its formation. Similarly, PPIX also accumulated in the meat products at increased pH conditions and production times. In contrast, a breakdown of heme was observed. This breakdown was more gradual and independent of pH and showed no clear relationship with the formed amounts of Zn(II)PPIX and PPIX. A statistically significant relationship between Zn(II)PPIX formation and product redness was established. PMID:26686009

  10. Formation and evolution of molecular products in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; McVay, Renee C; Huang, Dan D; Dalleska, Nathan F; Aumont, Bernard; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-11-17

    Much of our understanding of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from volatile organic compounds derives from laboratory chamber measurements, including mass yield and elemental composition. These measurements alone are insufficient to identify the chemical mechanisms of SOA production. We present here a comprehensive dataset on the molecular identity, abundance, and kinetics of α-pinene SOA, a canonical system that has received much attention owing to its importance as an organic aerosol source in the pristine atmosphere. Identified organic species account for ∼58-72% of the α-pinene SOA mass, and are characterized as semivolatile/low-volatility monomers and extremely low volatility dimers, which exhibit comparable oxidation states yet different functionalities. Features of the α-pinene SOA formation process are revealed for the first time, to our knowledge, from the dynamics of individual particle-phase components. Although monomeric products dominate the overall aerosol mass, rapid production of dimers plays a key role in initiating particle growth. Continuous production of monomers is observed after the parent α-pinene is consumed, which cannot be explained solely by gas-phase photochemical production. Additionally, distinct responses of monomers and dimers to α-pinene oxidation by ozone vs. hydroxyl radicals, temperature, and relative humidity are observed. Gas-phase radical combination reactions together with condensed phase rearrangement of labile molecules potentially explain the newly characterized SOA features, thereby opening up further avenues for understanding formation and evolution mechanisms of α-pinene SOA. PMID:26578760

  11. Modeling the formation of the quench product in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Inkaew, Kanawut; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated changes in bottom ash morphology and mineralogy under lab-scale quenching conditions. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the quench product/layer around bottom ash particles. In the experiments, the unquenched bottom ashes were heated to 300°C for 1h, and were quenched by warm water (65°C) with different simulated conditions. After having filtered and dried, the ashes were analyzed by a combination of methodologies namely, particle size distribution analysis, intact particle and thin-section observation, X-ray diffractometry, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that after quenching, the morphology and mineralogy of the bottom ash changed significantly. The freshly quenched bottom ash was dominated by a quench product that was characterized by amorphous and microcrystalline calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) phases. This product also enclosed tiny minerals, glasses, ceramics, metals, and organic materials. The dominant mineral phases produced by quenching process and detected by XRD were calcite, Friedel's salt, hydrocalumite and portlandite. The formation of quench product was controlled by the fine fraction of the bottom ash (particle size <0.425mm). From the observations, a conceptual model of the ash-water reactions and formation of the quench product in the bottom ash was proposed. PMID:27079853

  12. Quasi-monolithic tunable optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbore, Mark (Inventor); Tapos, Francisc (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical resonator has a piezoelectric element attached to a quasi-monolithic structure. The quasi-monolithic structure defines an optical path. Mirrors attached to the structure deflect light along the optical path. The piezoelectric element controllably strains the quasi-monolithic structure to change a length of the optical path by about 1 micron. A first feedback loop coupled to the piezoelectric element provides fine control over the cavity length. The resonator may include a thermally actuated spacer attached to the cavity and a mirror attached to the spacer. The thermally actuated spacer adjusts the cavity length by up to about 20 microns. A second feedback loop coupled to the sensor and heater provides a coarse control over the cavity length. An alternative embodiment provides a quasi-monolithic optical parametric oscillator (OPO). This embodiment includes a non-linear optical element within the resonator cavity along the optical path. Such an OPO configuration is broadly tunable and capable of mode-hop free operation for periods of 24 hours or more.

  13. Package Holds Five Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Decker, D. Richard; Olson, Hilding M.

    1996-01-01

    Packages protect and hold monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chips while providing dc and radio-frequency (RF) electrical connections for chips undergoing development. Required to be compact, lightweight, and rugged. Designed to minimize undesired resonances, reflections, losses, and impedance mismatches.

  14. Assessment, modeling and optimization of parameters affecting the formation of disinfection by-products in water.

    PubMed

    Gougoutsa, Chrysa; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on (a) the development of a screening methodology, in order to determine the main experimental variables affecting chlorinated and brominated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in water during chlorination experiments and (b) the application of a central composite design (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM) for the mathematical description and optimization of DBP formation. Chlorine dose and total organic carbon (TOC) were proven to be the main factors affecting the formation of total chlorinated DBPs, while chlorine dose and bromide concentration were the main parameters affecting the total brominated THMs. Longer contact time promoted a rise in chlorinated DBPs' concentration even in the presence of a minimal amount of organic matter. A maximum production of chlorinated DBPs was observed under a medium TOC value and it reduced at high TOC concentrations, possibly due to the competitive production of brominated THMs. The highest concentrations of chlorinated THMs were observed at chlorine dose 10 mg L(-1) and TOC 5.5 mg L(-1). The formation of brominated DBPs is possible even with a minimum amount of NaOCl in the presence of high concentration of bromide ions. Brominated DBPs were observed in maximum concentrations using 8 mg L(-1) of chlorine in the presence of 300 μg L(-1) bromides. PMID:27178297

  15. Monoliths: special issue in a new package.

    PubMed

    Svec, Frantisek

    2013-08-01

    Regular special issues concerning monoliths have always been a stronghold of the Journal of Separation Science. Typically, we issued a call for papers, collected and processed the submitted manuscripts, and all of them were then printed in a single issue of the journal. This approach worked to a certain limit quite acceptably but there was always a longer waiting time between the early submissions and publication. This is why we decided to do it this year differently. I claimed in my 2013 New Years Editorial: "We are living in the electronic era! Why not to make an advantage of that?" And we do. As a result, all manuscript submitted for publication in the special issue Monoliths have already been published in regular issues as soon as they were accepted. The first page of these papers includes a footnote: "This paper is included in the virtual special issue Monoliths available at the Journal of Separation Science website." All papers published with this footnote were collected in a virtual special issue accessible through the internet. This concept ruled out possible delays in publication of contributions submitted early. Since we did not have any real "special issue", there was no need for any hard deadline for submission. We just collected manuscripts submitted for the special issue Monoliths published from January to July 2013 and included them in the virtual special issue. This new approach worked very well and we published 22 excellent papers that are included in the issue available now at this website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1615-9314/homepage/virtual_special_issue__monoliths.htm. PMID:23939823

  16. The Importance of Ammonia for Winter Haze Formation in Two Oil and Gas Production Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L., Jr.; Li, Y.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Archuleta, C.; Tigges, M.; Sewell, H. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fine particle ammonium nitrate formation results from the atmospheric reaction of gaseous ammonia and nitric acid. This reaction is most important in winter when low temperatures thermodynamically enhance particle formation. Nitrogen oxides emissions from oil and gas operations partially react in the atmosphere to form nitric acid. The availability of atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in determining whether the nitric acid formed results in wintertime ammonium nitrate formation. Here we contrast situations in two important U.S. oil and gas production regions. Measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and other species were made from 2007 to present near Boulder, Wyoming and in winters 2013 and 2014 in western North Dakota. The Boulder, Wyoming site is close to the large Jonah and Pinedale Anticline gas fields. Field sites at the north unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Fort Union are situated in the large Bakken Formation oil and gas production region. Wintertime formation of nitric acid and ammonium nitrate, together comprising nitrogen in the +5 oxidation state (N(V)), was observed in both locations. Concentrations of N(V), however, are generally much lower at Boulder, WY than in the Bakken. An even bigger difference is seen in fine particle ammonium nitrate concentrations; limited regional ammonia is available in western Wyoming to react with nitric acid, leaving a portion of the nitric acid trapped in the gas phase. Higher concentrations of ammonia are observed in the Bakken where they support formation of much higher concentrations of ammonium nitrate. Comparison of these two regions clearly indicates the importance of understanding both local NOx emissions and regional concentrations of ammonia in predicting source impacts on formation of fine particles and haze.

  17. Biofilm Formation and β-Lactamase Production in Burn Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Samira; Eftekhar, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen characterized by its innate resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance also occurs by the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), metallo β-lactamases (MBL), and AmpC β-lactamases. Another important factor for establishment of chronic infections by P. aeruginosa is biofilm formation mediated by the psl gene cluster. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate biofilm formation and presence of the pslA gene in burn isolates of P. aeruginosa as well as the association of antibiotic resistance, MBL, ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase production with biofilm formation among the isolates. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two burn isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran from August to October 2011. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion assay. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were screened using the double disc synergy test, AmpC disc test and combined disc diffusion assay, respectively. The potential to form biofilm was measured using the microtiter plate assay and pslA gene was detected using specific primers and PCR. Results: Biofilm formation was observed in 43.5% of the isolates, of which 66.7% produced strong and 33.3% formed weak biofilms. All biofilm-positive and 14.2% of biofilm-negative isolates harbored the pslA gene. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were significantly higher in the biofilm-positive isolates (70.3%, 62.9% and 33.3%, respectively) compared to the biofilm-negative strains (31.4%, 34.2% and 20%, respectively). Overall, 19 isolates (30.6%) co-produced MBL and AmpC, among which the majority were biofilm-positive (63.1%). Finally, four isolates (6.4%) had all three enzymes, of which 3 (75%) produced biofilm. Conclusions: Biofilm formation (both strong and weak) strongly correlated with pslA gene carriage. Biofilm formation also correlated with MBL and AmpC

  18. Monitoring dediazoniation product formation by high-performance liquid chromatography after derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; González-Romero, Elisa

    2003-03-14

    A derivatization protocol that exploits the rapid reaction between arenediazonium ions and a suitable coupling agent followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analyses of the reaction mixture was employed to determine the product distribution, the rate constants for product formation and the association constant of 4-nitrobenzenediazonium, PNBD, ion with beta-cyclodextrin, beta-CD. The derivatization of PNBD with the coupling agent leads to the formation of a stable azo dye that prevents by-side reactions of PNBD with the solvents of the mobile phase, including water, or the metallic parts of the chromatographic system that would eventually lead to erroneous identification and quantification of dediazoniation products. The results show that in the presence of beta-CD, nitrobenzene is formed at the expense of 4-nitrophenol, which is the major product in its absence. The observed rate constants for the interaction between PNBD and beta-CD increase upon increasing [beta-CD] showing a saturation profile indicative of the formation of an inclusion complex between PNBD and beta-CD. By fitting the experimental data to a simplified Lineaweaver-Burk equation, the corresponding association constant and the maximum acceleration rate of beta-CD towards PNBD were estimated. The protocol is applicable under a variety of experimental conditions provided that the rate of the coupling reaction is much faster than that of dediazoniation. PMID:12650254

  19. Thermodynamics of formate-oxidizing metabolism and implications for H2 production.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Bae, Seung Seob; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2012-10-01

    Formate-dependent proton reduction to H(2) (HCOO(-) + H(2)O → HCO(3)(-) + H(2)) has been reported for hyperthermophilic Thermococcus strains. In this study, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus onnurineus strain NA1, yielded H(2) accumulation to a partial pressure of 1 × 10(5) to 7 × 10(5) Pa until the values of Gibbs free energy change (ΔG) reached near thermodynamic equilibrium (-1 to -3 kJ mol(-1)). The bioenergetic requirement for the metabolism to conserve energy was demonstrated by ΔG values as small as -5 kJ mol(-1), which are less than the biological minimum energy quantum, -20 kJ mol(-1), as calculated by Schink (B. Schink, Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 61:262-280, 1997). Considering formate as a possible H(2) storage material, the H(2) production potential of the strain was assessed. The volumetric H(2) production rate increased linearly with increasing cell density, leading to 2,820 mmol liter(-1) h(-1) at an optical density at 600 nm (OD(600)) of 18.6, and resulted in the high specific H(2) production rates of 404 ± 6 mmol g(-1) h(-1). The H(2) productivity indicates the great potential of T. onnurineus strain NA1 for practical application in comparison with H(2)-producing microbes. Our result demonstrates that T. onnurineus strain NA1 has a highly efficient metabolic system to thrive on formate in hydrothermal systems. PMID:22885755

  20. Thermodynamics of Formate-Oxidizing Metabolism and Implications for H2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Bae, Seung Seob; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Formate-dependent proton reduction to H2 (HCOO− + H2O → HCO3− + H2) has been reported for hyperthermophilic Thermococcus strains. In this study, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus onnurineus strain NA1, yielded H2 accumulation to a partial pressure of 1 × 105 to 7 × 105 Pa until the values of Gibbs free energy change (ΔG) reached near thermodynamic equilibrium (−1 to −3 kJ mol−1). The bioenergetic requirement for the metabolism to conserve energy was demonstrated by ΔG values as small as −5 kJ mol−1, which are less than the biological minimum energy quantum, −20 kJ mol−1, as calculated by Schink (B. Schink, Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 61:262-280, 1997). Considering formate as a possible H2 storage material, the H2 production potential of the strain was assessed. The volumetric H2 production rate increased linearly with increasing cell density, leading to 2,820 mmol liter−1 h−1 at an optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 18.6, and resulted in the high specific H2 production rates of 404 ± 6 mmol g−1 h−1. The H2 productivity indicates the great potential of T. onnurineus strain NA1 for practical application in comparison with H2-producing microbes. Our result demonstrates that T. onnurineus strain NA1 has a highly efficient metabolic system to thrive on formate in hydrothermal systems. PMID:22885755

  1. Engineering the productivity of recombinant Escherichia coli for limonene formation from glycerol in minimal media.

    PubMed

    Willrodt, Christian; David, Christian; Cornelissen, Sjef; Bühler, Bruno; Julsing, Mattijs K; Schmid, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency and productivity of cellular biocatalysts play a key role in the industrial synthesis of fine and bulk chemicals. This study focuses on optimizing the synthesis of (S)-limonene from glycerol and glucose as carbon sources using recombinant Escherichia coli. The cyclic monoterpene limonene is extensively used in the fragrance, food, and cosmetic industries. Recently, limonene also gained interest as alternative jet fuel of biological origin. Key parameters that limit the (S)-limonene yield, related to genetics, physiology, and reaction engineering, were identified. The growth-dependent production of (S)-limonene was shown for the first time in minimal media. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was chosen as the preferred host strain, as it showed low acetate formation, fast growth, and high productivity. A two-liquid phase fed-batch fermentation with glucose as the sole carbon and energy source resulted in the formation of 700 mg L(org) (-1) (S)-limonene. Specific activities of 75 mU g(cdw) (-1) were reached, but decreased relatively quickly. The use of glycerol as a carbon source resulted in a prolonged growth and production phase (specific activities of ≥50 mU g(cdw) (-1) ) leading to a final (S)-limonene concentration of 2,700 mg L(org) (-1) . Although geranyl diphosphate (GPP) synthase had a low solubility, its availability appeared not to limit (S)-limonene formation in vivo under the conditions investigated. GPP rerouting towards endogenous farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) formation also did not limit (S)-limonene production. The two-liquid phase fed-batch setup led to the highest monoterpene concentration obtained with a recombinant microbial biocatalyst to date. PMID:24756896

  2. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. PMID:21772398

  3. SU8 diaphragm micropump with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

    PubMed

    Ezkerra, Aitor; Fernández, Luis José; Mayora, Kepa; Ruano-López, Jesús Miguel

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a SU8 unidirectional diaphragm micropump with embedded out-of-plane cantilever check valves. The device represents a reliable and low-cost solution for integration of microfluidic control in lab-on-a-chip devices. Its planar architecture allows monolithic definition of its components in a single step and potential integration with previously reported PCR, electrophoresis and flow-sensing SU8 microdevices. Pneumatic actuation is applied on a PDMS diaphragm, which is bonded to the SU8 body at wafer level, further enhancing its integration and mass production capabilities. The cantilever check valves move synchronously with the diaphragm, feature fast response (10ms), low dead volume (86nl) and a 94% flow blockage up to 300kPa. The micropump achieves a maximum flow rate of 177 μl min(-1) at 6 Hz and 200 kPa with an effective area of 10 mm(2). The device is reliable, self-priming and tolerant to particles and big bubbles. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first micropump in SU8 with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves. PMID:21853192

  4. The market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    Professional astronomical telescopes are complex optical systems at the limit of technical feasibility. Often monolithic primary mirrors and sometimes even secondary mirrors with huge dimensions are used. Prominent examples are the two reflectors of the Large Binocular Telescope and the giant mirrors of VLT, GEMINI, and SUBARU. The performance of such precision optical components significantly depends on the physical parameters and the quality of their substrate materials. Within this paper selection criteria for mirror substrates will be discussed, thereby considering the important technical parameters as well as commercial points and aspects of project management. Qualities and limitations of classical mirror substrate materials like Zerodur, ULE, Sitall, borosilicate glass and Cervit will be evaluated and compared to new substrate materials like silicon carbide and beryllium. The different suppliers and their production processes are presented. In addition large mirrors of existing observatories and of telescopes under construction will be listed, thereby concentrating on mirrors above three meter in diameter. An outlook on material trends and on future astronomical telescopes closes this overview on the market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy.

  5. Post irradiation analysis and performance modeling of dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G.L.; Medvedev, P.G.; Robinson, A.B.; Shevlyakov, G.V.; Ryu, H.J.

    2008-07-15

    We analyzed fission product swelling of post-irradiation U-Mo fuels from the early RERTR tests to the recent RERTR-8 test. We found that the gas bubble swelling of the fuel-swelling model was overestimated. From the recent tests, RERTR-7A and 8, we could also collect a considerable amount of fuel swelling data from monolithic U-Mo fuel plates. The fuel swelling data from the monolithic fuel plates are considered more reliable because the interaction layer growth between the fuel and matrix in dispersion fuel, which obscures fuel swelling, does not exist. The swelling correlation comparison to the Si-added dispersion fuel data and monolithic fuel data suggested that a modification of the existing model was necessary. We also developed an interaction layer growth model for U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates with a Si-added matrix. PLATE code calculations with the new PIE data analysis results were performed. The updated versions predict with better accuracies for both monolithic fuel plates and dispersion fuel plates. In this paper, we present the results of fission product swelling characterization. In addition, the interaction layer growth model for U-Mo/Al with a Si-added matrix is presented. (author)

  6. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  7. Colony formation and interleukin 2 production by leukaemic human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, A S; Dewar, A E; Seidelin, P H; Murray, R

    1983-01-01

    PHA-induced colony formation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production were studied in four patients with T cell leukaemia (three cases OKT4+/T helper and one case OKT8+/T cytotoxic suppressor). Cases of T helper cell leukaemia showed colony formation that was comparable to normal purified blood T cells and was not dependent on the addition of conditioned medium, containing IL-2 activity, to cultures. In contrast the T suppressor cell leukaemia formed colonies only when cultures were supplemented with IL-2 containing medium. When IL-2 production by PHA stimulated cells was measured culture supernatants from the three T helper cell leukaemias all showed normal or high levels of activity, when compared to normal blood mononuclear cells, whereas the T suppressor cell leukaemia showed no activity. PMID:6604606

  8. Modelling disinfection by-products formation in bromide-containing waters.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, M; Korshin, G V

    2009-09-15

    A kinetic model capable of simulating by-products formation in bromide-containing waters during disinfection processes is presented in this paper. The model is based on two parallel sequences of incorporation and oxidation reactions induced by bromine or chlorine reacting with natural organic matter (NOM). Each sequence starts from a different type of NOM functionality that has its own set of specific reaction rate. Decay reactions of NOM and halogenated intermediates are assumed to follow a first order kinetic, while disinfection by-product (DBP) generation reactions are simulated introducing so-called splitting coefficients. This approach allows obtaining explicit expressions for DBP species. Model's results are compared with experimental data obtained for seawater samples. Comparison of the data confirms the model's ability to predict DBPs formation with high precision. PMID:19299084

  9. Formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) by activated sludge at various salinities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Ai-Min; Xu, Juan; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-02-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) present a significant component of effluent organic matter from biological wastewater treatment reactors, and can affect the membrane fouling and formation of disinfection by-products. Thus, SMP have attracted increasing concerns in wastewater treatment and reclamation. In this work, the formation of SMP by activated sludge at various NaCl concentrations is investigated by using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and fluorescence regional integration (FRI). The results show that a high level of salinity decreases substrate removal efficiency and leads to an accumulation of SMP, especially proteins. Three components of SMP, one protein-like and two humic-acid-like components, are identified by PARAFAC, which exhibit different trends with the variation of NaCl concentration. FRI analysis reveals that the majority of protein fluorescence is attributed to tryptophan and tryptophan-like proteins, rather than tyrosine and tyrosine-like proteins. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the normalized volume percentages of tyrosine and tryptophan region increase, while those of humic- and fulvic-acid-like region decrease significantly. This work demonstrates that salinity affects the formation of SMP, and that EEM with PARAFAC in combination with FRI analysis is a useful tool to get insight into the formation of SMP by activated sludge. PMID:22622691

  10. Role of Vibrio polysaccharide (vps) genes in VPS production, biofilm formation and Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Syed, Khalid A; Klose, Karl E; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2010-09-01

    Biofilm formation enhances the survival and persistence of the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae in natural ecosystems and its transmission during seasonal cholera outbreaks. A major component of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix is the Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS), which is essential for development of three-dimensional biofilm structures. The vps genes are clustered in two regions, the vps-I cluster (vpsU, vpsA-K, VC0916-27) and the vps-II cluster (vpsL-Q, VC0934-39), separated by an intergenic region containing the rbm gene cluster that encodes biofilm matrix proteins. In-frame deletions of the vps clusters and genes encoding matrix proteins drastically altered biofilm formation phenotypes. To determine which genes within the vps gene clusters are required for biofilm formation and VPS synthesis, we generated in-frame deletion mutants for all the vps genes. Many of these mutants exhibited reduced capacity to produce VPS and biofilms. Infant mouse colonization assays revealed that mutants lacking either vps clusters or rbmA (encoding secreted matrix protein RbmA) exhibited a defect in intestinal colonization compared to the wild-type. Understanding the roles of the various vps gene products will aid in the biochemical characterization of the VPS biosynthetic pathway and elucidate how vps gene products contribute to VPS biosynthesis, biofilm formation and virulence in V. cholerae. PMID:20466768

  11. Regulation of product formation during glucose or lactose limitation in nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Fordyce, A M; Crow, V L; Thomas, T D

    1984-01-01

    Nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis in a pH-stat were dosed with sugar to allow fermentation at the maximum rate or were fed a continuous supply of sugar at rates less than the maximum. Under anaerobic conditions, rapid fermentation of either glucose or lactose was essentially homolactic. However, with strain ML3, limiting the fermentation rate diverted approximately half of the pyruvate to formate, acetate, and ethanol. At limiting glucose fermentation rates, cells contained lower concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase activator (fructose 1,6-diphosphate) and pyruvate formate-lyase inhibitors (triose phosphates). As a result, pyruvate formate-lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase play a greater role in pyruvate metabolism. In contrast to strain ML3, strain ML8 did not give the same diversion of products under anaerobic conditions, and cells retained higher concentrations of the above effector compounds. Lactose metabolism under aerobic conditions resulted in pyruvate excretion by both S. lactis ML3 and ML8. At 7% of the maximum utilization rate, pyruvate accounted for 69 and 35% of the lactose metabolized by ML3 and ML8, respectively. Acetate was also a major product, especially with ML8. The data suggest that NADH oxidase is involved in coenzyme recycling in the presence of oxygen and that pyruvate formate-lyase is inactivated, but the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex still functions. PMID:6435521

  12. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy. PMID:23988277

  13. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  14. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R. )

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  15. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  16. Influence of sclerotia formation on ligninolytic enzyme production in Morchella crassipes.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2014-07-01

    Morels are wild edible ascomycetous mushrooms that are highly prized because of their medicinal and nutritional qualities. Ligninolytic enzymes are considered as one of the most important enzymes in fungi due to their involvement in fruiting body formation during artificial cultivation on different substrates. In the life cycle of morels, sclerotia are the intermediate stage to form a fruiting body from mycelia. We have studied the production of ligninolytic enzymes by Morchella crassipes MR8 growing on different substrates and during sclerotia formation. This fungus is able to produce ligninolytic enzymes such as laccase (Lac), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) when grown on different substrates. Maximum Lac activity was observed when grown in wheat grains whereas maximum activities of MnP and LiP were observed when grown in rice straw. Laccase enzyme was produced in high titers during sclerotia formation and maturation when grown in combinations of soil and substrates. A large number of sclerotia was observed in soil and wheat grains, along with high titers of laccase. Cellulase activity was observed to be constant during sclerotia formation and maturation. The present study results suggest that laccase enzyme might play an important role in sclerotia formation in morels. PMID:23712903

  17. Eucommia ulmoides extracts prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Sugawa, Hikari; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakajima, Akari; Kanagawa, Amane; Hirata, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Moroishi, Narumi; Nagai, Mime; Nagai, Ryoji

    2016-06-15

    Proteins non-enzymatically react with reducing sugars to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), resulting in the induction of protein denaturation. Because the levels of AGE increase with age and are elevated in age-related diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, the intake of compound(s) that inhibit the formation of AGEs by daily meal may represent a potential strategy for preventing age-related diseases. In this study, we measured the inhibitory effects of several Eucommia ulmoides extracts on the formation of AGEs, N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N(ω)-(carboxymethyl)arginine (CMA). Although a crude extract obtained from E. ulmoides bark is widely used as herbal medicine, E. ulmoides leaf extract (ELE) inhibited CML and CMA formation more effectively during the incubation of gelatin with ribose. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of compounds present in ELE on CML and CMA formation were studied. As a result, isoquercetin showed the strongest inhibitory effect of all the tested ELE components. These results indicate that the oral intake of ELE may inhibit the formation of AGEs, thereby ameliorating age-related diseases. PMID:27080730

  18. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30

    of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained

  19. Comparison of soil-monolith extraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Rupp, H.; Weller, U.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    In the international literature the term „lysimeter" is used for different objectives, e.g. suction cups, fluxmeters, etc. According to our understanding it belongs to the direct methods to measure water and solute fluxes in soil. Depending on the scientific task the shape and dimensions of the lysimeter as well as the type of filling (disturbed or undisturbed) and the specific instrumentation can be different. In any case where water dynamics or solute transport in natural soil is considered, lysimeters should be filled with 'undisturbed' monoliths which are large enough to contain the small scale heterogeneity of a site since flow and transport is highly sensitive to soil structure. Furthermore, lysimeters with vegetation should represent the natural crop inventory and the maximum root penetration depth should be taken into account. The aim of this contribution is to give an overview about different methods for obtaining undisturbed soil monoliths, in particular about i) techniques for the vertical and ii) for the horizontal extraction and iii) to evaluate the most frequently used procedures based on X-ray tomography images. Minimal disturbance of the soil monolith during extraction and subsequence filling of the lysimeter vessel is of critical importance for establishing flow and transport conditions corresponding approximately to natural field conditions. In the past, several methods were used to extract and fill lysimeter vessels vertically - including hand digging, employing sets of trihedral scaffold with lifting blocks and ballast, or using heavy duty excavators, which could shear and cut large blocks of soil. More recently, technologies have been developed to extract cylindrical soil monoliths by using ramming equipment or screw presses. One of the great disadvantages of the mentioned methods is the compaction or settling of soil that occurs during the "hammering" or "pressing". For this reason a new technology was developed, which cuts the outline of

  20. Monolithic Optical-To-Electronic Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard; Mactaggert, Ross

    1994-01-01

    Monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuit converts multiplexed digital optical signals into electrical signals, separates, and distributes them to intended destinations. Developed to deliver phase and amplitude commands to monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) at elements of millimeter-wave phased-array antenna from single optical fiber driven by external array controller. Also used in distribution of high-data-rate optical communications in local-area networks (LAN's). Notable features include options for optical or electrical clock inputs; outputs for raw data, addresses, and instructions for diagnosis; and optical-signal-detection circuit used to reduce power consumption by 80 percent between data-transmission times. Chip fabricated by processes available at many major semiconductor foundries. Distribution of digital signals in aircraft, automobiles, and ships potential application.

  1. Monolithic Flexure Pre-Stressed Ultrasonic Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Allen, Phillip Grant (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic ultrasonic horn where the horn, backing, and pre-stress structures are combined in a single monolithic piece is disclosed. Pre-stress is applied by external flexure structures. The provision of the external flexures has numerous advantages including the elimination of the need for a pre-stress bolt. The removal of the pre-stress bolt eliminates potential internal electric discharge points in the actuator. In addition, it reduces the chances of mechanical failure in the actuator stacks that result from the free surface in the hole of conventional ring stacks. In addition, the removal of the stress bolt and the corresponding reduction in the overall number of parts reduces the overall complexity of the resulting ultrasonic horn actuator and simplifies the ease of the design, fabrication and integration of the actuator of the present invention into other structures.

  2. Monolithic Flexure Pre-Stressed Ultrasonic Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Allen, Phillip Grant (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A monolithic ultrasonic horn where the horn, backing, and pre-stress structures are combined in a single monolithic piece is disclosed. Pre-stress is applied by external flexure structures. The provision of the external flexures has numerous advantages including the elimination of the need for a pre-stress bolt. The removal of the pre-stress bolt eliminates potential internal electric discharge points in the actuator. In addition, it reduces the chances of mechanical failure in the actuator stacks that result from the free surface in the hole of conventional ring stacks. In addition, the removal of the stress bolt and the corresponding reduction in the overall number of parts reduces the overall complexity of the resulting ultrasonic horn actuator and simplifies the ease of the design, fabrication and integration of the actuator of the present invention into other structures.

  3. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, M.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Hair, L.M.

    1995-03-07

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels. 6 figs.

  4. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

  5. Monolithic microextraction tips by emulsion photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2009-03-20

    Monoliths formed by photopolymerization are excellent means for fabricating functional elements in miniaturized microdevices such as microextraction tips which are becoming important for sample preparation. Various silica-based and polymer-based materials have been used to fabricate monoliths with through pores of several nm to 4 microm. However, the back pressure created by such methods is still considered to be high for microtips that use suction forces to deliver the liquid. In this study, we demonstrated that emulsion techniques such as oil-in-water can be used to form monoliths with large through pores (>20 microm), and with rigid structures on small (10 microL) and large (200 microL) pipette tips by photopolymerization. We further showed that, with minor modifications, various functionalized particles (5-20 microm) can be added to form stable emulsions and successfully encapsulated into the monoliths for qualitative and quantitative solid-phase microextractions for a diverse application. Due to high permeability and large surface area, quick equilibration can be achieved by pipetting to yield high recovery rates. Using tryptic digests of ovalbumin as the standard, we obtained a recovery yield of 90-109% (RSD: 10-16%) with a loading capacity of 3 mug for desalting tips immobilized with C18 beads. Using tryptic digests of beta-casein and alpha-casein as standards, we showed that phosphopeptides were substantially enriched by tips immobilized with immobilized metal affinity chromatography or TiO(2) materials. Using estrogenic compounds as standards, we obtained a recovery yield of 95-108% (RSD: 10-12%) and linear calibration curves ranging from 5 to 100 ng (R(2)>0.99) for Waters Oasis HLB tips immobilized with hydrophilic beads. PMID:19203757

  6. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, P.R.

    1999-09-28

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

  7. Monolithic 3D CMOS Using Layered Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sachid, Angada B; Tosun, Mahmut; Desai, Sujay B; Hsu, Ching-Yi; Lien, Der-Hsien; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Chen, Yu-Ze; Hettick, Mark; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Zeng, Yuping; He, Jr-Hau; Chang, Edward Yi; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Javey, Ali; Hu, Chenming

    2016-04-01

    Monolithic 3D integrated circuits using transition metal dichalcogenide materials and low-temperature processing are reported. A variety of digital and analog circuits are implemented on two sequentially integrated layers of devices. Inverter circuit operation at an ultralow supply voltage of 150 mV is achieved, paving the way to high-density, ultralow-voltage, and ultralow-power applications. PMID:26833783

  8. InP monolithically integrated coherent transmitter.

    PubMed

    Andriolli, N; Fresi, F; Bontempi, F; Malacarne, A; Meloni, G; Klamkin, J; Poti, L; Contestabile, G

    2015-04-20

    A novel InP monolithically integrated coherent transmitter has been designed, fabricated and tested. The photonic integrated circuit consists of a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a modified nested Mach-Zehnder modulator having tunable input power splitters. Back-to-back coherent transmission for PDM-QPSK signals is reported up to 10 Gbaud (40 Gb/s) using the integrated laser and up to 32Gbaud (128 Gb/s) using an external low phase noise laser. PMID:25969111

  9. Solgel-derived photosensitive germanosilicate glass monoliths.

    PubMed

    Heaney, A D; Erdogan, T

    2000-12-15

    We demonstrate volume gratings written in solgel-derived, Ge-doped silica monoliths. Glass was fabricated both with and without germanium oxygen deficient center (GODC) defects. The UV absorption and UV-induced index changes of these glasses, with and without hydrogen loading, are reported. The presence of GODC defects greatly enhances the photosensitivity of Ge-doped silica with and without the presence of hydrogen. PMID:18066337

  10. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Michael W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Hair, Lucy M.

    1995-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels.

  11. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myles, K. M.; Mcpheeters, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of the monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) concept has been proven, and the performance has been dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials have been minimized, thus allowing successful fabrication of the MSOFC with few defects. The MSOFC shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source for many applications from stationary power, to automobile propulsion, to space pulsed power.

  12. Nanoporous Carbon Monoliths with Tunable Thermal Insulation and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Fenghua; Luo, Zhenhua; Li, Hao; Zhao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nanoscale porous carbon monoliths, with excellent compressive strength and thermal insulation, were obtained with a simple method of carbonizing cured phenol-formaldehyde resin/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends. Apparent density, pore size and morphology of the carbon monoliths were tailored by changing the composition, curing process and carbonization temperature. The continuous nanopores played a key role in enhancing mechanical and thermal performance of the carbon materials. When PMMA concentration was 25%, apparent density and thermal conductivity of the nanoporous carbonaceous monoliths were obtained as low as 1.07 g · cm⁻³ and 0.42 W/(m · K), decreasing by 29.4% and 35.4% than that of carbonaceous monoliths obtained from pure PF; while compressive strength of the nanoporous carbonaceous monoliths was as high as 34 MPa, which was improved over five times than that of pure PF carbon monoliths. PMID:27398592

  13. PEGylated protein separation using different hydrophobic interaction supports: Conventional and monolithic supports.

    PubMed

    Mayolo-Deloisa, Karla; González-Valdez, José; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Protein hydrophobicity can be modified after a PEGylation process. However, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has been used to separate PEGylation reaction products less frequently than other techniques. In this context, chromatographic monoliths represent a good alternative to continue exploring the separation of PEGylated proteins with HIC. In this work, the separation of PEGylated proteins using C4 A monolith as well as Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose was analyzed. Three proteins were used as models: RNase A, β-lactoglobulin, and lysozyme. All proteins were PEGylated in the N-terminal amino groups with 20 kDa methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) propionaldehyde. The concentration of ammonium sulfate (1 M) used was the same for all stationary phases. The results obtained demonstrated that the C4 A monolith could better resolve all protein PEGylation reaction mixtures, since the peaks of mono- and di-PEGylated proteins can be clearly distinguished in the chromatographic profiles. On the contrary, while using Butyl Sepharose media only the PEGylation reaction mixtures of RNase A could be partially separated at 35 and 45 CVs. PEGylated proteins of β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme could not be resolved when Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose were used. It is then clear that monoliths are an excellent choice to explore the purification process of PEGylated proteins exploiting the advantages of HIC. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:702-707, 2016. PMID:26918888

  14. Large-volume methacrylate monolith for plasmid purification. Process engineering approach to synthesis and application.

    PubMed

    Danquah, Michael K; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-04-25

    The extent of exothermicity associated with the construction of large-volume methacrylate monolithic columns has somewhat obstructed the realisation of large-scale rapid biomolecule purification especially for plasmid-based products which have proven to herald future trends in biotechnology. A novel synthesis technique via a heat expulsion mechanism was employed to prepare a 40 mL methacrylate monolith with a homogeneous radial pore structure along its thickness. Radial temperature gradient was recorded to be only 1.8 degrees C. Maximum radial temperature recorded at the centre of the monolith was 62.3 degrees C, which was only 2.3 degrees C higher than the actual polymerisation temperature. Pore characterisation of the monolithic polymer showed unimodal pore size distributions at different radial positions with an identical modal pore size of 400 nm. Chromatographic characterisation of the polymer after functionalisation with amino groups displayed a persistent dynamic binding capacity of 15.5 mg of plasmid DNA/mL. The maximum pressure drop recorded was only 0.12 MPa at a flow rate of 10 mL/min. The polymer demonstrated rapid separation ability by fractionating Escherichia coli DH5alpha-pUC19 clarified lysate in only 3 min after loading. The plasmid sample collected after the fast purification process was tested to be a homogeneous supercoiled plasmid with DNA electrophoresis and restriction analysis. PMID:18329651

  15. PPAR-γ activation by Tityus serrulatus venom regulates lipid body formation and lipid mediator production.

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV) consists of numerous peptides with different physiological and pharmacological activities. Studies have shown that scorpion venom increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production, contributing to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction, and patient death. We have previously demonstrated that TsV is a venom-associated molecular pattern (VAMP) recognized by TLRs inducing intense inflammatory reaction through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4. Lipid bodies (LBs) are potential sites for eicosanoid production by inflammatory cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) is implicated in LB formation and acts as an important modulator of lipid metabolism during inflammation. In this study, we used murine macrophages to evaluate whether the LB formation induced by TsV after TLR recognition correlates with lipid mediator generation by macrophages and if it occurs through PPAR-γ activation. We demonstrate that TsV acts through TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation and PPAR-γ activation to induce LB formation and generation of PGE2 and LTB4. Our data also show that PPAR-γ negatively regulates the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription factor. Based on these results, we suggest that during envenomation, LBs constitute functional organelles for lipid mediator production through signaling pathways that depend on cell surface and nuclear receptors. These findings point to the inflammatory mechanisms that might also be triggered during human envenomation by TsV. PMID:25450800

  16. Product formation controlled by substrate dynamics in leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Tholander, Fredrik; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Qureshi, Abdul Aziz; Niegowski, Damian; Hasan, Mahmudul; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) (EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme with both an epoxide hydrolase and an aminopeptidase activity. LTA4H from the African claw toad, Xenopus laevis (xlLTA4H) has been shown to, unlike the human enzyme, convert LTA4 to two enzymatic metabolites, LTB4 and another biologically active product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4 (5(S),12R-dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid). In order to study the molecular aspect of the formation of this product we have characterized the structure and function of xlLTA4H. We solved the structure of xlLTA4H to a resolution of 2.3Å. It is a dimeric structure where each monomer has three domains with the active site in between the domains, similar as to the human structure. An important difference between the human and amphibian enzyme is the phenylalanine to tyrosine exchange at position 375. Our studies show that mutating F375 in xlLTA4H to tyrosine abolishes the formation of the LTB4 isomeric product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4. In an attempt to understand how one amino acid exchange leads to a new product profile as seen in the xlLTA4H, we performed a conformer analysis of the triene part of the substrate LTA4. Our results show that the Boltzmann distribution of substrate conformers correlates with the observed distribution of products. We suggest that the observed difference in product profile between the human and the xlLTA4H arises from different level of discrimination between substrate LTA4 conformers. PMID:24333438

  17. Strength and toughness of monolithic and composite silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    The strength and toughness of two composite and two monolithic silicon nitrides were measured from 25 to 1400 C. The monolithic and composite materials were made from similar starting powders. Both of the composite materials contained 30 vol percent silicon carbide whiskers. All measurements were made by four point flexure in surrounding air and humidity. The composite and monolithic materials exhibited similar fast fracture properties as a function of temperature.

  18. Less common applications of monoliths III. Gas chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Svec, Frantisek; Kurganov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Porous polymer monoliths emerged about two decades ago. Despite this short time, they are finding applications in a variety of fields. In addition to the most common and certainly best known use of this new category of porous media as stationary phases in liquid chromatography, monolithic materials also found their applications in other areas. This review article focuses on monoliths in capillaries designed for separations in gas chromatography. PMID:17645884

  19. Immune thrombocytopenia: antiplatelet autoantibodies inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and impair platelet production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Iraqi, Muna; Perdomo, Jose; Yan, Feng; Choi, Philip Y-I; Chong, Beng H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disease mediated by antiplatelet autoantibodies that cause platelet destruction and suppression of platelet production. In vitro effects of autoantibodies on megakaryocyte production and maturation have been reported recently. However, the impact of these autoantibodies on crucial megakaryocyte functions, proplatelet formation and subsequent platelet release, has not been evaluated. We examined the effects of serum and IgG from 19 patients with immune thrombocytopenia using day 8 or 9 megakaryocytes (66.3 ± 10.6% CD41+), derived from cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+). The number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes, the number of platelets released in the culture, total megakaryocyte numbers, ploidy pattern and caspase activation were measured at various times after treatment. After 5 days of treatment the number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes was significantly decreased by 13 immune thrombocytopenia autoantibodies relative to the control group (P<0.0001) and this decrease was accompanied by a corresponding reduction of platelet release. Other features, including total megakaryocyte numbers, maturation and apoptosis, were not affected by immune thrombocytopenia antibodies. Treating the megakaryocytes with the thrombopoietin receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag reversed the effect of the autoantibodies on megakaryocytes by restoring their capacity to form proplatelets. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies in immune thrombocytopenia inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and hence the ability of the megakaryocytes to release platelets. Treatment with either romiplostim or eltrombopag regenerates proplatelet formation from the megakaryocytes. PMID:25682608

  20. Cinnamon bark oil and its components inhibit biofilm formation and toxin production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Jintae

    2015-02-16

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug resistant bacteria, and pathogenic biofilms contribute to reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. In this study, 83 essential oils were initially screened for biofilm inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cinnamon bark oil and its main constituent cinnamaldehyde at 0.05% (v/v) markedly inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Furthermore, cinnamon bark oil and eugenol decreased the production of pyocyanin and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa. Also, cinnamon bark oil, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol at 0.01% (v/v) significantly decreased biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Transcriptional analysis showed that cinnamon bark oil down-regulated curli genes and Shiga-like toxin gene stx2 in EHEC. In addition, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) film incorporating biofilm inhibitors was fabricated and shown to provide efficient biofilm control on solid surfaces. This is the first report that cinnamon bark oil and its components, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol, reduce the production of pyocyanin and PQS, the swarming motility, and the hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa, and inhibit EHEC biofilm formation. PMID:25500277

  1. Precipitation of organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products during struvite formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Biao; Yuan, Shoujun; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhen-Hu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-11-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) and arsanilic acid (ASA) have been extensively used as organoarsenic animal feed additives. Organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), exist in the effluent from anaerobic reactors treating animal manure contaminated by ROX or ASA with ammonium (NH4(+)-N) and phosphate (PO4(3-)-P) together. Therefore, arsenic species in the effluent might be involved in the struvite formation process. In this study, the involvement of organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products As(V) and As(III) in the struvite crystallization was investigated. The results demonstrated that arsenic compounds did not substantially affect the PO4(3-)-P recovery, but confirmed the precipitation of arsenic during struvite formation. The precipitation of arsenic compounds in struvite was considerably affected by a solution pH from 9.0 to 11.0. With an increase in pH, the content of ASA and ROX in the precipitation decreased, but the contents of As(III) and As(V) increased. In addition, the arsenic content of As(V) in the struvite was higher than that of As(III), ASA and ROX. The results indicated that the struvite could be contaminated when the solution contains arsenic species, but that could be minimized by controlling the solution pH and maintaining anaerobic conditions during struvite formation. PMID:27262276

  2. Methane production from formate, acetate and H2/CO2; focusing on kinetics and microbial characterization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofang; Angelidaki, Irini; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Liu, Houguang; Liu, Yuhong; Huang, Xu; Zhu, Gefu

    2016-10-01

    For evaluating the methanogenesis from typical methanogenic precursors (formate, acetate and H2/CO2), CH4 production kinetics were investigated at 37±1°C in batch anaerobic digestion tests and stimulated by modified Gompertz model. The results showed that maximum methanation rate from formate, acetate and H2/CO2 were 19.58±0.49, 42.65±1.17 and 314.64±3.58NmL/gVS/d in digested manure system and 6.53±0.31, 132.04±3.96 and 640.16±19.92NmL/gVS/d in sewage sludge system during second generation incubation. Meanwhile the model could not fit well in granular sludge system, while the rate of formate methanation was faster than from H2/CO2 and acetate. Considering both the kinetic results and microbial assay we could conclude that H2/CO2 methanation was the fastest methanogenic step in digested manure and sewage sludge system with Methanomicrobiales as dominant methanogens, while granular sludge with Methanobacteriales as dominant methanogens contributed to the fastest formate methanation. PMID:27423547

  3. Antarctic Bottom Water production by intense sea-ice formation in the Cape Darnley polynya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Fukamachi, Yasushi; Williams, Guy D.; Nihashi, Sohey; Roquet, Fabien; Kitade, Yujiro; Tamura, Takeshi; Hirano, Daisuke; Herraiz-Borreguero, Laura; Field, Iain; Hindell, Mark; Aoki, Shigeru; Wakatsuchi, Masaaki

    2013-03-01

    The formation of Antarctic Bottom Water--the cold, dense water that occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean--is a key process in global ocean circulation. This water mass is formed as dense shelf water sinks to depth. Three regions around Antarctica where this process takes place have been previously documented. The presence of another source has been identified in hydrographic and tracer data, although the site of formation is not well constrained. Here we document the formation of dense shelf water in the Cape Darnley polynya (65°-69°E) and its subsequent transformation into bottom water using data from moorings and instrumented elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). Unlike the previously identified sources of Antarctic Bottom Water, which require the presence of an ice shelf or a large storage volume, bottom water production at the Cape Darnley polynya is driven primarily by the flux of salt released by sea-ice formation. We estimate that about 0.3-0.7×106m3s-1 of dense shelf water produced by the Cape Darnley polynya is transformed into Antarctic Bottom Water. The transformation of this water mass, which we term Cape Darnley Bottom Water, accounts for 6-13% of the circumpolar total.

  4. Silicon-based optoelectronics: Monolithic integration for WDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Matthew Richard T.

    2000-10-01

    This thesis details the development of enabling technologies required for inexpensive, monolithic integration of Si-based wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) components and photodetectors. The work involves the design and fabrication of arrayed waveguide grating demultiplexers in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), the development of advanced SiGe photodetectors capable of photodetection at 1.55 mum wavelengths, and the development of a low cost fabrication technique that enables the high volume production of Si-based photonic components. Arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers were designed and fabricated in SOI. The fabrication of AWGs in SOI has been reported in the literature, however there are a number of design issues specific to the SOI material system that can have a large effect on device performance and design, and have not been theoretically examined in earlier work. The SOI AWGs presented in this thesis are the smallest devices of this type reported, and they exhibit performance acceptable for commercial applications. The SiGe photodetectors reported in the literature exhibit extremely low responsivities at wavelengths near 1.55 mum. We present the first use of three dimensional growth modes to enhance the photoresponse of SiGe at 1.55 mum wavelengths. Metal semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors were fabricated using this undulating quantum well structure, and demonstrate the highest responsivities yet reported for a SiGe-based photodetector at 1.55 mum. These detectors were monolithically integrated with low-loss SOI waveguides, enabling integration with nearly any Si-based passive WDM component. The pursuit of inexpensive Si-based photonic components also requires the development of new manufacturing techniques that are more suitable for high volume production. This thesis presents the development of a low cost fabrication technique based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS), a standard processing technique used for Si integrated circuits

  5. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    DOEpatents

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2004-05-25

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered in an inert gas or nitrogen gas at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  6. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  7. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, D.A.; Bacchi, D.P.; Connors, T.F.; Collins, E.L. III

    1998-02-10

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by a novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken. 2 figs.

  8. Alumina composites for oxide/oxide fibrous monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T. A.; Polzin, B. J.; Picciolo, J. J.; Singh, D.; Tsaliagos, R. N.; Goretta, K. C.

    2000-03-01

    Most work on ceramic fibrous monoliths (FMs) has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN system. In an effort to develop oxidation-resistant FMs, several oxide systems have recently been examined. Zirconia-toughened alumina and alumina/mullite appear to be good candidates for the cell phase of FMs. These composites offer higher strength and toughness than pure alumina and good high-temperature stability. By combining these oxides, possibly with a weaker high-temperature oxide as the cell-boundary phase, it should be possible to product a strong, resilient FM that exhibits graceful failure. Several material combinations have been examined. Results on FM fabrication and microstructural development are presented.

  9. Sliding Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Glycopeptidolipid Production in Mycobacterium colombiense Strains

    PubMed Central

    Maya-Hoyos, Milena; Leguizamón, John; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Soto, Carlos Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium colombiense is a novel member of the Mycobacterium avium complex, which produces respiratory and disseminated infections in immunosuppressed patients. Currently, the morphological and genetic bases underlying the phenotypic features of M. colombiense strains remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth morphology show increased biofilm formation on hydrophobic surfaces and sliding on motility plates. Thin-layer chromatography experiments showed that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth colonies produce large amounts of glycolipids with a chromatographic behaviour similar to that of the glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) of M. avium. Conversely, we observed a natural rough variant of M. colombiense (57B strain) lacking pigmentation and exhibiting impaired sliding, biofilm formation, and GPL production. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a gene cluster that is likely involved in GPL biosynthesis in M. colombiense CECT 3035. RT-qPCR experiments showed that motile culture conditions activate the transcription of genes possibly involved in key enzymatic activities of GPL biosynthesis. PMID:26180799

  10. Determination of cloud condensation nuclei production from measured new particle formation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.; McCormick, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    A semi-analytical expression has been developed that accurately models the population dynamics of an aerosol growing from the detection limit (3 nm) to a characteristic CCN size (100 nm), quantifying the contributions of size and time-dependent source and sink terms such as coagulation of smaller particles and scavenging by the pre-existing aerosol. These model inputs were calculated from measured aerosol size distributions and growth rates acquired during intensive measurement campaigns in Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, and Tecamac, Mexico. Twenty CCN formation events from these campaigns were used to test the validity of this model. Measured growth rates ranged from 3-22 nm/h. The modeled and measured CCN production probabilities agreed well with each other, ranging from 1-20%. The pre-existing CCN number concentration increased on average by a factor of 3.8 as a result of new particle formation.

  11. Sliding Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Glycopeptidolipid Production in Mycobacterium colombiense Strains.

    PubMed

    Maya-Hoyos, Milena; Leguizamón, John; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Soto, Carlos Y

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium colombiense is a novel member of the Mycobacterium avium complex, which produces respiratory and disseminated infections in immunosuppressed patients. Currently, the morphological and genetic bases underlying the phenotypic features of M. colombiense strains remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth morphology show increased biofilm formation on hydrophobic surfaces and sliding on motility plates. Thin-layer chromatography experiments showed that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth colonies produce large amounts of glycolipids with a chromatographic behaviour similar to that of the glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) of M. avium. Conversely, we observed a natural rough variant of M. colombiense (57B strain) lacking pigmentation and exhibiting impaired sliding, biofilm formation, and GPL production. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a gene cluster that is likely involved in GPL biosynthesis in M. colombiense CECT 3035. RT-qPCR experiments showed that motile culture conditions activate the transcription of genes possibly involved in key enzymatic activities of GPL biosynthesis. PMID:26180799

  12. Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagoort, J. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

  13. Quercetin inhibits advanced glycation end product formation by trapping methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Tiesong; Sang, Shengmin; Lv, Lishuang

    2014-12-17

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO) not only are endogenous metabolites but also exist in exogenous resources, such as foods, beverages, urban atmosphere, and cigarette smoke. They have been identified as reactive dicarbonyl precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which have been associated with diabetes-related long-term complications. In this study, quercetin, a natural flavonol found in fruits, vegetables, leaves, and grains, could effectively inhibit the formation of AGEs in a dose-dependent manner via trapping reactive dicarbonyl compounds. More than 50.5% of GO and 80.1% of MGO were trapped at the same time by quercetin within 1 h under physiological conditions. Quercetin and MGO (or GO) were combined at different ratios, and the products generated from this reaction were analyzed with LC-MS. Both mono-MGO and di-MGO adducts of quercetin were detected in this assay using LC-MS, but only tiny amounts of mono-GO adducts of quercetin were found. Additionally, di-MGO adducts were observed as the dominant product with prolonged incubation time. In the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-MGO/GO system, quercetin traps MGO and GO directly and then significantly inhibits the formation of AGEs. PMID:25412188

  14. Increased efficiency of evolved group I intron spliceozymes by decreased side product formation

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Zhaleh N.; Müller, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    The group I intron ribozyme from Tetrahymena was recently reengineered into a trans-splicing variant that is able to remove 100-nt introns from pre-mRNA, analogous to the spliceosome. These spliceozymes were improved in this study by 10 rounds of evolution in Escherichia coli cells. One clone with increased activity in E. coli cells was analyzed in detail. Three of its 10 necessary mutations extended the substrate binding duplexes, which led to increased product formation and reduced cleavage at the 5′-splice site. One mutation in the conserved core of the spliceozyme led to a further reduction of cleavage at the 5′-splice site but an increase in cleavage side products at the 3′-splice site. The latter was partially reduced by six additional mutations. Together, the mutations increased product formation while reducing activity at the 5′-splice site and increasing activity at the 3′-splice site. These results show the adaptation of a ribozyme that evolved in nature for cis-splicing to trans-splicing, and they highlight the interdependent function of nucleotides within group I intron ribozymes. Implications for the possible use of spliceozymes as tools in research and therapy, and as a model for the evolution of the spliceosome, are discussed. PMID:26106216

  15. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-01

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors. PMID:27215334

  16. A kinetic model for product formation of microbial and mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.

    1995-05-20

    Growth of microbial and mammalian cells can be classified into substrate-limited and substrate-sufficient growth according to the relative availability of the substrate (carbon and energy source) and other nutrients. It has been observed for a number of microbial and mammalian cells that the consumption rate of substrate and energy (ATP) is generally higher under substrate-sufficient conditions than under substrate limitation. Accordingly, the product formation under substrate excess often exhibits different patterns from those under substrate limitation. In this study, the Luedeking-Piret kinetic model is extended to include a term describing the effect of residual substrate concentration. The applicability of the extended model is demonstrated with three microbial cultures for the production of primary metabolites and three hybridoma cell cultures for the production of ammonia and lactic acid over a wide range of substrate concentration. Anaerobic fermentation of glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae is a multiproduct fermentation process. At a neutral pH value, acetic acid, ethanol, and 1,3-propanediol are the main fermentation products. Formation of acetic acid and/or ethanol is necessary for the generation by K. pneumoniae. The aerobic growth of bacillus strain TS1 on methanol has been studied in methanol-limited and methanol-sufficient hemostat cultures. Under methanol-limited conditions there is no extracellular product formed. However, under methanol-sufficient conditions, particularly with nitrogen limitation, metabolites such as acetic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid are excreted into the culture medium above a certain level of residual methanol concentration.

  17. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  18. Ozonation of piperidine, piperazine and morpholine: Kinetics, stoichiometry, product formation and mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; Jewell, Kevin S; Reisz, Erika; Lutze, Holger V; Ternes, Thomas A; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-01-01

    Piperidine, piperazine and morpholine as archetypes for secondary heterocyclic amines, a structural unit that is often present in pharmaceuticals (e.g., ritalin, cetirizine, timolol, ciprofloxacin) were investigated in their reaction with ozone. In principle the investigated compounds can be degraded with ozone in a reasonable time, based on their high reaction rate constants with respect to ozone (1.9 × 10(4)-2.4 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). However, transformation is insufficient (13-16%), most likely due to a chain reaction, which decomposes ozone. This conclusion is based on OH scavenging experiments, leading to increased compound transformation (18-27%). The investigated target compounds are similar in their kinetic and stoichiometric characteristics. However, the mechanistic considerations based on product formation indicate various reaction pathways. Piperidine reacts with ozone via a nonradical addition reaction to N-hydroxypiperidine (yield: 92% with and 94% without scavenging, with respect to compound transformation). However, piperazine degradation with ozone does not lead to N-hydroxypiperazine. In the morpholine/ozone reaction, N-hydroxymorpholine was identified. Additional oxidation pathways in all cases involved the formation of OH with high yields. One important pathway of piperazine and morpholine by ozonation could be the formation of C-centered radicals after ozone or OH radical attack. Subsequently, O2 addition forms unstable peroxyl radicals, which in one pathway loose superoxide radicals by generating a carbon-centered cation. Subsequent hydrolysis of the carbon-centered cation leads to formaldehyde, whereby ozonation of the N-hydroxy products can proceed in the same way and in addition give rise to hydroxylamine. A second pathway of the short-lived peroxyl radicals could be a dimerization to form short-lived tetraoxides, which cleave by forming hydrogen peroxide. All three products have been found. PMID:26624229

  19. Gas, Water, and Oil Production from the Wasatch Formation, Greater Natural Buttes Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Hoffman, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from 38 wells with production commencing during the 1980s from the Wasatch Formation in the Greater Natural Buttes field, Uinta Basin, Utah. This study is one of a series of reports examining fluid production from tight gas reservoirs, which are characterized by low permeability, low porosity, and the presence of clay minerals in pore space. The general ranges of production rates after 2 years are 100-1,000 mscf/day for gas, 0.35-3.4 barrel per day for oil, and less than 1 barrel per day for water. The water:gas ratio ranges from 0.1 to10 barrel per million standard cubic feet, indicating that free water is produced along with water dissolved in gas in the reservoir. The oil:gas ratios are typical of a wet gas system. Neither gas nor water rates show dependence upon the number of perforations, although for low gas-flow rates there is some dependence upon the number of sandstone intervals that were perforated. Over a 5-year time span, gas and water may either increase or decrease in a given well, but the changes in production rate do not exhibit any dependence upon well proximity or well location.

  20. Monitoring the morphology development of polymer-monolithic stationary phases by thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Sam; Wouters, Bert; Vaast, Axel; Terryn, Herman; Van Assche, Guy; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2014-01-01

    Thermal analysis and SEM were employed to gain insights in the different stages of morphology development and the thermal properties of polymer-monolithic stationary phases. The studied system was a thermally initiated free-radical copolymerization reaction at 70°C of styrene and divinylbenzene in the presence of tetrahydrofuran and 1-decanol. The key events in the early stages of morphology development are initiation, chain growth, branching, and cyclization, leading to microgel particles. Interparticle reactions through pendant vinyl groups lead to the formation of microgel clusters. The rapid increase in molecular weight and cross-link density of the microgel clusters causes a reaction-induced phase separation, and the formation of a macroscopic network of interconnected globules was observed (macrogelation) at around 45 min. After 3 h or 65% conversion, a space-filling macroporous monolithic network was observed. Afterwards, mainly growth of existing globules takes place, reducing the macropore size. The porogen ratio affects the timing of the reaction-induced phase separation, strongly influencing the morphology of the polymer material. The use of a mixture of divinylbenzene isomers yielded a monolithic material that is less cross-linked at the surface compared to the central part of the polymer backbone due to copolymerization-composition drift. The less cross-linked outer layer starts devitrifying at 100°C. PMID:24166744

  1. Leaching of mercury-containing cement monoliths aged for one year.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Margareta; Allard, Bert

    2008-01-01

    A directive from the Swedish Government states that waste containing more than 1% of mercury shall be permanently deposited. The stabilization of mercury by conversion to a sparingly soluble compound like the sulphide is crucial to ensure long-term immobilization in a permanent storage. Immobilization by the solidification/stabilization (S/S) method and possible formation of HgS from mercury oxide or elemental mercury by reaction with a sulphur source (S or FeS) is investigated by a modified version of the NEN 7345 Dutch tank-leaching test. The diffusion of mercury during 11 months from 1-year-old mercury containing monoliths of Portland and slag cement is demonstrated. In a geologic repository under conditions representative of deep granitic bedrock (bicarbonate buffered to pH 8.6), a favourable monolith combination is slag cement with addition of the iron sulphide troilite. The apparent diffusion coefficient of mercury is estimated. PMID:17544639

  2. A format standard for efficient interchange of high-contrast direct imaging science products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Vigan, Arthur; Soummer, Rémi; Chauvin, Gaël.; Pueyo, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall D.; Hines, Dean C.

    2014-07-01

    The present and next few years will see the arrival of several new coronagraphic instruments dedicated to the detection and characterization of planetary systems. These ground- and space-based instruments (Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, Subaru/ CHARIS, JWST NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs among others), will provide a large number of new candidates, through multiple nearby-star surveys and will complete and extend those acquired with current generation instruments (Palomar P1640, VLT/NACO, Keck, HST). To optimize the use of the wealth of data, including non-detection results, the science products of these instruments will require to be shared among the community. In the long term such data exchange will significantly ease companion confirmations, planet characterization via different type of instruments (integral field spectrographs, polarimetric imagers, etc.), and Monte-Carlo population studies from detection and non-detection results. In this context, we initiated a collaborative effort between the teams developing the data reduction pipelines for SPHERE, GPI, and the JWST coronagraphs, and the ALICE (Archival Legacy Investigations of Circumstellar Environment) collaboration, which is currently reprocessing all the HST/NICMOS coronagraphic surveys. We are developing a standard format for the science products generated by high-contrast direct imaging instruments (reduced image, sensitivity limits, noise image, candidate list, etc.), that is directly usable for astrophysical investigations. In this paper, we present first results of this work and propose a preliminary format adopted for the science product. We call for discussions in the high-contrast direct imaging community to develop this effort, reach a consensus and finalize this standard. This action will be critical to enable data interchange and combination in a consistent way between several instruments and to stiffen the scientific production in the community.

  3. Impact of groundwater surface storage on chlorination and disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Padhi, R K; Satpathy, K K; Subramanian, S

    2015-09-01

    The change in water quality arising from the open storage of groundwater (GW) and its impact on chlorination and chlorination by-product formation were investigated. Water quality descriptors, such as temperature, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen contents of GW undergo substantial alteration when stored in a reservoir. Dissolved organic content (DOC) measured in the two water sources studied, i.e., GW and open reservoir water (RW), varied from 0.41 mg/L to 0.95 mg/L and 0.93 mg/L to 2.53 mg/L, respectively. Although DOC demonstrated wide variation, UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA254) values for GW (0.022-0.067) and RW (0.037-0.077) did not display reciprocal variations. The chlorine demand (CD) of RW was always higher than that of GW for the corresponding sampling period. Average trihalomethane (THM) formation for RW was 50-80% higher compared to GW and thus poses an enhanced health risk. Appreciable amounts of bromide present in these water sources (0.15-0.26 mg/L in GW and 0.17-0.65 mg/L in RW) have resulted in the non-selective distribution of the four THM species. The formation of more toxic brominated THM due to chlorination of these near-coast drinking water sources must be regarded as a decisive factor for the choice of water disinfection regime. PMID:26322769

  4. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibitor Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and MPO-ANCA Production

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Daigo; Shida, Haruki; Hattanda, Fumihiko; Miyoshi, Arina; Masuda, Sakiko; Nishio, Saori; Tomaru, Utano; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis, wherein, MPO-ANCA plays a critical role in the pathogenesis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from activated neutrophils are composed of extracellular web-like DNA and antimicrobial proteins, including MPO. Diverse stimuli, such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ligands of toll-like receptors (TLR), induce NETs. Although TLR-mediated NET formation can occur with preservation of living neutrophilic functions (called vital NETosis), PMA-stimulated neutrophils undergo cell death with NET formation (called suicidal NETosis). In the process of suicidal NETosis, histones are citrullinated by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Since this step is necessary for decondensation of DNA, PAD4 plays a pivotal role in suicidal NETosis. Although NETs are essential for elimination of microorganisms, excessive formation of NETs has been suggested to be implicated in MPO-ANCA production. This study aimed to determine if pan-PAD inhibitors could suppress MPO-ANCA production in vivo. At first, NETs were induced in peripheral blood neutrophils derived from healthy donors (1 × 106/ml) by stimulation with 20 nM PMA with or without 20 μM propylthiouracil (PTU), an anti-thyroid drug. We then determined that the in vitro NET formation was inhibited completely by 200 μM Cl-amidine, a pan-PAD inhibitor. Next, we established mouse models with MPO-ANCA production. BALB/c mice were given intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of PMA (50 ng at days 0 and 7) and oral PTU (2.5 mg/day) for 2 weeks. These mice were divided into two groups; the first group was given daily i.p. injection of PBS (200 μl/day) (n = 13) and the other group with daily i.p. injection of Cl-amidine (0.3 mg/200 μl PBS/day) (n = 7). Two weeks later, citrullination as an indicator of NET formation in the peritoneum and serum MPO-ANCA titer was compared

  5. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibitor Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and MPO-ANCA Production.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Daigo; Shida, Haruki; Hattanda, Fumihiko; Miyoshi, Arina; Masuda, Sakiko; Nishio, Saori; Tomaru, Utano; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis, wherein, MPO-ANCA plays a critical role in the pathogenesis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from activated neutrophils are composed of extracellular web-like DNA and antimicrobial proteins, including MPO. Diverse stimuli, such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ligands of toll-like receptors (TLR), induce NETs. Although TLR-mediated NET formation can occur with preservation of living neutrophilic functions (called vital NETosis), PMA-stimulated neutrophils undergo cell death with NET formation (called suicidal NETosis). In the process of suicidal NETosis, histones are citrullinated by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Since this step is necessary for decondensation of DNA, PAD4 plays a pivotal role in suicidal NETosis. Although NETs are essential for elimination of microorganisms, excessive formation of NETs has been suggested to be implicated in MPO-ANCA production. This study aimed to determine if pan-PAD inhibitors could suppress MPO-ANCA production in vivo. At first, NETs were induced in peripheral blood neutrophils derived from healthy donors (1 × 10(6)/ml) by stimulation with 20 nM PMA with or without 20 μM propylthiouracil (PTU), an anti-thyroid drug. We then determined that the in vitro NET formation was inhibited completely by 200 μM Cl-amidine, a pan-PAD inhibitor. Next, we established mouse models with MPO-ANCA production. BALB/c mice were given intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of PMA (50 ng at days 0 and 7) and oral PTU (2.5 mg/day) for 2 weeks. These mice were divided into two groups; the first group was given daily i.p. injection of PBS (200 μl/day) (n = 13) and the other group with daily i.p. injection of Cl-amidine (0.3 mg/200 μl PBS/day) (n = 7). Two weeks later, citrullination as an indicator of NET formation in the peritoneum and serum MPO-ANCA titer was compared

  6. Secondary organic aerosol formation from m-xylene photooxidation: The role of the phenolic product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Qi, L.; Clark, C.; Sato, K.; Tang, P.; Cocker, D.

    2009-12-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons comprise a significant fraction of volatile organic compounds in the urban atmosphere and their importance as precursors to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been widely recognized. However, SOA formation from aromatics is one of the least understood processes among all the classes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its complex multi-generation reactions. Phenolic compounds have been identified as one of the significant products from OH-initiated reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons and are suggested to have a very high potential of SOA formation (e.g., cresol isomers having SOA yield 9~42%, Henry et al., Atmos. Environ., 2008). We examined the effect of extent of oxidation of m-xylene on chemical composition and physical properties using m-xylene and xylenol as reactants in environmental chamber experiments. Chemical composition of SOA was investigated by Liquid Chromatography / Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (LC/ToF-MS), and Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Physical properties of SOA such as density, volatility, and hygroscopicity were investigated by Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS), Hygroscopicity/Volatility - Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H/V-TDMA), respectively. Also SOA yields were obtained to evaluate the importance of xylenol as an intermediate product.

  7. Tensor representation techniques for full configuration interaction: A Fock space approach using the canonical product format.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Auer, Alexander A; Espig, Mike

    2016-06-28

    In this proof-of-principle study, we apply tensor decomposition techniques to the Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) wavefunction in order to approximate the wavefunction parameters efficiently and to reduce the overall computational effort. For this purpose, the wavefunction ansatz is formulated in an occupation number vector representation that ensures antisymmetry. If the canonical product format tensor decomposition is then applied, the Hamiltonian and the wavefunction can be cast into a multilinear product form. As a consequence, the number of wavefunction parameters does not scale to the power of the number of particles (or orbitals) but depends on the rank of the approximation and linearly on the number of particles. The degree of approximation can be controlled by a single threshold for the rank reduction procedure required in the algorithm. We demonstrate that using this approximation, the FCI Hamiltonian matrix can be stored with N(5) scaling. The error of the approximation that is introduced is below Millihartree for a threshold of ϵ = 10(-4) and no convergence problems are observed solving the FCI equations iteratively in the new format. While promising conceptually, all effort of the algorithm is shifted to the required rank reduction procedure after the contraction of the Hamiltonian with the coefficient tensor. At the current state, this crucial step is the bottleneck of our approach and even for an optimistic estimate, the algorithm scales beyond N(10) and future work has to be directed towards reduction-free algorithms. PMID:27369492

  8. Tensor representation techniques for full configuration interaction: A Fock space approach using the canonical product format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Auer, Alexander A.; Espig, Mike

    2016-06-01

    In this proof-of-principle study, we apply tensor decomposition techniques to the Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) wavefunction in order to approximate the wavefunction parameters efficiently and to reduce the overall computational effort. For this purpose, the wavefunction ansatz is formulated in an occupation number vector representation that ensures antisymmetry. If the canonical product format tensor decomposition is then applied, the Hamiltonian and the wavefunction can be cast into a multilinear product form. As a consequence, the number of wavefunction parameters does not scale to the power of the number of particles (or orbitals) but depends on the rank of the approximation and linearly on the number of particles. The degree of approximation can be controlled by a single threshold for the rank reduction procedure required in the algorithm. We demonstrate that using this approximation, the FCI Hamiltonian matrix can be stored with N5 scaling. The error of the approximation that is introduced is below Millihartree for a threshold of ɛ = 10-4 and no convergence problems are observed solving the FCI equations iteratively in the new format. While promising conceptually, all effort of the algorithm is shifted to the required rank reduction procedure after the contraction of the Hamiltonian with the coefficient tensor. At the current state, this crucial step is the bottleneck of our approach and even for an optimistic estimate, the algorithm scales beyond N10 and future work has to be directed towards reduction-free algorithms.

  9. ZnO nanoparticles inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence factor production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a variety of virulence factors, and biofilms of this bacterium are much more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. Thirty-six metal ions have been investigated to identify antivirulence and antibiofilm metal ions. Zinc ions and ZnO nanoparticles were found to markedly inhibit biofilm formation and the production of pyocyanin, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), pyochelin, and hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa without affecting the growth of planktonic cells. Transcriptome analyses showed that ZnO nanoparticles induce the zinc cation efflux pump czc operon and several important transcriptional regulators (porin gene opdT and type III repressor ptrA), but repress the pyocyanin-related phz operon, which explains observed phenotypic changes. A mutant study showed that the effects of ZnO nanoparticles on the control of pyocyanin production and biofilm formation require the czc regulator CzcR. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles markedly increased the cellular hydrophilicity of P. aeruginosa cells. Our results support that ZnO nanoparticles are potential antivirulence materials against recalcitrant P. aeruginosa infections and possibly other important pathogens. PMID:24958247

  10. Impacts of drinking water pretreatments on the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R; Yin, Daqiang

    2011-12-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including both nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) and carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs), was investigated by analyzing chlorinated water samples following the application of three pretreatment processes: (i) powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption; (ii) KMnO(4) oxidation and (iii) biological contact oxidation (BCO), coupled with conventional water treatment processes. PAC adsorption can remove effectively the precursors of chloroform (42.7%), dichloroacetonitrile (28.6%), dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) (27.2%) and trichloronitromethane (35.7%), which were higher than that pretreated by KMnO(4) oxidation and/or BCO process. The removal efficiency of dissolved organic carbon by BCO process (76.5%)--was superior to that by PAC adsorption (69.9%) and KMnO(4) oxidation (61.4%). However, BCO increased the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration which caused more N-DBPs to be formed during subsequent chlorination. Soluble microbial products including numerous DON compounds were produced in the BCO process and were observed to play an essential role in the formation of DCAcAm in particular. PMID:22014706

  11. Effects of encapsulation of microorganisms on product formation during microbial fermentations.

    PubMed

    Westman, Johan O; Ylitervo, Päivi; Franzén, Carl Johan; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-12-01

    This paper reviews the latest developments in microbial products by encapsulated microorganisms in a liquid core surrounded by natural or synthetic membranes. Cells can be encapsulated in one or several steps using liquid droplet formation, pregel dissolving, coacervation, and interfacial polymerization. The use of encapsulated yeast and bacteria for fermentative production of ethanol, lactic acid, biogas, L-phenylacetylcarbinol, 1,3-propanediol, and riboflavin has been investigated. Encapsulated cells have furthermore been used for the biocatalytic conversion of chemicals. Fermentation, using encapsulated cells, offers various advantages compared to traditional cultivations, e.g., higher cell density, faster fermentation, improved tolerance of the cells to toxic media and high temperatures, and selective exclusion of toxic hydrophobic substances. However, mass transfer through the capsule membrane as well as the robustness of the capsules still challenge the utilization of encapsulated cells. The history and the current state of applying microbial encapsulation for production processes, along with the benefits and drawbacks concerning productivity and general physiology of the encapsulated cells, are discussed. PMID:23104646

  12. Shading of colours in production of ceramic wares - reasons of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, J.; Lis, J.; Szwendke, P.; Wójczyk, M.

    2011-10-01

    One of the most important problems we have to deal with in the ceramic whiteware production is maintaining the stable tonality of colour of the glazes and the decoration of the ceramic products. This difficulties are especially significant for the large batches of production like for example the ceramic titles. The manufacturing of the one assortment for a few days requires the multiple preparation of the glazes and decorative materials. Similar problems occur during the renewing of the production of the given assortment after a longer period of time. The presented paper shows the results of the research covering this topics carried on in The Department of The Ceramic Technology on the AGH Krakow Poland. It is presented the kinds of the factors that can influence the formation of the shadings of coloured glazes: way of mixing of the glaze with stains, time of the mixing and the firing curves. The obtained results of the colour differences ΔE00, calculated from the "Cie L a b" measurements shows that the most important factor that influences the arising of the colour shading is the change of the firing condition and the sequence of the homogenization as the second important.

  13. High-Tc superconducting monolithic phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto-Kobayashi, June H.; Jackson, Charles M.; Pettiette-Hall, Claire L.; Burch, John F.

    1992-03-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) X-band phase shifter using a distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) approach was designed and fabricated. Phase swings of over 60 deg were measured at 65 K and below, with measurable phase shifts at temperatures above 77 K. High quality HTS films and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) were deposited by laser ablation. A total of 40 HTS step edge SQUIDs were successfully integrated into a monolithic HTS circuit to produce a phase shifter in a resonant configuration. The magnitude of the Josephson inductance is calculated and a lumped element model is compared to measurements.

  14. Monolithic LTCC seal frame and lid

    DOEpatents

    Krueger, Daniel S.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Stockdale, Dave; Duncan, James Brent; Riggs, Bristen

    2016-06-21

    A method for forming a monolithic seal frame and lid for use with a substrate and electronic circuitry comprises the steps of forming a mandrel from a ceramic and glass based material, forming a seal frame and lid block from a ceramic and glass based material, creating a seal frame and lid by forming a compartment and a plurality of sidewalls in the seal frame and lid block, placing the seal frame and lid on the mandrel such that the mandrel fits within the compartment, and cofiring the seal frame and lid block.

  15. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  16. 21 CFR 201.66 - Format and content requirements for over-the-counter (OTC) drug product labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Format and content requirements for over-the-counter (OTC) drug product labeling. 201.66 Section 201.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.66 Format...

  17. Effect of magnetic ion exchange and ozonation on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Ryan S; Singer, Philip C

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of treatment with magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin followed by ozonation in achieving disinfection goals while controlling bromate and chlorinated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation. Three water samples were collected from raw water supplies impacted by the San Francisco Bay Delta to represent the varying levels of bromide and total organic carbon (TOC) that occur throughout the year. A fourth water was prepared by spiking bromide into a portion of one of the samples. Samples of each water were pre-treated with alum or virgin MIEX resin, and the raw and treated waters were subsequently ozonated under semi-batch conditions to assess the impact of treatment on ozone demand, ozone exposure for disinfection ("CT"), and bromate formation. Finally, aliquots of raw, coagulated, resin-treated, and ozonated waters were chlorinated in order to measure trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). In the waters studied, MIEX resin removed 41-68% of raw water TOC, compared to 12-44% for alum. MIEX resin also reduced the bromide concentration by 20-50%. The removal of TOC by alum and MIEX resin significantly reduced the ozone demand of all waters studied, resulting in higher dissolved ozone concentrations and CT values for a given amount of ozone transferred into solution. For a given level of disinfection (CT), the amount of bromate produced by ozonation of MIEX-treated waters was similar to or slightly less than that of raw water and significantly less than that of alum-treated water. MIEX resin removed 39-85% of THMFP compared to 16-56% removal by alum. Ozonation reduced THMFP by 35-45% in all cases. This work indicates that in bromide-rich waters in which ozone disinfection is used, MIEX resin is a more appropriate treatment than alum for the removal of organic carbon, as it achieves superior TOC and THM precursor removal and decreases the production of bromate from ozone. PMID:23286989

  18. Effects of hydrogen partial pressure on autotrophic growth and product formation of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Kantzow, Christina; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Low aqueous solubility of the gases for autotrophic fermentations (e.g., hydrogen gas) results in low productivities in bioreactors. A frequently suggested approach to overcome mass transfer limitation is to increase the solubility of the limiting gas in the reaction medium by increasing the partial pressure in the gas phase. An increased inlet hydrogen partial pressure of up to 2.1 bar (total pressure of 3.5 bar) was applied for the autotrophic conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide with Acetobacterium woodii in a batch-operated stirred-tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply. Compared to the autotrophic batch process with an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 0.4 bar (total pressure of 1.0 bar) the final acetate concentration after 3.1 days was reduced to 50 % (29.2 g L(-1) compared to 59.3 g L(-1)), but the final formate concentration was increased by a factor of 18 (7.3 g L(-1) compared to 0.4 g L(-1)). Applying recombinant A. woodii strains overexpressing either genes for enzymes in the methyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or the genes phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase at an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 1.4 bar reduced the final formate concentration by up to 40 % and increased the final dry cell mass and acetate concentrations compared to the wild type strain. Solely the overexpression of the two genes for ATP regeneration at the end of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway resulted in an initial switch off of formate production at increased hydrogen partial pressure until the maximum of the hydrogen uptake rate was reached. PMID:27059835

  19. Pseudomonas and neutrophil products modify transferrin and lactoferrin to create conditions that favor hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, B E; Edeker, B L

    1991-01-01

    In vivo most extracellular iron is bound to transferrin or lactoferrin in such a way as to be unable to catalyze the formation of hydroxyl radical from superoxide (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). At sites of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection bacterial and neutrophil products could possibly modify transferrin and/or lactoferrin forming catalytic iron complexes. To examine this possibility, diferrictransferrin and diferriclactoferrin which had been incubated with pseudomonas elastase, pseudomonas alkaline protease, human neutrophil elastase, trypsin, or the myeloperoxidase product HOCl were added to a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase .O2-/H2O2 generating system. Hydroxyl radical formation was only detected with pseudomonas elastase treated diferrictransferrin and, to a much lesser extent, diferriclactoferrin. This effect was enhanced by the combination of pseudomonas elastase with other proteases, most prominently neutrophil elastase. Addition of pseudomonas elastase-treated diferrictransferrin to stimulated neutrophils also resulted in hydroxyl radical generation. Incubation of pseudomonas elastase with transferrin which had been selectively iron loaded at either the NH2- or COOH-terminal binding site yielded iron chelates with similar efficacy for hydroxyl radical catalysis. Pseudomonas elastase and HOCl treatment also decreased the ability of apotransferrin to inhibit hydroxyl radical formation by a Fe-NTA supplemented hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system. However, apotransferrin could be protected from the effects of HOCl if bicarbonate anion was present during the incubation. Apolactoferrin inhibition of hydroxyl radical generation was unaffected by any of the four proteases or HOCl. Alteration of transferrin by enzymes and oxidants present at sites of pseudomonas and other bacterial infections may increase the potential for local hydroxyl radical generation thereby contributing to tissue injury. Images PMID:1655825

  20. Creating deep soil core monoliths: Beyond the solum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil monoliths serve as useful teaching aids in the study of the Earth’s critical zone where rock, soil, water, air, and organisms interact. Typical monolith preparation has so far been confined to the 1 to 2-m depth of the solum. Critical ecosystem services provided by soils include materials from ...

  1. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  2. Design considerations for monolithic unidirectional planar ring oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Bao, Guojun; Ge, Yi; Wang, Zhongming; He, Anzhi; Tao, Hailin

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of monolithic unidirectional planar ring oscillator (PROs) are analyzed, and design criteria for PROs with low thresholds and large nonreciprocities are expounded on the basis of the eigenpolarization theory of monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators. A Nd:BGO PRO is designed to take advantage of its large Verdet coefficient.

  3. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Horne, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array.

  4. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Horne, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array. 10 figures.

  5. Differences in porous characteristics of styrenic monoliths prepared by controlled thermal polymerization in molds of varying dimensions.

    PubMed

    Byström, Emil; Viklund, Camilla; Irgum, Knut

    2010-02-01

    Nitroxide-mediated polymerization was used as a model system for preparing styrenic monolithic materials with significant mesopore contents in different mold formats, with the aim of assessing the validity of pore characterization of capillary monoliths by analysis of parallel bulk polymerized precursor solution. Capillary monoliths were prepared in 250 microm id fused silica tubes (quadruplicate samples, in total 17 m), and the batch polymerizations were carried out in parallel in 100 microL microvials and regular 2 mL glass vials, both in quintuplicate. The monoliths recovered from the molds were characterized for their meso- and macroporous properties by nitrogen sorptiometry (three repeated runs on each sample), followed by a single analysis by mercury intrusion porosimetry. A total of 14 monolith samples were thus analyzed. A Grubbs' test identified one regular vial sample as an outlier in the sorptiometric surface area measurements, and data from this sample were consequently excluded from the pore size calculations, which are based on the same nitrogen sorption data, and also from the mercury intrusion data set. The remaining data were subjected to single factor analyses of variance analyses to test if the porous properties of the capillary monoliths were different from those of the bulk monoliths prepared in parallel. Significant differences were found between all three formats both in their meso- and macroporous properties. When the dimension was shrunk from conventional vial to capillary size, the specific surface area decreased from 52.2+/-4.7 to 34.6+/-1.7 m(2)/g. This decrease in specific surface area was accompanied by a significant shift in median diameter of the through-pores, from 310+/-3.9 to 544+/-13 nm. None of these differences were obvious from the scanning electron micrographs that were acquired for each sample type. The common practice of determining the mesopore characteristics from analysis of samples prepared by parallel bulk

  6. Monoterpene SOA - Contribution of first-generation oxidation products to formation and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzel, Anke; Rodigast, Maria; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of the consecutive reactions of first-generation terpene oxidation products provides insight into the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). To this end, OH radical reactions with α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were examined along with the OH-oxidation of nopinone as a β-pinene oxidation product and pinonaldehyde and myrtenal as α-pinene oxidation products. The SOA yield of β-pinene (0.50) was much higher than that of α-pinene (0.35) and the limonene/OH system (0.30). This is opposite to the ozonolysis SOA yields described in the literature. The growth curve of SOA from β-pinene shows the contribution of secondary reactions, such as further reaction of nopinone. This contribution (17%) and the high SOA yield of nopinone (0.24) might lead to the high SOA formation potential observed for β-pinene. The majority of the C9 oxidation products observed from β-pinene can be attributed to the consecutive reaction of nopinone, whereas in the case of pinonaldehyde, only a few α-pinene oxidation products were identified. Nopinone contributes significantly to the formation of pinic acid (51%), homoterpenylic acid (74%), and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butane-tricarboxylic acid (MBTCA, 88%) during β-pinene oxidation. The oxidation of pinonaldehyde was expected to produce important SOA markers, but only negligible amounts were identified. This indicates that their formation by oxidation of α-pinene must proceed via different pathways from the further oxidation of pinonaldehyde. Only pinonic acid and MBTCA were found in considerable amounts and were formed in α-pinene oxidation with 57% yield, while that for the pinonaldehyde/OH reaction was 33%. The lack of important SOA marker compounds might cause the low SOA yield (0.07) observed for pinonaldehyde. Based on the low SOA yield, pinonaldehyde contributes only 4.5% to α-pinene SOA. Myrtenal was identified among the gas-phase products of α-pinene oxidation. A majority of α-pinene SOA marker compounds was

  7. Potential of long capillary monolithic columns for the analysis of protein digests.

    PubMed

    van de Meent, Michiel H M; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    2009-02-01

    The gain in separation efficiency for protein digests using long monolithic columns has been evaluated for a LC-MS system with capillary monolithic columns of different lengths (150 and 750 mm). A mixture of BSA, alpha-casein and beta-casein tryptic digests was used as a test sample. Peak capacity and productivity (peak capacity per unit time) were determined from base peak chromatograms and MS/MS data were used for protein identification by MASCOT database searching. Peak capacity and protein identification scores were higher for the long column. Analyses with similar gradient slope for the two columns produced ratios of the peak capacities that were slightly higher than the expected value of the square root of the column length ratio. Peak capacity ratios varied from 2.7 to 4.0 for four different gradient slopes, while protein identification scores were 2-4 times higher for the long column. Similar values were obtained for the productivity of both columns and the highest productivity was obtained at gradient times of 45 and 75 min for the short and long column, respectively. The use of long monolithic columns improves peptide separation and increases reliability of protein identification for complex digests, especially if longer gradients are chosen. PMID:19160369

  8. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. PMID:26627587

  9. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30

    of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in

  10. FOAM FORMATION IN THE SALTSTONE PRODUCTION FACILITY: EVALUATION OF SOURCES AND MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.

    2011-01-18

    The Saltstone Production Facility receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. Influents into Tank 50H include the Effluent Treatment Project waste concentrate, H-Canyon low activity waste and General Purpose Evaporator bottoms, Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit decontaminated salt solution, and salt solution from the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjust campaign. Using the Waste Characterization System (WCS), this study tracks the relative amounts of each influent into Tank 50H, as well as the total content of Tank 50H, in an attempt to identify the source of foaming observed in the Saltstone Production Facility hopper. Saltstone has been using antifoam as part of routine processing with the restart of the facility in December 2006. It was determined that the maximum admix usage in the Saltstone Production Facility, both antifoam and set retarder, corresponded with the maximum concentration of H-Canyon low activity waste in Tank 50H. This paper also evaluates archived salt solutions from Waste Acceptance Criteria analysis for propensity to foam and the antifoam dosage required to mitigate foaming. It was determined that Effluent Treatment Project contributed to the expansion factor (foam formation) and General Purpose Evaporator contributed to foaminess (persistence). It was also determined that undissolved solids contribute to foam persistence. It was shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced both the expansion factor and foaminess of salt solutions. The evaluation of foaming in the grout hopper during the transition from water to salt solution indicated that higher water-to-premix ratios tended to produce increased foaming. It was also shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced foam formation and persistence.

  11. The Role of Oxygen in the Formation of TNT Product Ions in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Keith Alvin; Atkinson, David Alan; Ewing, Robert Gordon

    2002-03-01

    The atmospheric pressure ionization of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in air yields the (TNT-H)- product ion. It is generally accepted that this product ion is formed by the direct proton abstraction of neutral TNT by O2- reactant ions. Data presented here demonstrate the reaction involves the formation of an intermediate (TNT·O2)-, from the association of either TNT+O2- or TNT-+O2. This intermediate has two subsequent reaction branches. One of these branches involves simple dissociation of the intermediate to TNT-; the other branch is a terminal reaction that forms the typically observed (TNT-H)- ion via proton abstraction. The dissociation reaction involving electron transfer to TNT- appeared to be kinetically favored and prevailed at low concentrations of oxygen (less than 2%). The presence of significant amounts of oxygen, however, resulted in the predominant formation of the (TNT-H)- ion by the terminal reaction branch. With TNT- in the system, either from direct electron attachment or by simple dissociation of the intermediate, increasing levels of oxygen in the system will continue to reform the intermediate, allowing the cycle to continue until proton abstraction occurs. Key to understanding this complex reaction pathway is that O2- was observed to transfer an electron directly to neutral TNT to form the TNT-. At oxygen levels of less than 2%, the TNT- ion intensity increased with increasing levels of oxygen (and O2-) and was larger than the (TNT-H)- ion intensity. As the oxygen level increased from 2 to 10%, the (TNT-H)- product ion became predominant. The potential reaction mechanisms were investigated with an ion mobility spectrometer, which was configured to independently evaluate the ionization pathways.

  12. Monolithic Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyst Bed Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    With recent increased industry and government interest in rocket grade hydrogen peroxide as a viable propellant, significant effort has been expended to improve on earlier developments. This effort has been predominately centered in improving heterogeneous. typically catalyst beds; and homogeneous catalysts, which are typically solutions of catalytic substances. Heterogeneous catalyst beds have traditionally consisted of compressed wire screens plated with a catalytic substance, usually silver, and were used m many RCS applications (X-1, Mercury, and Centaur for example). Aerojet has devised a heterogeneous catalyst design that is monolithic (single piece), extremely compact, and has pressure drops equal to or less than traditional screen beds. The design consists of a bonded stack of very thin, photoetched metal plates, silver coated. This design leads to a high surface area per unit volume and precise flow area, resulting in high, stable, and repeatable performance. Very high throughputs have been demonstrated with 90% hydrogen peroxide. (0.60 lbm/s/sq in at 1775-175 psia) with no flooding of the catalyst bed. Bed life of over 900 seconds has also been demonstrated at throughputs of 0.60 lbm/s/sq in across varying chamber pressures. The monolithic design also exhibits good starting performance, short break-in periods, and will easily scale to various sizes.

  13. The Cell Factory Aspergillus Enters the Big Data Era: Opportunities and Challenges for Optimising Product Formation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Vera; Fiedler, Markus; Nitsche, Benjamin; King, Rudibert

    2015-01-01

    Living with limits. Getting more from less. Producing commodities and high-value products from renewable resources including waste. What is the driving force and quintessence of bioeconomy outlines the lifestyle and product portfolio of Aspergillus, a saprophytic genus, to which some of the top-performing microbial cell factories belong: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus terreus. What makes them so interesting for exploitation in biotechnology and how can they help us to address key challenges of the twenty-first century? How can these strains become trimmed for better growth on second-generation feedstocks and how can we enlarge their product portfolio by genetic and metabolic engineering to get more from less? On the other hand, what makes it so challenging to deduce biological meaning from the wealth of Aspergillus -omics data? And which hurdles hinder us to model and engineer industrial strains for higher productivity and better rheological performance under industrial cultivation conditions? In this review, we will address these issues by highlighting most recent findings from the Aspergillus research with a focus on fungal growth, physiology, morphology and product formation. Indeed, the last years brought us many surprising insights into model and industrial strains. They clearly told us that similar is not the same: there are different ways to make a hypha, there are more protein secretion routes than anticipated and there are different molecular and physical mechanisms which control polar growth and the development of hyphal networks. We will discuss new conceptual frameworks derived from these insights and the future scientific advances necessary to create value from Aspergillus Big Data. PMID:25616499

  14. Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Billingsley

    2005-12-01

    Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses

  15. Development of a far-infrared Ge:Ga monolithic array for a possible application to SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahata, Mai; Kamiya, Shuhei; Matsuura, Shuji; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Sawayama, Yoshihiro; Doi, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Takao; Wada, Takehiko; Kawada, Hidehiro; Creten, Ybe; Okcan, Burak; Raab, Walfried; Poglitsch, Albrecht

    2010-07-01

    We present the current status of the development of a far-infrared monolithic Ge:Ga photoconductor array proposed for the SAFARI instrument onboard SPICA, which is a future infrared space mission. SPICA has a large (3-m class) cooled (<6 K) telescope, which enables us to make astronomical observations with high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity in the mid- and far-infrared wavelength. As a candidate detector to cover the 45-110 μm band of a far-infrared focal plan instrument of SAFARI, we are developing a large format monolithic Ge:Ga array. The monolithic Ge:Ga array is directly connected to cryogenic readout electronics (CRE) using the Au-Indium bumping technology. Our goal is to develop a 64×64 Ge:Ga array, on the basis of existing technologies and experience in making the 3×20 Ge:Ga monolithic arrays for the AKARI satellite. In order to realize a larger format array with better sensitivity than that of the AKARI array, we have been making some technical improvements; (1) development of the Au-In bumping technology to realize the large format array, (2) optimization of the structure of the transparent electrode to achieve the better sensitivity, (3) development of an anti-reflection coating to reduce interference fringe between the Ge substrate, and (4) Use of the low-noise cryogenic readout electronics with low power consumption. We fabricated the prototype 5×5 Ge:Ga arrays to demonstrate and evaluate the properties of monolithic array. We demonstrate experimentally the feasibility of these elemental technologies, and also show the results of performance measurements for the prototype Ge:Ga arrays.

  16. Roles of N287 in catalysis and product formation of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nimpiboon, Pitchanan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Kaulpiboon, Jarunee; Kidokoro, Shun-Ichi; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook

    2016-09-16

    Amylomaltase catalyzes intermolecular and intramolecular transglucosylation reactions to form linear and cyclic oligosaccharides, respectively. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure-function relationship of amylomaltase from a mesophilic Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to substitute Tyr for Asn287 (N287Y) to determine its role in controlling amylomaltase activity and product formation. Expression of the wild-type (WT) and N287Y was achieved by cultivating recombinant cells in the medium containing lactose at 16 °C for 14 h. The purified mutated enzyme showed a significant decrease in all transglucosylation activities while hydrolysis activity was not changed. Optimum temperature and pH for disproportionation reaction were slightly changed upon mutation while those for cyclization reaction were not changed. Interestingly, N287Y showed a change in large-ring cyclodextrin (LR-CD) product profile in which the larger size was observed together with an increase in thermostability and substrate preference for G5 in addition to G3. The secondary structure of the mutated enzyme was slightly changed in related to the WT as evidenced from circular dichroism analysis. This work thus demonstrates that N287 is required for transglucosylation activities of CgAM. Having an aromatic residue in this position increased thermostability, changed product profile and substrate preference but demolished most enzyme activities. PMID:27507216

  17. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression. PMID:25662254

  18. Effect of licorice extract on cell viability, biofilm formation and exotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rohinishree, Yadahalli Shrihari; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant clinical pathogen, as it causes infections to humans and animals. Even though several antibiotics and other treatments have been used to control S. aureus infections and intoxication, bacterium is able to adapt, survive and produces exotoxins. Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) has been used traditionally in various medicinal (antimicrobial) preparations, and Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is the major active constituents present in it. In the present investigation the effect of licorice extract on methicillin susceptible S. aureus (FRI 722) and methicillin resistant S. aureus (ATCC 43300) growth and toxin production was studied. The MIC of licorice extract was found to be 0.25 and 2.5 mg GA ml(-1) against S. aureus FRI 722 and S. aureus ATCC 43300, respectively. Inhibition of biofilm formation was observed even at very low concentration (25 μg GA ml(-1)). Gradual decrease in expression and production of exotoxins such as α and β hemolysins and enterotoxin B was observed with the increasing concentrations of licorice extract, however, suboptimal concentration induced the expression of some of the virulence genes. This study indicated efficacy of licorice extract in controlling growth and pathogenicity of both methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant S. aureus, however, the mechanisms of survival and toxin production at suboptimal concentration needs further study. PMID:27162389

  19. Impact of formate on the growth and productivity of Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC and Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 grown on syngas.

    PubMed

    Ramió-Pujol, Sara; Ganigué, Ramon; Bañeras, Lluís; Colprim, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The current energy model based on fossil fuels is coming to an end due to the increase in global energy demand. Biofuels such as ethanol and butanol can be produced through the syngas fermentation by acetogenic bacteria. The present work hypothesizes that formate addition would positively impact kinetic parameters for growth and alcohol production in Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC and Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 by diminishing the need for reducing equivalents. Fermentation experiments were conducted using completely anaerobic batch cultures at different pH values and formate concentrations. PETC cultures were more tolerant to formate concentrations than P7, specially at pH 5.0 and 6.0. Complete growth inhibition of PETC occurred at sodium formate concentrations of 30.0 mM; however, no differences in growth rates were observed at pH 7.0 for the two strains. Incubation at formate concentrations lower than 2.0 mM resulted in increased growth rates for both strains. The most recognizable effects of formate addition on the fermentation products were the increase in the total carbon fixed into acids and alcohols at pH 5.0 and pH 6.0, as well as, a higher ethanol to total products ratio at pH 7.0. Taken all together, these results show the ability of acetogens to use formate diminishing the energy demand for growth, and enhancing strain productivity. PMID:26421736

  20. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  1. Hydrogel coated monoliths for enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G

    PubMed Central

    Smeltink, M. W.; Straathof, A. J. J.; Paasman, M. A.; van de Sandt, E. J. A. X.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogel-coated monolith for the entrapment of penicillin G acylase (E. coli, PGA). After screening of different hydrogels, chitosan was chosen as the carrier material for the preparation of monolithic biocatalysts. This protocol leads to active immobilized biocatalysts for the enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G (PenG). The monolithic biocatalyst was tested in a monolith loop reactor (MLR) and compared with conventional reactor systems using free PGA, and a commercially available immobilized PGA. The optimal immobilization protocol was found to be 5 g l−1 PGA, 1% chitosan, 1.1% glutaraldehyde and pH 7. Final PGA loading on glass plates was 29 mg ml−1 gel. For 400 cpsi monoliths, the final PGA loading on functionalized monoliths was 36 mg ml−1 gel. The observed volumetric reaction rate in the MLR was 0.79 mol s−1 m−3monolith. Apart from an initial drop in activity due to wash out of PGA at higher ionic strength, no decrease in activity was observed after five subsequent activity test runs. The storage stability of the biocatalysts is at least a month without loss of activity. Although the monolithic biocatalyst as used in the MLR is still outperformed by the current industrial catalyst (immobilized preparation of PGA, 4.5 mol s−1 m−3catalyst), the rate per gel volume is slightly higher for monolithic catalysts. Good activity and improved mechanical strength make the monolithic bioreactor an interesting alternative that deserves further investigation for this application. Although moderate internal diffusion limitations have been observed inside the gel beads and in the gel layer on the monolith channel, this is not the main reason for the large differences in reactor performance that were observed. The pH drop over the reactor as a result of the chosen method for pH control results in a decreased performance of both the MLR and the packed bed reactor compared to the batch system. A different

  2. Impact of antioxidants on the formation of volatile secondary lipid oxidation products in oil-in-water emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food emulsions are particularly susceptible to lipid oxidation, which leads to the formation of off-flavors and odors, and ultimately, shorter product shelf lives. Here we examine antioxidants for use in emulsions from a variety of different sources, including natural product extracts as well as rat...

  3. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  4. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  5. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  6. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  7. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  8. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  9. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  10. Dissociation and product formation in NF sub 3 radio-frequency glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Greenberg, K.E. )

    1990-03-15

    Laser Raman spectroscopy was used to measure NF{sub 3} dissociation and N{sub 2} formation in the active volume of 13.56-MHz NF{sub 3} radio-frequency (rf) discharges. Gating the rf discharge suppressed optical emission, allowing NF{sub 3} and N{sub 2} Raman measurements at rf powers where N{sub 2} production was expected to be significant. Greater than 90% dissociation of the NF{sub 3} was observed in a 750 mTorr discharge at rf power densities on the order of 1 W/cm{sup 2} , yet less than 50 mTorr of N{sub 2} was produced. NF was the only other nitrogen containing species detected in the active volume of the discharge.

  11. Metolachlor and alachlor breakdown product formation patterns in aquatic field mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, W.H.; Graham, D.W.; DeNoyelles, F., Jr.; Smith, V.H.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)- N-(2-methoxy-1-methyl)ethyl)acetamide] and alachlor [2-chloro-N-(2,6- diethylphenyl)-N-methoxymethyl)acetamide] in aquatic systems was investigated using outdoor tank mesocosms. Metolachlor and alachlor levels and their ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanillic acid breakdown products were monitored over time under five experimental treatments (each in quadruplicate). Background water conditions were identical in all treatments with each treatment differing based on the level and type(s) of herbicide present. Treatments included a noherbicide control, 10 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L alachlor, and 25 ??g/L alachlor plus 25 ??g/L metolachlor in combination. The experiment was initiated by adding herbicide(s) to the units to the target concentrations; herbicide and breakdown product levels and other chemical parameters were then monitored for 85 days. In general, metolachlor half-lives were longer than alachlor half-lives under all treatments, although the differences were not statistically significant. Metolachlor half-lives (??95% confidence limits) ranged from 33.0 d (??14.1 d) to 46.2 d (??40.0 d), whereas alachlor half- lives ranged from 18.7 d (??3.5 d) to 21.0 d (??6.5 d) for different treatments. Formation patterns of ESA were similar in all treatments, whereas oxanillic acid formation differed for the two herbicides. Alachlor oxanillic acid was produced in larger quantities than metolachlor oxanillic acid and either ESA under equivalent conditions. Our results suggest that the transformation pathways for alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems are similar and resemble the acetochlor pathway in soils proposed by Feng (Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 1991, 34, 136); however, the oxanillic acid branch of the pathway is favored for alachlor as compared with metolachlor.The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N- (2-methoxy-1-methylethy

  12. Building Bridges: Biocatalytic C–C-Bond Formation toward Multifunctional Products

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carbon–carbon bond formation is the key reaction for organic synthesis to construct the carbon framework of organic molecules. The review gives a selection of biocatalytic C–C-bond-forming reactions which have been investigated during the last 5 years and which have already been proven to be applicable for organic synthesis. In most cases, the reactions lead to products functionalized at the site of C–C-bond formation (e.g., α-hydroxy ketones, aminoalcohols, diols, 1,4-diketones, etc.) or allow to decorate aromatic and heteroaromatic molecules. Furthermore, examples for cyclization of (non)natural precursors leading to saturated carbocycles are given as well as the stereoselective cyclopropanation of olefins affording cyclopropanes. Although many tools are already available, recent research also makes it clear that nature provides an even broader set of enzymes to perform specific C–C coupling reactions. The possibilities are without limit; however, a big library of variants for different types of reactions is required to have the specific enzyme for a desired specific (stereoselective) reaction at hand. PMID:27398261

  13. Role of Anaerobiosis in Capsule Production and Biofilm Formation in Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Phippen, Britney L.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a pervasive human pathogen, can cause potentially fatal septicemia after consumption of undercooked seafood. Biotype 1 strains of V. vulnificus are most commonly associated with human infection and are separated into two genotypes, clinical (C) and environmental (E), based on the virulence-correlated gene. For ingestion-based vibriosis to occur, this bacterium must be able to withstand multiple conditions as it traverses the gastrointestinal tract and ultimately gains entry into the bloodstream. One such condition, anoxia, has yet to be extensively researched in V. vulnificus. We investigated the effect of oxygen availability on capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production and biofilm formation in this bacterium, both of which are thought to be important for disease progression. We found that lack of oxygen elicits a reduction in both CPS and biofilm formation in both genotypes. This is further supported by the finding that pilA, pilD, and mshA genes, all of which encode type IV pilin proteins that aid in attachment to surfaces, were downregulated during anaerobiosis. Surprisingly, E-genotypes exhibited distinct differences in gene expression levels of capsule and attachment genes compared to C-genotypes, both aerobically and anaerobically. The importance of understanding these disparities may give insight into the observed differences in environmental occurrence and virulence potential between these two genotypes of V. vulnificus. PMID:25404024

  14. Role of anaerobiosis in capsule production and biofilm formation in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Britney L; Oliver, James D

    2015-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a pervasive human pathogen, can cause potentially fatal septicemia after consumption of undercooked seafood. Biotype 1 strains of V. vulnificus are most commonly associated with human infection and are separated into two genotypes, clinical (C) and environmental (E), based on the virulence-correlated gene. For ingestion-based vibriosis to occur, this bacterium must be able to withstand multiple conditions as it traverses the gastrointestinal tract and ultimately gains entry into the bloodstream. One such condition, anoxia, has yet to be extensively researched in V. vulnificus. We investigated the effect of oxygen availability on capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production and biofilm formation in this bacterium, both of which are thought to be important for disease progression. We found that lack of oxygen elicits a reduction in both CPS and biofilm formation in both genotypes. This is further supported by the finding that pilA, pilD, and mshA genes, all of which encode type IV pilin proteins that aid in attachment to surfaces, were downregulated during anaerobiosis. Surprisingly, E-genotypes exhibited distinct differences in gene expression levels of capsule and attachment genes compared to C-genotypes, both aerobically and anaerobically. The importance of understanding these disparities may give insight into the observed differences in environmental occurrence and virulence potential between these two genotypes of V. vulnificus. PMID:25404024

  15. Tensor representation techniques in post-Hartree-Fock methods: matrix product state tensor format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Udo; Auer, Henry; Espig, Mike; Hackbusch, Wolfgang; Auer, Alexander A.

    2013-09-01

    In this proof-of-principle study, we discuss the application of various tensor representation formats and their implications on memory requirements and computational effort for tensor manipulations as they occur in typical post-Hartree-Fock (post-HF) methods. A successive tensor decomposition/rank reduction scheme in the matrix product state (MPS) format for the two-electron integrals in the AO and MO bases and an estimate of the t 2 amplitudes as obtained from second-order many-body perturbation theory (MP2) are described. Furthermore, the AO-MO integral transformation, the calculation of the MP2 energy and the potential usage of tensors in low-rank MPS representation for the tensor contractions in coupled cluster theory are discussed in detail. We are able to show that the overall scaling of the memory requirements is reduced from the conventional N 4 scaling to approximately N 3 and the scaling of computational effort for tensor contractions in post-HF methods can be reduced to roughly N 4 while the decomposition itself scales as N 5. While efficient algorithms with low prefactor for the tensor decomposition have yet to be devised, this ansatz offers the possibility to find a robust approximation with low-scaling behaviour with system and basis-set size for post-HF ab initio methods.

  16. Monolithic 3D-ICs with single grain Si thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, R.; Derakhshandeh, J.; Tajari Mofrad, M. R.; Chen, T.; Golshani, N.; Beenakker, C. I. M.

    2012-05-01

    Monolithic 3D integration is the ultimate approach in 3D-ICs as it provides high-density and submicron vertical interconnects and hence transistor level integration. Here, high-quality Si layer formation at a low temperature is a key challenge. We review our recent achievements in monolithic 3D-ICs based on single-grain Si TFTs that are fabricated inside a single-grain with a low-temperature process. With the μ-Czochralski process based on a pulsed-laser crystallization, Si grains with a diameter of 6 μm are successfully formed on predetermined positions. Single-grain (SG) Si TFTs are fabricated inside the single-grain with mobility for electron and holes of 600 cm2/V s and 200 cm2/V s, respectively. Two layers of the SG Si TFT were vertically stacked and successfully implemented into CMOS inverter, 3D 6T-SRAM and single-grain lateral PIN photo-diode with in-pixel amplifier. Those results indicate that the SG TFTs are attractive for use in monolithic 3D-ICs on an arbitrary substrate including a glass and even a plastic for applications such as ultra-high-density memories, logic-to-logic integration, CPU integrated display, and high-definition image sensor for artificial retina.

  17. Formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in 10 chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water supply systems.

    PubMed

    Liew, Deborah; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water supplies is a public health concern, particularly since some N-DBPs have been reported to be more toxic than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of the presence of N-DBPs in 10 drinking water supply systems in Western Australia is presented. A suite of 28 N-DBPs, including N-nitrosamines, haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAAms) and halonitromethanes (HNMs), were measured and evaluated for relationships with bulk parameters in the waters before disinfection. A number of N-DBPs were frequently detected in disinfected waters, although at generally low concentrations (<10 ng/L for N-nitrosamines and <10 μg/L for other N-DBPs) and below health guideline values where they exist. While there were no clear relationships between N-DBP formation and organic nitrogen in the pre-disinfection water, N-DBP concentrations were significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ammonia, and these, in addition to high bromide in one of the waters, led to elevated concentrations of brominated HANs (26.6 μg/L of dibromoacetonitrile). There were significant differences in the occurrence of all classes of N-DBPs between chlorinated and chloraminated waters, except for HNMs, which were detected at relatively low concentrations in both water types. Trends observed in one large distribution system suggest that N-DBPs can continue to form or degrade within distribution systems, and redosing of disinfectant may cause further by-product formation. PMID:27523603

  18. Monolithic semiconductor mid-IR optical parametric oscillators with modal phase matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, R. M.; Oh, S. W.; Osowski, M. L.; Panja, C.; Rudy, P. T.; Stakelon, T.; Ungar, J. E.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical analysis and experimental data from a monolithic semiconductor laser and optical parametric oscillator device which generates near-infrared laser beam and converts it to a longer mid-infrared wavelength by modal phase matching. The device design exploits the strong optical nonlinearity and transparency of III-V compound semiconductors while achieving phase matching of the near-infrared pump beam to the mid-infrared product beam(s). These devices have the potential to dramatically improve the CW Mid-IR power available at room temperature from monolithic semiconductor lasers, making them ideal for a broad range of applications including infrared countermeasures, detecting chemical weapons, imaging, and fog-penetrating optical communications.

  19. Aerobic nitrous oxide production through N-nitrosating hybrid formation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Mooshammer, Maria; Kitzler, Barbara; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa

    2014-05-01

    Soil emissions are largely responsible for the increase of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere and are generally attributed to the activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. However, the contribution of the recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to N2O production from soil is unclear as is the mechanism by which they produce it. Here we investigate the potential of Nitrososphaera viennensis, the first pure culture of AOA from soil, to produce N2O and compare its activity with that of a marine AOA and an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) from soil. N. viennensis produced N2O at a maximum yield of 0.09% N2O per molecule of nitrite under oxic growth conditions. N2O production rates of 4.6±0.6 amol N2O cell(-1) h(-1) and nitrification rates of 2.6±0.5 fmol NO2(-) cell(-1) h(-1) were in the same range as those of the AOB Nitrosospira multiformis and the marine AOA Nitrosopumilus maritimus grown under comparable conditions. In contrast to AOB, however, N2O production of the two archaeal strains did not increase when the oxygen concentration was reduced, suggesting that they are not capable of denitrification. In (15)N-labeling experiments we provide evidence that both ammonium and nitrite contribute equally via hybrid N2O formation to the N2O produced by N. viennensis under all conditions tested. Our results suggest that archaea may contribute to N2O production in terrestrial ecosystems, however, they are not capable of nitrifier-denitrification and thus do not produce increasing amounts of the greenhouse gas when oxygen becomes limiting. PMID:24401864

  20. Novel porous fly-ash containing geopolymer monoliths for lead adsorption from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Novais, Rui M; Buruberri, L H; Seabra, M P; Labrincha, J A

    2016-11-15

    In this study novel porous biomass fly ash-containing geopolymer monoliths were produced using a simple and flexible procedure. Geopolymers exhibiting distinct total porosities (ranging from 41.0 to 78.4%) and low apparent density (between 1.21 and 0.44g/cm(3)) were fabricated. Afterwards, the possibility of using these innovative materials as lead adsorbents under distinct conditions was evaluated. Results demonstrate that the geopolymers' porosity and the pH of the ion solution strongly affect the lead adsorption capacity. Lead adsorption by the geopolymer monoliths ranged between 0.95 and 6.34mglead/ggeopolymer. More porous geopolymers presented better lead removal efficiency, while higher pH in the solution reduced their removal ability, since metal precipitation is enhanced. These novel geopolymeric monoliths can be used in packed beds that are easily collected when exhausted, which is a major advantage in comparison with the use of powdered adsorbents. Furthermore, their production encompasses the reuse of biomass fly-ash, mitigating the environmental impact associated with this waste disposal, while decreasing the adsorbents production costs. PMID:27475461

  1. Thermal cycling effect in U-10Mo/Zry-4 monolithic nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Denise A.; Zimmermann, Angelo J. O.; Silva, Selma L.; Piqueira, J. R. C.

    2016-05-01

    Uranium alloys in a monolithic form have been considered attractive candidates for high density nuclear fuel. However, this high-density fissile material configuration keeps the volume permitted for the retention of fission products at a minimum. Additionally, the monolithic nuclear fuel has a peculiar configuration, whereby the fuel is in direct contact with the cladding. How this fuel configuration will retain fission products and how this will affect its integrity under various physical conditions - such as thermal cycling - are some of the technological problems for this new fuel. In this paper, the effect of out-of-pile thermal cycling is studied for a monolithic fuel plate produced by a hot co-rolling method using U-10Mo (wt %) as the fuel alloy and Zircaloy-4 as the cladding material. After performing 10 thermal cycles from 25 to 400 °C at a rate of 1 °C/min (∼125 h), the fuel alloy presented several fractures that were observed to occur in the last three cycles. These cracks nucleated approximately in the center of the fuel alloy and crossed the interdiffusion zone initiating an internal crack in the cladding. The results suggest that the origin of these fractures is the thermal fatigue of the U-10Mo alloy caused due to the combination of two factors: (i) the high difference in the thermal expansion coefficient of the fuel and of the cladding material, and (ii) the bound condition of fuel/cladding materials in this fuel element configuration.

  2. Manganese Oxide Nanoarray-Based Monolithic Catalysts: Tunable Morphology and High Efficiency for CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yu; Song, Wenqiao; Lin, Hui-Jan; Wang, Sibo; Biswas, Sourav; Mollahosseini, Mehdi; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-03-30

    A generic one-pot hydrothermal synthesis route has been successfully designed and utilized to in situ grow uniform manganese oxide nanorods and nanowires onto the cordierite honeycomb monolithic substrates, forming a series of nanoarray-based monolithic catalysts. During the synthesis process, three types of potassium salt oxidants have been used with different reduction potentials, i.e., K2Cr2O7, KClO3, and K2S2O8, denoted as HM-DCM, HM-PCR, and HM-PSF, respectively. The different reduction potentials of the manganese source (Mn(2+)) and oxidants induced the formation of manganese oxide nanoarrays with different morphology, surface area, and reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. K2Cr2O7 and KClO3 can induce sharp and long nanowires with slow growth rates due to their low reduction potentials. In comparison, the nanoarrays of HM-PSF presented shorter nanorods but displayed an efficient 90% CO oxidation conversion at 200 °C (T90) without noble-metal loading. Reducibility tests for the three monolithic catalysts by hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction revealed an activation energy order of HM-PSF > HM-DCM > HM-PCR for CO oxidation. The characterizations of oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated the abundant surface-adsorbed oxygen and lattice oxygen contributing to the superior reactivity of HM-PSF. The straightforward synthetic process showed a scalable, low-cost, and template-free method to fabricate manganese oxide nanoarray monolithic catalysts for exhaust treatment. PMID:26954301

  3. Flow-through immunosensors using antibody-immobilized polymer monoliths

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jikun; Chen, Chien-Fu; Chang, Chih-Wei; DeVoe, Don L.

    2010-01-01

    High-sensitivity and rapid flow-through immunosensors based on photopolymerized surface-reactive polymer monoliths are investigated. The porous monoliths were synthesized within silica capillaries from glycidyl methacrylate and ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate precursors, providing a tortuous pore structure with high surface area for the immobilization of antibodies or other biosensing ligands. The unique morphology of the monolith ensures efficient mass transport and interactions between solvated analyte molecules and covalently immobilize antibodies anchored to the monolith surface, resulting in rapid immunorecognition. The efficacy of this approach is demonstrated through a direct immunoassay model using anti-IgG as a monolith-bound capture antibody and fluorescein-labeled IgG as an antigen. In situ antigen measurements exhibited a linear response over a concentration range between 0.1 - 50 ng/mL with 5 min assay times, while controllable injection of 1 μL volumes of antigen through the monolith elements yielded a mass detection limit of 100 pg (~700 amol). These results suggest that porous monolith supports represent a flexible and promising material for the fabrication of rapid and sensitive immunosensors suitable for integration into capillary or microfluidic devices. PMID:20598520

  4. Novel highly hydrophilic zwitterionic monolithic column for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengjin; Smith, Norman W; Ferguson, Paul D; Taylor, Mark R

    2009-08-01

    A novel zwitterionic hydrophilic porous poly(SPV-co-MBA) monolithic column was prepared by thermal co-polymerisation of 1-(3-sulphopropyl)-4-vinylpyridinium-betaine (4-SPV) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). An HILIC/RP dual separation mechanism was observed on this optimised poly(SPV-co-MBA) monolithic column and the composition of the mobile phase corresponding to the transition from the HILIC to the RP mode was around 30% ACN in water. Higher hydrophilicity was achieved on this novel monolithic column compared to the poly(N,N-dimethyl-N-methacryloxyethyl-N-(3-sulphopropyl)ammonium betaine-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column. Permeability studies showed slight swelling and/or shrinking with mobile phases of different polarity. As might be anticipated, a weak electrostatic interaction for charged analytes was also observed by studying the influence of mobile phase pH and salt concentration on their retention on the poly(SPV-co-MBA) monolithic column. The final optimised poly(SPV-co-MBA) monolith showed comparable selectivities to commercial ZIC-pHILIC phases for polar test analytes. Fast separation of five pyrimidines and purines was achieved in less than 1 min due to the high permeability of the monolithic column. Additionally, baseline separation of nine benzoic acid derivatives was also observed using either a pH or ACN gradient. PMID:19606441

  5. Detailed Mechanistic Study of the Non-enzymatic Formation of the Discoipyrrole Family of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Colosimo, Dominic A; MacMillan, John B

    2016-02-24

    Discoipyrroles A-D (DPA-DPD) are recently discovered natural products produced by the marine bacterium Bacillus hunanensis that exhibit anticancer properties in vitro. Initial biosynthetic studies demonstrated that DPA is formed in the liquid fermentation medium of B. hunanensis from three secreted metabolites through an unknown but protein-independent mechanism. The increased identification of natural products that depend on non-enzymatic steps creates a significant need to understand how these different reactions can occur. In this work, we utilized (15)N-labeled starting materials and continuous high-sensitivity (1)H-(15)N HMBC NMR spectroscopy to resolve scarce reaction intermediates of the non-enzymatic discoipyrrole reaction as they formed in real time. This information guided supplemental experiments using (13)C- and (18)O-labeled materials to elucidate the details of DPA's non-enzymatic biosynthesis, which features a highly concerted pyrrole formation and necessary O2-mediated oxidation. We have illustrated a novel way of using isotopically enhanced two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to interrogate reaction mechanisms as they occur. In addition, these findings add to our growing knowledge of how multicomponent non-enzymatic reactions can occur through inherently reactive bacterial metabolites. PMID:26824832

  6. Geochemical study of products associated with spontaneous oxidation of coal in the Cerro Pelado Formation, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Márquez, G.; Alejandre, F. J.; Del Río, J. J.; Hurtado, A.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this research work is a geochemical, mineralogical, and textural characterization of spontaneously smouldered coal-derived products in northwestern Venezuela (Cerro Pelado Formation, some 10 km from Pedregal city). Several solid samples were collected from this formation, six of unweathering coal, an other six of resulting unmelted rocks forming on a surface coal bed, and the last four of mineralizations found accumulating around gas vents. The fresh coal and the unmelted material were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and proximate techniques. Products such as magnetite and chabazite-K were identified in the alteration rocks. Likewise, both materials were also studied in order to determine the mobilization of 17 elements into the environment; such elements were analysed through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy on extracts obtained by a sequential extraction method: each sample was firstly extracted with MilliQ water and then the resultant residue was washed. This and the subsequently resulting residues are extracted according to the mentioned procedure by using, respectively, ammonium acetate, chlorhydric acid, peroxide and chlorhydric acid, nitric acid and fluorhydric acid, and nitric acid. The studied elements are classified as highly mobile (Na, Ni, ...), nearly immobile (Ti, P) and partially mobile (Mg, Fe, K, ...). In regards to mineralizations around fumaroles associated with smoldering coal seams, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses have revealed the presence of salammoniac, mascagnite and other solid combustion compounds formed by reaction of gas emitted from coal oxidation, in addition to previously non-reported sulfur-rich by-products associated with gas fissures, particularly ammonium thiosulfate, a phase first obtained only synthetically in the laboratory. Another objective of the research was to collect and analyse gases escaping from surficial vents

  7. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.

    2006-02-14

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  8. A decoupled monolithic projection method for natural convection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaomin; Kim, Kyoungyoun; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient monolithic numerical procedure based on a projection method for solving natural convection problems. In the present monolithic method, the buoyancy, linear diffusion, and nonlinear convection terms are implicitly advanced by applying the Crank-Nicolson scheme in time. To avoid an otherwise inevitable iterative procedure in solving the monolithic discretized system, we use a linearization of the nonlinear convection terms and approximate block lower-upper (LU) decompositions along with approximate factorization. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed method is more stable and computationally efficient than other semi-implicit methods, preserving temporal second-order accuracy.

  9. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    DOEpatents

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  10. Monolithic cascade-type solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Shibukawa, A.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Solar cells consist of a semiconductor base, a bottom cell with a band-gap energy of E1, and a top cell with a band-gap energy of E2, and 0.96 E1 1.36 eV and (0.80 E + 0.77) eV E2 (0.80 E1 + 0.92) eV. A monolithic cascade-type solar cell was prepared with an n(+)-type GaAs base, a GaInAs bottom solar cell, and a GaAiInAs top solar cell. The surface of the cell is coated with a SiO antireflection film. The efficiency of the cell is 32%.

  11. A monolithic bolometer array suitable for FIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; LeDuc, H. G.; Lange, A. E.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    The development of arrays of infrared bolometers that are suitable for use in the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope (FIRST) mission is reported. The array architecture is based on the silicon nitride micromesh bolometer currently baselined for use in the case of the Planck mission. This architecture allows each pixel to be efficiently coupled to one or both polarizations and to one or more spatial models of radiation. Micromesh structures are currently being developed, coupled with transistor-edge sensors and read out by a SQUID amplifier. If these devices are successful, then the relatively large cooling power available at 300 mK may enable a SQUID-based multiplexer to be integrated on the same wafer as the array, creating a monolithic, fully multiplexed, 2D array with relatively few connections to the sub-Kelvin stage.

  12. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K. . Electro-Optics Technology Center); Wei, G. ); Yu, P.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors' institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  13. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K.; Wei, G.; Yu, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors` institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  14. Monolithically Peltier-cooled laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hava, S.; Hunsperger, R.G.; Sequeira, H.B.

    1984-04-01

    A new method of cooling a GaAs/GaAlAs laser in an optical integrated circuit or on a discrete chip, by adding an integral thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling and heat spreading device to the laser, is presented. This cooling both reduces and stabilizes the laser junction temperature to minimize such deleterious effects as wavelength drift due to heating. A unified description of the electrical and thermal properties of a monolithic semiconductor mesa structure is given. Here it is shown that an improvement in thermal characteristics is obtained by depositing a relatively thick metallic layer, and by using this layer as a part of an active Peltier structure. Experimental results reveal a 14-percent increase in emitted power (external quantum efficiency) due to passive heat spreading and a further 8-percent if its Peltier cooler is operated. Fabrication techniques used to obtain devices exhibiting the above performance characteristics are given. 21 references.

  15. Wide-bore monolithic column for electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruijuan; Ding, Guosheng; Guo, Yugao; Liu, Danning; Bao, James J

    2007-06-01

    A new wide-bore electrophoresis (WE) system adopting an inner cooling device was set up to perform electrochromatography. In this system, a quartz tube of 1.2 mm inner diameter was used as the separation channel. The Joule heat generated during electrophoresis was removed timely through the outer surface of the quartz tube and a cooling capillary inserted into the quartz tube. A proper coolant passed through the cooling capillary to further improve the cooling efficiency. In the primary research, a polyacrylamide monolithic column was successfully prepared in this quartz tube. Then it was evaluated in the electrochromatographic mode. An electric field strength as high as 625 V/cm can be applied to this system without obvious deviation of the current from the linear curve of the Ohm plot. Sample volume as high as 1 microL was injected into the WE system and reasonable efficiency was obtained for separation of the test compounds. PMID:17480039

  16. Development of 20 GHz monolithic transmit modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the development of a transmit module for the band 17.7 to 20.2 GHz is presented. The module was to monolithically combine, on one chip, five bits of phase shift, a buffer amplifier and a power amplifier to produce 200 mW to the antenna element. The approach taken was MESFET ion implanted device technology. A common pinch-off voltage was decided upon for each application. The beginning of the total integration phases revealed hitherto unencountered hazards of large microwave circuit integration which were successfully overcome. Yield and customer considerations finally led to two separate chips, one containing the power amplifiers and the other containing the complete five bit phase shifter.

  17. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  18. Monolithic short wave infrared (SWIR) detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A monolithic self-scanned linear detector array was developed for remote sensing in the 1.1- 2.4-micron spectral region. A high-density IRCCD test chip was fabricated to verify new design approaches required for the detector array. The driving factors in the Schottky barrier IRCCD (Pdsub2Si) process development are the attainment of detector yield, uniformity, adequate quantum efficiency, and lowest possible dark current consistent with radiometric accuracy. A dual-band module was designed that consists of two linear detector arrays. The sensor architecture places the floating diffusion output structure in the middle of the chip, away from the butt edges. A focal plane package was conceptualized and includes a polycrystalline silicon substrate carrying a two-layer, thick-film interconnecting conductor pattern and five epoxy-mounted modules. A polycrystalline silicon cover encloses the modules and bond wires, and serves as a radiation and EMI shield, thermal conductor, and contamination seal.

  19. Synthesis and application of a macroporous boronate affinity monolithic column using a metal-organic gel as a porogenic template for the specific capture of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Lin, Zian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-12-23

    A macroporous boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared and applied to specifically capture glycoproteins using metal-organic gels (MOGs) as a porogenic template. This newly explored application of MOGs has proven to be a more convenient method for the formation of macropores in contrast to traditional porogenic methods. The poly (3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic columns were synthesized in stainless columns by in situ polymerization. To fabricate the macroporous formation with a uniformed open-channel network, the preparation conditions, such as reaction temperature, the concentration of the MOGs and the ratio of monomers were systematically investigated. The prepared macroporous monoliths were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Furthermore, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and transferrin (TF) were chosen as test glycoproteins, and the chromatographic analysis demonstrated that the macroporous boronate affinity monoliths exhibited a higher selectivity and better dynamic binding capacity toward glycoproteins compared with non-glycoproteins. The resulted affinity monolithic column was successfully employed to specifically capture TF from a bovine serum sample. PMID:22078233

  20. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  1. The formation of Pliocene sapropels and carbonate cycles in the Mediterranean: Diagenesis, dilution, and productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Os, B. J. H.; Lourens, L. J.; Hilgen, F. J.; de Lange, G. J.; Beaufort, L.

    1994-08-01

    High-resolution micropaleontological (planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils) and geochemical (stable isotopes, organic carbon, Fe, P, S, Ca, Ba, Mn, and Al) records are presented for the first sapropel-containing carbonate cycle in the Pliocene of Sicily. The carbonate cycle is characterized by a gray to white to beige to white color layering typical of the marls of the Trubi formation. A faintly laminated sapropel is intercalated in the gray-colored bed of the carbonate cycle. CaCO3 content varies from 40% in the beige to 45-50% in the white layers. Lowest CaCO3 content of 25-30% is found in the gray layer and sapropel. Variations in carbonate and organic matter percentages can best be explained by changes in paleoproductivity rather than by variations in dilution and dissolution. Total productivity was highest during deposition of the gray layer and sapropel, as indicated by high organic carbon and Ba contents and high abundance of Globorotalia puncticulata. Carbonate production reached its highest values, however, during deposition of the white layers, as evidenced by enhanced abundances of planktonic foraminifera and nannofossils. The low carbonate content in the gray layer and sapropel is explained in terms of a collapse in carbonate production caused by extreme changes in the physical and biochemical properties of the water column, which in turn resulted in siliceous plankton and opportunistic foraminifers such as Globorotalia puncticulata outcompeting most calcareous organisms. The beige layer represents a low-productivity environment similar to the present-day eastern Mediterranean basin. Several mechanisms have previously been proposed to explain variations in productivity in the eastern Mediterranean. Both sapropels and gray layers were deposited at times when perihelion occurred in northern hemisphere summer. We envisage that the increase in seasonal contrast resulting from this orbital configuration enhanced winter mixing and stabilization

  2. Impact of LIP formation on marine productivity during early Aptian and latest Cenomanian Oceanic Anoxic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.; Duncan, R.

    2003-04-01

    Of all the Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), the Early Aptian OAE1a and latest Cenomanian OAE2 are truly global in nature and typically represented by carbonate crisis and Corg-rich black shales. They correlate with onset and climax of the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse, a time of exceptional warmth with accelerated burial of organic matter, carbon and strontium isotope excursions, and major biotic changes. Extraordinary rates of volcanism during the formation of Ontong Java and Caribbean Plateaus are proposed to have introduced excess CO_2 in the ocean/atmosphere system, turning the climate into a super-greenhouse state. High-resolution multidisciplinary investigations of well-dated sections indicate that marine ecosystems reacted to higher fertility and pCO2 by reducing biomineralization and increasing production of organic matter. In particular, rates of calcitization and evolutionary changes of micrite-forming calcareous nannoplankton (the biological and carbonate pump) affected the organic and inorganic carbon cycle as well as diffusion of atmospheric CO_2 in the Cretaceous ocean. Increasing geological evidence suggests that OAE1a and OAE2 were mainly oceanic productivity events, directly or indirectly controlled by submarine volcanic eruptions. High levels of volcanogenic CO_2 in the atmosphere accelerated continental weathering and increased nutrient content in oceanic surface waters via river run-off. However, only coastal eutrophication can be triggered by river input, and this mechanism cannot explain enhanced primary productivity in remote parts of large oceans like those recorded in wide-spread sediments of OAE1a and OAE2. Conversely, global productivity can be stimulated by hydrothermal megaplumes that introduce in the oceans high concentrations of dissolved and particulate metals that are biolimiting (and toxic) and, consequently, can trigger large blooms (and deaths) of primary producers. We speculate that during OAE1a and OAE2, higher productivity

  3. Neutral, Charged and Stratified Polar Monoliths for Hydrophilic Interaction Capillary Electrochromatography

    PubMed Central

    Gunasena, Dilani N.; El Rassi, Ziad

    2013-01-01

    Novel polar monoliths were introduced for hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography (HI-CEC). In one case, a neutral polar monolith resulted from the in situ polymerization of glyceryl methacrylate (GMM) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) in a ternary porogenic solvent. GMM and PETA possess hydroxyl functional groups, which impart the monolith with hydrophilic interaction sites. This monolith is designated as hydroxy monolith. Although the hydroxy monolith is neutral and void of fixed charges on the surface, a relatively strong cathodal EOF was observed due to the electric double layer formed by the adsorption of ions from the mobile phase, producing a bulk mobile phase flow. The second monolith is charged and referred to as AP-monolith that possesses amine/amide functionalities on its surface, and was prepared by the in situ polymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl) methacrylamide hydrochloride (NAPM) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in the presence of cyclohexanol, dodecanol and methanol as porogens. Over the pH range studied a strong anodal EOF was observed. The AP-monolith was further exploited in HI-CEC by modifying its surface with neutral mono- and oligosaccharides to produce a series of the so called sugar modified AP-monoliths (SMAP-monolith), which are considered as stratified hydrophilic monoliths possessing a sub-layer of polar amine/amide groups and a top layer of sugar (a polyhydroxy top layer).The SMAP-monoliths can be viewed as a blend of both the hydroxy monolith and the AP-monolith. The polarity of the various monoliths seems to follow the order: hydroxy monolith < AP-monolith < SMAP-monolith. The novel monoliths were characterized over a wide range of elution conditions with a variety of polar solutes including phenols, substituted phenols, nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and nucleotides PMID:23972465

  4. Estimating the CO2 sequestration potential of depleted and fractured shale formations using CH4 production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Oil and gas production from hydraulically fractured shale formations is an abundant new source of domestically available energy for the United States. It will also result in significant CO2 emissions with important climate implications. Several studies have suggested that fractured shale formations could be used to permanently store CO2 once they are depleted of hydrocarbons. Many of the largest shale formations being developed in the United States have temperature and pressure profiles that are similar to those of saline aquifers being widely studied for geologic carbon sequestration. Here a modeling framework was developed that can be used to estimate the sequestration capacity for a shale formation based on historical CH4 production. The model is applied to those portions of the Marcellus formation found in Pennsylvania because reliable data on well production is readily available for this state. Production data from over 300 wells was compiled and used to estimate historical production and to extrapolate projected production. In shales, much of the CO2 would be sorbed to the pore and fracture surface and so this model considers sorption kinetics as well as total sorption capacity. The results suggest that shale formations could represent a significant repository for geologic carbon sequestration. The Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gigatonnes of CO2 between now and 2030. This would be over 50% of total annual US CO2 emissions from stationary sources. The mass transfer and sorption kinetics results indicate that CO2 injection proceeds several times faster than CH4 production. Model estimates were most sensitive to the permeability of the formation and assumptions about the ultimate ratio of adsorbed CH4 to CO2. CH4 production is a useful basis for calculating sequestration capacity because gas mass transfer out of the formation will be impacted by the same factors (e.g., temperature, pressure, and moisture content

  5. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

    2014-04-01

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  6. Self-Assembled 3D Graphene Monolith from Solution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Li, Zhengjie; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-02-19

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-assembled monoliths (GAs), especially ones prepared by self-assembly in the liquid phase, represent promising forms to realize the practical applications of graphene due to their high surface utilization and operability. However, the understanding of the assembly process and structure control of 3D GAs, as a new class of carbon materials, is quite inadequate. In this Perspective, we give a demonstration of the assembly process and discuss the key factors involved in the structure control of 3D GAs to pave the way for their future applications. It is shown that the assembly process starts with the phase separation, which is responsible for the formation of the 3D networked structure and liquid phase as the spacers avoid the parallel overlap of graphene layers and help form an interlinked pore system. Well-tailored graphene sheets and selected assembly media must be a precondition for a well-controlled assembly process and microstructure of a 3D GA. The potential applications in energy storage featuring high rate and high volumetric energy density demonstrate advantages of 3D GAs in real applications. PMID:26262482

  7. Contribution of alginate and levan production to biofilm formation by Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Laue, Heike; Schenk, Alexander; Li, Hongqiao; Lambertsen, Lotte; Neu, Thomas R; Molin, Søren; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2006-10-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) play important roles in the attachment of bacterial cells to a surface and/or in building and maintaining the three-dimensional, complex structure of bacterial biofilms. To elucidate the spatial distribution and function of the EPSs levan and alginate during biofilm formation, biofilms of Pseudomonas syringae strains with different EPS patterns were compared. The mucoid strain PG4180.muc, which produces levan and alginate, and its levan- and/or alginate-deficient derivatives all formed biofilms in the wells of microtitre plates and in flow chambers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescently labelled lectins was applied to investigate the spatial distribution of levan and an additional as yet unknown EPS in flow-chamber biofilms. Concanavalin A (ConA) bound specifically to levan and accumulated in cell-depleted voids in the centres of microcolonies and in blebs. No binding of ConA was observed in biofilms of the levan-deficient mutants or in wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose as confirmed by an enzyme-linked lectin-sorbent assay using peroxidase-linked ConA. Time-course studies revealed that expression of the levan-forming enzyme, levansucrase, occurred mainly during early exponential growth of both planktonic and sessile cells. Thus, accumulation of levan in biofilm voids hints to a function as a nutrient storage source for later stages of biofilm development. The presence of a third EPS besides levan and alginate was indicated by binding of the lectin from Naja mossambica to a fibrous structure in biofilms of all P. syringae derivatives. Production of the as yet uncharacterized additional EPS might be more important for biofilm formation than the syntheses of levan and alginate. PMID:17005972

  8. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2 (-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2 (-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death. PMID:26920846

  9. The features of ceramic materials structure formation when using hard-melting wastes of thermal power stations in charge stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikova, Nelli; Yuriev, Ivan; Lutsenko, Alexander; Litvinova, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of aluminum silicate waste generated by thermal power station of the city of Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The chemical compositions of aluminum silicate waste are detected and the efficient mixture compositions with the addition of aluminum silicate waste are suggested herein. Ceramic brick structure formation is studied in this paper using X-ray phase and SEM analyses. It is identified that the formed vitreous phase facilitates such strengthening structural modifications as sintering out of pores and shrinkage of unmelted aluminum silicate particles with the following formation of a monolithic product.

  10. TolC Promotes ExPEC Biofilm Formation and Curli Production in Response to Medium Osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bo; Meng, Xian-Rong; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Tan, Chen; Jin, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Gao, Jian-Feng; Wu, Bin; Li, Zi-Li; Chen, Huan-Chun; Bi, Ding-Ren; Li, Shao-Wen

    2014-01-01

    While a high osmolarity medium activates Cpx signaling and causes CpxR to repress csgD expression, and efflux protein TolC protein plays an important role in biofilm formation in Escherichia coli, whether TolC also responds to an osmolarity change to regulate biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) remains unknown. In this study, we constructed ΔtolC mutant and complement ExPEC strains to investigate the role of TolC in the retention of biofilm formation and curli production capability under different osmotic conditions. The ΔtolC mutant showed significantly decreased biofilm formation and lost the ability to produce curli fimbriae compared to its parent ExPEC strain PPECC42 when cultured in M9 medium or 1/2 M9 medium of increased osmolarity with NaCl or sucrose at 28°C. However, biofilm formation and curli production levels were restored to wild-type levels in the ΔtolC mutant in 1/2 M9 medium. We propose for the first time that TolC protein is able to form biofilm even under high osmotic stress. Our findings reveal an interplay between the role of TolC in ExPEC biofilm formation and the osmolarity of the surrounding environment, thus providing guidance for the development of a treatment for ExPEC biofilm formation. PMID:25243151

  11. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rigali

    2001-10-01

    Published mechanical and thermal properties data on a variety of materials was gathered, with focus on materials that have potential with respect to developing wear resistant and damage tolerant composite for mining industry applications. Preliminary core materials of interest include but are not limited to: Diamond, Tungsten Carbide and Cemented Tungsten Carbides, Carbides of Boron, Silicon, Titanium and Aluminum, Diboride of Titanium and Aluminum, Nitrides of Aluminum, Silicon, Titanium, and Boron, Aluminum Oxide, Tungsten, Titanium, Iron, Cobalt and Metal Alloys. Preliminary boundary materials of interest include but are not limited to: W metal, WC-Co, W-Co, WFeNi, and Mo metal and alloys. Several FM test coupons were fabricated with various compositions using the above listed materials. These coupons were consolidated to varying degrees by uniaxial hot pressing, then cut and ground to expose the FM cell structure. One promising system, WC-Co core and WFeNi boundary, was consolidated to 97% of theoretical density, and demonstrates excellent hardness. Data on standard mechanical tests was gathered, and tests will begin on the consolidated test coupons during the upcoming reporting period. The program statements of work for ACR Inc. and its subcontractors, as well as the final contract negotiations, were finalized during the current reporting period. The program start date was February 22nd, 2001. In addition to the current subcontractors, Kennametal Inc., a major manufacturer of cutting tools and wear resistant tooling for the mining industry, expressed considerable interest in ACR's Fibrous Monolith composites for both machine and mining applications. At the request of Kennametal, ARC Inc fabricated and delivered several Fibrous Monolith coupons and components for testing and evaluation in the mining and machine tool applications. Additional samples of Diamond/Tungsten Carbide-6%Cobalt Fibrous Monolith were fabricated and delivered for testing Kennametal's Rapid

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Metformin and Pyridoxamine in the Formation of Early, Intermediate and Advanced Glycation End-Products

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saheem; Shahab, Uzma; Baig, Mohd. Hassan; Khan, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, M. Salman; Srivastava, A. K.; Saeed, Mohd; Moinuddin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-enzymatic glycation is the addition of free carbonyl group of reducing sugar to the free amino groups of proteins, resulting in the formation of a Schiff base and an Amadori product. Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) is one of the carbonyl species which reacts rapidly with the free amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The highly reactive dihydroxyacetone phosphate is a derivative of dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and a product of glycolysis, having potential glycating effects to form AGEs. The formation of AGEs results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications. While the formation of DHA-AGEs has been demonstrated previously, no extensive studies have been performed to assess the inhibition of AGE inhibitors at all the three stages of glycation (early, intermediate and late) using metformin (MF) and pyridoxamine (PM) as a novel inhibitor. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) & its characterization by various spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, inhibition of glycation products at all the stages of glycation was also studied. Spectroscopic analysis suggests structural perturbations in the HSA as a result of modification which might be due to generation of free radicals and formation of AGEs. Conclusion The inhibition in the formation of glycation reaction reveals that Pyridoxamine is a better antiglycating agent than Metformin at all stages of the glycation (early, intermediate and late stages). PMID:24023728

  13. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-06-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  14. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-02-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night during spring and summer in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C105H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  15. Hierarchical Porous Polystyrene Monoliths from PolyHIPE.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinjia; Tan, Liangxiao; Xia, Lingling; Wood, Colin D; Tan, Bien

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical porous polystyrene monoliths (HCP-PolyHIPE) are obtained by hypercrosslinking poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monoliths prepared by polymerization of high internal phase emulsions (PolyHIPEs). The hypercrosslinking is achieved using an approach known as knitting which employs formaldehyde dimethyl acetal (FDA) as an external crosslinker. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms that the macroporous structure in the original monolith is retained during the knitting process. By increasing the amount of divinylbenzene (DVB) in PolyHIPE, the BET surface area and pore volume of the HCP-PolyHIPE decrease, while the micropore size increases. BET surface areas of 196-595 m(2) g(-1) are obtained. The presence of micropores, mesopores, and macropores is confirmed from the pore size distribution. With a hierarchical porous structure, the monoliths reveal comparable gas sorption properties and potential applications in oil spill clean-up. PMID:26178423

  16. 27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END OF WEST MAIN LOCK WALL, LOOKiNG SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  17. 62. VIEW SHOWING INSTALLATION TAINTER VALVE MACHINERY MONOLITH NO. 321, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW SHOWING INSTALLATION TAINTER VALVE MACHINERY MONOLITH NO. 32-1, LOOKING WEST Photograph No. 8571. October 24, 1949 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  18. 31. SPILLWAY CHANNEL WALLS REINF DETAILS; MONOLITHS E21 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. SPILLWAY CHANNEL WALLS REINF - DETAILS; MONOLITHS E-21 AND W-21. Sheet S-45, May, 1940. File no. 342/58. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  19. 10. LOCK CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CONCRETE MONOLITHS FOR WALLS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOCK CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CONCRETE MONOLITHS FOR WALLS, LOOKING NORTH. August 1934 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 16, Upper Mississippi River, Muscatine, Muscatine County, IA

  20. 25. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT UPPER END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT UPPER END OF MAIN LOCK AND DAM PIERS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (DOWNSTREAM). NOTE GANTRY CRANES - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  1. Advances in monoliths and related porous materials for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Knob, Radim; Sahore, Vishal; Sonker, Mukul; Woolley, Adam T

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the use of monolithic porous polymers has seen significant growth. These materials present a highly useful support for various analytical and biochemical applications. Since their introduction, various approaches have been introduced to produce monoliths in a broad range of materials. Simple preparation has enabled their easy implementation in microchannels, extending the range of applications where microfluidics can be successfully utilized. This review summarizes progress regarding monoliths and related porous materials in the field of microfluidics between 2010 and 2015. Recent developments in monolith preparation, solid-phase extraction, separations, and catalysis are critically discussed. Finally, a brief overview of the use of these porous materials for analysis of subcellular and larger structures is given. PMID:27190564

  2. 26. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT UPPER END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT UPPER END OF MAIN LOCK AND DAM PIERS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (DOWNSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  3. 53. VIEW OF ROCK FOUNDATIONS AIR CLEANED FOR MONOLITHS 1722, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW OF ROCK FOUNDATIONS AIR CLEANED FOR MONOLITHS 17-22, INTERMEDIATE WALL, LOOKING NORTH Photograph No. 12840. September 10, 1948 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  4. Preparation and characterization of macroporous monoliths imprinted with erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Pisarev, O A; Tennikova, T B

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of macroporous molecularly imprinted monoliths was performed using the monomers system 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and erythromycin as a template. The copolymerization was carried out in situ inside 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. stainless-steel tubing. The morphology of the monoliths was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The porous characteristics were determined both from the data of hydrodynamic permeability of monoliths and by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. The retention parameters of target substance (erythromycin), values of calculated imprinting factors and apparent dynamic dissociation constants were obtained for monoliths prepared with the application of different amount of template (4, 8 and 12 mol%). The separations of the mixtures azithromycin/erythromycin and ciprofloxacin/erythromycin were demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of erythromycin quantification in human blood plasma was shown. PMID:26033867

  5. Efficient CO2-Reducing Activity of NAD-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA for Formate Production from CO2 Gas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dae Haeng; Kim, Min Hoo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kwang Deog; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) has been widely used in various CO2-reduction systems but its practical applications are often impeded due to low CO2-reducing activity. In this study, we demonstrated superior CO2-reducing properties of FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) for production of formate from CO2 gas. To discover more efficient CO2-reducing FDHs than a reference enzyme, i.e. CbFDH, five FDHs were selected with biochemical properties and then, their CO2-reducing activities were evaluated. All FDHs including CbFDH showed better CO2-reducing activities at acidic pHs than at neutral pHs and four FDHs were more active than CbFDH in the CO2 reduction reaction. In particular, the FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) exhibited the highest CO2-reducing activity and had a dramatic preference for the reduction reaction, i.e., a 84.2-fold higher ratio of CO2 reduction to formate oxidation in catalytic efficiency (kcat/KB) compared to CbFDH. Formate was produced from CO2 gas using TsFDH and CbFDH, and TsFDH showed a 5.8-fold higher formate production rate than CbFDH. A sequence and structural comparison showed that FDHs with relatively high CO2-reducing activities had elongated N- and C-terminal loops. The experimental results demonstrate that TsFDH can be an alternative to CbFDH as a biocatalyst in CO2 reduction systems. PMID:25061666

  6. 3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A

    2013-03-01

    A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 μWm(-3) to 2.2 μWm(-3). Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 μWm(-3) is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts. PMID:23291561

  7. Shallow-water flow past isolated topography. Part I: Vorticity production and wake formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaer, C.; Smith, R.B. )

    1993-05-15

    The flow of a single layer of shallow water past high three-dimensional topography is studies in a nonrotating environment and in the absence of surface friction. The dimensionless parameters for this problem are the upstream Froude number, the dimensionless mountain height, and a dimensionless measure of the dissipation rate. In part I of this study, high-resolution numerical simulations are utilized to construct a regime diagram for steady left-right symmetric flow and for the domain of parameter space with subcritical upstream conditions. Three distinct regimes occur. They are characterized, respectively, by fore-aft symmetry, essentially inviscid dynamics, and entirely subcritical conditions (regime I); by transition to supercritical flow and the occurrence of a hydraulic jump over the lee slope (regime II); and by the inability of the flow to climb the mountain top resulting in flow separation (regime III). Regimes II and III are associated with a wake that entails significant potential vorticity features and sometimes reversed flow. Potential vorticity is produced by two related mechanisms. First, internal dissipation in the shallow-water system is generally not possible without potential vorticity production, even in an initially fully irrotational state and in absence of surface friction. The proof of this follows from a new theorem, which states that the steady-state Bernoulli function is the streamfunction of the total (i.e., advective and dissipative) vorticity flux. Second, flow separation in regime III can lead to the formation of contact discontinuities that are connected to the separation point and represent the inviscid limit of shearlines. Here potential vorticity production at the separation point is related to the joining of two streams of fluid with different values of the Bernoulli function. 59 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants. PMID:24705871

  9. Reaction kinetics and oxidation product formation in the degradation of acetaminophen by ferrate (VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Yibing; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the degradation of acetaminophen (AAP) in aqueous solutions by ferrate (VI), aiming to propose the kinetics, pathways and the oxidation products' formation in the AAP degradation. A series of jar tests were undertaken over ferrate (VI) dosages (molar ratios of ferrate (VI):AAP, 5:1 to 25:1) and pH values (4-11). The effects of co-existing ions (0.2-5 mM) and humic acid (10-50 mg l(-1)) on the AAP removal were investigated. Ferrate (VI) can remove 99.6% AAP (from 1000 μg l(-1)) in 60 min under study conditions when majority of the AAP reduction occurred in the first 5 min. The treatment performance depended on the ferrate(VI) dosage, pH and the type and strength of co-existing ions and humic acid. Raising ferrate (VI) dosage with optimal pH 7 improved the AAP degradation. In the presence of humic acid, the AAP degradation by ferrate (VI) was promoted in a short period (<30 min) but then inhibited with increasing in humic acid contents. The presence of Al(3+), CO3(2-) and PO4(3-) ions declined but the existence of K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions can improve the AAP removal. The catalytic function of Al(3+) on the decomposition of ferrate (VI) in aqueous solution was found. The kinetics of the reaction between ferrate (VI) and AAP was pseudo first-order for ferrete (VI) and pseudo second-order for AAP. The pseudo rate constant of ferrate (VI) with AAP was 1.4 × 10(-5) L(2) mg(-2) min(-1). Three oxidation products (OPs) were identified and the AAP degradation pathways were proposed. PMID:27155474

  10. Predicting the formation and the dispersion of toxic combustion products from the fires of dangerous substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Danihelka, P.; Dobeš, P.; Dlabka, J.; Hejzlar, T.; Baudišová, B.; Míček, D.; Zelinger, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Natural events, such as wildfires, lightning or earthquakes represent a frequent trigger of industrial fires involving dangerous substances. Dispersion of smoke plume from such fires and the effects of toxic combustion products are one of the reference scenarios expected in the framework of major accident prevention. Nowadays, tools for impact assessment of these events are rather missing. Detailed knowledge of burning material composition, atmospheric conditions, and other factors are required in order to describe quantitatively the source term of toxic fire products and to evaluate the parameters of smoke plume. Nevertheless, an assessment of toxic emissions from large scale fires involves a high degree of uncertainty, because of the complex character of physical and chemical processes in the harsh environment of uncontrolled flame. Among the others, soot particle formation can be mentioned as still being one of the unresolved problems in combustion chemistry, as well as decomposition pathways of chemical substances. Therefore, simplified approach for estimating the emission factors from outdoor fires of dangerous chemicals, utilizable for major accident prevention and preparedness, was developed and the case study illustrating the application of the proposed method was performed. ALOFT-FT software tool based on large eddy simulation of buoyant fire plumes was employed for predicting the local toxic contamination in the down-wind vicinity of the fire. The database of model input parameters can be effectively modified enabling the simulation of the smoke plume from pool fires or jet fires of arbitrary flammable (or combustible) gas, liquid or solid. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic via the project LD11012 (in the frame of the COST CM0901 Action) and the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic (project no. SPII 1a10 45/70).

  11. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Jung, H. B.; Wang, Guohui

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  12. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Majumdar, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  13. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Majumdar, S.

    1992-04-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  14. Global view of sea-ice production in polynyas and its linkage to dense/bottom water formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Nihashi, Sohey; Iwamoto, Katsushi

    2016-12-01

    Global overturning circulation is driven by density differences. Saline water rejected during sea-ice formation in polynyas is the main source of dense water, and thus sea-ice production is a key factor in the overturning circulation. Due to difficulties associated with in situ observation, sea-ice production and its interannual variability have not been well understood until recently. Methods to estimate sea-ice production on large scales have been developed using heat flux calculations based on satellite microwave radiometer data. Using these methods, we present the mapping of sea-ice production with the same definition and scale globally, and review the polynya ice production and its relationship with dense/bottom water. The mapping demonstrates that ice production rate is high in Antarctic coastal polynyas, in contrast to Arctic coastal polynyas. This is consistent with the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass which occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf polynya has by far the highest ice production in the Southern Hemisphere. The Cape Darnley polynya (65°E-69°E) is found to be the second highest production area and recent observations revealed that this is the missing (fourth) source of AABW. In the region off the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), the third source of AABW, sea-ice production decreased by as much as 40 %, due to the MGT calving in early 2010, resulting in a significant decrease in AABW production. The Okhotsk Northwestern polynya exhibits the highest ice production in the Northern Hemisphere, and the resultant dense water formation leads to overturning in the North Pacific, extending to the intermediate layer. Estimates of its ice production show a significant decrease over the past 30-50 years, likely causing the weakening of the North Pacific overturning. These regions demonstrate the strong linkage between variabilities of sea-ice production and bottom/intermediate water formation. The

  15. Adaption of kinetics to solid electrolyte interphase layer formation and application to electrolyte-soluble reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdin, Gerald; Zheng, Dong; Qu, Deyang

    2015-12-01

    During the electrochemical lithiation of a carbon electrode, carbonate-based electrolytes react with the electrode surface and undergo reductive decomposition to form a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer that passivates the surface of the carbon electrode. In addition, reduction of the electrolyte also results in the generation of electrolyte-soluble products. Structural similarities between the soluble and insoluble products provide an opportunity to examine the formation kinetics of the SEI layer through an analysis of the kinetic behavior of the soluble products. In this work, the electrolyte-soluble products generated by reductive decomposition of a baseline electrolyte were analyzed at different stages and at different hold times during the initial lithiation of an amorphous carbon electrode. A statistical regression analysis of that data was used to produce a representative lithiation experiment from which was calculated the potential-dependent formation rates for the soluble decomposition products. The predicted formation rate data was fitted using an adapted rate equation that accounts for the effect of the SEI layer to obtain estimated formation rate constants and redox potentials.

  16. Effect of bioconversion conditions on vanillin production by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 through an analysis of competing by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-kui; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformation conditions such as initial pH, the initial concentration of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, and the separate addition of ferulic acid and vanillic acid, on the production of vanillin through an analysis of competing by-product formation by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116. The extent and nature of by-product formation and vanillin yield were affected by initial pH and different initial concentrations of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, with a high yield of vanillin and high cell density obtained at pH 8.0, 10 g/l glucose, and 8 g/l yeast extract. High concentrations of ferulic acid were found to negatively affect cell density. Additional supplementation of 100 mg/l vanillic acid, a metabolically linked by-product, was found to result in a high concentration of vanillin and guaiacol, an intermediate of vanillin. Via an analysis of the effect of these transformation conditions on competing by-product formation, high concentrations of ferulic acid were transformed with a molar yield to vanillin of 96.1 and 95.2 %, by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 and Streptomyces V1, respectively, together with a minor accumulation of by-products. These are among the highest performance values reported in the literature to date for Streptomyces in batch cultures. PMID:24078147

  17. Factors impacting the formation of monochloropropanediol (MCPD) fatty acid diesters during palm (Elaeis guineensis) oil production.

    PubMed

    Craft, Brian D; Nagy, Kornél; Sandoz, Laurence; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Recently, organic and inorganic chlorinated compounds were detected in crude and commercially refined palm oils. Further, the predominant formation mechanism of monochloropropanediol (MCPD) diesters at high temperatures (>170-180°C) was revealed. The present study involved the development and comparison of solutions to mitigate MCPD diester levels in oils from various stages of palm oil production. Partially refined palm oil samples and oil extracted from fresh palm fruits were submitted to bench-top deodorisation experiments. Application of glycerol and ethanol as refining aids during the deodorisation of refined-bleached palm oil proved to be moderately effective; about 25%-35% reduction of MCPD diester levels was achieved. Washing crude palm oil with ethanol-water (1:1) prior to deodorisation was also an effective strategy yielding an ∼30% reduction of MCPD diester contents. Washing palm fruit pulp before oil extraction, however, was most impactful, resulting in a 95% reduction of MCPD diesters when compared to the deodorised control oil. This suggests that intervention upstream in the process chain is most efficient in reducing levels of these contaminants in refined oils. Following the study, a root-cause analysis was performed in order to map the parameters potentially responsible for the occurrence of MCPD diesters in refined palm oil and related fractions. PMID:22168150

  18. Natural gas production from Ordovician Queenston Formation in West Auburn field, Cayuga County, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.L.

    1988-08-01

    Gas has been produced from the Upper Ordovician Queenston Formation at West Auburn field, Cayuga County, New York, for over 20 years. This field indicates Queenston production to be long lived, with substantially economic reserves found at depths shallower than 2,000 ft. Locally, The Queenston is comprised of sand and silty shale with the primary reservoirs found in quartzose sandstones. The overall thickness of the Queenston clastic interval is over 700 ft with gas found in the upper 300 ft. Three primary gas sands are continuous across the field area and have high average porosities of as much as 13.0% and average permeabilities of 0.20 md. Extreme examples show peak porosities approaching 20% and permeabilities of over 5.0 md. The reservoir is composed of very fine to medium-grained, moderately sorted, red sandstone. Sand grains are predominantly quartz with minor amounts of feldspar. The main pore-filling constituent is abundant authigenic clay with iron oxides, thus contributing to reduced permeabilities. These sands vary in reservoir quality through the field and, hence, allow for stratigraphic trapping of the gas. Other factors involved include the updip accumulation of gas against the Silurian-Ordovician unconformity at the top of the Queenston. Some of the pay sands are absent due to this unconformity in the area farthest updip and, therefore, decrease the overall reserve potential of the individual well in that part of the field.

  19. Cathodes enhance Corynebacterium glutamicum growth with nitrate and promote acetate and formate production.

    PubMed

    Xafenias, Nikolaos; Kmezik, Cathleen; Mapelli, Valeria

    2016-09-01

    The industrially important Corynebacterium glutamicum can only incompletely reduce nitrate into nitrite which then accumulates and inhibits growth. Herein we report that cathodes can resolve this problem and enhance glucose fermentation and growth by promoting nitrite reduction. Cell growth was inhibited at relatively high potentials but was significant when potentials were more reductive (-1.20V with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate as redox mediator or -1.25V vs. Ag/AgCl). Under these conditions, glucose was consumed up to 6 times faster and acetate was produced at up to 11 times higher yields (up to 1.1mol/mol-glucose). Acetate concentrations are the highest reported so far for C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions, reaching values up to 5.3±0.3g/L. Herein we also demonstrate for the first time formate production (up to 3.4±0.3g/L) by C. glutamicum under strongly reducing conditions, and we attribute this to a possible mechanism of CO2 bioreduction that was electrochemically triggered. PMID:27235972

  20. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  1. Preparing titania aerogel monolithic chromatography columns using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sui, Ruohong; Liu, Suya; Lajoie, Gilles A; Charpentier, Paul A

    2010-06-01

    The search for a method to fabricate monolithic inorganic columns has attracted significant recent attention due to their unique ability in separation applications of various biomolecules. Silica and polymer based monolithic columns have been prepared, but titania and other metal oxide monoliths have been elusive, primarily due to their fragility. This article describes a new approach for preparing nanostructured titania based columns, which offer better performance over conventional particle packed columns for separating a wide variety of biomolecules including phosphopeptides. TiO(2) monolithic aerogels were synthesized in separation columns using in situ sol-gel reactions in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) followed by calcination, and compared to those prepared in heptanes. The characterization results show that scCO(2) is a better solvent for the sol-gel reactions, providing lower shrinkage with the anatase TiO(2) monolith composed of nanofibers with very high surface areas. The monolithic columns show the ability to isolate phosphopeptides with little flow resistance compared to conventional titania particle based microcolumns. PMID:20373296

  2. Pepsin-modified chiral monolithic column for affinity capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tingting; Chi, Cuijie; Ji, Yibing

    2014-11-01

    Pepsin-modified affinity monolithic capillary electrochromatography, a novel microanalysis system, was developed by the covalent bonding of pepsin on silica monolith. The column was successfully applied in the chiral separation of (±)-nefopam. Furthermore, the electrochromatographic performance of the pepsin-functionalized monolith for enantiomeric analysis was evaluated in terms of protein content, pH of running buffer, sample volume, buffer concentration, applied voltage, and capillary temperature. The relative standard deviation (%RSD) values of retention time (intraday <0.53, n = 10; interday <0.53, n = 10; column-to-column <0.70, n = 20; and batch-to-batch <0.80, n = 20) indicated satisfactory stability of these columns. No appreciable change was observed in retention and resolution for chiral recognition of (±)-nefopam in 50 days with 100 injections. The proteolytic activity of this stationary phase was further characterized with bovine serum albumin as substrate for online protein digestion. As for monolithic immobilized enzyme reactor, successive protein injections confirmed both the operational stability and ability to reuse the bioreactor for at least 20 digestions. It implied that the affinity monolith used in this research opens a new path of exploring particularly versatile class of enzymes to develop enzyme-modified affinity capillary monolith for enantioseparation. PMID:25146884

  3. Phenylalanine functionalized zwitterionic monolith for hydrophobic interaction electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiabin; Jia, Wenchao; Lin, Xucong; Wu, Xiaoping; Xie, Zenghong

    2013-12-01

    A novel phenylalanine (Phe) functionalized zwitterionic monolith for hydrophobic electrochromatography was prepared by a two-step procedure involving the synthesis of glycidyl methacrylate based polymer monolith and subsequent on-column chemical modification with Phe via ring-opening reaction of epoxides. Benefitting from the hydrophobicity of both methacrylate-based matrix and aromatic group of Phe, this monolith could exhibit good hydrophobic interaction for the separation. Typical RP chromatographic behavior was observed toward various solutes. The well-controlled cathodic or anodic EOF of the prepared column could be facilely switched by altering the pH values of running buffers. The separation mechanism of this Phe functionalized zwitterionic monolith is discussed in detail. Two mixed-mode mechanisms of RP/cation exchange and RP/anion exchange could be further realized on the same monolith in different pH condition of the mobile phase. Versatile separation capabilities of neutral, basic, and acidic analytes have been successfully achieved in this zwitterionic monolith by CEC method. PMID:24242631

  4. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  5. Mechanically stable, hierarchically porous Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1) monoliths via direct conversion of copper(II) hydroxide-based monoliths.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Reboul, Julien; Sumida, Kenji; Zhu, Yang; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of highly crystalline macro-meso-microporous monolithic Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1; btc(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) is demonstrated by direct conversion of Cu(OH)2-based monoliths while preserving the characteristic macroporous structure. The high mechanical strength of the monoliths is promising for possible applications to continuous flow reactors. PMID:25572361

  6. Identification of the Genes Involved in the Fruiting Body Production and Cordycepin Formation of Cordyceps militaris Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhuang-li; Qiu, Xue-hong

    2015-01-01

    A mutant library of Cordyceps militaris was constructed by improved Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and screened for degradation features. Six mutants with altered characters in in vitro and in vivo fruiting body production, and cordycepin formation were found to contain a single copy T-DNA. T-DNA flanking sequences of these mutants were identified by thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR approach. ATP-dependent helicase, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and ubiquitin-like activating enzyme were involved in in vitro fruiting body production, serine/threonine phosphatase involved in in vivo fruiting body production, while glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase and telomerase reverse transcriptase involved in cordycepin formation. These genes were analyzed by bioinformatics methods, and their molecular function and biology process were speculated by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. The results provided useful information for the control of culture degeneration in commercial production of C. militaris. PMID:25892913

  7. Coke- and sintering-resistant monolithic catalysts derived from in situ supported hydrotalcite-like films on Al wires for dry reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Du, Xianjun; Zhang, Dengsong; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-04-01

    Monolithic catalysts derived from in situ supported hydrotalcite-like films on Al wires display high resistance to coke formation and sintering in the dry reforming of methane due to their hierarchical porous structure, well dispersed metallic nickel species, more basic sites and strong metal-support interaction effect. PMID:23463343

  8. Recent applications in natural product synthesis of dihydrofuran and -pyran formation by ring-closing alkene metathesis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Reece; Pal, Ritashree; Parker, Nicholas A; Sear, Claire E; Smith, Peter W; Ribaucourt, Aubert; Hodgson, David M

    2016-07-01

    In the past two decades, alkene metathesis has risen in prominence to become a significant synthetic strategy for alkene formation. Many total syntheses of natural products have used this transformation. We review the use, from 2003 to 2015, of ring-closing alkene metathesis (RCM) for the generation of dihydrofurans or -pyrans in natural product synthesis. The strategies used to assemble the RCM precursors and the subsequent use of the newly formed unsaturation will also be highlighted and placed in context. PMID:27108941

  9. Biasable, Balanced, Fundamental Submillimeter Monolithic Membrane Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Tsang, Raymond; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This device is a biasable, submillimeter-wave, balanced mixer fabricated using JPL s monolithic membrane process a simplified version of planar membrane technology. The primary target application is instrumentation used for analysis of atmospheric constituents, pressure, temperature, winds, and other physical and chemical properties of the atmospheres of planets and comets. Other applications include high-sensitivity gas detection and analysis. This innovation uses a balanced configuration of two diodes allowing the radio frequency (RF) signal and local oscillator (LO) inputs to be separated. This removes the need for external diplexers that are inherently narrowband, bulky, and require mechanical tuning to change frequency. Additionally, this mixer uses DC bias-ability to improve its performance and versatility. In order to solve problems relating to circuit size, the GaAs membrane process was created. As much of the circuitry as possible is fabricated on-chip, making the circuit monolithic. The remainder of the circuitry is precision-machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs circuit. The most critical alignments are performed using micron-scale semiconductor technology, enabling wide bandwidth and high operating frequencies. The balanced mixer gets superior performance with less than 2 mW of LO power. This can be provided by a simple two-stage multiplier chain following an amplifier at around 90 GHz. Further, the diodes are arranged so that they can be biased. Biasing pushes the diodes closer to their switching voltage, so that less LO power is required to switch the diodes on and off. In the photo, the diodes are at the right end of the circuit. The LO comes from the waveguide at the right into a reduced-height section containing the diodes. Because the diodes are in series to the LO signal, they are both turned on and off simultaneously once per LO cycle. Conversely, the RF signal is picked up from the RF waveguide by the probe at the left, and flows

  10. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol. PMID:26907243

  11. Use of eutectic mixtures for preparation of monolithic carbons with CO₂-adsorption and gas-separation capabilities.

    PubMed

    López-Salas, N; Jardim, E O; Silvestre-Albero, A; Gutiérrez, M C; Ferrer, M L; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Silvestre-Albero, J; del Monte, F

    2014-10-21

    With global warming becoming one of the main problems our society is facing nowadays, there is an urgent demand to develop materials suitable for CO2 storage as well as for gas separation. Within this context, hierarchical porous structures are of great interest for in-flow applications because of the desirable combination of an extensive internal reactive surface along narrow nanopores with facile molecular transport through broad "highways" leading to and from these pores. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been recently used in the synthesis of carbon monoliths exhibiting a bicontinuous porous structure composed of continuous macroporous channels and a continuous carbon network that contains a certain microporosity and provides considerable surface area. In this work, we have prepared two DESs for the preparation of two hierarchical carbon monoliths with different compositions (e.g., either nitrogen-doped or not) and structure. It is worth noting that DESs played a capital role in the synthesis of hierarchical carbon monoliths not only promoting the spinodal decomposition that governs the formation of the bicontinuous porous structure but also providing the precursors required to tailor the composition and the molecular sieve structure of the resulting carbons. We have studied the performance of these two carbons for CO2, N2, and CH4 adsorption in both monolithic and powdered form. We have also studied the selective adsorption of CO2 versus CH4 in equilibrium and dynamic conditions. We found that these materials combined a high CO2-sorption capacity besides an excellent CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivity and, interestingly, this performance was preserved when processed in both monolithic and powdered form. PMID:25255054

  12. Monolithic Nickel (II) Oxide Aerogels Using an Organic Epoxide: The Importance of the Counter Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Simpson, R L

    2004-01-13

    The synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials prepared using the epoxide addition method is described. The addition of the organic epoxide propylene oxide to an ethanolic solution of NiCl{sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O resulted in the formation of an opaque light green monolithic gel and subsequent drying with supercritical CO{sub 2} gave a monolithic aerogel material of the same color. This material has been characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The results indicate that the nickel (II) oxide aerogel has very low bulk density (98 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx}98 %porous)), high surface area (413 m{sup 2}/g), and has a particulate-type aerogel microstructure made up of very fine spherical particles with an open porous network. By comparison, a precipitate of Ni{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 4} is obtained when the same preparation is attempted with the common Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O salt as the precursor. The implications of the difference of reactivity of the two different precursors are discussed in the context of the mechanism of gel formation via the epoxide addition method. The synthesis of nickel (II) oxide aerogel, using the epoxide addition method, is especially unique in our experience. It is our first example of the successful preparation of a metal oxide aerogel using a metal divalent metal ion and may have implications for the application of this method to the preparation of aerogels or nanoparticles of other divalent metal oxides. To our knowledge this is the first report of a monolithic pure nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials.

  13. Monolithic cryopolymers with embedded nanoparticles. I. Capillary liquid chromatography of proteins using neutral embedded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dario Arrua, R; Nordborg, Anna; Haddad, Paul R; Hilder, Emily F

    2013-01-18

    Rigid monolithic cryostructures were prepared in capillary format at sub-zero temperatures and used successfully in the separation of proteins by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The polymerization mixture consisted of poly(ethyleneglycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) M(n)∼258 as the single monomer, a mixture of dioxane and water as the porogen and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) and ammonium persulfate (APS) as the initiator system. At sub-zero temperatures, the solvent mixture used as the porogen is frozen, leading to the formation of a polymeric structure templated by the solvent crystals that are formed. The optimization of the polymerization reaction was carried out by studying the influence of different reaction parameters including the temperature of the reaction, monomer concentration and solvent, on the porous characteristics of the polymers obtained. Separations were performed in HIC mode using 3 M ammonium sulfate in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.9 to 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.9 over a 15 min gradient. The addition of neutral nanoparticles synthesized by mini-emulsion polymerization greatly improved the separation of the protein mixture, doubling the peak capacity of the control column without nanoparticles (from 7 to 17). Although the peak capacities and resolution values achieved were lower than those reported for conventional methacrylate monolithic columns, the use of this polymerization approach allows the preparation of polymeric structures which presented a more open porous structure and consequently exhibited significantly higher permeability than conventional polymer monoliths. PMID:23273630

  14. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  15. Standard enthalpy of formation of L-glutamine and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Lytkin, A. I.; Krutova, O. N.; Damrina, K. V.

    2014-03-01

    Heat effects of the dissolution of crystalline L-glutamine in water and lithium hydroxide solutions were determined by direct calorimetry at 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies of formation of L-glutamine and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solution were calculated.

  16. Developing strategies to improve the nutritional quality and production of plant foods through manipulation of calcium oxalate formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of oxalate commonly occurs in numerous organisms. Oxalate negatively affects human health by acting as an antinutrient affecting calcium bioavailability and/or contributing to the pathological condition of urinary stone formation where it is a primary component. In some microbes, ox...

  17. THE GAS PHASE REACTION OF OZONE WITH 1,3-BUTADIENE: FORMATION YIELDS OF SOME TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product yields. In separa...

  18. Standard enthalpies of formation of α-aminobutyric acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.

    2016-08-01

    Heats of solution of crystalline α-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K are measured by means of direct calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation of the amino acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution are calculated.

  19. Fast product formation and slow product release are important features in a hysteretic reaction mechanism of glutathione transferase T2-2.

    PubMed

    Jemth, P; Mannervik, B

    1999-08-01

    The reaction mechanism of rat glutathione transferase T2-2 has been studied using pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics. Several parts of the catalytic cycle including binding of substrates, product formation, and product release were investigated. Under saturating conditions, a two-step product release was found to be rate limiting in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions between the nucleophilic substrate glutathione and either of the two electrophilic substrates 1-menaphthyl sulfate and 4-nitrobenzyl chloride. The rate constant for pre-steady-state product formation on rat glutathione transferase T2-2 has an observed pK(a) value of 5.7 apparently due to ionization of the sulfhydryl group of glutathione. This rate constant is approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than k(cat) at pH values of >6. It can be predicted from the pH dependence that product formation would be the sole rate-limiting step at pH values of <3. A hysteretic mechanism of rGST T2-2 is proposed based on a slow conformational transition detected in pre-steady-state displacement experiments. PMID:10433705

  20. Lymphotoxin-Dependent B Cell-FRC Crosstalk Promotes De Novo Follicle Formation and Antibody Production following Intestinal Helminth Infection.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Lebon, Luc; Mosconi, Ilaria; Yang, Chen-Ying; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Luther, Sanjiv A; Harris, Nicola L

    2016-05-17

    Secondary lymphoid tissues provide specialized niches for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and undergo a remarkable expansion in response to inflammatory stimuli. Although the formation of B cell follicles was previously thought to be restricted to the postnatal period, we observed that the draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) of helminth-infected mice form an extensive number of new, centrally located, B cell follicles in response to IL-4Rα-dependent inflammation. IL-4Rα signaling promoted LTα1β2 (lymphotoxin) expression by B cells, which then interacted with CCL19 positive stromal cells to promote lymphoid enlargement and the formation of germinal center containing B cell follicles. Importantly, de novo follicle formation functioned to promote both total and parasite-specific antibody production. These data reveal a role for type 2 inflammation in promoting stromal cell remodeling and de novo follicle formation by promoting B cell-stromal cell crosstalk. PMID:27160906

  1. Inhibition of platelet aggregation and reduced formation of thromboxane and lipoxygenase products in platelets by oil of cloves.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, K C; Justesen, U

    1987-09-01

    Oil of cloves (OC) was found to be a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (AA), collagen and epinephrine; in this respect it was most effective against AA-induced aggregation. Inhibition of aggregation by OC seems to be mediated through a reduced formation of thromboxane as indicated by the following experimental evidence. (i) OC inhibited TxB2 formation in intact as well as lysed platelet preparations from added arachidonate, and (ii) it inhibited the formation of TxB2 from AA-labelled platelets after activation with Ca2+-ionophore A23187. The formation of lipoxygenase derived products was dependent on the concentration of OC used; at its lower concentration their amounts increased but this was found to be reversed at higher concentrations. At all concentrations thromboxane was decreased with a concomitant increase in unused AA. PMID:3118394

  2. There's more than one way to skin a cat: A wide selection of techniques used for the preparation of porous polymer monoliths

    PubMed Central

    Svec, Frantisek

    2010-01-01

    The porous polymer monoliths went a long way since their invention two decades ago. While the first studies applied the traditional polymerization processes at that time well established for the preparation of polymer particles, creativity of scientists interested in the monolithic structures has later led to the use of numerous less common techniques. This review article presents vast variety of methods that have meanwhile emerged. The text first briefly describes the early approaches used for the preparation of monoliths comprising standard free radical polymerizations and includes their development up to present days. Specific attention is paid to the effects of process variables on the formation of both porous structure and pore surface chemistry. Specific attention is also devoted to the use of photopolymerization. Then, several less common free radical polymerization techniques are presented in more detail such as those initiated by γ-rays and electron beam, the preparation of monoliths from high internal phase emulsions, and cryogels. Living processes including stable free radicals, atom transfer radical polymerization, and ring opening metathesis polymerization are also discussed. The review ends with description of preparation methods based on polycondensation and polyaddition reactions as well as on precipitation of preformed polymers affording the monolithic materials. PMID:19828151

  3. Quest for organic polymer-based monolithic columns affording enhanced efficiency in high performance liquid chromatography separations of small molecules in isocratic mode

    PubMed Central

    Svec, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    The separations of small molecules using columns containing porous polymer monoliths invented two decades ago went a long way from the very modest beginnings to the current capillary columns with efficiencies approaching those featured by their silica-based counterparts. This review article presents a variety of techniques that have been used to form capillary formats of monolithic columns with enhanced separation performance in isocratic elutions. The following text first describes the traditional approaches used for the preparation of efficient monoliths comprising variations in polymerization conditions including temperature as well as composition of monomers and porogenic solvents. Encouraging results of these experiments fueled research of completely new preparation methods such as polymerization to an incomplete conversion, use of single crosslinker, hypercrosslinking, and incorporation of carbon nanotubes that are described in the second part of the text. PMID:21816401

  4. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    differences between gaseous and dissolved methane (Zimmer et al., 2011). Gas hydrate is formed using a confined pressure of 12-15 MPa and a fluid pressure of 8-11 MPa with a set temperature of 275 K. The duration of the formation process depends on the required hydrate saturation and is usually in a range of several weeks. The subsequent decomposition experiments aiming at testing innovative production scenarios such as the application of a borehole tool for thermal stimulation of hydrate via catalytic oxidation of methane within an autothermal catalytic reactor (Schicks et al. 2011). Furthermore, experiments on hydrate decomposition via pressure reduction are performed to mimic realistic scenarios such as found during the production test in Mallik (Yasuda and Dallimore, 2007). In the near future it is planned to scale up existing results on CH4-CO2 exchange efficiency (e.g. Strauch and Schicks, 2012) by feeding CO2 to the hydrate reservoir. All experiments are due to the gain of high-resolution spatial and temporal data predestined as a base for numerical modeling. References Schicks, J. M., Spangenberg, E., Giese, R., Steinhauer, B., Klump, J., Luzi, M., 2011. Energies, 4, 1, 151-172. Zimmer, M., Erzinger, J., Kujawa, C., 2011. Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 4, 995-1001. Yasuda, M., Dallimore, S. J., 2007. Jpn. Assoc. Pet. Technol., 72, 603-607. Beeskow-Strauch, B., Schicks, J.M., 2012. Energies, 5, 420-437.

  5. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.

    1983-01-01

    Key requirements for a 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne communication antenna feed array applications include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five-bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. The RF designs for each of the four submodules (low noise amplifier, some gain control, phase shifter, and RF to IF sub-module) are presented. Except for the phase shifter, high frequency, low noise FETs with sub-half micron gate lengths are employed in the submodules. For the gain control, a two stage dual gate FET amplifier is used. The phase shifter is of the passive switched line type and consists of 5-bits. It uses relatively large gate width FETs (with zero drain to source bias) as the switching elements. A 20 GHz local oscillator buffer amplifier, a FET compatible balanced mixer, and a 5-8 GHz IF amplifier constitute the RF/IF sub-module. Phase shifter fabrication using ion implantation and a self-aligned gate technique is described. Preliminary RF results obtained on such phase shifters are included.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, Charles C.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  8. Monolithic ceramic analysis using the SCARE program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manderscheid, Jane M.

    1988-01-01

    The Structural Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation (SCARE) computer program calculates the fast fracture reliability of monolithic ceramic components. The code is a post-processor to the MSC/NASTRAN general purpose finite element program. The SCARE program automatically accepts the MSC/NASTRAN output necessary to compute reliability. This includes element stresses, temperatures, volumes, and areas. The SCARE program computes two-parameter Weibull strength distributions from input fracture data for both volume and surface flaws. The distributions can then be used to calculate the reliability of geometrically complex components subjected to multiaxial stress states. Several fracture criteria and flaw types are available for selection by the user, including out-of-plane crack extension theories. The theoretical basis for the reliability calculations was proposed by Batdorf. These models combine linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) with Weibull statistics to provide a mechanistic failure criterion. Other fracture theories included in SCARE are the normal stress averaging technique and the principle of independent action. The objective of this presentation is to summarize these theories, including their limitations and advantages, and to provide a general description of the SCARE program, along with example problems.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.; Young, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration via olivine carbonation: Examining the formation of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, H. E.; Plümper, O.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its abundance and natural ability to sequester CO2, olivine has been proposed as one mineral that could be used in the control of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere (Metz, 2005). Large scale peridotite deposits found in locations such as the Western Gneiss Region in Norway could provide in-situ sites for sequestration or the raw materials for ex-situ mineral carbonation. Determining the conditions under which magnesite (MgCO3) forms most efficiently is crucial to conduct a cost effective process. Understanding the development of secondary minerals is particularly important for in-situ methods as these phases can form passivating layers and affect the host rock porosity. The final solution of flow-through experiments conducted at alkaline pH have been shown to be supersaturated with respect to talc and chrysotile (Giammer et al., 2005), although these phases were not found to have precipitated the formation of a passivating, amorphous silica layer has been observed on reacted olivine surfaces (Bearat et al., 2006). By studying magnesite and other products produced during the carbonation of olivine within Teflon lined steel autoclaves we have begun to form a more comprehensive understanding of how these reactions would proceed during sequestration processes. We have performed batch experiments using carbonated saline solutions in the presence of air or gaseous CO2 from 80 to 200 ˚ C. X-ray powder diffraction was used to identify magnesite within the reaction products. Crystals of magnesite up to 20 m in diameter can be observed on olivine grain surfaces with scanning electron microscopy. Secondary reaction products formed a platy layer on olivine surfaces in reactions above 160 ˚ C and below pH 12. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the platy layer revealed an increase in Fe concentration. The macroscopically observable red colouration of the reaction products and Raman spectroscopy indicate that hematite is present in these layers. For experiments with

  12. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  13. Submerged Conidiation and Product Formation by Aspergillus niger at Low Specific Growth Rates Are Affected in Aerial Developmental Mutants ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Arentshorst, Mark; Park, JooHae; van den Hondel, Cees A.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Ram, Arthur F.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to an aerial environment or severe nutrient limitation induces asexual differentiation in filamentous fungi. Submerged cultivation of Aspergillus niger in carbon- and energy-limited retentostat cultures both induces and fuels conidiation. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that this differentiation strongly affects product formation. Since conidiation is inherent in the aerial environment, we hypothesized that product formation near zero growth can be influenced by affecting differentiation or development of aerial hyphae in general. To investigate this idea, three developmental mutants (ΔfwnA, scl-1, and scl-2 mutants) that have no apparent vegetative growth defects were cultured in maltose-limited retentostat cultures. The secondary-metabolite profile of the wild-type strain defined flavasperone, aurasperone B, tensidol B, and two so far uncharacterized compounds as associated with conidium formation, while fumonisins B2, B4, and B6 were characteristic of early response to nutrient limitation by the vegetative mycelium. The developmental mutants responded differently to the severe substrate limitation, which resulted in distinct profiles of growth and product formation. fwnA encodes the polyketide synthase responsible for melanin biosynthesis during aerial differentiation, and we show that conidial melanin synthesis in submerged retentostat cultures and aurasperone B production are fwnA dependent. The scl-1 and scl-2 strains are two UV mutants generated in the ΔfwnA background that displayed reduced asexual conidiation and formed sclerotium-like structures on agar plates. The reduced conidiation phenotypes of the scl-1 and scl-2 strains are reflected in the retentostat cultivation and are accompanied by elimination or severely reduced accumulation of secondary metabolites and distinctly enhanced accumulation of extracellular protein. This investigation shows that submerged conidiation and product formation of a mitosporic fungus

  14. Biofilm Formation and Quorum-Sensing-Molecule Production by Clinical Isolates of Serratia liquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Lázaro-Díez, María; Mayer, Celia; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Calvo, Jorge; Marco, Francesc; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Icardo, José Manuel; Otero, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Serratia spp. are opportunistic human pathogens responsible for an increasing number of nosocomial infections. However, little is known about the virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and long-term survival of Serratia liquefaciens in the hospital environment. In this study, two reporter strains, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and VIR24, and high-resolution triple-quadrupole liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to detect and to quantify N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals in 20 S. liquefaciens strains isolated from clinical samples. Only four of the strains produced sufficient amounts of AHLs to activate the sensors. Investigation of two of the positive strains by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS confirmed the presence of significant amounts of short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone [C4-HSL] and N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C6-HSL]) in both strains, which exhibited a complex and strain-specific signal profile that included minor amounts of other short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C8-HSL] and N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [OC6-HSL]) and long-acyl-chain (C10, C12, and C14) AHLs. No correlation between biofilm formation and the production of large amounts of AHLs could be established. Fimbria-like structures were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the presence of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene fimH in all strains was confirmed by PCR. The ability of S. liquefaciens to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment, increasing the probability of causing nosocomial infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes. PMID:25746999

  15. Risk assessment of coal production: an information system user's manual. [SAS (Statistical Analysis System) format

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Birchfield, T.E.; Fore, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    A specialized information system comprising all US domestic coal mine and processing plant injuries as reported to the Mine Safety and Health Administration of the US Department of Labor for the years 1975 through 1980 has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for online and batch users. The data are stored in two principal datasets: (1) annual summaries of accidental injuries and fatalities in both surface and underground bituminous and anthracite mines, as well as information on injuries suffered by workers employed in coal-processing (blending, crushing, etc.) facilities; and (2) annual summaries of employment (person-hours, number of individuals) and production (tons) of each domestic mine or processing facility for which the US Department of Labor has granted an operating permit. There are currently more than 232 000 records available online to interested users. Data are recorded for the following variables: county, state, date of injury, sex of victim, age at time of accident, degree of injury, occupation title at time of injury, activity during injury, location of accident, type of coal, type of mine, type of mining machine, type of accident, source and nature of injury, part of body injured, total mine experience, experience at current mine and job title held at time of injury, and number of days away from work or number of days restricted or charged due to the injury. As these values are organized by FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standards) county code for each reporting facility, compilations may be made on a subregional or substate basis. The datasets have been established in SAS (Statistical Analysis System) format and are readily manipulated by SAS routines available at ORNL. Several appendices are included in the manual to provide the user with a detailed description of all the codes available for data retrieval. Sample retrieval sessions are also incorporated.

  16. Color-Center Production and Formation in Electron-Irradiated Magnesium Aluminate Spinel and Ceria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Lelong, Gerald; Guillaumet, Maxime; Weber, William J.; Takaki, Seiya; Yasuda, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-20

    Single crystals of magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with (100) or (110) orientations and cerium dioxide or ceria (CeO2) were irradiated by 1.0-MeV and 2.5-MeV electrons in a high fluence range. Point-defect production was studied by off-line UV-visible optical spectroscopy after irradiation. For spinel, regardless of both crystal orientation and electron energy, two characteristic broad bands centered at photon energies of 5.4 eV and 4.9 eV were assigned to F and F+ centers (neutral and singly-ionized oxygen vacancies), respectively, on the basis of available literature data. No clear differences in colour-centre formation were observed for the two crystal orientations. Using calculationsmore » of displacement cross sections by elastic collisions, these results are consistent with a very large threshold displacement energy (200 eV) for oxygen atoms at RT. A third very broad band centered at 3.7 eV might be attributed either to an oxygen hole center (V-type center) or an F2 dimer center (oxygen di-vacancy). The onset of recovery of these color centers took place at 200°C with almost full bleaching at 600°C. Activation energies (~0.3-0.4 eV) for defect recovery were deduced from the isochronal annealing data by using a first-order kinetics analysis. For ceria, a sub band-gap absorption feature peaked at ~3.1 eV was recorded for 2.5-MeV electron irradiation only. Assuming a ballistic process, we suggest that the latter defect might result from cerium atom displacement on the basis of computed cross sections.« less

  17. Human metabolites and transformation products of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide: analysis, occurrence and formation during abiotic treatments.

    PubMed

    Česen, Marjeta; Kosjek, Tina; Busetti, Francesco; Kompare, Boris; Heath, Ester

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical method for the analysis of cytostatic cyclophosphamide (CP), ifosfamide (IF) and their selected metabolites/transformation products (TPs): carboxy-cyclophosphamide (carboxy-CP), keto-cyclophosphamide (keto-CP) and 3-dechloroethyl-ifosfamide/N-dechloroethyl-cyclophosphamide (N-decl-CP) in wastewater (WW). Keto-cyclophosphamide, CP and IF were extracted with Oasis HLB and N-decl-CP and carboxy-CP with Isolute ENV+ cartridges. Analyte derivatization was performed by silylation (metabolites/TPs) and acetylation (CP and IF). The recoveries and LOQs of the developed method were 58, 87 and 103 % and 77.7, 43.7 and 6.7 ng L(-1) for carboxy-CP, keto-CP and N-decl-CP, respectively. After validation, the analytical method was applied to hospital WW and influent and effluent samples of a receiving WW treatment plant. In hospital WW, levels up to 2690, 47.0, 13,200, 2100 and 178 ng L(-1) were detected for CP, IF, carboxy-CP, N-decl-CP and keto-CP, respectively, while in influent and effluent samples concentrations were below LOQs. The formation of TPs during abiotic treatments was also studied. Liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify CP and IF TPs in ultrapure water, treated with UV and UV/H2O2. UV treatment produced four CP TPs and four IF TPs, while UV/H2O2 resulted in five CPs and four IF TPs. Besides already known TPs, three novel TPs (CP-TP138a, imino-ifosfamide and IF-TP138) have been tentatively identified. In hospital WW treated by UV/O3/H2O2, none of the target metabolites/TPs resulted above LOQs. PMID:26920534

  18. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  19. Effect of roasting time of buckwheat groats on the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Małgorzata, Wronkowska; Konrad, Piskuła Mariusz; Zieliński, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity of buckwheat, induced by roasting at 160 °C for 30, 40 and 50 min, were evaluated in the study. Furozine, was detected after roasting, in all buckwheat samples. Increase of FIC, the presence of significant amounts of CML and enhanced browning were observed, along with increasing times of roasting. The formation of acrylamide in the obtained buckwheat products was also significantly connected with the time of roasting. A significant degradation was observed in natural antioxidants, as affected by heat treatment time. The colour parameter changed significantly with the increasing of roasting time. Overall, 30min of roasting was beneficial from a nutritional point of view for the obtained buckwheat product. PMID:26593501

  20. A nitric oxide-responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi regulates flagella production and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Henares, Bernadette M; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  1. A Nitric Oxide-Responsive Quorum Sensing Circuit in Vibrio harveyi Regulates Flagella Production and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Henares, Bernadette M.; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  2. Nickel sulfide formation at low temperature: initial precipitates, solubility and transformation products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of nickel sulfides has been examined experimentally over the temperature range from 25 to 60°C. At all conditions studied, hexagonal (α-NiS) was the initial precipitate from solution containing Ni2+ and dissolved sulfide. The formation of millerite (β- NiS, rhombo...

  3. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  4. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  5. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  6. Monolithic generators of pseudo-nondiffracting optical vortex beams at the microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, Albertas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Brasselet, Etienne

    2013-10-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of micro-optical elements with typical size of 100 μm, which enable the production of pseudo-nondiffracting optical vortex beams of arbitrary order. This is made possible from the monolithic integration of spiral phase plates and axicons into helical axicons by direct laser writing using femtosecond laser nanopolymerization. The optical performances of the fabricated three-dimensional singular microstructures are experimentally measured and compared with their expected theoretical behavior, both in intensity and phase. The proposed approach thus represents an attempt to merge the field of singular integrated optics with that of nondiffracting light fields.

  7. Monolithic light guide optics enabling new user experience for see-through AR glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarayeddline, K.; Mirza, K.; Benoit, P.; Hugel, X.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the performances of mold light guide based see-through optics for the production of AR glasses for commercial and professional applications. A monolithic thin mold light guide with surface structure mirror array extracts and project bright and large virtual image into the user eye of sight. The light guide thin form factor allows a new user experience with two possible positions for the virtual image in front of the user eye. A wireless AR glasses based on this concept will be described and demonstrated. A comparison with others light guide based technologies in term of Safety, Brightness efficiency and form factor will be presented and discussed.

  8. Parallel preconditioners for monolithic solution of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-Vergiat, Luc; McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Shear bands are one of the most fascinating instabilities in metals that occur under high strain rates. They describe narrow regions, on the order of micron scales, where plastic deformations and significant heating are localized which eventually leads to fracture nucleation and failure of the component. In this work shear bands are described by a set of four strongly coupled thermo-mechanical equations discretized by a mixed finite element formulation. A thermo-viscoplastic flow rule is used to model the inelastic constitutive law and finite thermal conductivity is prescribed which gives rise to an inherent physical length scale, governed by competition of shear heating and thermal diffusion. The residual equations are solved monolithically by a Newton type method at every time step and have been shown to yield mesh insensitive result. The Jacobian of the system is sparse and has a nonsymmetric block structure that varies with the different stages of shear bands formation. The aim of the current work is to develop robust parallel preconditioners to GMRES in order to solve the resulting Jacobian systems efficiently. The main idea is to design Schur complements tailored to the specific block structure of the system and that account for the varying stages of shear bands. We develop multipurpose preconditioners that apply to standard irreducible discretizations as well as our recent work on isogeometric discretizations of shear bands. The proposed preconditioners are tested on benchmark examples and compared to standard state of practice solvers such as GMRES/ILU and LU direct solvers. Nonlinear and linear iterations counts as well as CPU times and computational speedups are reported and it is shown that the proposed preconditioners are robust, efficient and outperform traditional state of the art solvers.

  9. Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J.-W.; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass–ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass–ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics. PMID:24139756

  10. V-band monolithic two stage HEMT amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aust, M.; Yonaki, J.; Nakano, K.; Berenz, J.; Dow, G.

    Two different types of HEMT (high-electron-mobility transistor) monolithic low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) using AlGaAs/GaAs and pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAs materials have been developed and have demonstrated excellent performance at 60 GHz. These monolithic LNAs have achieved noise figures of 5 dB, as well as associated gains of 11 dB. These two-stage circuits both utilize 0.2- x 60-micron HEMT devices for both bandpass and low-pass circuit topologies. Noise figures as low as 4.5 dB have been observed for single-stage MMIC- (monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit) implemented LNAs, and gains in excess of 20 dB have been observed for three-stage versions of this amplifier with a 5-dB noise figure in the V band. This result represents the state-of-the art monolithic HEMT amplifier performance for AlGaAs and pseudomorphic InGaAs materials. This MMIC amplifier can occupy about less than one-third the size of existing MIC hybrid V-band LNAs. This represents a significant size reduction and cost saving due to repeatable circuit performance with monolithic technology. The chip sizes are both 1.6 x 2.7 mm for these two-stage amplifiers.

  11. New Graphene Form of Nanoporous Monolith for Excellent Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hui; Lin, Tianquan; Xu, Feng; Tang, Yufeng; Liu, Zhanqiang; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-01-13

    Extraordinary tubular graphene cellular material of a tetrahedrally connected covalent structure was very recently discovered as a new supermaterial with ultralight, ultrastiff, superelastic, and excellent conductive characteristics, but no high specific surface area will keep it from any next-generation energy storage applications. Herein, we prepare another new graphene monolith of mesoporous graphene-filled tubes instead of hollow tubes in the reported cellular structure. This graphene nanoporous monolith is also composed of covalently bonded carbon network possessing high specific surface area of ∼1590 m(2) g(-1) and electrical conductivity of ∼32 S cm(-1), superior to graphene aerogels and porous graphene forms self-assembled by graphene oxide. This 3D graphene monolith can support over 10 000 times its own weight, significantly superior to CNT and graphene cellular materials with a similar density. Furthermore, pseudocapacitance-active functional groups are introduced into the new nanoporous graphene monolith as an electrode material in electrochemical capacitors. Surprisingly, the electrode of 3D mesoporous graphene has a specific capacitance of 303 F g(-1) and maintains over 98% retention after 10 000 cycles, belonging to the list for the best carbon-based active materials. The macroscopic mesoporous graphene monolith suggests the great potential as an electrode for supercapacitors in energy storage areas. PMID:26641709

  12. Continuous vs. discrete models of nonadiabatic monolith catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Groppi, G.; Tronconi, E.

    1996-08-01

    Monolith catalysts are widely applied for clean up of waste gases [catalytic mufflers, volatile organic compound (VOC) incinerators, reactors for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}] in view of their unique combination of low-pressure drops and high gas-solid interfacial areas. The crucial point in continuous heat-transfer models is the evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity coefficients, which are functions both of the physical properties of the two phases and of the monolith geometry. In this work a novel expression for calculation of the radial effective conductivity is derived. The physical consistency of the steady-state continuous model implementing such an expression is then analyzed by comparison with a discrete monolith model. In spite of the just-mentioned limitations, discrete models have been partially validated in the literature against experimental temperature profiles in heated monoliths; thus, they can be regarded as a standard in evaluating the adequacy of the continuum approach. The reference problem of pure heat transfer with constant temperature of the external monolith wall is investigated for these purposes.

  13. Surfactant-Bound Monolithic Columns for Capillary Electrochromatography

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid (AAUA) is designed for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) was evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes (ABs) and seven alkyl phenyl ketones (APKs) as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of AAUA monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6%, 8% and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution, and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e., morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates (NMCs) pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase. PMID:19885887

  14. Formation of halogenated disinfection by-products in cobalt-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation processes in the presence of halides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiping; Dong, Wei; Kong, Deyang; Ji, Yuefei; Lu, Junhe; Yin, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) generated by activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and persulfate (PS) are highly oxidative and applied to degrade various organic pollutants. This research was designed to investigate formation of halogenated by-products in Co(2+) activated PMS process in the presence of halides and natural organic matter (NOM). It was revealed that no halogenated by-products were detected in the presence of Cl(-) while 189 μg/L bromoform and 100.7 μg/L dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were found after 120 h when 2 mg/L NOM, 0.1 mM Br(-), 1.0 mM PMS, and 5 μL Co(2+) were present initially. These products are known as disinfection by-products (DBPs) since they are formed in water disinfection processes. Formation of DBPs was even more significant in the absence of Co(2+). The data indicate that both PMS and SO4(-) can transform Br(-) to reactive bromine species which react with NOM to form halogenated by-products. Less DBP formation in Co(2+)-PMS systems was due to the further destruction of DBPs by SO4(-). More DBPs species including chlorinated ones were detected in the presence of both Cl(-) and Br(-). However, more brominated species produced than chlorinate ones generally. The total DBP yield decreased with the increase of Cl(-) content when total halides kept constant. This is one of the few studies that demonstrate the formation of halogenated DBPs in Co(2+)/PMS reaction systems, which should be taken into consideration in the application of SO4(-) based oxidation technologies. PMID:27093695

  15. Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myles, K. M.; Mcpheeters, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is an oxide-ceramic structure in which appropriate electronic and ionic conductors are fabricated in a honeycomb shape similar to a block of corrugated paperboard. These electronic and ionic conductors are arranged to provide short conduction paths to minimize resistive losses. The power density achievable with the MSOFC is expected to be about 8 kW/kg or 4 kW/L, at fuel efficienceis over 50 percent, because of small cell size and low resistive losses in the materials. The MSOFC operates in the range of 700 to 1000 C, at which temperatures rapid reform of hydrocarbon fuels is expected within the nickel-YSZ fuel channels. Tape casting and hot roll calendering are used to fabricate the MSOFC structure. The performance of the MSOFC has improved significantly during the course of development. The limitation of this system, based on materials resistance alone without interfacial resistances, is 0.093 ohm-sq cm area-specific resistance (ASR). The current typical performance of MSOFC single cells is characterized by ASRs of about 0.4 to 0.5 ohm-sq cm. With further development the ASR is expected to be reduced below 0.2 ohm-sq cm, which will result in power levels greater than 1.4 W/sq cm. The feasibility of the MSOFC concept was proven, and the performance was dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials were minimized. As a result of good matching of these properties, the MSOFC structure was successfully fabricated with few defects, and the system shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source.

  16. Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, K. M.; McPheeters, C. C.

    1989-12-01

    The Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is an oxide-ceramic structure in which appropriate electronic and ionic conductors are fabricated in a honeycomb shape similar to a block of corrugated paperboard. These electronic and ionic conductors are arranged to provide short conduction paths to minimize resistive losses. The power density achievable with the MSOFC is expected to be about 8 kW/kg or 4 kW/L, at fuel efficienceis over 50 percent, because of small cell size and low resistive losses in the materials. The MSOFC operates in the range of 700 to 1000 C, at which temperatures rapid reform of hydrocarbon fuels is expected within the nickel-YSZ fuel channels. Tape casting and hot roll calendering are used to fabricate the MSOFC structure. The performance of the MSOFC has improved significantly during the course of development. The limitation of this system, based on materials resistance alone without interfacial resistances, is 0.093 ohm-sq cm area-specific resistance (ASR). The current typical performance of MSOFC single cells is characterized by ASRs of about 0.4 to 0.5 ohm-sq cm. With further development the ASR is expected to be reduced below 0.2 ohm-sq cm, which will result in power levels greater than 1.4 W/sq cm. The feasibility of the MSOFC concept was proven, and the performance was dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials were minimized. As a result of good matching of these properties, the MSOFC structure was successfully fabricated with few defects, and the system shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source.

  17. Deletion of the Chloroplast-Localized Thylakoid Formation1 Gene Product in Arabidopsis Leads to Deficient Thylakoid Formation and Variegated Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Sullivan, Rusty W.; Kight, Alicia; Henry, Ralph L.; Huang, Jirong; Jones, Alan M.; Korth, Kenneth L.

    2004-01-01

    Development of thylakoid membranes depends upon the transport of membrane vesicles from the chloroplast inner envelope and subsequent fusion of vesicles within the interior of the plastid. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Thylakoid formation1 (Thf1) gene product is shown here to control an important step required for the normal organization of these vesicles into mature thylakoid stacks and ultimately for leaf development. The Arabidopsis Thf1 gene encodes an imported chloroplast protein, as shown by in vitro import and localization of a Thf1-green fluorescent protein fusion product in transgenic plants. This gene is conserved in oxygenic photoautotrophs ranging from cyanobacteria to flowering land plants. Transcript levels for Thf1 are induced in the light and decrease under dark conditions, paralleling profiles of light-regulated nuclear genes involved in chloroplast function. Disruption of the Thf1 gene via T-DNA insertion results in plants that are severely stunted with variegated leaf patterns. Nongreen sectors of variegated leaves lacking Thf1 expression contain plastids that accumulate membrane vesicles on the interior and lack organized thylakoid structures. Green sectors of Thf1-disrupted leaves contain some chloroplasts that form organized thylakoid membranes, indicating that an inefficient compensatory mechanism supports thylakoid formation in the absence of Thf1. Genetic complementation of a Thf1 knockout line confirms the role of this gene in chloroplast and leaf development. Transgenic plants expressing the Thf1 gene in antisense orientation are stunted with altered thylakoid organization, especially in young seedlings. The data indicate that the Thf1 gene product plays a crucial role in a dynamic process of vesicle-mediated thylakoid membrane biogenesis. PMID:15516501

  18. Pre-Launch Algorithm and Data Format for the Level 1 Calibration Products for the EOS AM-1 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce W.; Godden, Gerald D.; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Knight, Edward J.; Qiu, Shi-Yue; Montgomery, Harry; Hopkins, M. M.; Khayat, Mohammad G.; Hao, Zhi-Dong; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiometric calibration product is described for the thermal emissive and the reflective solar bands. Specific sensor design characteristics are identified to assist in understanding how the calibration algorithm software product is designed. The reflected solar band software products of radiance and reflectance factor both are described. The product file format is summarized and the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) Homepage location for the current file format is provided.

  19. A Community Format for Electro-Optical Space Situational Awareness (EOSSA) Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T.; Mutschler, S.; Meiser, D.; Crespo, R.; Shine, N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible format for compiling radiometry/photometry data with pertinent information about the collections into a file for use by the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) community. With the increase in the number of Electro-Optical (EO) sensors collecting photometric, radiometric, and spectroscopic data on man-made Resident Space Objects (RSOs) for SSA purposes, the EO SSA community of interest and stakeholders in SSA require a file format protocol for reporting the extracted information used for SSA from these datasets. This EOSSA file format provides a foundation to enable data providers to format their processed data. The objective of this format is to handle a variety of photometric measurements from multiple sensors and provide fields for specific parameters containing crucial data about the object, the sensor, the collection, and the processing. The chosen formatting type for EOSSA is the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS). It is maintained by the International Astronomical Union and NASA/GSFC. FITS is the standard data format used in astronomy and has extensions and features that make it easy to transport and archive large scientific data sets. There are types of FITS files for multi-dimensional arrays, such as images, or hyperspectral image cubes, and headers and tables for data extracted from the images, and descriptive information about the data and sensor. The FITS binary table extension is the most efficient data structure to use for the purposes of SSA with respect to ease of programming, computational speed, and storage space. A hierarchical data format (HDF5) has many of these features; however, its biggest drawback to our purpose is that the files are large and require a lot of storage space. Secondly, no standardized HDF5 file structure has been developed and there is no high level application programming interface (API).

  20. GaAs monolithic R.F. modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  1. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  2. Integrated analysis of production potential and profitability of a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Zammerilli, A.M.; Yost, A.B. II; Muncey, J.G.; Hegeman, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal well candidate based on the heterogenous nature of the reservoir (suggested by large well-to-well variances in reserves) and the low percentage of economical vertical wells. Since there was substantial evidence of reservoir heterogeneity, it was unknown whether the selected, wellsite would penetrate a reservoir with the desired properties for a horizontal well. Thus, an integrated team was formed to combine geologic analysis, seismic interpretation, reservoir engineering, reservoir simulation, and economic assessment to analyze the production potential and profitability of completing a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose formation.

  3. Density functional computational studies on the glucose and glycine Maillard reaction: Formation of the Amadori rearrangement products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Roy, Amlan K.; Shipar, Abul Haider; Ahmed, M. Samsuddin

    Theoretical energy changes of various intermediates leading to the formation of the Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs) under different mechanistic assumptions have been calculated, by using open chain glucose (O-Glu)/closed chain glucose (A-Glu and B-Glu) and glycine (Gly) as a model for the Maillard reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been applied on the proposed mechanisms under different pH conditions. Thus, the possibility of the formation of different compounds and electronic energy changes for different steps in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated. B-Glu has been found to be more efficient than A-Glu, and A-Glu has been found more efficient than O-Glu in the reaction. The reaction under basic condition is the most favorable for the formation of ARPs. Other reaction pathways have been computed and discussed in this work.0

  4. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-12-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  5. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  6. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  7. Polar monolithic capillary columns: Analysis of light hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. A.; Shiryaeva, V. E.; Popova, T. P.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the nature of the stationary phase and carrier gas (helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or nitrous oxide) on the efficiency and separating ability of monolithic ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) polymer capillary columns was studied using a model mixture of light hydrocarbons C1-C4. The results were compared with the properties of silica gel and divinylbenzene (DVB) monolithic columns. For EDMA polymer monolithic columns, the effect of the carrier gas on the separating ability was markedly lower than for silica gel columns. A reduction in HETP observed in the series He > H2 > N2 > N2O > CO2 is also known for hollow capillary columns with polymer stationary phases, but the change in efficiency was ˜20-30% in this case. Under the optimum conditions, HETP was minimum for the columns when CO2 or N2O was used.

  8. Tooth-colored CAD/CAM monolithic restorations.

    PubMed

    Reich, S

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic restoration (also known as a full contour restoration) is one that is manufactured from a single material for the fully anatomic replacement of lost tooth structure. Additional staining (followed by glaze firing if ceramic materials are used) may be performed to enhance the appearance of the restoration. For decades, monolithic restoration has been the standard for inlay and partial crown restorations manufactured by both pressing and computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. A limited selection of monolithic materials is now available for dental crown and bridge restorations. The IDS (2015) provided an opportunity to learn about and evaluate current trends in this field. In addition to new developments, established materials are also mentioned in this article to complete the picture. In line with the strategic focus of the IJCD, the focus here is naturally on CAD/CAM materials. PMID:26110926

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL PROPERTIES AND BOND STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    D E Burkes; D D Keiser; D M Wachs; J S Larson; M D Chapple

    2007-03-01

    Understanding fuel foil mechanical properties, and fuel / cladding bond quality and strength in monolithic plates is an important area of investigation and quantification. Specifically, what constitutes an acceptable monolithic fuel – cladding bond, how are the properties of the bond measured and determined, and what is the impact of fabrication process or change in parameters on the level of bonding? Currently, non-bond areas are quantified employing ultrasonic determinations that are challenging to interpret and understand in terms of irradiation impact. Thus, determining mechanical properties of the fuel foil and what constitutes fuel / cladding non-bonds is essential to successful qualification of monolithic fuel plates. Capabilities and tests related to determination of these properties have been implemented at the INL and are discussed, along with preliminary results.

  10. A Possible Astronomically Aligned Monolith at Gardom's Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Daniel; Alder, Andy; Bemand, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    A unique triangular shaped monolith located within the Peak District National Park at Gardom's Edge could be intentionally astronomically aligned. It is set within a landscape rich in late Neolithic and Bronze Age remains. We show that the stone is most likely in its original orientation owing to its clear signs of erosion and associated to the time period of the late Neolithic. It is tilted towards south and its north side slopes at an angle equal to the maximum altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. This alignment emphasizes the changing declinations of the Sun during the seasons as well as giving an indication of mid-summers day. This functionality is achieved by an impressive display of light and shadow on the north facing side of the monolith. Together with other monuments in the close vicinity the monolith would have represented an ideal marker or social arena for seasonal gatherings for the otherwise dispersed small communities.

  11. 102 W monolithic single frequency Tm-doped fiber MOPA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Si, Lei

    2013-12-30

    We demonstrate a high power all-fiber single frequency Tm-doped fiber amplifier. The maximum output power reached 102 W and the central wavelength was 1.97 μm. The single frequency laser signal from a seed laser was amplified based on a monolithic master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The slope efficiency was about 50% against the absorbed pump power. Neither parasitic lasing nor nonlinear effect was observed in the monolithic fiber amplifier. The SBS threshold of the single frequency Tm-doped fiber amplifier was analyzed and estimated. The output power is not limited by the SBS threshold and could be further improved by increasing the pump power. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of average power exceeding 100 W from monolithic all-fiber laser near 2 μm wavelength. PMID:24514831

  12. Synthesis of transparent nanocomposite monoliths for gamma scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Hajagos, Tibor J.; Kishpaugh, David; Jin, Yunxia; Hu, Wei; Chen, Qi; Pei, Qibing

    2015-08-01

    During the past decade, inorganic nanoparticles/polymer nanocomposites have been intensively studied to provide a low cost, high performance alternative for gamma scintillation. However, the aggregation of nanoparticles often occurs even at low nanoparticle concentrations and thus deteriorates the transparency and performance of these nanocomposite scintillators. Here we report an efficient fabrication protocol of transparent nanocomposite monoliths based on surface modified hafnium oxide nanoparticles. Using hafnium oxide nanoparticles with surface-grafted methacrylate groups, highly transparent bulk-size nanocomposite monoliths (2 mm thick, transmittance at 550 nm >75%) are fabricated with nanoparticle loadings up to 40 wt% (net hafnium wt% up to 28.5%). These nanocomposite monoliths of 1 cm diameter and 2 mm thickness are capable of producing a full energy photopeak for 662 keV gamma rays, with the best deconvoluted photopeak energy resolution reaching 8%.

  13. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant. PMID:24555406

  14. Assessing the performance of curtain flow first generation silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Soliven, Arianne; Foley, Dominic; Pereira, Luisa; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew; Cabrera, Karin; Ritchie, Harald; Edge, Tony

    2014-07-18

    Analytical scale active flow technology first generation silica monolithic columns kitted out in curtain flow mode of operation were studied for the first time. A series of tests were undertaken assessing the column efficiency, peak asymmetry and detection sensitivity. Two curtain flow columns were tested, one with a fixed outlet ratio of 10% through the central exit port, the other with 30%. Tests were carried out using a wide range in inlet flow segmentation ratios. The performance of the curtain flow columns were compared to a conventional monolithic column. The gain in theoretical plates achieved in the curtain flow mode of operation was as much as 130%, with almost Gaussian bands being obtained. Detection sensitivity increased by as much as 250% under optimal detection conditions. The permeability advantage of the monolithic structure together with the active flow technology makes it a priceless tool for high throughput, sensitive, low detection volume analyses. PMID:24906299

  15. Modelling the Biphasic Growth and Product Formation by Enterococcus faecium CECT 410 in Realkalized Fed-Batch Fermentations in Whey

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Nelson Pérez; Fajardo, Paula; Fuciños, Clara; Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Alonso, Elisa; Torrado, Ana; Pastrana, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The influence of initial pH on growth and nutrient (total sugars, nitrogen, and phosphorous) consumption by Enterococcus faecium CECT 410 was studied during batch cultures in whey. With these data, two realkalized fed-batch fermentations were developed using different feeding substrates. The shift from homolactic to mixed acid fermentation, the biphasic kinetics observed for cell growth and nitrogen consumption and the increase in the concentrations of biomass and products (lactic acid, acetic acid, ethanol, and butane-2,3-diol) were the most noteworthy observations of these cultures. Modelling the fed-batch growth of Ent. faecium with the Logistic and bi-Logistic models was not satisfactory. However, biomass production was best mathematically described with the use of a double Monod model, which was expressed in terms of biomass, product accumulation, and nitrogen utilization. Product formation was successfully modelled with a modified form of the Luedeking and Piret model developed in this study. PMID:20689729

  16. Thermodynamics-based design of microbial cell factories for anaerobic product formation.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, Hugo F; van Maris, A J A; Wahl, S Aljoscha; Heijnen, J J

    2015-09-01

    The field of metabolic engineering has delivered new microbial cell factories and processes for the production of different compounds including biofuels, (di)carboxylic acids, alcohols, and amino acids. Most of these processes are aerobic, with few exceptions (e.g., alcoholic fermentation), and attention is focused on assembling a high-flux product pathway with a production limit usually set by the oxygen transfer rate. By contrast, anaerobic product synthesis offers significant benefits compared to aerobic systems: higher yields, less heat generation, reduced biomass production, and lower mechanical energy input, which can significantly reduce production costs. Using simple thermodynamic calculations, we demonstrate that many products can theoretically be produced under anaerobic conditions using several conventional and non-conventional substrates. PMID:26232033

  17. The C(3P) + NH3 Reaction in Interstellar Chemistry. I. Investigation of the Product Formation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgalais, Jérémy; Capron, Michael; Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar; Osborn, David L.; Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Le Picard, Sébastien D.

    2015-10-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. Kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.

  18. 40 CFR Table I-13 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  20. 40 CFR Table I-5 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

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  5. 40 CFR Table I-4 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  6. Evaluating the influence of process parameters on soluble microbial products formation using response surface methodology coupled with grey relational analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Luo, Hong-Wei; Fang, Fang; Li, Wen-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMPs) present a major part of residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluents from biological wastewater treatment systems, and the SMP formation is greatly influenced by a variety of process parameters. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with grey relational analysis (GRA) method was used to evaluate the effects of substrate concentration, temperature, NH(4)(+)-N concentration and aeration rate on the SMP production in batch activated sludge reactors. Carbohydrates were found to be the major component of SMP, and the influential priorities of these factors were: temperature>substrate concentration > aeration rate > NH(4)(+)-N concentration. On the basis of the RSM results, the interactive effects of these factors on the SMP formation were evaluated, and the optimal operating conditions for a minimum SMP production in such a batch activated sludge system also were identified. These results provide useful information about how to control the SMP formation of activated sludge and ensure the bioreactor high-quality effluent. PMID:20832838

  7. Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose to enhance methane fermentation. I. Monosaccharide and furfurals hydrothermal decomposition and product formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, K.D.; McCarty, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    Over a pH range 1-4 and temperatures from 170 to 230/sup 0/C, the decomposition rates of xylose, galactose, mannose, glucose, 2-furfural, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) were pseudo first order. The effect of temperature and pH on the pseudo first-order decomposition rate constants was modeled using the Arrhenius equation and acid-base catalysis, respectively. Decomposition rates of the monosaccharides were minimum at a pH 2-2.5. Above pH 2.5, the monosaccharide decomposition was base catalyzed, with acid catalysis occurring at a pH of less than 2 for glucose. The furfurals were subject to acid catalysis at below ca. pH 3.5. The hydrothermal conversion of glucose to its decomposition products during thermochemical pretreatment can be modeled as a combination of series and parallel reactions. The formation rates of identified soluble products from glucose decomposition, 5-HMF and levulinic acid, were also functions of temperature and pH. The rate of 5-HMF formation relative to glucose decomposition decreased as the pH increased from 2.0 to 4.0, with levulinic acid formation only detected when the pH was 2.5 or less. For glucose decomposition, humic solids accounted for ca. 20% of the decomposition products.

  8. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-01

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  9. Monolithic HTS microwave phase shifter and other devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Charles M.; Kobayashi, June H.; Guillory, Emery B.; Pettiette-Hall, Claire; Burch, John F.

    1992-08-01

    We describe a monolithic high-temperature superconductor (HTS) phase shifter based on the distributed Josephson inductance (DJI) design integrated monolithically into a 10-GHz microstrip line. This microwave circuit incorporates greater than 1000 HTS RF SQUIDS. Recent data demonstrate the performance of this broadband HTS circuit. We observed phase shifts greater than 150 deg in resonant structures, and 20 deg in broadband circuits. The nonlinear inductance of the superconducting transmission line can be used for other novel applications, including parametric amplification. A comparison of the DJI circuit to a series array of Josephson elements (used for pulse sharpening) will contrast these two new and exciting nonlinear transmission line circuits.

  10. A Monolithic Oxide-Based Transversal Thermoelectric Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, S.; Bochmann, A.; Reimann, T.; Schulz, T.; Dreßler, C.; Udich, S.; Töpfer, J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication and properties of a monolithic transversal thermoelectric energy harvester based on the combination of a thermoelectric oxide and a metal. The fabrication of the device is done with a ceramic multilayer technology using printing and co-firing processes. Five transversal devices were combined to a meander-like thermoelectric generator. Electrical measurements and finite element calculations were performed to characterize the resulting thermoelectric generator. A maximum experimental electrical power output of 30.2 mW at a temperature difference of {Δ }T = 208 K was found. The prepared monolithic thermoelectric generator provides at {Δ }T = 35 K sufficient energy to drive a simple electronic sensor application.

  11. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, T.; Havranek, M.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Marinas, C.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented.

  12. Silver-coated monolithic columns for separation in radiopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Ondrej; Kucka, Jan; Svec, Frantisek; Hruby, Martin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the preparation of a macroporous monolithic column containing anchored silver nanoparticles and its use for the elimination of excess radioiodine from the radiolabeled pharmaceutical. The poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was first functionalized with cystamine and the free thiol groups liberated by reaction with borohydride. In-house-prepared silver nanoparticles were then attached by interaction with the surface thiols. The deiodization process was demonstrated with the commonly used radiopharmaceutical m-iodobenzylguanidine labeled with radionuclide iodine-125. PMID:24478196

  13. Estimating The CO2 Sequestration Capacity of Fractured Shale Formations Using Methane Production Rates: The Case of the Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Z.; Clarens, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Fractured shale formations that have been drained of hydrocarbons could serve as attractive sites for geologic sequestration of CO2. Shales preferentially sorb CO2 enabling greater storage potential than would be expected based only on the pores vacated during CH4 production. Sequestration in shales could have a variety of other benefits because the intrinsically low permeability of the rock could help mitigate leakage risks and infrastructure resources could be leveraged to minimize costs. Here a modeling framework developed by the authors to estimate the sequestration capacity of fractured shale formations based on CH4 production rates was applied to the Utica Shale. The model is based on a unipore transport model, which assumes that diffusion of gases into and out of the kerogen matrix will control gas transport. The results from the Utica formation were compared to estimates for sequestration in the Marcellus shale to understand how the petrophysical characteristics of these two formations impact estimated sequestration capacity. A detailed sensitivity analysis was carried out to link modeling assumptions and key parameters with known physicochemical characteristics of these two shale formations. Modeling parameters were derived from published production data obtained from the state of Ohio. The model was found to be most sensitive to the equilibrium sorption parameters of CH4 and CO2, for which there is good literature data available. Published values for CO2 sorption varied considerably based on the composition of the shale. Improved experimental data is needed to provide the most accurate estimates of storage in different formations. Differences were observed in gas diffusivity estimates for the Marcellus and Utica shale that could be understood in terms of the petrophysical characteristics of the two formations. We also found important effects tied to the effective diffusion length out of an average pore in the kerogen. These results allow us to understand

  14. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  15. Monolithic Flexure Pre-Stressed Ultrasonic Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Allen, Phillip Grant

    2011-01-01

    High-power ultrasonic actuators are generally assembled with a horn, backing, stress bolt, piezoelectric rings, and electrodes. The manufacturing process is complex, expensive, difficult, and time-consuming. The internal stress bolt needs to be insulated and presents a potential internal discharge point, which can decrease actuator life. Also, the introduction of a center hole for the bolt causes many failures, reducing the throughput of the manufactured actuators. A new design has been developed for producing ultrasonic horn actuators. This design consists of using flexures rather than stress bolts, allowing one to apply pre-load to the piezoelectric material. It also allows one to manufacture them from a single material/plate, rapid prototype them, or make an array in a plate or 3D structure. The actuator is easily assembled, and application of pre-stress greater than 25 MPa was demonstrated. The horn consists of external flexures that eliminate the need for the conventional stress bolt internal to the piezoelectric, and reduces the related complexity. The stress bolts are required in existing horns to provide prestress on piezoelectric stacks when driven at high power levels. In addition, the manufacturing process benefits from the amenability to produce horn structures with internal cavities. The removal of the pre-stress bolt removes a potential internal electric discharge point in the actuator. In addition, it significantly reduces the chances of mechanical failure in the piezoelectric stacks that result from the hole surface in conventional piezoelectric actuators. The novel features of this disclosure are: 1. A design that can be manufactured from a single piece of metal using EDM, precision machining, or rapid prototyping. 2. Increased electromechanical coupling of the horn actuator. 3. Higher energy density. 4. A monolithic structure of a horn that consists of an external flexure or flexures that can be used to pre-stress a solid piezoelectric structure

  16. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  17. Development of large-area monolithically integrated Silicon-Film photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1991--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Shreve, K.P.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (< 100-{mu}m) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achievable with the use of light trapping and a passivated back surface. The long-term goal for the product is a 1200-cm{sup 2}, 18%-efficient, monolithic array. The short-term objectives are to improve material quality and to fabricate 100 cm{sup 2} monolithically interconnected solar cell arrays. Low minority-carrier diffusion length in the silicon film and series resistance in the interconnected device structure are presently limiting device performance. Material quality is continually improving through reduced impurity contamination. Metallization schemes, such as a solder-dipped interconnection process, have been developed that will allow low-cost production processing and minimize R{sub s} effects. Test data for a nine-cell device (16 cm{sup 2}) indicated a V{sub oc} of 3.72 V. These first-reported monolithically interconnected multicrystalline silicon-on-ceramic devices show low shunt conductance (< 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}) due to limited conduction through the ceramic and no process-related metallization shunts.

  18. Manufacturing of Monolithic Electrodes from Low-Cost Renewable Resources

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Nichiolas William; Rios, Orlando; Johs, Alexander; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Keffer, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignin, a low-cost, biomass derived precursor, was selected as an alternative for carbon based free standing anodes in Li-ion batteries. Industrially scalable melt-spinning and melt-blowing synthesis methods were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that are compatible with industrially viable production. Engineering studies predict that LCFs can be manufactured at $3/lb using these technologies, which compares favorably to $12/lb for battery grade graphite. The physical properties of lignin carbon fibers, specifically the tunable electrochemical and thermal transport, are suitable for energy storage applications as both an active material and current collector. The elimination of inactive components in the slurry-coated electrodes was enabled by LCF processing parameters modifications to produce monolithic mats in which the fibers are electrically interconnected. These mats were several hundreds of micrometers thick, and the fibers functioned as both current collector and active material by virtue of their mixed ionic/electronic conductivities. The LCFs were coated onto copper current collectors with PVDF binder and conductive carbon additive through conventional slurry processing. Galvanostatic cycling of the LCFs against Li revealed reversible capacities greater than 300 mAh/g. The coulombic efficiencies were over 99.8%. The mats were galvanostatically cycled in half cells against Li. Specific capacities as high as 250 mAh/g were achieved approximately 17% lower than the capacities of the same fibers in slurries. However, there were no inactive materials reducing the practical specific capacity of the entire electrode construction. Lithiation and delithiation of the LCFs proceeded with coulombic efficiencies greater than 99.9%, and the capacity retention was greater than 99% over 100 cycles at a rate of 15 mA/g. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. PMID:26842853

  20. Formation of Toxic Iodinated Disinfection By-Products from Compounds Used in Medical Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) were investigated as a source of iodine in the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (iodo-THM) and iodo-acid disinfection byproducts (DBPs), both of which are highly genotoxic and/or cytotoxic in mammalian cells. ICM are widely used at medical cen...