Science.gov

Sample records for product surveillance postmarketing

  1. Postmarketing Surveillance for “Modified-Risk” Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acquired authority to regulate tobacco products in 2009. This authority will provide a structured process for manufacturers to introduce products that may have “modified-risk” for morbidity or mortality relative to traditional tobacco products, with postmarketing surveillance and studies a condition of marketing. Method: A narrative review approach was taken. The author searched and integrated publicly accessible literature on tobacco product surveillance as well as drug and medical device postmarket activities currently performed by FDA. Results: FDA relies on active and passive methods for postmarket surveillance and can require specific studies and risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for certain products, including those with abuse liability. Past efforts at examining the individual and population effects of reduced harm tobacco products provide an example of integrating different data streams. Discussion: Postmarket surveillance can be viewed in terms of the Agent–Host–Vector–Environment model, and concepts from diffusion of innovations are relevant to understanding factors associated with the adoption of new products by the population. Given that active and passive surveillance approaches have different strengths and weaknesses, multiple approaches may be necessary to evaluate population-level effects. Assuring that required studies are properly conducted and reported and that data indicating significant public health harms are quickly recognized will be important going forward. Conclusions: The advent of broad regulatory authority over tobacco provides opportunities for policy evaluation research. The research community can provide FDA with the independent science it needs to evaluate the public health impact of novel tobacco products. PMID:21330282

  2. Postmarket surveillance. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is implementing the postmarket surveillance (PS) provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The purpose of this rule is to provide for the collection of useful data about devices that can reveal unforeseen adverse events or other information necessary to protect the public health. PMID:12053947

  3. [Post-marketing surveillance studies].

    PubMed

    Pigeot, I; Windeler, J

    2005-05-01

    Approval of a drug on the market is typically considered as the successful endpoint of a long development phase. This often leads to reduced interest in further research for the indication approved, while in contrast the patient's as well as physician's interest in further research increases. This paper discusses the main areas of effectiveness, safety and post-marketing practice regarding sensible study types for the specific area and the potential gain of knowledge. PMID:15887069

  4. 21 CFR 822.8 - When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... surveillance plan? 822.8 Section 822.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.8 When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan? You must submit your plan...

  5. 21 CFR 822.5 - How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... surveillance? 822.5 Section 822.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.5 How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance? We will send you a letter (the postmarket surveillance order)...

  6. 21 CFR 822.5 - How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... surveillance? 822.5 Section 822.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.5 How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance? We will send you a letter (the postmarket surveillance order)...

  7. 21 CFR 822.5 - How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... surveillance? 822.5 Section 822.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.5 How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance? We will send you a letter (the postmarket surveillance order)...

  8. 21 CFR 822.30 - May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.30 Section 822.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Waivers and Exemptions § 822.30 May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance? You...

  9. 21 CFR 822.30 - May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.30 Section 822.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Waivers and Exemptions § 822.30 May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance? You...

  10. 21 CFR 822.30 - May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.30 Section 822.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Waivers and Exemptions § 822.30 May I request exemption from the requirement to conduct postmarket surveillance? You...

  11. 77 FR 52745 - Leveraging Registries With Medical Device Data for Postmarket Surveillance and Evidence Appraisal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... iterative nature of product development, the learning curve associated with technology adoption, and the... intensity. CDRH believes that registry development in targeted product areas will both provide needed... Postmarket Surveillance and Evidence Appraisal Throughout the Total Product Life Cycle AGENCY: Food and...

  12. ABCDXXX: The obscenity of postmarketing surveillance for teratogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jan M

    2012-08-01

    Our current system of postmarketing surveillance, which is based on voluntary reporting of suspected teratogenic effects, is a failure. Postmarketing surveillance should, at a minimum, provide reassurance that every approved drug treatment does not produce a teratogenic effect as great as thalidomide embryopathy or fetal alcohol syndrome. This means that postmarketing surveillance should be able to detect a twofold or greater increase in the frequency of major congenital anomalies, a fivefold or greater increase in the frequency of intellectual disability, or a characteristic pattern of minor anomalies and functional abnormalities that occurs with a frequency of at least 10% among the children of women who were treated with the drug during pregnancy. Effective surveillance for teratogenic effects could be accomplished through a complementary set of mechanisms that includes pregnancy exposure registries or cohorts as well as direct examination of a small subset of infants whose mothers received the treatment during various periods of pregnancy. If this routine surveillance reveals a "signal" (i.e., an indication suggesting a possible teratogenic effect), further study would be needed to establish whether the observed effect is real and causal. Once a signal of possible teratogenicity in humans has been recognized, validating or refuting it would become an urgent matter. PMID:22786781

  13. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool: A Web Based, Dynamic, and Interoperable System for Postmarketing Drug Surveillance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinaci, A. Anil; Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce B.; Gonul, Suat; Yuksel, Mustafa; Invernizzi, Paolo; Thakrar, Bharat; Pacaci, Anil; Cinar, H. Alper; Cicekli, Nihan Kesim

    2015-01-01

    Postmarketing drug surveillance is a crucial aspect of the clinical research activities in pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology. Successful utilization of available Electronic Health Record (EHR) data can complement and strengthen postmarketing safety studies. In terms of the secondary use of EHRs, access and analysis of patient data across different domains are a critical factor; we address this data interoperability problem between EHR systems and clinical research systems in this paper. We demonstrate that this problem can be solved in an upper level with the use of common data elements in a standardized fashion so that clinical researchers can work with different EHR systems independently of the underlying information model. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool lets the clinical researchers extract data from different EHR systems by designing data collection set schemas through common data elements. The tool interacts with a semantic metadata registry through IHE data element exchange profile. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool and its supporting components have been implemented and deployed on the central data warehouse of the Lombardy region, Italy, which contains anonymized records of about 16 million patients with over 10-year longitudinal data on average. Clinical researchers in Roche validate the tool with real life use cases. PMID:26543873

  14. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool: A Web Based, Dynamic, and Interoperable System for Postmarketing Drug Surveillance Studies.

    PubMed

    Sinaci, A Anil; Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce B; Gonul, Suat; Yuksel, Mustafa; Invernizzi, Paolo; Thakrar, Bharat; Pacaci, Anil; Cinar, H Alper; Cicekli, Nihan Kesim

    2015-01-01

    Postmarketing drug surveillance is a crucial aspect of the clinical research activities in pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology. Successful utilization of available Electronic Health Record (EHR) data can complement and strengthen postmarketing safety studies. In terms of the secondary use of EHRs, access and analysis of patient data across different domains are a critical factor; we address this data interoperability problem between EHR systems and clinical research systems in this paper. We demonstrate that this problem can be solved in an upper level with the use of common data elements in a standardized fashion so that clinical researchers can work with different EHR systems independently of the underlying information model. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool lets the clinical researchers extract data from different EHR systems by designing data collection set schemas through common data elements. The tool interacts with a semantic metadata registry through IHE data element exchange profile. Postmarketing Safety Study Tool and its supporting components have been implemented and deployed on the central data warehouse of the Lombardy region, Italy, which contains anonymized records of about 16 million patients with over 10-year longitudinal data on average. Clinical researchers in Roche validate the tool with real life use cases. PMID:26543873

  15. 21 CFR 822.11 - What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.11 Section 822.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.11 What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket...

  16. 21 CFR 822.11 - What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.11 Section 822.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.11 What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket...

  17. 21 CFR 822.11 - What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.11 Section 822.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.11 What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket...

  18. 21 CFR 822.11 - What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.11 Section 822.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.11 What should I consider when designing my plan to conduct postmarket...

  19. Improving the Postmarket Surveillance of Total Joint Arthroplasty Devices

    PubMed Central

    Mahomed, Nizar N; Syed, Khalid; Sledge, Clement B.; Brennan, Troyen A; Liang, Matthew H

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the FDA’s approval process and postmarket surveillance strategies for THR devices. Design The FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) 510k releasable database was used to document approved THR devices. The CDRH Medical Device Reporting data files were used to study the efficiency of the FDA’s post-market surveillance system. Manufacturers were contacted to supply information regarding their implants. Medline was searched between 1966-1996 to determine the percentage of THR devices with published data on clinical outcomes. Results Between 1976 and 1996, 701 new THR devices were approved by the Substantial Equivalent (SE) route and 34 were approved on the basis of Premarket Approval PMA. The number of approvals doubled between 1991-1995 compared to 1976-1990. Seventy-four different manufacturers obtained approval to market THR devices. Only four manufacturers obtained approval via the PMA application. Under Mandatory Device Reporting all revision arthroplasties should be reported. Using data from 2 independent services for which we had US hospital discharge data in 1993 we estimate that only 3% of all revision THR were reported to the FDA. Manufacturers of hip implants failed to provide useful information. Medline search revealed only 15% of the approved THR devices had published data on outcomes. Conclusion Current FDA premarket approval and postmarket surveillance strategies fail to provide information for evidence-based selection of THR devices. Recommendations are made to avert problems with device failures. PMID:19088864

  20. Efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan in postmarketing surveillance studies.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2005-01-01

    While randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials are considered the gold standard of clinical evidence, they are limited by patient numbers, duration of patient exposure, and restricted patient populations. Data from controlled trials may not be generalizable to all individuals likely to take the drug under investigation. Postmarketing surveillance studies are designed to measure efficacy and safety in larger and more diverse populations, allowing them to detect less common and delayed adverse events. However, postmarketing surveillance studies are limited by their lack of randomization, open-label design that can result in patient and physician bias, incomplete follow-up, less than rigorous outcome measurement, and lack of a contemporaneous control group. With regard to acute treatment of migraine, clinical trials using per protocol primary endpoints do not reflect the more favorable experience with triptans in general practice. Postmarketing surveillance studies have been performed to determine whether the high levels of efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan reported in controlled clinical trials can been reproduced in routine practice. An observational study conducted in Spain with 2,074 migraine sufferers (4,183 attacks) reported a 2-hour pain-relief rate of 86.9%, a 2-hour pain-free rate of 51.5%, and a sustained pain-free rate of 46.0%; 1.1% of patients reported adverse reactions. A German postmarketing study in 899 patients (2,131 attacks) with acute migraine treated with almotriptan 12.5 mg reported 2-hour pain relief in 84.5% of attacks and 2-hour pain free in 41.4%; 1.1% of patients reported adverse reactions. The consistency of response (at least two out of three attacks successfully treated) with almotriptan 12.5 mg was 87.3%. Regarding satisfaction, 88.5% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied and 80.3% of patients stated that almotriptan was better compared to their prior therapy; 92% of physicians indicated that they would continue

  1. 77 FR 9256 - Design and Methodology for Postmarket Surveillance Studies Under Section 522 of the Federal Food...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design and Methodology for Postmarket Surveillance Studies... announcing a public workshop entitled ``Design and Methodology for Postmarket Surveillance Studies under... stakeholders with experience in epidemiology, statistics, and biomedical research to advance the design...

  2. 21 CFR 822.5 - How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.5 Section 822.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.5 How will I know if I...

  3. 21 CFR 822.5 - How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will I know if I must conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.5 Section 822.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.5 How will I know if I...

  4. 21 CFR 822.6 - When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.6 Section 822.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.6 When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? We will...

  5. 21 CFR 822.6 - When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.6 Section 822.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.6 When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? We will...

  6. 21 CFR 822.6 - When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.6 Section 822.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.6 When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? We will...

  7. 21 CFR 822.6 - When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.6 Section 822.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.6 When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? We will...

  8. 21 CFR 822.6 - When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.6 Section 822.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Notification § 822.6 When will you notify me that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? We will...

  9. Signal detection in post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Nabarun; Schnoll, Sidney H

    2009-12-01

    Signal detection for pharmaceutical controlled substances presents unique challenges compared to other pharmacovigilance programs because risks are present in the patient and non-patient populations. Defining signals for controlled substances has been difficult because no specific empirical criteria have been established through regulatory actions or guidances. We start with a review of data sources available for decision making to regulators and industry. In this paper we present a framework for processing signals received during post-marketing surveillance: signal identification, verification and assessment, followed by intervention and evaluation. Signal identification involves processing qualitative and quantitative information in order to generate hypotheses describing concerns with controlled substances. Integration of heterogeneous data sources makes this process difficult and we describe multiple approaches utilized in practice today. Signal verification currently relies heavily on telephone interviews with stakeholders in local communities. Once information on a potential signal has been gathered signal assessment is a higher order process conducted with an eye towards broader societal expectations and the ability to intervene or further study the problem. Intervention and evaluation complete the cycle of signal assessment and triage. This paper is intended as a primer of the current practice of signal assessment in the post-marketing surveillance for controlled substances. PMID:19616902

  10. Quality of alcohol-based hand disinfectants and their regulatory status. Production, sales and post-marketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    A high standard of hand hygiene is achieved by developing, producing and distributing hand disinfectants compliant with the German law for medicinal products. This ensures optimal protection of patients and staff from infections. In addition all local requirements are automatically fulfilled independent of the place within which the product is being used. It is shown that continuous improvement can be stimulated by intensive cooperation between the customer and supplier to ensure that customer expectations are met. PMID:18994683

  11. Japanese Physicians’ Views on Drug Post-Marketing Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Katashima, Rumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Yanagawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Registration trials leading to the approval of drugs are paramount in drug development. After approval, continuous efforts are necessary to ensure proper use of the approved drugs. In Japan, post-marketing surveillance (PMS) by drug companies is conducted in accordance with good post-marketing study practice (GPSP). Although the global standard for pharmacovigilance is incorporated into GPSP, attention has recently been focused on disassociating them. In this study, we examined physicians’ views on PMS with the aim of conducting PMS more effectively. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records between 2009 and 2013 from the institutional review board of Tokushima University Hospital, an academic hospital in rural Japan. The annual number of times PMS was performed was then determined. Next, we assessed physicians’ attitudes toward drug PMS, including ethical issues, in a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire designed for this study. Five- and two-point scales were used. The questionnaire was distributed in 2014 to 221 physicians listed as investigators in PMS contracts. Results Of the 221 physicians, 103 (46.6%) responded to the questionnaire. About 50% of the respondents had experience writing PMS reports. Many of the physicians considered PMS to be important but burdensome. Furthermore, from the viewpoint of research ethics, many physicians considered it improper within the present PMS framework to collect and provide data beyond the scope of routine clinical practice without obtaining informed consent in the case of extra blood sampling, provision of images, monitoring and controlled studies. Conclusions Beyond practical factors such as workload, attention should be given to establishing an ethical infrastructure and globally harmonized system with regard to the Japanese PMS system. Given the limitations of this single-institution study, further research is needed to collect information for developing a suitable infrastructure. PMID:26566409

  12. 21 CFR 822.25 - What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has been approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... surveillance plan has been approved? 822.25 Section 822.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.25 What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has...

  13. 21 CFR 822.25 - What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has been approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... surveillance plan has been approved? 822.25 Section 822.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.25 What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has...

  14. 21 CFR 822.25 - What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has been approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... surveillance plan has been approved? 822.25 Section 822.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.25 What are my responsibilities after my postmarket surveillance plan has...

  15. 21 CFR 822.28 - If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If I stop marketing the device subject to... of Manufacturers § 822.28 If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do? You must continue to conduct postmarket surveillance in accordance with your approved...

  16. 21 CFR 822.28 - If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If I stop marketing the device subject to... of Manufacturers § 822.28 If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do? You must continue to conduct postmarket surveillance in accordance with your approved...

  17. 21 CFR 822.28 - If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false If I stop marketing the device subject to... of Manufacturers § 822.28 If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do? You must continue to conduct postmarket surveillance in accordance with your approved...

  18. 21 CFR 822.28 - If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false If I stop marketing the device subject to... of Manufacturers § 822.28 If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do? You must continue to conduct postmarket surveillance in accordance with your approved...

  19. 21 CFR 822.28 - If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If I stop marketing the device subject to... of Manufacturers § 822.28 If I stop marketing the device subject to postmarket surveillance, what must I do? You must continue to conduct postmarket surveillance in accordance with your approved...

  20. 21 CFR 822.15 - How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device? 822.15 Section 822.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Radiological Health's (CDRH') Web site...

  1. 21 CFR 822.15 - How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device? 822.15 Section 822.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Radiological Health's (CDRH') Web site (www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/). The 36-month period refers to...

  2. 21 CFR 822.15 - How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device? 822.15 Section 822.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Radiological Health's (CDRH') Web site...

  3. 21 CFR 822.15 - How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device? 822.15 Section 822.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Radiological Health's (CDRH') Web site (www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/). The 36-month period refers to...

  4. 21 CFR 822.15 - How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long must I conduct postmarket surveillance of my device? 822.15 Section 822.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Radiological Health's (CDRH') Web site (www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/). The 36-month period refers to...

  5. Monitoring product safety in the postmarketing environment

    PubMed Central

    Dieck, Gretchen S

    2013-01-01

    The safety profile of a medicinal product may change in the postmarketing environment. Safety issues not identified in clinical development may be seen and need to be evaluated. Methods of evaluating spontaneous adverse experience reports and identifying new safety risks include a review of individual reports, a review of a frequency distribution of a list of the adverse experiences, the development and analysis of a case series, and various ways of examining the database for signals of disproportionality, which may suggest a possible association. Regulatory agencies monitor product safety through a variety of mechanisms including signal detection of the adverse experience safety reports in databases and by requiring and monitoring risk management plans, periodic safety update reports and postauthorization safety studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration is working with public, academic and private entities to develop methods for using large electronic databases to actively monitor product safety. Important identified risks will have to be evaluated through observational studies and registries. PMID:25114782

  6. Strategies for Postmarketing Surveillance of Drugs and Devices in Patients with ESRD Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Moshe; Yeh, Robert W.; Herzog, Charles A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Summary The lack of evidence on the effectiveness and safety of interventions in chronic dialysis patients has been a subject of continuing criticism. New technologies are often introduced into the market without having specifically studied or even included patients with advanced kidney disease. Therefore, the need to generate valid effectiveness and safety data in this vulnerable subpopulation is of utmost importance. The US Food and Drug Administration has recently placed an increased focus on safety surveillance, and sponsors must now meet this additional postmarketing commitment. In patients with ESRD, the unique data collection environment in the United States allows for creative and efficient study designs to meet the needs of patients, providers, and sponsors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the methodological and practical aspects of the different options for postmarketing study design in this field, with critical appraisal of their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23970129

  7. Continuous Versus Group Sequential Analysis for Post-Market Drug and Vaccine Safety Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. R.; Kulldorff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The use of sequential statistical analysis for post-market drug safety surveillance is quickly emerging. Both continuous and group sequential analysis have been used, but consensus is lacking as to when to use which approach. We compare the statistical performance of continuous and group sequential analysis in terms of type I error probability; statistical power; expected time to signal when the null hypothesis is rejected; and the sample size required to end surveillance without rejecting the null. We present a mathematical proposition to show that for any group sequential design there always exists a continuous sequential design that is uniformly better. As a consequence, it is shown that more frequent testing is always better. Additionally, for a Poisson based probability model and a flat rejection boundary in terms of the log likelihood ratio, we compare the performance of various continuous and group sequential designs. Using exact calculations, we found that, for the parameter settings used, there is always a continuous design with shorter expected time to signal than the best group design. The two key conclusions from this article are (i) that any post-market safety surveillance system should attempt to obtain data as frequently as possible, and (ii) that sequential testing should always be performed when new data arrives without deliberately waiting for additional data. PMID:26011024

  8. Estimating post-marketing exposure to pharmaceutical products using ex-factory distribution data.

    PubMed

    Telfair, Tamara; Mohan, Aparna K; Shahani, Shalini; Klincewicz, Stephen; Atsma, Willem Jan; Thomas, Adrian; Fife, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has an obligation to identify adverse reactions to drug products during all phases of drug development, including the post-marketing period. Estimates of population exposure to pharmaceutical products are important to the post-marketing surveillance of drugs, and provide a context for assessing the various risks and benefits, including drug safety, associated with drug treatment. This paper describes a systematic approach to estimating post-marketing drug exposure using ex-factory shipment data to estimate the quantity of medication available, and dosage information (stratified by indication or other factors as appropriate) to convert the quantity of medication to person time of exposure. Unlike the non-standardized methods often used to estimate exposure, this approach provides estimates whose calculations are explicit, documented, and consistent across products and over time. The methods can readily be carried out by an individual or small group specializing in this function, and lend themselves to automation. The present estimation approach is practical and relatively uncomplicated to implement. We believe it is a useful innovation. PMID:16758501

  9. Adverse events associated with vitamin K1: results of a worldwide postmarketing surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S P; Williams, R

    1998-05-01

    We compared adverse events associated with a conventional vitamin K(1) preparation, Konakion, with a new mixed micellar formulation, Konakion MM. Data were obtained worldwide from spontaneous reports, clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance. During the period 1974 to July 1995, an estimated 635 million adults and 728 million children were prescribed Konakion or Konakion MM. Of the 404 adverse events in 286 subjects reported, 387 (96%) were associated with Konakion. Konakion MM accounted for 4% (n=17) of the reported adverse events, and 5% of total sales figures. Thirteen of the 17 adverse events (76%) reported for Konakion MM were minor injection site reactions. Overall, 120 of the adverse events were serious, of which 117 (98%) were associated with Konakion. Eighty-five probable anaphylactoid reactions (of which six were fatal) were reported for conventional Konakion, compared with one non-fatal anaphylactoid reaction for Konakion MM. During the last 12 months of postmarketing surveillance, there were 14 serious adverse events reported in an estimated 21 million individuals treated with Konakion, but none in the 13 million who received Konakion MM. These results suggest that the Cremophor EL-solubilized preparations of vitamin K(1) have a higher profile of adverse events, including anaphylactoid reactions, than the newer mixed micellar preparation, Konakion MM. PMID:15073995

  10. Lasting treatment effects in a postmarketing surveillance study of prolonged-release melatonin.

    PubMed

    Hajak, Göran; Lemme, Kathrin; Zisapel, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance studies are useful to evaluate how a new medicinal product performs in everyday treatment and how the patient who takes it feels and functions, thereby determining the benefit/risk ratio of the drug under real-life conditions. Prolonged-release melatonin (PRM; Circadin) was approved in Europe for the management of primary insomnia patients age 55 years or older suffering from poor quality of sleep. With traditional hypnotics (e.g. benzodiazepine-receptor agonists), there are concerns about rebound insomnia and/or withdrawal symptoms. We report data from a postmarketing surveillance study in Germany on the effects of 3 weeks of treatment with PRM on sleep in patients with insomnia during treatment and at early (1-2 days) and late (around 2 weeks) withdrawal. In total, 653 patients (597 evaluable) were recruited at 204 sites (mean age 62.7 years, 68% previously treated with hypnotics, 65% women). With PRM treatment, the mean sleep quality (on a scale of 1-5 on which 1 is very good and 5 is very bad) improved from 4.2 to 2.6 and morning alertness improved from 4.0 to 2.5. The improvements persisted over the post-treatment observation period. Rebound insomnia, defined as a one-point deterioration in sleep quality below baseline values, was found in 3.2% (early withdrawal) and 2.0% (late withdrawal). Most of the patients (77%) who used traditional hypnotics before PRM treatment had stopped using them and only 5.6% of naive patients started such drugs after PRM discontinuation. PRM was well tolerated during treatment and the most frequently reported adverse events were nausea (10 patients, 1.5%), dizziness, restlessness and headache (five patients each, <1%). There were no serious adverse events and no adverse events were reported after discontinuation. The persisting treatment effect and very low rebound rate suggest a beneficial role of sleep-wake cycle stabilization with PRM in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:25054634

  11. 21 CFR 822.7 - What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Radiological Health's (CDRH's) Web site (http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/OfficeofMedicalProductsand... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate? 822.7 Section 822.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  12. 21 CFR 822.7 - What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Radiological Health's (CDRH's) Web site (http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/OfficeofMedicalProductsand... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate? 822.7 Section 822.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  13. 21 CFR 822.7 - What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate? 822.7 Section 822.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Radiological Health's (CDRH's) Web site (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/dispute.html)....

  14. 21 CFR 822.7 - What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate? 822.7 Section 822.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Radiological Health's (CDRH's) Web site (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/dispute.html)....

  15. 21 CFR 822.7 - What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What should I do if I do not agree that postmarket surveillance is appropriate? 822.7 Section 822.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Radiological Health's (CDRH's) Web site (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ombudsman/dispute.html)....

  16. A Distributed, Collaborative Intelligent Agent System Approach for Proactive Postmarketing Drug Safety Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanqing; Ying, Hao; Farber, Margo S.; Yen, John; Dews, Peter; Miller, Richard E.; Massanari, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Discovering unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in postmarketing surveillance as early as possible is of great importance. The current approach to postmarketing surveillance primarily relies on spontaneous reporting. It is a passive surveillance system and limited by gross underreporting (<10% reporting rate), latency, and inconsistent reporting. We propose a novel team-based intelligent agent software system approach for proactively monitoring and detecting potential ADRs of interest using electronic patient records. We designed such a system and named it ADRMonitor. The intelligent agents, operating on computers located in different places, are capable of continuously and autonomously collaborating with each other and assisting the human users (e.g., the food and drug administration (FDA), drug safety professionals, and physicians). The agents should enhance current systems and accelerate early ADR identification. To evaluate the performance of the ADRMonitor with respect to the current spontaneous reporting approach, we conducted simulation experiments on identification of ADR signal pairs (i.e., potential links between drugs and apparent adverse reactions) under various conditions. The experiments involved over 275 000 simulated patients created on the basis of more than 1000 real patients treated by the drug cisapride that was on the market for seven years until its withdrawal by the FDA in 2000 due to serious ADRs. Healthcare professionals utilizing the spontaneous reporting approach and the ADRMonitor were separately simulated by decision-making models derived from a general cognitive decision model called fuzzy recognition-primed decision (RPD) model that we recently developed. The quantitative simulation results show that 1) the number of true ADR signal pairs detected by the ADRMonitor is 6.6 times higher than that by the spontaneous reporting strategy; 2) the ADR detection rate of the ADRMonitor agents with even moderate decision-making skills is five

  17. A distributed, collaborative intelligent agent system approach for proactive postmarketing drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanqing; Ying, Hao; Farber, Margo S; Yen, John; Dews, Peter; Miller, Richard E; Massanari, R Michael

    2010-05-01

    Discovering unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in postmarketing surveillance as early as possible is of great importance. The current approach to postmarketing surveillance primarily relies on spontaneous reporting. It is a passive surveillance system and limited by gross underreporting (<10% reporting rate), latency, and inconsistent reporting. We propose a novel team-based intelligent agent software system approach for proactively monitoring and detecting potential ADRs of interest using electronic patient records. We designed such a system and named it ADRMonitor. The intelligent agents, operating on computers located in different places, are capable of continuously and autonomously collaborating with each other and assisting the human users (e.g., the food and drug administration (FDA), drug safety professionals, and physicians). The agents should enhance current systems and accelerate early ADR identification. To evaluate the performance of the ADRMonitor with respect to the current spontaneous reporting approach, we conducted simulation experiments on identification of ADR signal pairs (i.e., potential links between drugs and apparent adverse reactions) under various conditions. The experiments involved over 275,000 simulated patients created on the basis of more than 1000 real patients treated by the drug cisapride that was on the market for seven years until its withdrawal by the FDA in 2000 due to serious ADRs. Healthcare professionals utilizing the spontaneous reporting approach and the ADRMonitor were separately simulated by decision-making models derived from a general cognitive decision model called fuzzy recognition-primed decision (RPD) model that we recently developed. The quantitative simulation results show that 1) the number of true ADR signal pairs detected by the ADRMonitor is 6.6 times higher than that by the spontaneous reporting strategy; 2) the ADR detection rate of the ADRMonitor agents with even moderate decision-making skills is five

  18. Composite sequential Monte Carlo test for post-market vaccine safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ivair R

    2016-04-30

    Group sequential hypothesis testing is now widely used to analyze prospective data. If Monte Carlo simulation is used to construct the signaling threshold, the challenge is how to manage the type I error probability for each one of the multiple tests without losing control on the overall significance level. This paper introduces a valid method for a true management of the alpha spending at each one of a sequence of Monte Carlo tests. The method also enables the use of a sequential simulation strategy for each Monte Carlo test, which is useful for saving computational execution time. Thus, the proposed procedure allows for sequential Monte Carlo test in sequential analysis, and this is the reason that it is called 'composite sequential' test. An upper bound for the potential power losses from the proposed method is deduced. The composite sequential design is illustrated through an application for post-market vaccine safety surveillance data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26561330

  19. 21 CFR 822.21 - What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have approved it? 822.21 Section 822.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Review and Action § 822.21 What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance...

  20. 21 CFR 822.21 - What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have approved it? 822.21 Section 822.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Review and Action § 822.21 What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance...

  1. 21 CFR 822.21 - What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have approved it? 822.21 Section 822.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Review and Action § 822.21 What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance...

  2. 21 CFR 822.21 - What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have approved it? 822.21 Section 822.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Review and Action § 822.21 What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance...

  3. 21 CFR 822.21 - What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance plan after you have approved it? 822.21 Section 822.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Review and Action § 822.21 What must I do if I want to make changes to my postmarket surveillance...

  4. [Results of a post-marketing surveillance of meropenem administered over 2 g/day for serious infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Koji; Tani, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kazuo; Nukui, Kazuhiko; Nagao, Munehiko

    2015-10-01

    The post-marketing surveillance of meropenem (Meropen®) administered over 2g/day for serious infectious diseases was conducted between August 2011 and June 2013 to evaluate safety and efficacy under actual clinical use. There were 382 and 322 evaluable cases for safety and efficacy respectively, of 399 case cards collected from 87 institutions. In safety analysis, the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with use of meropenem (including abnormal laboratory findings) was 19.1% (73/382 cases), and the main ADRs were hepatic function abnormal, aspartate aminotransferase increased, alanine aminotransferase increased, liver disorder, and diarrhoea, which were similar to these observed in the post-marketing surveillances of meropenem conducted before. In efficacy analysis, the efficacy was 73.6% (237/322 cases), which is as same as 71.4% (3214/4504 cases) of post-marketing surveillance of meropenem conducted after first approval under 2 g/day for infectious diseases. These results confirmed meropenem (Meropen®) is one of the useful antimicrobial agents for serious infectious diseases. PMID:26742284

  5. A team agent approach to postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanqing; Ying, Hao; Barth-Jones, Daniel; Yen, John; Zhu, Shizhou; Miller, Richard; Michael Massanari, R

    2005-01-01

    Current postmarketing surveillance methods largely rely on spontaneous reports which suffer from serious underreporting, latency, and inconsistent reporting. Thus they are not ideal for rapidly identifying rare adverse drug reactions (ADRs). We propose an active, multi-agent computer software system, where each agent is empowered with teamwork capabilities such as anticipating information needs, identifying relevant ADR information, and continuously monitoring and proactively sharing such information in a collaborative fashion with other agents. The main purpose of this system is to help regulatory authorities (e.g., FDA in the U.S.) find previously unrecognized ADRs as early as possible. Another objective is to promote increased filing of on-line ADR reports thereby, addressing the severe underreporting problem with the current system. The proposed system has the potential to significantly accelerate the process of ADR discovery and response by utilizing electronic patient data distributed across many different sources and locations more effectively. Our preliminary system design is presented and some issues related to it are discussed. PMID:17281878

  6. Postmarketing surveillance of the safety and effectiveness of abatacept in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Harigai, Masayoshi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Inokuma, Shigeko; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Ryu, Junnosuke; Takei, Syuji; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Tamada, Hiroshi; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To perform a postmarketing surveillance study evaluating the safety and effectiveness of abatacept in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Safety and effectiveness data were collected for all RA patients (at 772 sites) treated with intravenous abatacept between September 2010 and June 2011. Patients were treated by the approved dosing regimen according to the package insert. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated at baseline and at weeks 4, 12, and 24 using Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) according to erythrocyte sedimentation rate or serum C-reactive protein concentrations. Results: Overall, 3882 and 3016 abatacept-naïve RA patients were included in safety and effectiveness analyses, respectively. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were reported for 15.66% of patients and serious ADRs were detected for 2.52% of patients. The incidence of serious infections was 1.03% and these were mainly attributed to different types of bacterial pneumonia. Disease activity improved significantly over 6 months. Separate multivariate analysis identified predictors of severe ADR, and severe infections and factors predictive of clinically meaningful DAS28 improvement after 6 months of treatment with abatacept. Conclusions: Abatacept was efficacious and well tolerated in a clinical setting. No new safety concerns were detected. PMID:26635183

  7. 21 CFR 822.20 - What are the consequences if I fail to submit a postmarket surveillance plan, my plan is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the consequences if I fail to submit a postmarket surveillance plan, my plan is disapproved and I fail to submit a new plan, or I fail to conduct surveillance in accordance with my approved plan? 822.20 Section 822.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND...

  8. Security and Privacy Qualities of Medical Devices: An Analysis of FDA Postmarket Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Baker, Matthew; Ransford, Benjamin; Molina-Markham, Andres; Stewart, Quinn; Fu, Kevin; Reynolds, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical devices increasingly depend on computing functions such as wireless communication and Internet connectivity for software-based control of therapies and network-based transmission of patients’ stored medical information. These computing capabilities introduce security and privacy risks, yet little is known about the prevalence of such risks within the clinical setting. Methods We used three comprehensive, publicly available databases maintained by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to evaluate recalls and adverse events related to security and privacy risks of medical devices. Results Review of weekly enforcement reports identified 1,845 recalls; 605 (32.8%) of these included computers, 35 (1.9%) stored patient data, and 31 (1.7%) were capable of wireless communication. Searches of databases specific to recalls and adverse events identified only one event with a specific connection to security or privacy. Software-related recalls were relatively common, and most (81.8%) mentioned the possibility of upgrades, though only half of these provided specific instructions for the update mechanism. Conclusions Our review of recalls and adverse events from federal government databases reveals sharp inconsistencies with databases at individual providers with respect to security and privacy risks. Recalls related to software may increase security risks because of unprotected update and correction mechanisms. To detect signals of security and privacy problems that adversely affect public health, federal postmarket surveillance strategies should rethink how to effectively and efficiently collect data on security and privacy problems in devices that increasingly depend on computing systems susceptible to malware. PMID:22829874

  9. EVOLVE (nebivolol evaluation for efficacy and safety in the treatment of hypertension) postmarketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Faruqui, Arif A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of EVOLVE [nebivolol (nevol) evaluation for efficacy and safety in the treatment of hypertension], a postmarketing surveillance (PMS) study is to identify, validate and quantify the safety and efficacy associated with the use of nebivolol. EVOLVE study was an open-label, non-comparative, prospective, one month follow-up study of 301 patients of either sex with stage 1 hypertension, as defined by the JNC VII guidelines. The data was collected from 27 centres from all over India during the period August, 2006 to December, 2006. Nebivolol (2.5-5 mg/day) was given for 1 month. Clinical assessment was done at the start of the treatment and at 15th day and 30th day follow-ups. Concomitant medications administered were also recorded. Baseline mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 157.73 +/- 14.16 mm Hg which dropped to 135.13 +/- 11.15 mm Hg at the end of the study. At the end of 1 month treatment the change in mean SBP was 22.6 mm Hg ie, 14.32% reduction from baseline which was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Also the baseline mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 97.21 +/- 8.25 mm Hg that dropped to 83.69 +/- 6.63 mm Hg at the end of the study. At the end of one month treatment the change in mean DBP was 13.52 mmHg ie, 13.9% reduction from baseline which was significant (p < 0.001). The heart rate in this study showed a significant decrease from 86.13 +/- 9.35 at basal to 75.09 +/- 7.42 at the end of the study (p < 0.001). It was observed that at the end of one month of treatment, majority of the patients ie, 97.75% of total cases showed good to excellent response to nebivolol. EVOLVE PMS study showed that nebivolol hydrochloride is very safe and only 8.2% of cases (n = 22) reported adverse effects, the commonest being dizziness (3.28%). Less than 1% patients reported nausea, constipation, headache, weakness, tiredness and pedal oedema; 99.25% of patients reported good to excellent tolerability; 82.33% patients achieved the goals recommended by

  10. 21 CFR 822.20 - What are the consequences if I fail to submit a postmarket surveillance plan, my plan is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the consequences if I fail to submit a postmarket surveillance plan, my plan is disapproved and I fail to submit a new plan, or I fail to conduct surveillance in accordance with my approved plan? 822.20 Section 822.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  11. 76 FR 1170 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Postmarketing Adverse Event Reporting for Medical Products and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Postmarketing Adverse Event Reporting for Medical Products and Dietary Supplements During an Influenza Pandemic.'' The draft guidance discusses FDA's intended approach to enforcement of adverse event reporting requirements for drugs, biologics, medical devices, and dietary......

  12. Risk Management Post-Marketing Surveillance for the Abuse of Medications Acting on the Central Nervous System: Expert Panel Report

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Balster, Robert L.; Henningfield, Jack E.; Schuster, Charles R.; Anthony, James C.; Barthwell, Andrea G.; Coleman, John J.; Dart, Richard C.; Gorodetzky, Charles W.; O’Keeffe, Charles; Sellers, Edward M.; Vocci, Frank; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    The abuse and diversion of medications is a significant public health problem. This paper is part of a supplemental issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence focused on the development of risk management plans and post-marketing surveillance related to minimizing this problem. The issue is based on a conference that was held in October, 2008. An Expert Panel was formed to provide a summary of the conclusions and recommendations that emerged from the meeting involving drug abuse experts, regulators and other government agencies, pharmaceutical companies and professional and other non-governmental organizations. This paper provides a written report of this Expert Panel. Eleven conclusions and eleven recommendations emerged concerning the state of the art of this field of research, the regulatory and public health implications and recommendations for future directions. It is concluded that special surveillance tools are needed to detect the emergence of medication abuse in a timely manner and that risk management tools can be implemented to increase the benefit to risk ratio. The scientific basis for both the surveillance and risk management tools is in its infancy, yet progress needs to be made. It is also important that the unintended consequences of increased regulation and the imposition of risk management plans be minimized. PMID:19783383

  13. 77 FR 11134 - Guidance for Industry on Postmarketing Adverse Event Reporting for Medical Products and Dietary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... 10.115). The guidance represents the Agency's current thinking on postmarketing adverse event... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Postmarketing Adverse Event... announcing the availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Postmarketing Adverse Event Reporting...

  14. Value of postmarketing surveillance studies in achieving a complete picture of antimigraine agents: using almotriptan as an example.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Massiou, Hélène

    2006-02-01

    Randomised controlled trials cannot collect all the data relevant for use in everyday clinical practice because drug exposure is limited, endpoints are restricted and some patient populations are excluded. Postmarketing surveillance (PS) studies can add important information for real-world clinical practice. Acute migraine therapy with almotriptan 12.5 mg was evaluated in 4 PS studies, 2 conducted in Spain, 1 in Germany and 1 in France. Almotriptan was associated with a high rate of treatment response and was well tolerated in all 4 studies. In the Spanish and German studies, 2-hour pain-relief, 2-hour pain-free, and sustained painfree rates were enhanced when patients treated mild pain. Patient satisfaction with almotriptan, assessed in the German and French studies, was high and the majority of patients preferred almotriptan to their previous acute migraine therapy. In conclusion, PS studies augment our knowledge of antimigraine therapy, giving a more complete picture of how such agents work in the general population. PMID:16440139

  15. Semiparametric Bayesian commensurate survival model for post-market medical device surveillance with non-exchangeable historical data.

    PubMed

    Murray, Thomas A; Hobbs, Brian P; Lystig, Theodore C; Carlin, Bradley P

    2014-03-01

    Trial investigators often have a primary interest in the estimation of the survival curve in a population for which there exists acceptable historical information from which to borrow strength. However, borrowing strength from a historical trial that is non-exchangeable with the current trial can result in biased conclusions. In this article we propose a fully Bayesian semiparametric method for the purpose of attenuating bias and increasing efficiency when jointly modeling time-to-event data from two possibly non-exchangeable sources of information. We illustrate the mechanics of our methods by applying them to a pair of post-market surveillance datasets regarding adverse events in persons on dialysis that had either a bare metal or drug-eluting stent implanted during a cardiac revascularization surgery. We finish with a discussion of the advantages and limitations of this approach to evidence synthesis, as well as directions for future work in this area. The article's Supplementary Materials offer simulations to show our procedure's bias, mean squared error, and coverage probability properties in a variety of settings. PMID:24308779

  16. Sucrose-Formulated Recombinant Factor VIII Dosing Flexibility in Prophylaxis Regimens: Experience from Postmarketing Surveillance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Thomas J.; Rauchensteiner, Stephan; Tückmantel, Claudia; Pieper, Alexander; Maas Enriquez, Monika; Mathew, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Prophylaxis regimens for severe hemophilia A allowing more flexible dosing while maintaining efficacy may improve adherence and decrease the cost of prophylaxis. Here, we compared the clinical effectiveness of once- or twice-weekly versus ≥3-times-weekly prophylaxis with sucrose-formulated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII-FS) in a “real-world” practice setting. Methods. Data from 3 postmarketing studies were pooled. Patients with severe hemophilia A receiving ≥1 prophylaxis infusion/wk of rFVIII-FS for ≥80% of a prophylaxis observation period (≥5 months) were included. Patients were categorized based on physician-assigned treatment regimens of 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk (n = 63) or ≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk (n = 76). Descriptive statistics were determined for annualized bleeding rates (ABRs). Results. Median (quartile 1; quartile 3) ABR for all bleeds was 2.0 (0; 4.0) in the 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk group and 3.9 (1.5; 9.3) in the ≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk group. Median ABRs for joint, spontaneous, and trauma-related bleeds were numerically lower with 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk. As an estimate of prophylaxis success, 63% (≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk) to 84% of patients (1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk) had ≤4 annualized joint bleeds. Conclusions. Dosing flexibility and successful prophylaxis with rFVIII-FS were demonstrated. Very good bleeding control was achieved with both once-twice-weekly and ≥3-times-weekly prophylaxis dosing regimens. PMID:26356675

  17. 21 CFR 822.8 - When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... surveillance plan? 822.8 Section 822.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Document Room, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 5901-B, Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. For devices regulated by the Center for Devices and......

  18. 21 CFR 822.8 - When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... surveillance plan? 822.8 Section 822.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Document Room, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 5901-B, Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. For devices regulated by the Center for Devices and......

  19. 21 CFR 822.8 - When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... surveillance plan? 822.8 Section 822.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Document Room, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 5901-B, Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. For devices regulated by the Center for Devices and......

  20. 21 CFR 822.8 - When, where, and how must I submit my postmarket surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... surveillance plan? 822.8 Section 822.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Document Room, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 5901-B, Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. For devices regulated by the Center for Devices and......

  1. Post-marketing surveillance in the published medical and grey literature for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty catheters: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) may identify rare serious incidents or adverse events due to the long-term use of a medical device, which was not captured in the pre-market process. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a non-surgical procedure that uses a balloon-tipped catheter to enlarge a narrowed artery. In 2011, 1,942 adverse event reports related to the use of PTCA catheters were submitted to the FDA by the manufacturers, an increase from the 883 reported in 2008. The primary research objective is to conduct a systematic review of the published and grey literature published between 2007 and 2012 for the frequency of incidents, adverse events and malfunctions associated with the use of PTCA catheters in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Grey literature has not been commercially published. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed for medical literature on PMS for PTCA catheters in patients with CAD published between January 2007 and July 2012. We also searched the grey literature. Results This review included 11 studies. The in-hospital adverse events reported were individual cases of myocardial infarction and hematoma. In studies of patients with coronary perforation, more patients with balloon angioplasty were identified compared with patients who required stenting. Conclusions Our systematic review illustrates that the volume and quality of PMS studies associated with the use of PTCA catheters in patients with CAD are low in the published and grey literature, and may not be useful sources of information for decisions on safety. In most studies, the objectives were not to monitor the long-term safety of the use of PTCA catheters in clinical practice. Future studies can explore the strengths and limitations of PMS databases administered by regulatory authorities. PMID:24112460

  2. Adverse drug reactions in elderly patients: alternative approaches to postmarket surveillance.

    PubMed

    Noah, B A; Brushwood, D B

    2000-01-01

    In the last three years, the Food and Drug Administration has withdrawn seven prescription drugs from the market, and it has required intensified warnings for a number of others, all due to the discovery of previously unforeseen side effects associated with their use. Adverse drug reactions are a leading cause of death in the United States. For a variety of physiological and socio-medical reasons, the elderly are particularly susceptible to adverse drug reactions. Because the pre-approval process cannot expose all potential risks associated with a drug, the authors assert that policymakers should consider implementing a more extensive, and more integrated, post-approval surveillance and testing system. They conclude that the recent cluster of drug withdrawals due to safety problems raises legitimate questions about the rigor and effectiveness of the post-approval monitoring system for new drugs, and these questions extend beyond the obvious difficulties associated with the collection and analysis of risk data. Traditionally viewed as a regulatory problem for the FDA, the problem of adverse drug reactions implicates patient welfare and the provision of medical care more broadly, and a purely regulatory mind set unnecessarily constrains thinking about possible approaches to improving drug safety. Possible solutions to the problem ought to contemplate more formalized involvement of the medical community, pharmacists, and patients. This Article introduces a proposed systems approach to detecting and preventing adverse drug reactions, and discusses several other incremental reforms to existing systems that may help the medical community to improve the overall safety of prescription drug therapy for the elderly, and ultimately for all patients. PMID:11184355

  3. Post-marketing surveillance study with iodixanol in 20 185 Chinese patients from routine clinical practices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B-C; Hou, L; Lv, B

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of immediate and delayed adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and to assess patient discomfort following administration of iodixanol during imaging examinations in routine clinical practice. Methods: A total of 20 185 patients across 95 clinical centres were enrolled in a prospective post-marketing surveillance registry with iodixanol. Patients were monitored for occurrence of ADRs immediately following iodixanol administration and for up to 7 days after administration. Results: The overall rate of ADRs was 1.52%, of which 0.58% was immediate and 0.97% was delayed onset. Two patients had non-fatal serious ADRs (0.01%). The ADRs were significantly more common in patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT/coronary CT angiography vs others (p < 0.001), in those receiving pre-heated iodixanol vs non-heating (p < 0.001), in those aged 70 years or younger (p < 0.001), in those in whom a power injector was used for contrast delivery (p < 0.001) and in those with a history of an allergic reaction to contrast (p = 0.024). Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, intravenous route of contrast injection, body weight ≥80 kg, age less than 65 years, contrast flow rate ≥4 ml s−1 and prior reaction to iodinated contrast medium were all significant and independent contributors to ADRs. Pre-treatment contrast volume and history of cardiac disease, gout, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or asthma did not affect the rate of ADRs. Discomfort was generally mild, with 94.8% of patients reporting a composite score of 0–3. Conclusion: The safety of iodixanol in routine clinical practice was shown to be similar to the published safety profiles of other non-ionic iodinated contrast agents. Patient discomfort during administration was mild or absent in most patients. Advances in knowledge: The major strength of this study is that it included 20 185 patients enrolled in various types of imaging examinations. The

  4. Post-marketing surveillance on the long-term use of dabigatran in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: Preliminary report of the J-dabigatran surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Ken; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Yasaka, Masahiro; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Makiko; Yagi, Nobutaka; Fukaya, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim A post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study is being conducted to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the long-term use of dabigatran etexilate (dabigatran) in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Results of an interim analysis of this prospective cohort study including patient characteristics and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected up to September 17, 2014 are reported here. Methods Patients with NVAF who began to receive dabigatran for the first time from December 2011 to November 2013 were enrolled at 1042 study sites in Japan. Clinical parameters included patient characteristics, dabigatran dose strength, concomitant medications and outcome events. All outcome events were collected as serious and non-serious adverse events (AEs). ADRs were evaluated in this report. Pre-defined safety events of special interest for intensive survey were serious and non-serious outcome events such as myocardial infarction, as well as the total number of hemorrhage and gastrointestinal disorders. Results A total of 6772 patients were registered. The safety analysis set included 6148 patients; mean age was 70.8±9.9 (SD) years: 2323 patients (37.8%) were aged 75 years or older. Males accounted for 66.8% of the patients. Mean CHADS2 score was 1.8±1.3; the CHADS2 score was 0 in 13.6%, 1 in 31.3%, 2 in 25.9%, 3 in 14.9%, and 4 to 6 in 11.1% of the patients. Of the 6148 patients, 1701 patients (27.7%) were switchers from warfarin and 4407 patients (71.7%) were non-switchers (OAC naïve patients). Treatment adherence was assessed for the first 3 months from the start of treatment for this analysis. Total 5656 patients (92.0%) reported taking dabigatran twice daily (bid) every day according to the label recommendation. During the follow up period [mean duration of follow up: 498±259 days (corresponding to 8386 patient-years)], pre-defined safety events of special interest for intensive survey (reported as serious ADRs) were: myocardial

  5. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2003-10-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, carbapenems, monobactams, and penicillins. Changes in CZOP susceptibility among bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated from the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (4,154 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2001, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter koseri, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacteroides fragilis group, and Prevotella/Porphyromonas. CZOP preserved its antibacterial activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis (MIC90: 4 micrograms/mL) and showed comparable activity to carbapenems against H. influenzae (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli was preferable (MIC90: 0.125 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of cefpirome (CPR), cefepime (CFPM), and imipenem (IPM). The MIC90 of CZOP against K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca was 1 and 0.25 microgram/mL, respectively. The MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae increased during 6 years (32 to 128 micrograms/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. aerogenes was preferable (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activities of CZOP against S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were relatively potent (MIC90: 0.5 and 0.25 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of CPR, CFPM, and carumonam. CZOP preserved comparable antibacterial

  6. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of recombinant factor VIII (REFACTO) in patients with haemophilia A: interim data from a postmarketing surveillance study in Germany and Austria.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, H; Externest, D; Ganser, A; Eifrig, B; Kreuz, W; Lenk, H; Pabinger, I; Schramm, W; Schwarz, T F; Zimmermann, R; Zavazava, N; Oldenburg, J; Klamroth, R

    2007-03-01

    An open-label, multicentre, postmarketing surveillance study conducted in Germany and Austria with recombinant factor VIII (REFACTO) has enrolled 217 patients (mean age 26.3 years) from 38 haemophilia centres during the first 4.8 years. Most patients (188/217; 86.6%) had severe to moderately severe haemophilia A, of whom 153 completed sufficient diary information for the main efficacy analysis. These 153 patients experienced a median of 6.6 (interquartile range 1.4-18.6) bleeding episodes per year. Patients treated with prophylaxis experienced a median of 4.4 (1.1-9.3) bleeds per year, while patients treated on-demand experienced a median of 22.8 (11.3-29.0) bleeds per year. Overall, most physicians (41/43 [95.3%]) were 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied' with the efficacy of REFACTO in the treatment of bleeding episodes. A total of 137 non-serious adverse events have been reported in 52/217 patients (24.0%) to date. In addition, 129 serious adverse events in 87 patients (40%) were reported, including 41 cases of 'less than expected therapeutic effect' (LETE). Of these, 39 LETE cases were reported in one centre; however, patients in this centre experienced considerably fewer bleeding episodes per year than patients outside this centre. Overall, six patients (2.8%) have developed de novo inhibitors, three of which were considered high titre. Four of these patients were at high risk (0-50 exposure days [ED]) of inhibitor formation, one was at intermediate risk (51-100 ED) and one was at low risk (>100 ED). These results emphasize the benefit of postmarketing surveillance and, overall, this study confirms the efficacy, safety and tolerability of REFACTO in the treatment of patients with haemophilia A. PMID:17286765

  7. Multicenter, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study to evaluate dosing of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women undergoing ovulation induction

    PubMed Central

    Nawroth, Frank; Tandler-Schneider, Andreas; Bilger, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study evaluated doses of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women who were anovulatory or oligomenorrheic and undergoing ovulation induction (OI) alone or OI with intrauterine insemination. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved monofollicular or bifollicular development (defined as one or two follicles ≥15 mm). Secondary endpoints included characteristics of ovulation stimulation treatment, such as mean total and mean daily r-hFSH doses. Data were analyzed for 3,193 patients from 30 German fertility centers. The proportion of patients with monofollicular or bifollicular development was 71.1% (n=2,270 of a total of 3,193 patients; intent-to-treat population). The mean±standard deviation total and daily doses of r-hFSH were 696.9±542.5 IU and 61.7±29.4 IU, respectively. The three doses prescribed most frequently were: 37.5 IU (n=703 from N=3,189; 22.0%), 50.0 IU (n=1,056 from N=3,189; 33.1%), and 75.0 IU (n=738 from N=3,189; 23.1%) on the first day of stimulation; and 37.5 IU (n=465 from N=3,189; 14.6%), 50.0 IU (n=922 from N=3,189; 28.9%), and 75.0 IU (n=895 from N=3,189; 28.1%) on the last day of stimulation. This noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study found that monofollicular or bifollicular development was achieved in 71% of patients studied and the small dose increment (12.5 IU) of the redesigned follitropin alfa pen allowed individualized treatment of women undergoing OI. PMID:25926755

  8. Post-marketing surveillance of adverse events following immunization with inactivated quadrivalent and trivalent influenza vaccine in health care providers in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Regan, Annette K; Tracey, Lauren; Gibbs, Robyn

    2015-11-17

    In 2015, inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine (QIV) was first introduced into the Australian market. A routine vaccine safety surveillance system in Western Australia was used to conduct post-licensure surveillance of adverse events following immunization with inactivated QIV and trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) in a sample of 1685 healthcare providers (HCPs). A similar percentage of HCPs who received QIV reported having any reaction seven days post-vaccination as HCPs who received TIV (13.6 vs. 12.8%, respectively; p=0.66). However, a slightly higher percentage of HCPs who received QIV reported pain or swelling at the injection site as compared to HCPs who received TIV (6.9% vs. 4.2%, respectively; p=0.02). No serious vaccine-associated adverse events were detected during follow-up of either vaccine. Acknowledging the study limitations, the results of this post-marketing surveillance support the safety of QIV, suggesting there is little difference in the reactogenicity of QIV as compared to TIV. PMID:26476362

  9. Long-term post-marketing surveillance of mizoribine for the treatment of lupus nephritis: Safety and efficacy during a 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kenya; Sudo, Yohei; Itoh, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Hisao; Kuroda, Tatsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of long-term use of mizoribine by undertaking a 3-year post-marketing surveillance study. Methods: Subjects were all lupus nephritis patients newly treated with mizoribine between 1 October 2003 and 30 September 2005 at contracted study sites. Results: Mizoribine was administered to 881 lupus nephritis patients in the safety analysis set consisting of 946 patients recruited from 281 contracted study sites after satisfying the eligibility criteria. There were 301 events of adverse drug reactions that were observed in 196 (20.7%) of the 946 subjects. There were 34 events of serious adverse drug reactions in 31 patients (3.2%). No deterioration in hematological and biochemical test values was observed, but immunological testing showed significant improvements in C3, CH50, and anti-DNA antibody titers. The negative rate of proteinuria also increased over time. The median steroid dosage was 15 mg/day at the commencement of treatment, but was reduced to 10 mg/day at 12 months and 8 mg/day at 36 months. Conclusion: The findings of the 3-year long-term drug use surveillance study indicated that mizoribine can be used over the long term with relatively few adverse drug reactions, suggesting its suitability for use in maintenance drug therapy. PMID:26770729

  10. Active post-marketing surveillance of the intralesional administration of human recombinant epidermal growth factor in diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background After several exploratory and confirmatory clinical trials, the intralesional administration of human recombinant epidermal growth factor (hrEGF) has been approved for the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this procedure in medical practice. Methods A prospective, post-marketing active pharmacosurveillance was conducted in 41 hospitals and 19 primary care polyclinics. Patients with DFU received hrEGF, 25 or 75 μg, intralesionally 3 times per week until complete granulation of the ulcer or 8 weeks maximum, adjuvant to standard wound care. Outcomes measured were complete granulation, amputations, and adverse events (AE) during treatment; complete lesion re-epithelization and relapses in follow-up (median: 1.2; maximum 4.2 years). Results The study included 1788 patients with 1835 DFU (81% Wagner’s grades 3 or 4; 43% ischemic) treated from May 2007 to April 2010. Complete granulation was observed in 76% of the ulcers in 5 weeks (median). Ulcer non-ischemic etiology (OR: 3.6; 95% CI: 2.8-4.7) and age (1.02; 1.01-1.03, for each younger year) were the main variables with influence on this outcome. During treatment, 220 (12%) amputations (171 major) were required in 214 patients, mostly in ischemic or Wagner’s grade 3 to 5 ulcers. Re-epithelization was documented in 61% of the 1659 followed-up cases; 5% relapsed per year. AE (4171) were reported in 47% of the subjects. Mild or moderate local pain and burning sensation, shivering and chills, were 87% of the events. Serious events, not related to treatment, occurred in 1.7% of the patients. Conclusions The favorable benefit/risk balance, confirms the beneficial clinical profile of intralesional hrEGF in the treatment of DFUs. PMID:24004460

  11. Reactogenicity and safety of the human rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix™ in The Philippines, Sri Lanka, and India: A post-marketing surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Lulu; Chitraka, Amarjeet; Liu, Aixue; Choudhury, Jaydeep; Kumar, Kishore; Berezo, Lennie; Cimafranca, Leonard; Chatterjee, Pallab; Garg, Pankaj; Siriwardene, Prasanna; Bernardo, Rommel; Mehta, Shailesh; Balasubramanian, Sundaram; Karkada, Naveen; Htay Han, Htay

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory bodies in The Philippines, Sri Lanka, and India require post-marketing surveillance to provide additional safety data on Rotarix™ in real-life settings. In such studies conducted in The Philippines (November 2006 to July 2012; NCT00353366), Sri Lanka (November 2008 to August 2009; NCT00779779), and India (August 2009 to April 2010; NCT00938327), 2 doses of Rotarix™ were administered according to the local prescribing information (PI). The occurrence of at least Grade “2”/”3” solicited adverse event (AE) (fever, vomiting, or diarrhea), within 15 days in The Philippines or 8 days in Sri Lanka and India; unsolicited AEs within 31 days and serious adverse events (SAEs) throughout the study were recorded. Of the 1494, 522, and 332 infants enrolled in The Philippines, Sri Lanka, and India, 14.7% 14.9% and 12.7% infants, respectively recorded at least Grade “2”/”3” solicited AEs. The most commonly reported solicited AEs were irritability in The Philippines (32.2% post-Dose-1; 23.5% post-Dose-2) and India (23.0% post-Dose-1; 13.2% post-Dose-2), and fever (18.0% post-Dose-1; 20.2% post-Dose-2) in Sri Lanka. Unsolicited AEs were recorded in 24.5% (The Philippines), 4.8% (Sri Lanka), and 6.9% (India) of infants. Forty-one SAEs were recorded in the Philippines of which 6 (decreased oral intake with increased sleeping time and constipation; pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and intussusception) were considered by the investigators as causally related to vaccination. One vaccine-unrelated SAE occurred in a Sri Lankan infant. All SAEs resolved and the infants recovered. Two doses of Rotarix™, administered to healthy infants according to local PI, were well tolerated in The Philippines, Sri Lanka, and India. PMID:25424932

  12. 21 CFR 314.540 - Postmarketing safety reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Postmarketing safety reporting. 314.540 Section... New Drugs for Serious or Life-Threatening Illnesses § 314.540 Postmarketing safety reporting. Drug products approved under this program are subject to the postmarketing recordkeeping and safety...

  13. 21 CFR 314.630 - Postmarketing safety reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Postmarketing safety reporting. 314.630 Section... Human Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 314.630 Postmarketing safety reporting. Drug products approved under this subpart are subject to the postmarketing recordkeeping and safety...

  14. 21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? 822.12 Section 822.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan...

  15. Safety and effectiveness of controlled-release paroxetine in routine clinical practice: results of a postmarketing surveillance study of patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaki; Kimura, Toshifumi; Kimura, Takeshi; Hara, Terufumi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are commonly used in the pharmacotherapy of depression. However, adverse events can lead to their early discontinuation. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of paroxetine controlled-release (CR) tablets in Japanese patients with depression/depressive state (hereafter referred to as depression) in routine clinical practice in Japan. Patients and methods This was an open-label, noninterventional, prospective, postmarketing surveillance study. A total of 3,213 patients aged 12–92 years with depression were prescribed paroxetine CR for 8 weeks at the physician’s discretion. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of the physician’s assessment using the Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-GI) and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness (CGI-SI) scales, as well as on the basis of the patients’ self-reported satisfaction. The primary effectiveness outcome was the improvement rate based on the physician’s assessment using the CGI-GI. Results The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 11.2% (359/3,213; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.1%–12.3%). The common adverse drug reactions that accounted for 1.0% or more of the incidence were nausea (3.5%) and somnolence (2.7%). The proportion of patients who continued paroxetine CR at week 8 was 80.2% (2,577/3,213; 95% CI: 78.8%–81.6%). The improvement rate at week 8 (last observation carried forward) was 72.8% (2,132/2,927; 95% CI: 71.2%–74.4%). The proportion of patients with CGI-SI scores of moderately or severely ill decreased from 63.6% at baseline to 17.9% at week 8. The proportion of patients who were satisfied with paroxetine CR treatment was 69.8% (2,040/2,921; 95% CI: 68.1%–71.5%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that paroxetine CR is a well-tolerated and efficacious treatment for depression in routine clinical practice. PMID

  16. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  17. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  18. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  19. Safety profiles and efficacy of infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis with or without psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis or psoriatic erythroderma: Results from the prospective post-marketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hideshi; Terui, Tadashi; Matsukawa, Miyuki; Takesaki, Kazumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-07-01

    A large-scale prospective post-marketing surveillance was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of infliximab in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. This study was conducted in all psoriasis patients treated with infliximab after its Japanese regulatory approval. Infliximab was administrated at 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and every 8 weeks thereafter. Patients were serially enrolled and observed for 6 months to evaluate the safety and efficacy. The safety and efficacy were evaluated in 764 and 746 patients, respectively. Incidences of any and serious adverse drug reactions were 22.51% and 6.94%, respectively, and those of any and serious infusion reactions were 6.15% and 1.31%, respectively, which were comparable with the results in the post-marketing surveillance with 5000 rheumatoid arthritis patients in Japan. Major adverse drug reactions during the follow-up period were infections (5.10%) including pneumonia, cellulitis and herpes zoster, however, no tuberculosis was observed. The safety profiles were equivalent, regardless of the psoriasis types. No new safety problems were identified. The response rates on global improvement and median improvement rate of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index in all patients were 88.0% and 85.0%, respectively. Of note, the efficacy was equivalent for each psoriasis type as well as for each body region. Infliximab was also effective in pustular psoriasis symptoms, joint symptoms and nail psoriasis, as well as improvement of quality of life. Infliximab was confirmed to be highly effective and well tolerated in treating refractory psoriasis, including pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. PMID:26704926

  20. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences. 600.80 Section 600.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Reporting of Adverse Experiences § 600.80 Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences....

  1. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences. 600.80 Section 600.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Reporting of Adverse Experiences § 600.80 Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences....

  2. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences. 600.80 Section 600.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Reporting of Adverse Experiences § 600.80 Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences....

  3. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences. 600.80 Section 600.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Reporting of Adverse Experiences § 600.80 Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences....

  4. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Blount, Katrina L; Ritchie, Jessica D; Hodshon, Beth; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    Background In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA’s pre-market approval (PMA) pathway. Methods and results We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%), nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Conclusion Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives. PMID:26060416

  5. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... scientific and medical journals either as case reports or as the result of a formal clinical trial. (2) As... experience, postmarketing clinical investigations, postmarketing epidemiological/surveillance studies... adverse drug experiences that occurred in clinical trials if they were previously submitted as part of...

  6. Safety and effectiveness of switching from infliximab to etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: results from a large Japanese postmarketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takao; Harigai, Masayoshi; Inokuma, Shigeko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ryu, Junnosuke; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Fujii, Koichi; Yoshinaga, Takunari; Freundlich, Bruce; Suzukawa, Michio

    2012-06-01

    Finding an effective treatment strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who have not benefited from previous tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist treatment is important for minimizing RA disease activity and improving patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and effectiveness of etanercept in patients with and without infliximab (IFX) treatment experience. Patients (n = 7,099) from a large postmarketing observational study of etanercept use in Japan were divided into 2 cohorts based on previous IFX use (pre-IFX and non-IFX). Baseline characteristics were assessed in each cohort. Adverse events (AEs) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) responses were monitored every 4 weeks for 24 weeks. At baseline, pre-IFX patients were younger and had fewer comorbidities and a shorter RA duration than non-IFX patients. During the study, pre-IFX patients received concomitant methotrexate more often than non-IFX patients. The incidence of AEs and serious AEs were significantly lower in pre-IFX patients, as was the percentage of patients who discontinued treatment. Both cohorts had significant improvement (P < 0.001) in EULAR responses at the end of the treatment period. This study demonstrated that etanercept was effective and well tolerated in active RA patients with and without prior IFX treatment. PMID:21331576

  7. Safety and effectiveness responses to etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis in Japan: a sub-analysis of a post-marketing surveillance study focusing on the duration of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takao; Harigai, Masayoshi; Inokuma, Shigeko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ryu, Junnosuke; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Fujii, Koichi; Yoshinaga, Takunari; Freundlich, Bruce; Suzukawa, Michio

    2012-06-01

    The aim is to investigate the relationship of duration of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with safety and effectiveness of etanercept (ETN) in Japan. Post-marketing surveillance data for 7,099 patients treated with ETN were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, treatment effectiveness, incidence of adverse events (AEs), and serious AEs (SAEs) in relation to duration of RA were studied. At baseline, patients with RA for longer duration were older, weighed less, had more comorbidities, allergies, and corticosteroid use, but smoked less and had less morning stiffness. By 2-5 years with RA, more than half of the patients had advanced to Steinbrocker radiographic stage III or IV. Methotrexate (MTX) was the most commonly used pre-treatment disease-modifying antirheumatic drug; however, concomitant MTX use and its dose were lower among patients with longer duration of RA. Remission rates (26.6%) were greatest among patients having RA for <2 years. Less AEs and SAEs were observed among patients with shorter duration of RA. These results suggest that RA treatment in Japan in the era pre-biologics may not have been adequate to control disease activity and prevent joint destruction. Patients with shorter duration of RA may have better physical status which allows the opportunity to treat more intensively putting a higher percentage of patients in remission and possibly decreasing exposure to SAEs. PMID:21327436

  8. Postmarketing analysis of medicines: methodology and value of the spanish case-control study and surveillance system in preventing birth defects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2007-01-01

    There are many surveillance systems of congenital defects all over the world; several of them have developed specific approaches to generate and test selected hypotheses regarding human teratogens. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of them have a permanent and systematised programme for the study of the risk and safety of drugs. The aim of this article is to describe the research programme on the potential effects of drugs in pregnancy followed by the Spanish Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECEMC), which is a permanent ongoing case-control study and surveillance system. The programme to analyse drugs includes a continuous and systematic study on the potential effects of medicines used during pregnancy. This programme has several characteristics that make it different from other current systems: (i) the collection of numerous datapoints (up to 312 per infant) in a case-control design; (ii) the use of a versatile and specific coding of birth defects; (iii) a specific programme for the continuous analysis of the potential effects of each type of drugs used during pregnancy that has been developed specifically for the ECEMC methodology, including its dysmorphological coding system. The description of the ECEMC's approach to surveillance of the effects of drug use during pregnancy may help researches in this area, particularly those using data from birth defects registries. PMID:17408307

  9. A large-scale prospective registration study of the safety and efficacy of sorafenib tosylate in unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan: results of over 3200 consecutive cases in post-marketing all-patient surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Oya, Mototsugu; Iijima, Masafumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Gemma, Akihiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Adachi, Masatoshi; Okayama, Yutaka; Sunaya, Toshiyuki; Inuyama, Lyo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Real-life safety and efficacy of sorafenib in advanced renal cell carcinoma in a nationwide patient population were evaluated by post-marketing all-patient surveillance. Methods All patients with unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan who started sorafenib therapy from February 2008 to September 2009 were registered and followed for up to 12 months. Baseline characteristics, treatment status, tumor response, survival and safety data were recorded by the prescribing physicians. Results Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 3255 and 3171 patients, respectively. The initial daily dose was 800 mg in 78.2% of patients. Median duration of treatment was 6.7 months and the mean relative dose intensity was 68.4%. Overall, 2227 patients (68.4%) discontinued the treatment by 12 months, half of which (52.0% of discontinued patients) were due to adverse events. The most common adverse drug reactions were hand–foot skin reaction (59%), hypertension (36%), rash (25%) and increase in lipase/amylase (23%). The median progression-free survival was 7.3 months (95% confidence intervals: 6.7–8.1), and the overall survival rate at 1 year was 75.4% (73.5–77.1). Prognostic factors for overall survival were mostly consistent with those in previous clinical trials in the univariate analysis and largely similar to those for progression-free survival and duration of treatment in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Sorafenib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma under the labeled dose was feasible in daily medical practice, for its acceptable toxicity profile and favorable clinical benefit that were consistent with those in clinical trials. PMID:26206897

  10. 21 CFR 822.10 - What must I include in my surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must I include in my surveillance plan? 822... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.10 What must I include in my surveillance plan? Your surveillance plan must include a discussion of: (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 822.10 - What must I include in my surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my surveillance plan? 822... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.10 What must I include in my surveillance plan? Your surveillance plan must include a discussion of: (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 822.10 - What must I include in my surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my surveillance plan? 822... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.10 What must I include in my surveillance plan? Your surveillance plan must include a discussion of: (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 822.10 - What must I include in my surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I include in my surveillance plan? 822... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.10 What must I include in my surveillance plan? Your surveillance plan must include a discussion of: (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 822.10 - What must I include in my surveillance plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must I include in my surveillance plan? 822... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Postmarket Surveillance Plan § 822.10 What must I include in my surveillance plan? Your surveillance plan must include a discussion of: (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? 822.12 Section 822.12 Food and Drugs FOOD... prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? Guidance documents that discuss...

  16. 21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? 822.12 Section 822.12 Food and Drugs FOOD... prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? Guidance documents that discuss...

  17. 21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? 822.12 Section 822.12 Food and Drugs FOOD... prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? Guidance documents that discuss...

  18. Manufacturer's drug interaction and postmarketing adverse event data: what are appropriate uses?

    PubMed

    Kraft, W K; Waldman, S A

    2001-01-01

    Governmental agencies overseeing pharmaceutical products use a risk/benefit approach to analyse data and make regulatory decisions. Comprehensive public dissemination of the safety profile of pharmaceutical products is part of an overall strategy for reducing risk associated with the use of any medical product. In the US, reports of postmarketing surveillance of approved drugs are in the public domain. Some, but not all, of the information in drug interaction studies is available to the public through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). However, there are concerns over the misuse of these data for commercial or other gain. The need to protect intellectual property and foster innovation in drug development, and concerns of legal liability are often cited as reasons to limit full public access to data from drug development studies. In contrast, intellectual freedom. public safety, and a mandate for transparent decision-making processes by regulatory agencies are issues that support open access to these data. Ultimately. concern for the public safety justifies open access to postmarketing surveillance data, and to a lesser degree, data regarding drug interactions in marketed products, and should outweigh the potential loss of competitive advantage by pharmaceutical companies. PMID:11522118

  19. Design and analysis of post-marketing research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Hua Andrew; Yang, Wei

    2013-07-01

    A post-marketing study is an integral part of research that helps to ensure a favorable risk-benefit profile for approved drugs used in the market. Because most of post-marketing studies use observational designs, which are liable to confounding, estimation of the causal effect of a drug versus a comparative one is very challenging. This article focuses on methodological issues of importance in designing and analyzing studies to evaluate the safety of marketed drugs, especially marketed traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) products. Advantages and limitations of the current designs and analytic methods for postmarketing studies are discussed, and recommendations are given for improving the validity of postmarketing studies in TCM products. PMID:23818199

  20. Post-Marketing Surveillance of Human Rabies Diploid Cell Vaccine (Imovax) in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) in the United States, 1990‒2015

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Pedro L.; Woo, Emily Jane; Paul, Wendy; Lewis, Paige; Petersen, Brett W.; Cano, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background In 1980, human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV, Imovax Rabies, Sanofi Pasteur), was licensed for use in the United States. Objective To assess adverse events (AEs) after HDCV reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous reporting surveillance system. Methods We searched VAERS for US reports after HDCV among persons vaccinated from January 1, 1990–July 31, 2015. Medical records were requested for reports classified as serious (death, hospitalization, prolonged hospitalization, disability, life-threatening-illness), and those suggesting anaphylaxis and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Physicians reviewed available information and assigned a primary clinical category to each report using MedDRA system organ classes. Empirical Bayesian (EB) data mining was used to identify disproportional AE reporting after HDCV. Results VAERS received 1,611 reports after HDCV; 93 (5.8%) were serious. Among all reports, the three most common AEs included pyrexia (18.2%), headache (17.9%), and nausea (16.5%). Among serious reports, four deaths appeared to be unrelated to vaccination. Conclusions This 25-year review of VAERS did not identify new or unexpected AEs after HDCV. The vast majority of AEs were non-serious. Injection site reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, and non-specific constitutional symptoms were most frequently reported, similar to findings in pre-licensure studies. PMID:27410239

  1. Tocilizumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a real-world clinical setting: results from 1 year of postmarketing surveillance follow-up of 417 patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shumpei; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Morio, Tomohiro; Origasa, Hideki; Sumitomo, Naokata; Tomobe, Minako; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Minota, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of tocilizumab (TCZ) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) in real-world clinical settings in Japan. Methods Paediatric patients with sJIA initiating TCZ between April 2008 and February 2012 and those previously enrolled in clinical trials who initiated TCZ before April 2008 were enrolled in a Japanese registry surveillance programme. Safety and effectiveness parameters were collected for 52 weeks. Results Of 417 patients enrolled, mean age was 11.2 years and 48.0% were female. TCZ exposure was 407.0 patient-years (PYs). Baseline corticosteroid use was higher than in clinical trials. Rates of total adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 224.3/100 PYs and 54.5/100 PYs, respectively, with SAEs higher than previously reported. The most frequent AEs and SAEs were infections and infestations (69.8/100 PYs and 18.2/100 PYs, respectively). 74 serious infections occurred in 55 patients (18.2/100 PYs); higher than previously reported. 26 macrophage activation syndrome events were reported in 24 patients (6.4/100 PYs). Fever and rash symptoms improved from baseline to week 52 (54.6% to 5.6% and 43.0% to 5.6%, respectively). At 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 52 weeks, 90.5%, 96.2% and 99.0% of patients achieved normal C reactive protein levels (<0.3 mg/dL), respectively. Conclusions These first real-world data demonstrated that TCZ was well tolerated, with acceptable safety and effectiveness in patients with sJIA. Higher incidences of SAEs and serious infections may be due to differences, such as corticosteroid use and concomitant diseases, between patient populations enrolled in previously reported clinical trials and this study. PMID:26644233

  2. Influenza Virus Surveillance in Coordinated Swine Production Systems, United States.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bryan S; DeBeauchamp, Jennifer; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Franks, John; Crumpton, Jeri Carol; Turner, Jasmine; Darnell, Daniel; Jeevan, Trushar; Kayali, Ghazi; Harding, Abbey; Webby, Richard J; Lowe, James F

    2015-10-01

    To clarify the epidemiology of influenza A viruses in coordinated swine production systems to which no animals from outside the system are introduced, we conducted virologic surveillance during September 2012-September 2013. Animal age, geographic location, and farm type were found to affect the prevalence of these viruses. PMID:26402228

  3. Subvisible Particle Content, Formulation, and Dose of an Erythropoietin Peptide Mimetic Product Are Associated With Severe Adverse Postmarketing Events.

    PubMed

    Kotarek, Joseph; Stuart, Christine; De Paoli, Silvia H; Simak, Jan; Lin, Tsai-Lien; Gao, Yamei; Ovanesov, Mikhail; Liang, Yideng; Scott, Dorothy; Brown, Janice; Bai, Yun; Metcalfe, Dean D; Marszal, Ewa; Ragheb, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    Peginesatide (Omontys(®); Affymax, Inc., Cupertino, CA) was voluntarily withdrawn from the market less than a year after the product launch. Although clinical trials had demonstrated the drug to be safe and efficacious, 49 cases of anaphylaxis, including 7 fatalities, were reported not long after market introduction. Commercialization was initiated with a multiuse vial presentation, which differs in formulation from the single-use vial presentation used in phase 3 studies. Standard physical and chemical testing did not indicate any deviation from product specifications in either formulation. However, an analysis of subvisible particulates using nanoparticle tracking analysis and flow imaging revealed a significantly higher concentration of subvisible particles in the multiuse vial presentation linked to the hypersensitivity cases. Although it is unknown whether the elevated particulate content is causally related to these serious adverse events, this report illustrates the utility of characterizing subvisible particulates not captured by conventional light obscuration. PMID:26886324

  4. 21 CFR 601.44 - Postmarketing safety reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Postmarketing safety reporting. 601.44 Section 601.44 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Accelerated Approval of Biological Products for Serious or Life-Threatening...

  5. 78 FR 28853 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Postmarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... require a manufacturers to conduct postmarket surveillance (PS) of any device that meets the criteria set... for a device 80 1 80 8 640 that is no longer marketed (Sec. 822.28) Waiver (Sec. 822.29) 1 1 1 40 40... document is based on the data available in FDA's internal tracking system. Sections 822.26, 822.27, and...

  6. Postmarket policy considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Matthew J; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J; Weymann, Deirdre; Morgan, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Oncology biological products are some of the most expensive drugs on the market and are a growing financial burden on patients and health-care systems. By 2020, numerous major biological cancer drugs will lose their patent protection allowing follow-on competitors, known as biosimilars, to enter the market. Clinical and regulatory considerations for biosimilars have begun to harmonise in Europe and the USA to help to define and streamline the pathway for biosimilar market authorisation. Yet, substantial international variation still exists in the pricing and market uptake of approved biosimilar oncology drugs. Differences in national postmarket policies for biosimilars might explain these disparities in pricing and uptake. In this Policy Review, policy approaches to competition between biosimilars and originators used by seven European countries--Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, and the UK--and the USA are discussed, chosen because these countries represent a variety of postmarket policies and build on conclusions from previous work. We discuss these policies within the context of interchangeability, physician prescribing, substitutability, pharmacist dispensing, hospital financing and tendering, and pricing. PMID:26758759

  7. [Literature review on premarketing and postmarketing evidence of xiyanping injection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Fei; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2014-09-01

    This article systematically summarizes the non-clinical safety studies, pharmacological studies and postmarketing safety studies of Xiyanping injection based on literature. These studies include acute toxicity test, long-term toxicity test, reproductive toxicity test, active and passive anaphylaxis test, curative mechanism study, clinical trials of effectiveness, active surveillance, security analysis of passive monitoring data, the real world analysis of hospital information system (HIS) data, literature analysis, etcetera This article also analysis the relationship of the different evidence, summarizes the strategy of the researches, in order to make it to be a reference for making a systemic research program of traditional Chinese medicine injection. PMID:25532411

  8. FDA's expanding postmarket authority to monitor and publicize food and consumer health product risks: the need for procedural safeguards to reduce "transparency" policy harms in the post-9/11 regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Roller, Sarah Taylor; Pippins, Raqiyyah R; Ngai, Jennifer W

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the expansion of FDA's discretionary authority in the post-9/11 period, particularly with respect to FDA's authority to monitor and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs, and other consumer health products. In addition, this article evaluates the need for FDA to establish procedural safeguards to reduce the significant risks of unintended and undue harm to people and regulated companies that can result from adverse publicity in the more "transparent" post 9/11 FDA regulatory environment. Specifically, Part I summarizes the amendments to the FDCA enacted during the post-9/11 period that have expanded FDA's postmarket authority to monitor, evaluate, and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs and other consumer health products marketed in the United States, in conjunction with FDA's Sentinel Initiative, Reportable Food Registry, and other adverse event reporting requirements. Part II discusses the convergence of FDA's expanded postmarket authority to publicize product-related risks with President Obama's transparency initiative aimed at fostering "open government" through increased public access to government information. In addition, Part II considers the nature of the procedural safeguards needed in the post-9/11 FDA regulatory environment, in view of FDA's historical record and illustrative cases that help expose how adverse "transparency" surrounding FDA warning letters, recalls and safety alerts concerning products in the marketplace can have undue and unintended prejudicial and harmful effects for the people and companies that are legally responsible for such products. Finally, based on these analysis, this article concludes with some observations concerning the nature of the procedural safeguards needed to reduce the significant risks of "transparency" policy harms in the pos-9/11 regulatory environment. PMID:19999646

  9. Population based mortality surveillance in carbon products manufacturing plants.

    PubMed Central

    Teta, M J; Ott, M G; Schnatter, A R

    1987-01-01

    The utility of a population based, corporate wide mortality surveillance system was evaluated after a 10 year observation period of one of the company's divisions. The subject population, 2219 white male, long term employees from Union Carbide Corporation's carbon based electrode and specialty products operations, was followed up for mortality from 1974 to 1983. External comparisons with the United States male population were supplemented with internal comparisons among subgroups of the study population, defined by broad job categories and time related variables, adjusting for important correlates of the healthy worker effect. Significant deficits of deaths were observed for all causes and the major non-cancer causes of death. The numbers of deaths due to malignant neoplasms and respiratory cancer were less than, but not statistically different from, expected. There was a non-significant excess of deaths from lymphopoietic cancer, occurring predominantly among salaried employees. When specific locations were examined, operations with potential exposure to coal tar products exhibited a mortality pattern similar to that of the total cohort. The risk for lung cancer was significantly raised (five observed, 1.4 expected) in one small, but older, location which did not involve coal tar products during the period of employment of these individuals, but which historically used asbestos materials for several unique applications. Although these findings are limited by small numbers and a short observation period, the population based surveillance strategy has provided valuable information regarding the mortality experience of the population, directions for future research, and the allocation of epidemiological resources. PMID:3593661

  10. Magnetic Resonance Based Diagnostics for Polymer Production and Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Cook, A; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R; Wheeler, H; Wilson, M

    2006-09-27

    In an effort to develop a magnetic resonance based diagnostic tool to be used for polymer production and surveillance, we have investigated the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and unilateral relaxometry. MRI provides a spatial map of the polymer, which can be correlated to the structure heterogeneity. Though highly detailed information can be obtained with MRI, the high equipment cost and expertise required to operate the system makes it a poor choice for a production setting. Unilateral relaxometry via the NMR MOUSE provides rapid, inexpensive polymer screening, useful in the development in new polymer parts or to identify potentially defective components. The NMR ProFiler (originally called the NMR MOUSE) was procured by Kansas City originally for production support of the W80 LEP with future applications as a surveillance diagnostic. A robotic autosampler has been designed allowing the detection of several components without the need for any human interaction. A summary of the qualification experiments and results to date from the ProFiler and the robotic unit will be presented.

  11. [Post-marketing drug safety measures for the attainment of safer and more effective use of drug].

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the 20th century's dramatic improvements in the direct and/or hazardous toxicity of drugs, indirect toxicity and/or long-term safety concerns such as relation of cancer risk and TNF-alpha receptor blockers have caused significant complexity in post-marketing surveillance (PMS) scenery. The post-marketing phase of drugs and their safety measures now appear to be much more complicated and heavier than decades ago. The spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system which has been one of the main pillars of PMS measures for almost 50 years may have to be reviewed in terms of its effectiveness, and may need augmentation from medical data bases. Only a pharmaco-epidemiological analysis and integration of the output with a conventional spontaneous reporting approach offers a chance to satisfy the current complex safety issues. Today's tendency toward practical saturation at medical/pharmaceutical frontiers, by regulatory authorities and safety divisions of pharmaceutical companies with ever-increasing day-to-day safety information can also be pointed out. Such phenomena may actually reduce the productivity of safety measures and also jeopardize the maintenance of an acceptable risk/benefit drug ratio. To alleviate these potential negative implications, establishment of a consortium to act as a sentinel that would gather up-to-date and essential safety information, including epidemiological data, from all sources and provide it plus recommendations to all stakeholders can be suggested. Through such activities, we could expect significant improvement of drug safety measures in post-marketing phase which would effectively cover not only new drugs but also generic and bio-simulated drugs. PMID:21628973

  12. Review of Transporter-Related Postmarketing Requirement or Postmarketing Commitment Studies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Sun, Bo; Agarwal, Sheetal; Zhang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this report are to summarize the content and status of transporter-related postmarketing requirement (PMR)/postmarketing commitment (PMC) studies in new drug applications (NDAs) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to discuss the reasons for requesting such studies and the impact of PMR/PMC study results on labeling to guide the optimal use of the drugs. Multiple data sources were searched to collect information on transporter-related PMR/PMC studies between January 1999 and May 2015. A total of 40 transporter-related PMR/PMC study requests were issued for 35 NDAs. Among these PMR/PMC studies, 27 requested studies related to P-glycoprotein. As of May 31, 2015, 34 transporter-related PMR/PMC studies (85%) are considered "fulfilled" (per the FDA's PMR/PMC website), and 22 (65%) resulted in labeling updates. The majority of the PMR/PMC studies are for drugs in the therapeutic areas of anti-infectives, oncology, and neurology. The results from PMR/PMC studies are important for dosing optimization and are often included in the updated labeling. Because a significant lag time is anticipated between drug approval and PMR/PMC fulfillment, NDA applicants are encouraged to include transporter-related assessments in clinical drug development programs for drug products. PMID:27385175

  13. Guideline for postmarketing Chinese medicine pharmacoeconomic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Fei; Xie, Yan-Ming; Zhang, Wen; Liao, Xing; Chang, Yan-Peng

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacoeconomics is an important part of the postmarketing Chinese medicine (CM) evaluation, and postmarketing pharmacoeconomic evaluation can reveal the clinical and market value of CM. The purpose of establishing the guideline for pharmacoeconomic evaluation is to make the evaluation process and results regarding Chinese patent medicines both scientific and fair. Every country's guidelines for pharmacoeconomic evaluation act as reference guidelines, we have already drawn up the guideline that takes into account the special characteristics of CM; and these are in preparation for the postmarketing CM pharmacoeconomic evaluation. PMID:24671571

  14. Surveillance methods for identifying, characterizing, and monitoring tobacco products: potential reduced exposure products as an example

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Richard J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Rees, Vaughan W.; Connolly, Gregory N.; Norton, Kaila J.; Sweanor, David; Parascandola, Mark; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Shields, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco products are widely sold and marketed, yet integrated data systems for identifying, tracking, and characterizing products are lacking. Tobacco manufacturers recently have developed potential reduction exposure products (PREPs) with implied or explicit health claims. Currently, a systematic approach for identifying, defining, and evaluating PREPs sold at the local, state or national levels in the US has not been developed. Identifying, characterizing, and monitoring new tobacco products could be greatly enhanced with a responsive surveillance system. This paper critically reviews available surveillance data sources for identifying and tracking tobacco products, including PREPs, evaluating strengths and weaknesses of potential data sources in light of their reliability and validity. Absent regulations mandating disclosure of product-specific information, it is likely that public health officials will need to rely on a variety of imperfect data sources to help identify, characterize, and monitor tobacco products, including PREPs. PMID:19959680

  15. A conceptual framework for economic optimization of single hazard surveillance in livestock production chains.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuezhen; Claassen, G D H; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2014-06-01

    Economic analysis of hazard surveillance in livestock production chains is essential for surveillance organizations (such as food safety authorities) when making scientifically based decisions on optimization of resource allocation. To enable this, quantitative decision support tools are required at two levels of analysis: (1) single-hazard surveillance system and (2) surveillance portfolio. This paper addresses the first level by presenting a conceptual approach for the economic analysis of single-hazard surveillance systems. The concept includes objective and subjective aspects of single-hazard surveillance system analysis: (1) a simulation part to derive an efficient set of surveillance setups based on the technical surveillance performance parameters (TSPPs) and the corresponding surveillance costs, i.e., objective analysis, and (2) a multi-criteria decision making model to evaluate the impacts of the hazard surveillance, i.e., subjective analysis. The conceptual approach was checked for (1) conceptual validity and (2) data validity. Issues regarding the practical use of the approach, particularly the data requirement, were discussed. We concluded that the conceptual approach is scientifically credible for economic analysis of single-hazard surveillance systems and that the practicability of the approach depends on data availability. PMID:24630402

  16. The application of post-market monitoring to novel foods.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, P; Howlett, J; Boeing, H; Cockburn, A; Constable, A; Davi, A; de Jong, N; Moseley, B; Oberdörfer, R; Robertson, C; Wal, J M; Samuels, F

    2008-01-01

    The role of post-market monitoring (PMM) in the safety assessment of novel foods is critically discussed in order to derive guidelines as to in which situations the application of PMM might be warranted. Available data sources on food consumption and health status, and the methodologies for generating such data are reviewed. The paper suggests improvements to make them more applicable for PMM purposes. It is concluded that any PMM programme must be a hypothesis-driven scientific exercise. PMM can have a role as a complement to, but not as a replacement for, a comprehensive pre-market safety assessment. Its use may be appropriate to confirm that product use is as predicted in the pre-market assessment; to provide reassurance that effects observed in the pre-market assessment occur with no greater frequency or intensity in the post-market phase than anticipated; and to investigate the significance of any adverse effects reported by consumers after market-launch. However PMM is insufficiently powerful to test the hypothesis that any effects seen in the pre-market assessment are absent in the post-market phase. Current methodologies place limitations on what PMM can achieve. PMM should only be used when triggered by or when the focus is on specific evidence-based questions. PMID:17950974

  17. The FDA's sentinel initiative--A comprehensive approach to medical product surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ball, R; Robb, M; Anderson, S A; Dal Pan, G

    2016-03-01

    In May 2008, the Department of Health and Human Services announced the launch of the Sentinel Initiative by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to create the Sentinel System, a national electronic system for medical product safety surveillance. This system complements existing FDA surveillance capabilities that track adverse events reported after the use of FDA regulated products by allowing the FDA to proactively assess the safety of these products. PMID:26667601

  18. Regulations and guidelines should be strengthened urgently for re-evaluation on post-marketing medicines in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-Ming; Tian, Feng

    2013-07-01

    This paper reviewed the situation of regulations and guidelines on post-marketing medicines in the developed countries and in China. The developed countries have accumulated a lot of empirical principles and techniques on postmarketing surveillance (also named pharmacovigilance), therefore, their regulation systems are nearly perfect. In China, the regulations on post-marketing re-evaluation and relative technical guidelines do not cover the whole aspects, even lack in some important aspects, and long-term risk management mechanisms have not been established. So it is urgent to establish new regulations and improve the regulatory system in China based on the existing regulations and guidelines, by learning from the ideas of foreign advanced regulations, then fully integrating them with China's actual conditions, and cooperating with multidisciplinary researchers. PMID:23818198

  19. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reports or as the result of a formal clinical trial. (2) As with all reports submitted under paragraph (c... derived from commercial marketing experience, postmarketing clinical investigations, postmarketing... adverse experience obtained from a postmarketing clinical study (whether or not conducted under...

  20. 75 FR 68802 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ...Under the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (Modernization Act), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is required to report annually in the Federal Register on the status of postmarketing requirements and commitments required of, or agreed upon by, holders of approved drug and biological products. This notice is the Agency's report on the status of the studies and......

  1. 21 CFR 601.28 - Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies... pediatric studies. Sponsors of licensed biological products shall submit the following information each year... labeling supplements for pediatric use have been submitted and whether new studies in the...

  2. 21 CFR 601.28 - Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies... pediatric studies. Sponsors of licensed biological products shall submit the following information each year... labeling supplements for pediatric use have been submitted and whether new studies in the...

  3. 21 CFR 601.28 - Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies... pediatric studies. Sponsors of licensed biological products shall submit the following information each year... labeling supplements for pediatric use have been submitted and whether new studies in the...

  4. 21 CFR 601.28 - Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual reports of postmarketing pediatric studies... pediatric studies. Sponsors of licensed biological products shall submit the following information each year... labeling supplements for pediatric use have been submitted and whether new studies in the...

  5. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE PRODUCT EVALUATION REPORTS: UNITED STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY Specific Sector Provisions for Medical Devices § 26.50 Alert system and exchange of... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket...

  6. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE PRODUCT EVALUATION REPORTS: UNITED STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY Specific Sector Provisions for Medical Devices § 26.50 Alert system and exchange of... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket...

  7. 76 FR 52669 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a notice of availability that appeared in the Federal Register of August 4, 2011 (76 FR 47211). The Agency is required to report annually in the Federal Register on the status of postmarketing requirements and commitments required of, or agreed upon by, holders of approved drug and biological products. The August 4, 2011, notice is the......

  8. 21 CFR 822.12 - Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do you have any information that will help me prepare my submission or design my postmarket surveillance plan? 822.12 Section 822.12 Food and Drugs FOOD... plan are available on the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's Web site and from the Center...

  9. Strategies for postmarketing surveillance of drugs for rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, A S; Gagne, J J

    2014-03-01

    Rare diseases are an important part of the public health, affecting 6-8% of the population, and drugs intended for rare diseases comprise the fastest growing subcategory of new drug approvals in the United States. However, clinical study of therapeutics in these populations is limited by the low prevalence of these diseases, and the natural history or pathogenesis of the disease may be poorly described. In addition, commonly used strategies for evaluation of postapproval safety and effectiveness, such as meta-analyses and review of spontaneous adverse event reports, may not be applicable. Alternative methodological approaches, including natural history studies, adaptive clinical trial designs, and epidemiological studies using patient-organized registries, show substantial promise for the study of rare disease therapeutics. Bayesian trials and distributed networks of large electronic databases are the most promising strategies for active and prospective monitoring of clinical interventions for rare diseases. PMID:24193169

  10. Preclinical, Clinical, and Over-the-Counter Postmarketing Experience with a New Vaginal Cup: Menstrual Collection

    PubMed Central

    North, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Menstrual cups have been available for decades, but their use is limited by bulky design and the need for multiple sizes. The Softcup® (Instead, Inc., San Diego, CA) is a simple single-size disposable over-the-counter (OTC) menstrual cup that compresses to tampon shape to facilitate insertion and can be worn during coitus. This report describes preclinical evaluation, clinical testing, and postmarketing monitoring of the Softcup. Methods Preclinical testing complied with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and used standard United States Pharmacopoeia methodologies for assessment of potential toxicity. Clinical testing enrolled 406 women in seven U.S. centers. A detailed written questionnaire assessed safety, acceptability, and effectiveness for menstrual collection. Study safety parameters included pelvic examinations, Pap smears, colposcopy, urinalysis, vaginal pH, wet mounts, gram stain, and vaginal microflora cultures. Postmarketing surveillance of over 100 million Softcups has been conducted by the manufacturer and by the FDA Medwatch system. Results No toxicity or mutagenicity was observed in preclinical evaluations. In clinical testing, after three cycles of cup use, 37% of subjects rated the cup as better than, 29% as worse than, and 34% as equal to pads or tampons. The cup was preferred for comfort, dryness, and less odor. Cups received lower ratings for disposal and convenience. Eighty-one percent of enrolled women were able to insert and remove their first cup using only written instructions. Use difficulties resulting in study discontinuations included cramping (1%), leakage (1%), and improper fit (3%). No safety parameters were adversely affected. No significant health risks were reported during postmarketing surveillance. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a single-size vaginal device has no significant health risks and is acceptable to many women without the need for fitting or other medical services. PMID

  11. Postmarketing Trials and Pediatric Device Approvals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Thomas J.; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical devices can be useful in a variety of diseases, but few devices have been specifically approved for use in children. The 2007 Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act was passed to stimulate pediatric device development. The current state of trial evidence underpinning the approval of pediatric devices remains poorly described. METHODS: We identified all high-risk (ie, class III) devices approved through the premarket approval or humanitarian device exemption pathways for therapeutic use in children between 2008 and 2011. We collected key information on clinical trial design (randomization, blinding, controls, and types of end points) as well as age distribution of trial participants. We also identified US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–mandated postmarketing trials. RESULTS: Twenty-two devices were approved for use in children via the premarket approval pathway and 3 via the humanitarian device exemption pathway. Twenty-two (88%) qualified as pediatric despite minimum approval ages of ≥18 years (the FDA Center for Devices and Radiologic Health considers patients 18–21 years old as pediatric). Most devices were approved on the basis of nonrandomized (59%), open-label (68%) studies with surrogate effectiveness end points (86%). Overall, 21 (84%) devices were not studied in any patients <18 years of age. Postmarketing studies were mandated by the FDA for 19 (76%) devices, although only 3 (18%) required enrollment of pediatric patients. CONCLUSIONS: Most high-risk pediatric devices are approved on the basis of trials in patients ≥18 years old, with few pediatric patients exposed to the devices before market availability. Few postmarketing studies require additional study in pediatric patients. PMID:24733871

  12. The New Product Watch: Successes and Challenges of Crowdsourcing as a Method of Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Amy L; Biener, Lois

    2016-01-01

    New smokeless tobacco (eg, snus and dissolvable tobacco products) and nontobacco nicotine products (eg, e-cigarettes) have emerged in recent years amid widespread speculation about locations of test marketing, toxic constituents, and consumer targeting. The New Product Watch was a pilot online monitoring system aimed at filling these information gaps by using a form of crowdsourcing: recruiting volunteers to visit local retailers and report their findings. With very little funding, the New Product Watch gathered county-specific data on new product availability in 19 states as well as trend data on product marketing and demand, and completed 2 rounds of product purchases and subsequent toxic constituent analyses. Data were collected over a 2-year period, between 2009 and 2011. Despite the successes, we found that this small-scale, volunteer effort was not a sustainable method for ensuring continuous, systematic surveillance of new product availability, marketing, and toxicity. PMID:24335713

  13. The role of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and healthcare professionals in post-marketing safety.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Meguru; Horiuchi, Naoya; Tamura, Atsushi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs and medical devices is necessary for medical progress; however, safety measures need to be put in place to protect the health of the population. In order to ensure the safety of drugs and medical devices, it is important to determine measures for appropriate management of risks at any time during the development phase, the regulatory review and the post-marketing phase. Adverse events detected in clinical trials are limited due to the restricted numbers of patients enrolled in the trials. Therefore, it is almost impossible to predict rare serious adverse events during the post-marketing phase. The revised Pharmaceutical Affairs Act was established in Japan in November 20, 2013. The new act focuses on increased safety of drugs and medical devices. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) is the regulatory authority in Japan that promotes safety measures from the development phase through to the post-marketing phase. In the post-marketing phase, the PMDA collects information from the medical product companies and healthcare professionals, as well as instructing and advising them with regard to post-marketing safety measures for each drug and medical device. Since Japan has a national health insurance system, a new drug or a medical device is available throughout the country when the drug price or medical fee is listed in the National Health Insurance price list. Healthcare professionals in medical institutions must learn about the drugs and medical devices they handle, and should make an effort to maintain patient safety. The PMDA medi-navi is a very useful electronic mail delivery service that provides critical information for protecting patients from health hazards caused by adverse events. The 'risk management plan' is also important as it contains important information about safety profile and post-marketing measures of a new drug. PMID:26183623

  14. Analysis of postmarket complaints database for the iFuse SI Joint Fusion System®: a minimally invasive treatment for degenerative sacroiliitis and sacroiliac joint disruption

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Reckling, W Carlton; Block, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    Background The sacroiliac joint is a common but under-recognized source of low back and gluteal pain. Patients with degenerative sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint disruption resistant to nonsurgical treatments may undergo open surgery with sacroiliac joint arthrodesis, although outcomes are mixed and risks are significant. Minimally invasive sacroiliac joint arthrodesis was developed to minimize the risk of iatrogenic injury and to improve patient outcomes compared with open surgery. Methods Between April 2009 and January 2013, 5319 patients were treated with the iFuse SI Joint Fusion System® for conditions including sacroiliac joint disruption and degenerative sacroiliitis. A database was prospectively developed to record all complaints reported to the manufacturer in patients treated with the iFuse device. Complaints were collected through spontaneous reporting mechanisms in support of ongoing mandatory postmarket surveillance efforts. Results Complaints were reported in 204 (3.8%) patients treated with the iFuse system. Pain was the most commonly reported clinical complaint (n = 119, 2.2%), with nerve impingement (n = 48, 0.9%) and recurrent sacroiliac joint pain (n = 43, 0.8%) most frequently cited. All other clinical complaints were rare (≤0.2%). Ninety-six revision surgeries were performed in 94 (1.8%) patients at a median follow-up of four (range 0–30) months. Revisions were typically performed in the early postoperative period for treatment of a symptomatic malpositioned implant (n = 46, 0.9%) or to correct an improperly sized implant in an asymptomatic patient (n = 10, 0.2%). Revisions in the late postoperative period were performed to treat symptom recurrence (n = 34, 0.6%) or for continued pain of undetermined etiology (n = 6, 0.1%). Conclusion Analysis of a postmarket product complaints database demonstrates an overall low risk of complaints with the iFuse SI Joint Fusion System in patients with degenerative sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint

  15. Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients and Providers Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... communication to patients and healthcare providers. Latest Safety Information Index to Drug-Specific Information For patients, consumers, ...

  16. Drug- and herb-induced liver injury: Progress, current challenges and emerging signals of post-marketing risk.

    PubMed

    Raschi, Emanuel; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and herb-induced liver injury is a hot topic for clinicians, academia, drug companies and regulators, as shown by the steadily increasing number of publications in the past 15 years. This review will first provide clues for clinicians to suspect idiosyncratic (unpredictable) DILI and succeed in diagnosis. Causality assessment remains challenging and requires careful medical history as well as awareness of multifaceted aspects, especially for herbs. Drug discontinuation and therapy reconciliation remain the mainstay in patent's management to minimize occurrence of acute liver failure. The second section will address novel agents associated with liver injury in 2014 (referred to as "signals"), especially in terms of clinical, research and drug development implications. Insights will be provided into recent trends by highlighting the contribution of different post-marketing data, especially registries and spontaneous reporting systems. This literature scrutiny suggests: (1) the importance of post-marketing databases as tools of clinical evidence to detect signals of DILI risk; and (2) the need for joining efforts in improving predictivity of pre-clinical assays, continuing post-marketing surveillance and design ad hoc post-authorization safety studies. In this context, ongoing European/United States research consortia and novel pharmaco-epidemiological tools (e.g., specialist prescription event monitoring) will support innovation in this field. Direct oral anticoagulants and herbal/dietary supplements appear as key research priorities. PMID:26167249

  17. Drug- and herb-induced liver injury: Progress, current challenges and emerging signals of post-marketing risk

    PubMed Central

    Raschi, Emanuel; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and herb-induced liver injury is a hot topic for clinicians, academia, drug companies and regulators, as shown by the steadily increasing number of publications in the past 15 years. This review will first provide clues for clinicians to suspect idiosyncratic (unpredictable) DILI and succeed in diagnosis. Causality assessment remains challenging and requires careful medical history as well as awareness of multifaceted aspects, especially for herbs. Drug discontinuation and therapy reconciliation remain the mainstay in patent’s management to minimize occurrence of acute liver failure. The second section will address novel agents associated with liver injury in 2014 (referred to as “signals”), especially in terms of clinical, research and drug development implications. Insights will be provided into recent trends by highlighting the contribution of different post-marketing data, especially registries and spontaneous reporting systems. This literature scrutiny suggests: (1) the importance of post-marketing databases as tools of clinical evidence to detect signals of DILI risk; and (2) the need for joining efforts in improving predictivity of pre-clinical assays, continuing post-marketing surveillance and design ad hoc post-authorization safety studies. In this context, ongoing European/United States research consortia and novel pharmaco-epidemiological tools (e.g., specialist prescription event monitoring) will support innovation in this field. Direct oral anticoagulants and herbal/dietary supplements appear as key research priorities. PMID:26167249

  18. Postmarket safety in Canada: are significant therapeutic advances and biologics less safe than other drugs? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Examine the probability of new active substances (NASs) approved in Canada between 1 January 1997 and 31 March 2012 acquiring a serious postmarket safety warning. Design Cohort study. Data sources Annual reports of the Therapeutic Products Directorate and the Biologic and Genetic Therapies Directorate; evaluations of therapeutic innovation from the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board and Prescrire International; MedEffect Canada website. Interventions Postmarket regulatory safety warning or withdrawal from market due to safety reasons. Primary and secondary outcome measures Compare the probability of acquiring a postmarket safety warning in Canada in four different groups of drugs: (1) traditional medications versus biologics; (2) medications that offer significant new therapeutic benefits versus those that do not. Determine how well the type of review that an NAS received from Health Canada predicted the product's postmarket therapeutic value. Results The probability of a traditional NAS acquiring a serious safety warning and/or being withdrawn was 29.9% (95% CI 21.8% to 40.2%) vs 27.3% (95% CI 18.2% to 39.7%) for an NAS of biological origin (p=0.47, log-rank test). For medications that were significant therapeutic advances the probability was 40.2% (95% CI 24.5% to 60.9%) vs 33.9% (95% CI 26.4% to 42.7%) for those that were not (p=0.18, log-rank test). Health Canada was 77.4% accurate in predicting the therapeutic importance of an NAS. Conclusions There was no difference in postmarket regulatory safety action between traditional medications and biologics and no difference between drugs with significant therapeutic benefits and those without. Although these results draw on Canadian data, they are likely to be relevant internationally. Further research should assess whether the current level of premarket safety evaluation is acceptable. PMID:24549164

  19. Post-marketing experience with an opioid nasal spray for migraine: lessons for the future.

    PubMed

    Loder, E

    2006-02-01

    In 1992 a nasal spray formulation of butorphanol, an opioid medication intended for pain relief, was marketed in the USA on an unscheduled basis. Only a few years later, amid widespread reports of abuse and dependence, primarily in migraine patients, its manufacturer voluntarily requested the Food and Drug Administration to reschedule the drug as a Schedule IV narcotic. The events surrounding this episode are reviewed, and four problem areas that might have contributed are identified: (i) inadequate review of previous experience with other formulations of butorphanol; (ii) failure to consider the impact of disease state and drug formulation on the risk of adverse events; (iii) the limited scope of clinical trials prior to approval; and (iv) aggressive marketing efforts. The implications of these lessons for future drug development and post-marketing surveillance in the migraine field are considered. PMID:16426261

  20. Regulatory considerations for determining postmarketing study commitments.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R J

    2007-08-01

    Postmarketing Study Commitments (PMCs) are, most commonly, agreements made by pharmaceutical companies at the time of an FDA approval to perform a study or studies to elucidate further characteristics of the drug under consideration. The role of PMCs in drug regulation has come under considerable scrutiny in recent years, particularly as discussions of drug safety have intensified. Although these agreed-upon PMCs are described in FDA regulations, such PMCs are not sought by FDA with every approval, and completion of the agreed-upon studies is not a requirement for the drug's sponsor (there are required PMCs under certain regulatory provisions and these are discussed below). Requests by FDA at the time of regulatory approval for studies under PMCs have been a common practice for many years. When made, PMCs are described in the approval letters and are therefore publicly available. Concerns over whether PMCs were being duly performed, reported, and reviewed by FDA were addressed in the FDA Modernization Act of 1997, which required more detailed reporting by manufactures on their progress in meeting the PMCs and required FDA to report certain information publicly. PMID:17538552

  1. 21 CFR 822.32 - What records are the investigators in my surveillance plan required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What records are the investigators in my surveillance plan required to keep? 822.32 Section 822.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES POSTMARKET SURVEILLANCE Records and Reports § 822.32 What records are the...

  2. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  3. Potential metal impurities in active pharmaceutical substances and finished medicinal products - A market surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Wollein, Uwe; Bauer, Bettina; Habernegg, Renate; Schramek, Nicholas

    2015-09-18

    A market surveillance study has been established by using different atomic spectrometric methods for the determination of selected elemental impurities of particular interest, to gain an overview about the quality of presently marketed drug products and their bulk drug substances. The limit tests were carried out with respect to the existing EMA guideline on the specification limits for residuals of metal catalysts or metal reagents. Also attention was given to the future implementation of two new chapters of the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) stating limit concentrations of elemental impurities. The methods used for determination of metal residues were inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and atomic absorption spectrometry technologies (GFAAS, CVAAS, HGAAS). This article presents the development and validation of the methods used for the determination of 21 selected metals in 113 samples from drug products and their active pharmaceutical ingredients. PMID:26036232

  4. Surveillance indicators for potential reduced exposure products (PREPs): developing survey items to measure awareness

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Karen; Biener, Lois; Garrett, Catherine A; Allen, Jane; Cummings, K Michael; Hartman, Anne; Marcus, Stephen; McNeill, Ann; O'Connor, Richard J; Parascandola, Mark; Pederson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, tobacco companies have introduced cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products (known as Potential Reduced Exposure Products, PREPs) with purportedly lower levels of some toxins than conventional cigarettes and smokeless products. It is essential that public health agencies monitor awareness, interest, use, and perceptions of these products so that their impact on population health can be detected at the earliest stages. Methods This paper reviews and critiques existing strategies for measuring awareness of PREPs from 16 published and unpublished studies. From these measures, we developed new surveillance items and subjected them to two rounds of cognitive testing, a common and accepted method for evaluating questionnaire wording. Results Our review suggests that high levels of awareness of PREPs reported in some studies are likely to be inaccurate. Two likely sources of inaccuracy in awareness measures were identified: 1) the tendency of respondents to misclassify "no additive" and "natural" cigarettes as PREPs and 2) the tendency of respondents to mistakenly report awareness as a result of confusion between PREPs brands and similarly named familiar products, for example, Eclipse chewing gum and Accord automobiles. Conclusion After evaluating new measures with cognitive interviews, we conclude that as of winter 2006, awareness of reduced exposure products among U.S. smokers was likely to be between 1% and 8%, with the higher estimates for some products occurring in test markets. Recommended measurement strategies for future surveys are presented. PMID:19840394

  5. Drug approval and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1980-01-01

    This article argues that current regulations governing the licensing of drugs, particularly in the U.S., need to be changed and replaced by a system of provisional or conditional licensing and increased postmarketing surveillance of drug use. In terms of research and development of new forms of contraception, this proposal would have great impact. It is believed that the U.S./Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements--animal experiments and Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials--not only put an unacceptable financial burden on any institution attempting to develop new contraceptives, but do not demonstrably contribute to the reduction of risks. The author questions whether even if oral contraceptives introduced prior to new U.S./FDA regulations had been subject to these current regulations that convincing evidence would have been found to alert anyone to the now-known rare adverse effects, such as risk of thromboembolism. It is pointed out that these sorts of rare risks were uncovered by continuous screening processes which are not now a part of the FDA drug regulation requirements. The author also questions the politics of "conpulsory safety," such as might be legislated for regulated car safety belt use. Citing a partnership already established between government and private industry in high-risk/low cost ventures in the aerospace industry, the author sees no reason why such a relationship could not evolve in the pharmaceutical industry. In Britain, proposals have been made to establish a fund to compensate patients adversely affected by drugs which pharmaceutical companies would reimburse if proved negligent; such a fund may work in the U.S. under new regulations which stress postmarketing surveillance. PMID:6110574

  6. Methodological approaches to developing and establishing the body of evidence on post-marketing Chinese medicine safety.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing; Robinson, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    Evidence based medicine demands the highest form of scientific evidence to demonstrate the efficacy and clinical effectiveness for any therapeutic intervention in order to provide best care. It is however accepted that in the absence of scientific evidence, personal experience and expert opinion together with professional judgement are critical. Obtaining evidence for drug safety, postmarketing surveillance (PMS) has focussed on follow up of observational cohorts exposed to a particular drug in order to estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Evidence on PMS of Chinese herbal products is still limited, in particular for herbal injections. The aim of this article is to suggest a new model of ascertaining the safety of Chinese medicine using a more comprehensive approach for collecting data. To collect safety data on the Chinese herbal injection, Kudiezi, a mixed methods approach is proposed using 18 hospital information systems to detect ADRs in order to prospectively observe 30,000 patients over 3 years. Evidence will also be collected using a questionnaire survey and through a sample of semi structured interviews. This information based on the expert opinion and the experience of clinicians will produce additional data on the frequency and types of side effects in clinical practice. Furthermore semi structured interviews with a random sample of patients receiving the injection will be carried out to ascertain any potential side effects missed. It is hoped that this comprehensive approach to data collection will accumulate wider evidence based on individual traditional Chinese medicine care and treatment and provide important feedback to the national data collection system to ensure completeness of ADR data recording, monitoring and any potential wider effects through developing improved ADR guidelines. PMID:23818200

  7. 21 CFR 314.630 - Postmarketing safety reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Postmarketing safety reporting. 314.630 Section 314.630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Approval of New Drugs When Human Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical...

  8. 21 CFR 314.540 - Postmarketing safety reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Postmarketing safety reporting. 314.540 Section 314.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Accelerated Approval of New Drugs for Serious or Life-Threatening...

  9. Surveillance of tobacco industry retail marketing activities of reduced harm products.

    PubMed

    Slater, Sandy; Giovino, Gary; Chaloupka, Frank

    2008-01-01

    With the introduction of potential reduced exposure products (PREPs) and the interest in studying tobacco harm reduction, sound research and surveillance are needed to examine and understand the distribution and availability of PREPs in communities, as well as the tobacco industry's marketing practices surrounding these products. We examined the availability and marketing of PREPs in a national sample of tobacco retail stores. We also compared the price of PREPs to those of premium brand cigarettes and examined the distribution of PREPs in comparison with premium brand cigarettes by store type, urbanization, region, and race/ethnicity. We found that PREPs are not widely available, are priced similarly to leading cigarette brands, and have few promotional offers. We also found some significant differences in the distribution of PREPs and cigarettes, as well as in the distribution of Ariva and Omni, by store type and community demographics. The fact that this study used data collected nationally emphasizes the importance of these findings and helps shed some light on the tobacco industry's PREP marketing strategies. This study's national sample provides a unique perspective that needs to be replicated if and when other PREPs are widely marketed. PMID:18188759

  10. Assessment of the Impact of Scheduled Postmarketing Safety Summary Analyses on Regulatory Actions

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, S; Pinnow, EE; Wu, E; Kurtzig, R; Hall, M; Dal Pan, GJ

    2016-01-01

    In addition to standard postmarketing drug safety monitoring, Section 915 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) requires the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct a summary analysis of adverse event reports to identify risks of a drug or biologic product 18 months after product approval, or after 10,000 patients have used the product, whichever is later. We assessed the extent to which these analyses identified new safety signals and resultant safety-related label changes. Among 458 newly approved products, 300 were the subjects of a scheduled analysis; a new safety signal that resulted in a safety-related label change was found for 11 of these products. Less than 2% of 713 safety-related label changes were based on the scheduled analyses. Our study suggests that the safety summary analyses provide only marginal value over other pharmacovigilance activities. PMID:26853718

  11. Assessment of the impact of scheduled postmarketing safety summary analyses on regulatory actions.

    PubMed

    Sekine, S; Pinnow, E E; Wu, E; Kurtzig, R; Hall, M; Dal Pan, G J

    2016-07-01

    In addition to standard postmarketing drug safety monitoring, Section 915 of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) requires the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct a summary analysis of adverse event reports to identify risks of a drug or biologic product 18 months after product approval, or after 10,000 patients have used the product, whichever is later. We assessed the extent to which these analyses identified new safety signals and resultant safety-related label changes. Among 458 newly approved products, 300 were the subjects of a scheduled analysis; a new safety signal that resulted in a safety-related label change was found for 11 of these products. Less than 2% of 713 safety-related label changes were based on the scheduled analyses. Our study suggests that the safety summary analyses provide only marginal value over other pharmacovigilance activities. PMID:26853718

  12. 77 FR 14402 - Draft Guidance on Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues.'' This draft guidance describes FDA's current approach to classifying a significant postmarket drug safety issue as a ``priority'' tracked safety issue (TSI) or a ``standard'' TSI, with the capability of elevating some priority TSIs to an......

  13. 76 FR 47211 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... a postmarketing study or clinical trial that an applicant has been required to, or has agreed to... postmarketing study/clinical trial. This report must also include reasons, if any, for failure to complete the study/clinical trial. These studies and clinical trials are intended to further define the...

  14. 77 FR 13339 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... monitor the progress of a postmarketing study or clinical trial that an applicant has been required to, or... the status of the postmarketing study/clinical trial. This report must also include reasons, if any, for failure to complete the study/clinical trial. These studies and clinical trials are intended...

  15. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  16. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  17. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  18. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences. 314.80 Section 314.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Applications § 314.80 Postmarketing reporting of...

  19. The use of existing environmental networks for the post-market monitoring of GM crop cultivation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Smets, G; Alcalde, E; Andres, D; Carron, D; Delzenne, P; Heise, A; Legris, G; Martinez Parrilla, M; Verhaert, J; Wandelt, C; Ilegems, M; Rüdelsheim, P

    2014-07-01

    The European Union (EU) Directive 2001/18/EC on the deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment requires that both Case-Specific Monitoring (CSM) and General Surveillance (GS) are considered as post-market implementing measures. Whereas CSM is directed to monitor potential adverse effects of GMOs or their use identified in the environmental risk assessment, GS aims to detect un-intended adverse effects of GMOs or their use on human and animal health or the environment. Guidance documents on the monitoring of genetically modified (GM) plants from the Commission and EFSA clarify that, as appropriate, GS can make use of established routine surveillance practices. Networks involved in routine surveillance offer recognised expertise in a particular domain and are designed to collect information on important environmental aspects over a large geographical area. However, as the suitability of existing monitoring networks to provide relevant data for monitoring impacts of GMOs is not known, plant biotechnology companies developed an approach to describe the processes and criteria that will be used for selecting and evaluating existing monitoring systems. In this paper, the availability of existing monitoring networks for this purpose is evaluated. By cataloguing the existing environmental monitoring networks in the EU, it can be concluded that they can only be used, in the context of GMO cultivation monitoring, as secondary tools to collect baseline information. PMID:24836113

  20. Rethinking Research Ethics: The Case of Postmarketing Trials

    PubMed Central

    London, Alex John; Carlisle, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Phase IV studies are often criticized for poor scientific standards. Yet they provide an important resource for addressing evidence shortfalls in drug safety, comparative effectiveness, and real-world utility. Current research ethics policies, and contemplated revisions to them, do not provide an adequate framework for preventing social harms that result from poor post-marketing research practice. Rather than focus exclusively on the welfare and interests of human volunteers, research policies and ethics should also safeguard the integrity of the research enterprise as a system for producing reliable medical evidence. We close by briefly describing how an integrity framework might be implemented for phase IV studies. PMID:22556237

  1. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions. PMID:25670520

  2. SURVEILLANCE REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveillance reports are designed to provide useful data to researchers, planners, policymakers, and other professionals interested in alcohol abuse and its associated illnesses and mortality. Other surveillance report topics include apparent per capita consumption of alcoholic b...

  3. Safety of inhaled glycopyrronium in patients with COPD: a comprehensive analysis of clinical studies and post-marketing data

    PubMed Central

    D’Urzo, Anthony D; Kerwin, Edward M; Chapman, Kenneth R; Decramer, Marc; DiGiovanni, Robert; D’Andrea, Peter; Hu, Huilin; Goyal, Pankaj; Altman, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic use of inhaled anticholinergics by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has raised long-term safety concerns, particularly cardiovascular. Glycopyrronium is a once-daily anticholinergic with greater receptor selectivity than previously available agents. Methods We assessed the safety of inhaled glycopyrronium using data pooled from two analysis sets, involving six clinical studies and over 4,000 patients with COPD who received one of the following treatments: glycopyrronium 50μg, placebo (both delivered via the Breezhaler® device), or tiotropium 18 μg (delivered via the HandiHaler® device). Data were pooled from studies that varied in their duration and severity of COPD of the patients (ie, ≤12 weeks duration with patients having moderate or severe COPD; and >1 year duration with patients having severe and very severe COPD). Safety comparisons were made for glycopyrronium vs tiotropium or placebo. Poisson regression was used to assess the relative risk for either active drug or placebo (and between drugs where placebo was not available) for assessing the incidence of safety events. During post-marketing surveillance (PMS), safety was assessed by obtaining reports from various sources, and disproportionality scores were computed using EMPIRICA™. In particular, the cardiac safety of glycopyrronium during the post-marketing phase was evaluated. Results The overall incidence of adverse events and deaths was similar across groups, while the incidence of serious adverse events was numerically higher in placebo. Furthermore, glycopyrronium did not result in an increased risk of cerebro-cardiovascular events vs placebo. There were no new safety reports during the PMS phase that suggested an increased risk compared to results from the clinical studies. Moreover, the cardiac safety of glycopyrronium during the PMS phase was also consistent with the clinical data. Conclusion The overall safety profile of glycopyrronium was

  4. RNA cleavage products generated by antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs are processed by the RNA surveillance machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; De Hoyos, Cheryl L.; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) elicit cleavage of the targeted RNA by the endoribonuclease RNase H1, whereas siRNAs mediate cleavage through the RNAi pathway. To determine the fates of the cleaved RNA in cells, we lowered the levels of the factors involved in RNA surveillance prior to treating cells with ASOs or siRNA and analyzed cleavage products by RACE. The cytoplasmic 5′ to 3′ exoribonuclease XRN1 was responsible for the degradation of the downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs or siRNA targeting mRNAs. In contrast, downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs targeting nuclear long non-coding RNA Malat 1 and pre-mRNA were degraded by nuclear XRN2. The downstream cleavage products did not appear to be degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction as the majority of these products contained intact poly(A) tails and were bound by the poly(A) binding protein. The upstream cleavage products of Malat1 were degraded in the 3′ to 5′ direction by the exosome complex containing the nuclear exoribonuclease Dis3. The exosome complex containing Dis3 or cytoplasmic Dis3L1 degraded mRNA upstream cleavage products, which were not bound by the 5′-cap binding complex and, consequently, were susceptible to degradation in the 5′ to 3′ direction by the XRN exoribonucleases. PMID:26843429

  5. RNA cleavage products generated by antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs are processed by the RNA surveillance machinery.

    PubMed

    Lima, Walt F; De Hoyos, Cheryl L; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-04-20

    DNA-based antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) elicit cleavage of the targeted RNA by the endoribonuclease RNase H1, whereas siRNAs mediate cleavage through the RNAi pathway. To determine the fates of the cleaved RNA in cells, we lowered the levels of the factors involved in RNA surveillance prior to treating cells with ASOs or siRNA and analyzed cleavage products by RACE. The cytoplasmic 5' to 3' exoribonuclease XRN1 was responsible for the degradation of the downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs or siRNA targeting mRNAs. In contrast, downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs targeting nuclear long non-coding RNA Malat 1 and pre-mRNA were degraded by nuclear XRN2. The downstream cleavage products did not appear to be degraded in the 3' to 5' direction as the majority of these products contained intact poly(A) tails and were bound by the poly(A) binding protein. The upstream cleavage products of Malat1 were degraded in the 3' to 5' direction by the exosome complex containing the nuclear exoribonuclease Dis3. The exosome complex containing Dis3 or cytoplasmic Dis3L1 degraded mRNA upstream cleavage products, which were not bound by the 5'-cap binding complex and, consequently, were susceptible to degradation in the 5' to 3' direction by the XRN exoribonucleases. PMID:26843429

  6. Hazards of Illicit Methamphetamine Production and Efforts at Reduction: Data from the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Natalia; Welles, Wanda Lizak; Wilburn, Rebecca E.; Rice, Nancy; Wu, Jennifer; Stanbury, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive drug of abuse that can easily be made in small illegal laboratories from household chemicals that are highly toxic and dangerous. Meth labs have been found in locations such as homes, outbuildings, motels, and cars. Its production endangers the “cook,” neighbors, responders, and the environment. This article describes surveillance data used to examine the emergence and public health impacts of illicit clandestine meth labs, as well as two states' efforts to thwart lab operations and prevent responder injuries. Methods. We analyzed data collected from 2001 to 2008 by 18 states participating in the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) Program to examine the occurrence and public health impacts of clandestine meth production. Results. HSEES data indicate that the majority of clandestine meth lab events occurred in residential areas. About 15% of meth lab events required evacuation. Nearly one-fourth of these events resulted in injuries, with 902 reported victims. Most victims (61%) were official responders, and one-third were members of the general public. Since 2004, with the implementation of local and federal laws and prevention activities, the number of meth lab events has declined. Increased education and training of first responders has led to decreased injuries among police officers, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel. Conclusions. HSEES data provided a good data source for monitoring the emergence of domestic clandestine meth production, the associated public health effects, and the results of state and federal efforts to promote actions to address the problem. PMID:21563719

  7. 76 FR 43691 - Unique Device Identification for Postmarket Surveillance and Enforcement; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...-mail, and telephone number. For those without Internet access, please contact Jay Crowley (see Contact..., information about lodging, and other relevant information on the Internet at http://www.fda.gov/UDI . Comments... Sentinel Initiative, on the Internet at...

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Zonisamide in Patients with Epilepsy: A Post-Marketing Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Jin; Son, Jeong Min; Mun, Jihee; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Zonisamide (ZNS) is one of new antiepileptic drug, which is known to inhibit seizure through multiple mechanisms of action. In Korea, ZNS was approved as an antiepileptic drug in 1992 and has been used for epilepsy patients with partial and generalized seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of ZNS in patients with epilepsy and to identify the incidence of adverse events in real clinical setting. Methods: This study was carried out in patients who received ZNS for epilepsy. Patients who were observed for at least 12 weeks after treatment with ZNS were included as evaluable subjects. Information regarding the status and type of adverse events occurring during the course of treatment with ZNS was obtained regardless of causal relationship to ZNS and efficacy was assessed by the study physicians and patients at 12 weeks post dose of ZNS. Results: A total of 1,948 patients were included in the study, and ZNS efficacy was evaluated in 1,744 patients. ZNS was used as a monotherapy in 1,095 patients and as an adjunctive drug in 853 patients. Of the total patients, 1,345 (69.1%) patients had partial seizure, 563 patients had generalized seizure, and 40 patients were undetermined. Adverse events were reported in 65 patients (3.34%) including 1 case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, but no incidence of serious unexpected adverse drug reactions were reported. 755 patients (43.29%) became seizure free with ZNS treatment, and additional 322 patients (18.41%) experienced marked improvement with ZNS treatment. Conclusions: Our study shows the safety and tolerability of ZNS treatment in patients with epilepsy in real clinical setting. In addition, ZNS was found to be an effective option as a monotherapy or in patients with generalized seizure. PMID:26819941

  9. 77 FR 52742 - Public Meeting-Strengthening the National Medical Device Postmarket Surveillance System; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061... Management between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, and will be posted to the docket at http://www... accessible at http://www.regulations.gov . It may be viewed at the Division of Dockets Management...

  10. A Mobile Sensing Approach for Regional Surveillance of Fugitive Methane Emissions in Oil and Gas Production.

    PubMed

    Albertson, John D; Harvey, Tierney; Foderaro, Greg; Zhu, Pingping; Zhou, Xiaochi; Ferrari, Silvia; Amin, M Shahrooz; Modrak, Mark; Brantley, Halley; Thoma, Eben D

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the need for surveillance of fugitive methane emissions over broad geographical regions. Most existing techniques suffer from being either extensive (but qualitative) or quantitative (but intensive with poor scalability). A total of two novel advancements are made here. First, a recursive Bayesian method is presented for probabilistically characterizing fugitive point-sources from mobile sensor data. This approach is made possible by a new cross-plume integrated dispersion formulation that overcomes much of the need for time-averaging concentration data. The method is tested here against a limited data set of controlled methane release and shown to perform well. We then present an information-theoretic approach to plan the paths of the sensor-equipped vehicle, where the path is chosen so as to maximize expected reduction in integrated target source rate uncertainty in the region, subject to given starting and ending positions and prevailing meteorological conditions. The information-driven sensor path planning algorithm is tested and shown to provide robust results across a wide range of conditions. An overall system concept is presented for optionally piggybacking of these techniques onto normal industry maintenance operations using sensor-equipped work trucks. PMID:26807713

  11. Application of syndromic surveillance on routinely collected cattle reproduction and milk production data for the early detection of outbreaks of Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Anouk; Brouwer-Middelesch, Henriëtte; Marceau, Alexis; Madouasse, Aurélien; Van der Stede, Yves; Fourichon, Christine; Welby, Sarah; Wever, Paul; van Schaik, Gerdien

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of routinely collected reproductive and milk production data for the early detection of emerging vector-borne diseases in cattle in the Netherlands and the Flanders region of Belgium (i.e., the northern part of Belgium). Prospective space-time cluster analyses on residuals from a model on milk production were carried out to detect clusters of reduced milk yield. A CUSUM algorithm was used to detect temporal aberrations in model residuals of reproductive performance models on two indicators of gestation length. The Bluetongue serotype-8 (BTV-8) epidemics of 2006 and 2007 and the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) epidemic of 2011 were used as case studies to evaluate the sensitivity and timeliness of these methods. The methods investigated in this study did not result in a more timely detection of BTV-8 and SBV in the Netherlands and BTV-8 in Belgium given the surveillance systems in place when these viruses emerged. This could be due to (i) the large geographical units used in the analyses (country, region and province level), and (ii) the high level of sensitivity of the surveillance systems in place when these viruses emerged. Nevertheless, it might be worthwhile to use a syndromic surveillance system based on non-specific animal health data in real-time alongside regular surveillance, to increase the sense of urgency and to provide valuable quantitative information for decision makers in the initial phase of an emerging disease outbreak. PMID:26732291

  12. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Samples are routinely collected and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, ground water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project.

  13. Embedding 'speaking up' into systems for safe healthcare product development and marketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Hugman, Bruce; Tobin, Mary; Whalen, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    Robust, active cooperation, and effective, open communication between all stakeholders is essential for ensuring regulatory compliance and healthcare product safety; avoiding the necessity for whistle-blowing; and, most essentially, meeting the transparency requirements of public trust.The focus here is on what can be done within a healthcare product organization (HPO) to achieve actionable, sustainable policies and practices such as leadership, management, and supervision role-modelling of best practice; ongoing process review and improvements in every department; protection of those who report concerns through robust policies endorsed at Board level throughout an organization to eliminate the fear of retaliation; training in open, non-defensive team-working principles; and mediation structure and process for resolution of differences of opinion or interpretation of contradictory and volatile data.Based on analyses of other safety systems, workplace silence and interpersonal breakdowns are warning signs of defective systems underlying poor compliance and compromising safety. Remedying the situation requires attention to the root causes underlying such symptoms of dysfunction, especially the human factor, i.e. those factors that influence human performance. It is essential that leadership and management listen to employees' concerns about systems and processes, assess them impartially and reward contributions that improve safety.Fundamentally, the safety, transparency, and trustworthiness of HPOs, both commercial and regulatory, can be judged by the extent of the freedom of their staff to 'speak up' when the time is right. This, in turn, consolidates the trust of external stakeholders in the safety of a system and its products. The promotion of 'speaking up' in an organization provides an important safeguard against the risk of poor compliance and the undermining of societal confidence in the safety of healthcare products. PMID:22339507

  14. Interactions between Natural Health Products and Oral Anticoagulants: Spontaneous Reports in the Italian Surveillance System of Natural Health Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Angelica; Gallo, Eugenia; Benemei, Silvia; Vietri, Michele; Lapi, Francesco; Volpi, Roberta; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Gori, Luigi; Mugelli, Alessandro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Vannacci, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The safety of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) use can be compromised by many popular herbal supplements taken by individuals. The literature reports that 30% of warfarin-treated patients self-medicates with herbs. Possible interactions represent an health risk. We aimed to identify all herbs-oral anticoagulants interactions collected in the Italian database of suspected adverse reactions to “natural health” products. Methods. The Italian database of spontaneous reports of suspected adverse reactions to natural products was analyzed to address herb-VKAs interactions. Results. From 2002 to 2009, we identified 12 reports with 7 cases of INR reduction in patients treated with warfarin (n = 3) and acenocoumarol (n = 4), and 5 cases of INR increase (all warfarin associated). It was reported 8 different herbal products as possibly interacting. Discussion. Our study confirms the risk of interactions, highlighting the difficulty to characterize them and their mechanisms and, finally, prevent their onset. The reported data underline the urgent need of healthcare providers being aware of the possible interaction between natural products and VKA, also because of the critical clinical conditions affecting patients. This is the first step to have the best approach to understand possible INR alterations linked to herb-VKA interaction and to rightly educate patients in treatment with VKA. PMID:21274401

  15. Poliomyelitis surveillance.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    Attention to the 4 poliomyelitis surveillance indicators approved by the International Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication (ICCPE) in 1994, has deteriorated since the Americas were declared free from wild poliovirus. The indicators are designed to measure the performance of health services and the sensitivity of the surveillance system to detect wild poliovirus circulating in the community. Sensitivity is the most important characteristic of the poliomyelitis surveillance system and it is measured by the rate of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) per 100,000 under age 15 years. As of March 21, 1998, the AFP rate reached its lowest level yet in the Americas, with only Bolivia, Chile, and Honduras presenting an acceptable rate (the analysis does not include the US and Canada). The other countries in the Caribbean region and Latin America had rates under 1 AFP case per 100,000 children under age 15. It follows that only 6% of children under age 15 in the region are currently protected by a sensitive AFP surveillance system. Poliovirus may therefore be circulating silently in the region. Renewed attention must be given to the AFP surveillance indicators. PMID:12321498

  16. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  17. 48 CFR 42.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surveillance requirements... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Production Surveillance and Reporting 42.1104 Surveillance requirements. (a) The contract administration office determines the extent...

  18. 48 CFR 42.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surveillance requirements... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Production Surveillance and Reporting 42.1104 Surveillance requirements. (a) The contract administration office determines the extent...

  19. 48 CFR 42.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surveillance requirements... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Production Surveillance and Reporting 42.1104 Surveillance requirements. (a) The contract administration office determines the extent...

  20. 48 CFR 42.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Surveillance requirements... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Production Surveillance and Reporting 42.1104 Surveillance requirements. (a) The contract administration office determines the extent...

  1. 48 CFR 42.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surveillance requirements... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Production Surveillance and Reporting 42.1104 Surveillance requirements. (a) The contract administration office determines the extent...

  2. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports. 26.50 Section 26.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL...

  3. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports. 26.50 Section 26.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL...

  4. 21 CFR 26.50 - Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alert system and exchange of postmarket vigilance reports. 26.50 Section 26.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL...

  5. 78 FR 20926 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Providing Postmarket Periodic Safety Reports in the International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Providing Postmarket Periodic Safety Reports in the ICH E2C(R2) Format (Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report).'' This guidance is intended to inform applicants of the conditions under which FDA will exercise its waiver authority to permit applicants to submit an International......

  6. [Sample size calculation in clinical post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingkun; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, as the Chinese government and people pay more attention on the post-marketing research of Chinese Medicine, part of traditional Chinese medicine breed has or is about to begin after the listing of post-marketing evaluation study. In the post-marketing evaluation design, sample size calculation plays a decisive role. It not only ensures the accuracy and reliability of post-marketing evaluation. but also assures that the intended trials will have a desired power for correctly detecting a clinically meaningful difference of different medicine under study if such a difference truly exists. Up to now, there is no systemic method of sample size calculation in view of the traditional Chinese medicine. In this paper, according to the basic method of sample size calculation and the characteristic of the traditional Chinese medicine clinical evaluation, the sample size calculation methods of the Chinese medicine efficacy and safety are discussed respectively. We hope the paper would be beneficial to medical researchers, and pharmaceutical scientists who are engaged in the areas of Chinese medicine research. PMID:22292397

  7. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  8. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  9. [Influenza surveillance].

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Karolina; Hallmann-Szelińska, Ewelina; Kondratiuk, Katarzyna; Brydak, Lidia B

    2016-01-01

    Influenza surveillance was established in 1947. From this moment WHO (World Health Organization) has been coordinating international cooperation, with a goal of monitoring influenza virus activity, effective diagnostic of the circulating viruses and informing society about epidemics or pandemics, as well as about emergence of new subtypes of influenza virus type A. Influenza surveillance is an important task, because it enables people to prepare themselves for battle with the virus that is constantly mutating, what leads to circulation of new and often more virulent strains of influenza in human population. As vaccination is the most effective method of fighting the virus, one of the major tasks of GISRS is developing an optimal antigenic composition of the vaccine for the current epidemic season. European Influenza Surveillance Network (EISN) has also developed over the years. EISN is running integrated epidemiological and virological influenza surveillance, to provide appropriate data to public health experts in member countries, to enable them undertaking relevant activities based on the current information about influenza activity. In close cooperation with GISRS and EISN are National Influenza Centres--national institutions designated by the Ministry of Health in each country. PMID:27117107

  10. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  11. [Active surveillance of adverse drug reaction in the era of big data: challenge and opportunity for control selection].

    PubMed

    Wang, S F; Zhan, S Y

    2016-07-01

    Electronic healthcare databases have become an important source for active surveillance of drug safety in the era of big data. The traditional epidemiology research designs are needed to confirm the association between drug use and adverse events based on these datasets, and the selection of the comparative control is essential to each design. This article aims to explain the principle and application of each type of control selection, introduce the methods and parameters for method comparison, and describe the latest achievements in the batch processing of control selection, which would provide important methodological reference for the use of electronic healthcare databases to conduct post-marketing drug safety surveillance in China. PMID:27453095

  12. Time Series Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Capsule Endoscopy between the Premarketing and Postmarketing Settings: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Kazuo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical studies for assessing the effectiveness and safety in a premarketing setting are conducted under time and cost constraints. In recent years, postmarketing data analysis has been given more attention. However, to our knowledge, no studies have compared the effectiveness and the safety between the pre- and postmarketing settings. In this study, we aimed to investigate the importance of the postmarketing data analysis using clinical data. Methods and Findings Studies on capsule endoscopy with rich clinical data in both pre- and postmarketing settings were selected for the analysis. For effectiveness, clinical studies published before October 10, 2015 comparing capsule endoscopy and conventional flexible endoscopy measuring the detection ratio of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were selected (premarketing: 4 studies and postmarketing: 8 studies) from PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Library, EMBASE and Web of Science. Among the 12 studies, 5 were blinded and 7 were non-blinded. A time series meta-analysis was conducted. Effectiveness (odds ratio) decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 5.19 [95% confidence interval: 3.07–8.76] vs. postmarketing: 1.48 [0.81–2.69]). The change in odds ratio was caused by the increase in the detection ratio with flexible endoscopy as the control group. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy did not change between pre- and postmarketing settings. Heterogeneity (I2) increased in the postmarketing setting because of one study. For safety, in terms of endoscope retention in the body, data from the approval summary and adverse event reports were analyzed. The incidence of retention decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 0.75% vs postmarketing: 0.095%). The introduction of the new patency capsule for checking the patency of the digestive tract might contribute to the decrease. Conclusions Effectiveness and safety could change in the postmarketing setting. Therefore, time series meta-analyses could be

  13. [Opportunity and challenge of post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Xi; Song, Hai-Bo; Ren, Jing-Tian; Yang, Le; Guo, Xiao-Xin; Pang, Yu

    2014-09-01

    Post-marketing evaluation is a process which evaluate the risks and benefits of drug clinical application comprehensively and systematically, scientific and systematic results of post-marketing evaluation not only can provide data support for clinical application of traditional Chinese medicine, but also can be a reliable basis for the supervision department to develop risk control measures. With the increasing demands for treatment and prevention of disease, traditional Chinese medicine has been widely used, and security issues are also exposed. How to find risk signal of traditional Chinese medicine in the early stages, carry out targeted evaluation work and control risk timely have become challenges in the development of traditional Chinese medicine industry. PMID:25532372

  14. Safety Overview of Postmarketing and Clinical Experience of Sodium Oxybate (Xyrem): Abuse, Misuse, Dependence, and Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. Grace; Swick, Todd J.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Thorpy, Michael J.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study reviewed the cumulative postmarketing and clinical safety experience with sodium oxybate (Xyrem®), a treatment approved for cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy. Study objectives were to investigate the occurrence of abuse/misuse of sodium oxybate since first market introduction in 2002, classify cases using DSM-IV criteria for substance abuse and dependence, and describe specific characteristics of these cases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed postmarketing spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from 15 countries for all cases containing reporting terminology related to abuse/misuse to determine its occurrence. All death cases independent of causality were reviewed to identify associated risk factors. Results: Approximately 26,000 patients worldwide received sodium oxybate from first market introduction in 2002 through March 2008. Of those 26,000 patients, 0.2% reported ≥ 1 of the events studied. These included 10 cases (0.039%) meeting DSM-IV abuse criteria, 4 cases (0.016%) meeting DSM-IV dependence criteria, 8 cases (0.031%, including 3 of the previous 4) with withdrawal symptoms reported after discontinuation of sodium oxybate, 2 confirmed cases (0.008%) of sodium oxybate–facilitated sexual assault, 8 cases (0.031%) of overdose with suicidal intent, 21 deaths (0.08%) in patients receiving sodium oxybate treatment with 1 death known to be related to sodium oxybate, and 3 cases (0.01%) of traffic accidents involving drivers taking sodium oxybate. During this period, approximately 600,000 bottles of sodium oxybate were distributed, and 5 incidents (0.0009%) of diversion were reported. Conclusion: Cumulative postmarketing and clinical experience indicates a very low risk of abuse/misuse of sodium oxybate. Citation: Wang YG; Swick TJ; Carter LP; Thorpy MJ; Benowitz NL. Safety overview of postmarketing and clinical experience of sodium oxybate (xyrem): abuse, misuse, dependence, and diversion. J Clin Sleep

  15. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling for Amphetamine Salts Drug Products in Generic Drug Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Babiskin, Andrew H; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2015-09-01

    Amphetamine (AMP) salts-based extended-release (ER) drug products are widely used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We developed physiologically based absorption models for mixed AMP salts ER capsules and dextroamphetamine sulfate ER capsules to address specific questions raised during generic drug postmarketing surveillance and bioequivalence (BE) guidance development. The models were verified against several data sets. Virtual BE simulations were conducted to assess BE in various populations other than normal healthy subjects where BE studies are generally conducted for approval. The models were also used to predict pharmacokinetics (PK) for hypothetical formulations having dissolution profiles falling within specification after the development of in vitro-in vivo relation. Finally, we demonstrated how to use the models to test sensitivity of PK metrics to the changes in formulation variables. PMID:25973928

  16. Information surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiders, Barbara; McQuerry, Dennis; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Rybka, Anthony

    2002-07-01

    Biological weapons are within reach of individuals, small groups, terrorist organizations, as well as nations. With pervasive integration of civilian and military populations worldwide, the ill winds of biological warfare stand to affect military troops and civilians alike. A variety of technologies are emerging - such as pathogen detection devices, streaming internet characterization tools, information exploitation techniques, automated feature extraction, and ubiquitous wireless communication - that can help. These technologies, if taken together within an integrated analytical framework, could make possible the monitoring of diverse parameters that may indicate a change in the state of health of a given population - either the emergence of a naturally occurring disease or the outbreak of a disease as a result of hostile intent. This presentation will discuss the application of new information surveillance tools and technologies as they apply to health and disease monitoring, particularly within the context of potential terrorist or hostile nation use of biological warfare. Although discussed within the specific context of health surveillance, the tools and processes described here are generally applicable within other domains of subject matter expertise.

  17. Information surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, Barbara AB; McQuerry, Dennis L.; Ferryman, Thomas A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Rybka, Anthony J.

    2002-07-15

    Biological weapons are within reach of individuals, small groups, terrorist organizations, as well as nations. With pervasive integration of civilian and military populations worldwide, the ill winds of biological warfare stand to affect military troops and civilians alike. A variety of technologies are emerging - such as pathogen detection devices, streaming internet characterization tools, information exploitation techniques, automated feature extraction, and ubiquitous wireless communication - that can help. These technologies, if taken together within an integrated analytical framework, could make possible the monitoring of diverse parameters that may indicate a change in the state of health of a given population - either the emergence of a naturally occurring disease or the outbreak of a disease as a result of hostile intent. This presentation will discuss the application of new information surveillance tools and technologies as they apply to health and disease monitoring, particularly within the context of potential terrorist or hostile nation use of biological warfare. Although discussed within the specific context of health surveillance, the tools and processes described here are generally applicable within other domains of subject matter expertise.

  18. Public involvement in environmental surveillance at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W. Jr.; Patton, G.W.; Woodruff, R.K.; Poston, T.M.

    1994-08-01

    Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site began during the mid-1940s following the construction and start-up of the nation`s first plutonium production reactor. Over the past approximately 45 years, surveillance operations on and off the Site have continued, with virtually all sampling being conducted by Hanford Site workers. Recently, the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office directed that public involvement in Hanford environmental surveillance operations be initiated. Accordingly, three special radiological air monitoring stations were constructed offsite, near hanford`s perimeter. Each station is managed and operated by two local school teaches. These three stations are the beginning of a community-operated environmental surveillance program that will ultimately involve the public in most surveillance operations around the Site. The program was designed to stimulate interest in Hanford environmental surveillance operations, and to help the public better understand surveillance results. The program has also been used to enhance educational opportunities at local schools.

  19. 48 CFR 242.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... production surveillance is required, shall— (A) Conduct a periodic risk assessment of the contractor to... risk assessment shall consider information provided by the contractor and the contracting officer; (B) Develop a production surveillance plan based on the risk level determined during a risk assessment;...

  20. 48 CFR 242.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... production surveillance is required, shall— (A) Conduct a periodic risk assessment of the contractor to... risk assessment shall consider information provided by the contractor and the contracting officer; (B) Develop a production surveillance plan based on the risk level determined during a risk assessment;...

  1. 48 CFR 242.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... production surveillance is required, shall— (A) Conduct a periodic risk assessment of the contractor to... risk assessment shall consider information provided by the contractor and the contracting officer; (B) Develop a production surveillance plan based on the risk level determined during a risk assessment;...

  2. 48 CFR 242.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... production surveillance is required, shall— (A) Conduct a periodic risk assessment of the contractor to... risk assessment shall consider information provided by the contractor and the contracting officer; (B) Develop a production surveillance plan based on the risk level determined during a risk assessment;...

  3. 48 CFR 242.1104 - Surveillance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... production surveillance is required, shall— (A) Conduct a periodic risk assessment of the contractor to... risk assessment shall consider information provided by the contractor and the contracting officer; (B) Develop a production surveillance plan based on the risk level determined during a risk assessment;...

  4. Concern, but not with surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ivinson, A J

    2000-01-01

    According to Brian Ward, vaccines are probably the most efficacious and cost-effective medical interventions ever invented. He notes that surveillance of vaccine-related adverse events is important, and resources should be made available for monitoring vaccine safety at a time of increasing vaccine activity. However, in an environment of limited resources, there is a dispute over the level of resources devoted to vaccine surveillance versus vaccine deployment. In an examination of the balance of risk versus benefit, several arguments are given. Nevertheless, no tangible evidence supports the claim that the increased use of new vaccines will be more trouble than it is worth. Ward offers a more worthy argument against the use of vaccines aimed at maintaining productivity rather than securing personal health and well-being. Overall, the author upholds the importance of good vaccine surveillance but opposes the notion of shifting resources from vaccine development to vaccine surveillance. PMID:10743292

  5. The surveillant assemblage.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, K D; Ericson, R V

    2000-12-01

    George Orwell's 'Big Brother' and Michel Foucault's 'panopticon' have dominated discussion of contemporary developments in surveillance. While such metaphors draw our attention to important attributes of surveillance, they also miss some recent dynamics in its operation. The work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari is used to analyse the convergence of once discrete surveillance systems. The resultant 'surveillant assemblage' operates by abstracting human bodies from their territorial settings, and separating them into a series of discrete flows. These flows are then reassembled in different locations as discrete and virtual 'data doubles'. The surveillant assemblage transforms the purposes of surveillance and the hierarchies of surveillance, as well as the institution of privacy. PMID:11140886

  6. Postmarketing safety surveillance for typhoid fever vaccines from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, July 1990 through June 2002.

    PubMed

    Begier, Elizabeth M; Burwen, Dale R; Haber, Penina; Ball, Robert

    2004-03-15

    Vaccines against Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi are used for prophylaxis of international travelers and have potential use as counterbioterrorism agents. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) cannot usually establish causal relationships between vaccines and reported adverse events without further research but has successfully detected unrecognized side effects of vaccine. We reviewed reports to VAERS for US-licensed typhoid fever vaccines for the period of July 1990 through June 2002. We received 321 reports for parenteral Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine and 345 reports for live, oral, attenuated Ty21a vaccine, with 7.5% and 5.5%, respectively, describing death, hospitalization, permanent disability, or life-threatening illness. Unexpected frequently reported symptoms included dizziness and pruritus for Vi vaccine and fatigue and myalgia for Ty21a vaccine. Gastroenteritis-like illness after receipt of Ty21a vaccine and abdominal pain after receipt of Vi vaccine, which are previously recognized events, occasionally required hospitalization. Nonfatal anaphylaxis was reported after both vaccines. VAERS reports do not indicate any unexpected serious side effects that compromise these vaccines' use for travelers' prophylaxis. PMID:14999618

  7. [Research about re-evaluation of screening of traditonal Chinese medicine symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of post-marketing Chinese medicine re-evaluation is to identify Chinese medicine clinical indications, while designing scientific and rational of Chinese medicine symptoms items are important to the result of symptoms re-evaluation. This study give screening of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang re-evaluation as example that reference to principle dyslipidemia clinical research, academic dissertations, Xuezhikang directions, clinical expert practice experience etc. while standardization those symptom names and screening 41 dyslipidemia common symptoms. Furthermore, this paper discuss about the accoerdance and announcements when screening symptoms item, so as to providing a research thread to manufacture PRO chart for post-marketing medicine re-evaluation. PMID:22292395

  8. Public participation in radiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hanf, R W; Schreckhise, R G; Patton, G W; Poston, T M; Jaquish, R E

    1997-10-01

    In 1989, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a program, for the U.S. Department of Energy, to involve local citizens in environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site. The Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program was patterned after similar community-involvement efforts at the Nevada Test Site and the Three Mile Island nuclear facility. Its purpose is to increase the flow of information to the public, thereby enhancing the public's awareness and understanding of surveillance activities. The program consists of two components: radiological air monitoring at nine offsite locations and agricultural product sampling at selected locations near the site. At each air-monitoring station, two local school teachers collect air particulate samples and operate equipment to monitor ambient radiation levels. Atmospheric tritium samples (as water vapor) are also collected at some locations. Four of the air-monitoring stations include large, colorful informational displays for public viewing. These displays provide details on station equipment, sample types, and sampling purposes. Instruments in the displays also monitor, record, and show real-time ambient radiation readings (measured with a pressurized ionization chamber) and meteorological conditions. Agricultural products, grown primarily by middle-school-aged students, are obtained from areas downwind of the site. Following analysis of these samples, environmental surveillance staff visit the schools to discuss the results with the students and their teachers. The data collected by these air and agricultural sampling efforts are summarized with other routinely collected sitewide surveillance data and reported annually in the Hanford Site environmental report. PMID:9314235

  9. Market surveillance on non-halal additives incorporated in surimi based products using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravindran, S.; Sahilah, A. M.; Aminah, A.

    2014-09-01

    Halal surveillance on halal ingredients incorporated in surimi based products were studied using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization on chip analysis. The primers used in this technique were targeted on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequence which able to differentiate 7 type (beef, chicken, duck, goat, buffalo, lamb and pork) of species on a single chip. 17 (n = 17*3) different brands of surimi-based product were purchased randomly from Selangor local market in January 2013. Of 17 brands, 3 (n = 3*3) brands were positive for chicken DNA, 1 (n = 1*3) brand was positive for goat DNA, and the remainder 13 brands (n = 13*3) have no DNA species detected. The sensitivity of PCR-southern hybridization primers to detect each meat species was 0.1 ng. In the present study, it is evidence that PCR-Southern Hybridization analysis offered a reliable result due to its highly specific and sensitive properties in detecting non-halal additive such as plasma protein incorporation in surimi-based product.

  10. Community pharmacist surveillance of hypertension in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Nicole W.; Lynd, Larry D.; Thomas, Jamie M.; Ferreira, Ema

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are associated with serious maternal and perinatal complications. For nonsevere hypertension, there is a lack of consensus regarding treatment during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Further, there is considerable variability in guidelines for antihypertensive drug choices. As part of a Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN)–funded project, we piloted a novel surveillance strategy in which community pharmacists recruited pregnant and breastfeeding women to monitor their blood pressure and medication use and to provide education on HDP. Methods: Participating pharmacists were required to complete a certified training program, identify and recruit patients who were pregnant or breastfeeding, obtain informed consent, administer a patient questionnaire and complete an initial case report form for enrolled patients. Study outcomes included the feasibility of community pharmacists to enroll patients and carry out study-related documentation and follow-up. The criteria for success in this pilot study included the ability of pharmacists to recruit 10 participants per pharmacy. Results: 178 community pharmacies across British Columbia agreed to participate in this feasibility study, of which 63 pharmacists completed the study training. Of these, only 21 pharmacists recruited at least 1 patient and 1 pharmacist met the success criteria. Overall, 51 patients were enrolled, 2 withdrew from the study and 7 patients were diagnosed with HDP. Antihypertensive medications used by patients included methyldopa and labetalol. Conclusions: While postmarketing surveillance is an important tool for the assessment of drug safety in the pregnant and breastfeeding patient population, the feasibility of community pharmacists taking on this role was not successfully demonstrated. PMID:25364340

  11. [Establish research model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-ke; Liu, Zhi; Lei, Xiang; Tian, Ran; Zheng, Rui; Li, Nan; Ren, Jing-tian; Du, Xiao-xi; Shang, Hong-cai

    2015-09-01

    The safety of Chinese patent medicine has become a focus of social. It is necessary to carry out work on post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. However, there have no criterions to guide the related research, it is urgent to set up a model and method to guide the practice for related research. According to a series of clinical research, we put forward some views, which contained clear and definite the objective and content of clinical safety evaluation, the work flow should be determined, make a list of items for safety evaluation project, and put forward the three level classification of risk control. We set up a model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. Based this model, the list of items can be used for ranking medicine risks, and then take steps for different risks, aims to lower the app:ds:risksrisk level. At last, the medicine can be managed by five steps in sequence. The five steps are, collect risk signal, risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management, and aftereffect assessment. We hope to provide new ideas for the future research. PMID:26983223

  12. Lack of pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between generic and branded amoxicillin formulations. A post-marketing clinical study on healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Del Tacca, Mario; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Di Paolo, Antonello; Virdis, Agostino; Massimetti, Gabriele; Gori, Giovanni; Versari, Daniele; Taddei, Stefano; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2009-01-01

    AIMS There are concerns about the quality of generic drugs in the postmarketing setting. The aim was to establish whether two generic formulations of amoxicillin, available on the Italian market, fulfil the criteria for clinical pharmacokinetic bioequivalence vs. the branded drug. METHODS Two generic amoxicillin products (generic A and B) were selected among four fast-release tablet formulations available on the Italian market. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers of either sex participated to a single-dose, randomized, three-treatment, crossover, single-blind bioequivalence study designed to compare generic A and B with branded amoxicillin. Plasma samples were collected at preset times for 24 h after dosing, and assayed for amoxicillin levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS Ninety percent confidence intervals of AUC ratios were 0.8238, 1.0502 (ratio 0.9302) and 0.8116, 1.1007 (ratio 0.9452) for generic A and B vs. branded amoxicillin, respectively. Ninety percent confidence intervals of Cmax ratios were 0.7921, 1.0134 (ratio 0.8960) and 0.8246, 1.1199 (ratio 0.9610) for generic A and B vs. branded amoxicillin, respectively. The mean pharmacokinetic profiles showed that the AUC value of branded amoxicillin was 8.5 and 5.4% greater than that estimated for generic A and B, respectively. Few adverse events were recorded; these were not serious and occurred without apparent relationship to any specific amoxicillin formulation. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that one of the two marketed amoxicillin generics analysed in the present study is not bioequivalent to the brand leader product for Cmax on the basis of single-dose pharmacokinetic assessment. PMID:19660001

  13. General Medical Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

  14. [Post-marketing reevaluation for potential quality risk and quality control in clinical application of traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-jiao; He, Li-yun; Liu, Bao-yan

    2015-06-01

    The effective quality control in clinical practices is an effective guarantee for the authenticity and scientificity of the findings. The post-marketing reevaluation for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) focuses on the efficacy, adverse reaction, combined medication and effective dose of drugs in the market by expanded clinical trials, and requires a larger sample size and a wider range of patients. Therefore, this increases the difficulty of quality control in clinical practices. With the experience in quality control in clinical practices for the post-marketing reevaluation for Kangbingdu oral for cold, researchers in this study reviewed the study purpose, project, scheme design and clinical practice process from an overall point of view, analyzed the study characteristics of the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs and the quality control risks, designed the quality control contents with quality impacting factors, defined key review contents and summarized the precautions in clinical practices, with the aim to improve the efficiency of quality control of clinical practices. This study can provide reference to clinical units and quality control-related personnel in the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs. PMID:26591543

  15. [Importance of Post-Marketing Studies in Gathering of Clinical Evidences for Proper Usage of Anti-Cancer Drugs, and the StudyRequirements for Their Credibility].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceutical companies recognize the importance of post-marketing studies because they are crucial in the generation of clinical evidences for the usage of new medicines. To generate clinical evidences, quality of post-marketing studies should be well controlled from view point of "ethical conduction" and "reliability of results". In addition, control of conflict of interest (COI) between researchers and industries is also indispensable and is requested for the transparency of the studies. Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association(JPMA)stresses its commitment to the progressof transparency in post-marketing studies. PMID:27220799

  16. Residues of veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostats in eggs--causes, control and results of surveillance program in Poland.

    PubMed

    Piatkowska, M; Jedziniak, P; Zmudzki, J

    2012-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products in food producing animals for a variety of purposes causes that their residues may be presented in edible tissues. As a result, in concern of public health, European Union Countries establish each year monitoring plans and they control the levels of harmful substances in food of animal origin. This paper presents survey of residues of veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostats in eggs for Poland and European Union in years 2007-2010. Despite the decrease in reported non-compliant results for coccidiostats, the numbers were still higher than those for veterinary medicines. The most often determined coccidiostats were: nicarbazin, dinitrocarbanilide, salinomycin and lasalocid, and the most often reported non-compliant results for veterinary medicines were: antimicrobials, enrofloxacin and doxycycline. PMID:23390776

  17. USE OF MAILBOX APPROACH, VIDEO SURVEILLANCE, AND SHORT-NOTICE RANDOM INSPECTIONS TO ENHANCE DETECTION OF UNDECLARED LEU PRODUCTION AT GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOYER, B.D.; GORDON, D.M.; JO, J.

    2006-07-16

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability. ''Mailbox'' declarations have been used in the last two decades to verify receipts, production, and shipments at some bulk-handling facilities (e.g., fuel-fabrication plants). The operator declares the status of his plant to the IAEA on a daily basis using a secure ''Mailbox'' system such as a secure tamper-resistant computer. The operator agrees to hold receipts and shipments for a specified period of time, along with a specified number of annual inspections, to enable inspector access to a statistically large enough population of UF{sub 6} cylinders and fuel assemblies to achieve the desired detection probability. The inspectors can access the ''Mailbox'' during randomly timed inspections and then verify the operator's declarations for that day. Previously, this type of inspection regime was considered mainly for verifying the material balance at fuel-fabrication, enrichment, and conversion plants. Brookhaven National Laboratory has expanded the ''Mailbox'' concept with short-notice random inspections (SNRIs), coupled with enhanced video surveillance, to include declaration and verification of UF{sub 6} cylinder operational data to detect activities associated with undeclared LEU production at GCEPs. Since the ''Mailbox'' declarations would also include data relevant to material-balance verification, these randomized inspections would replace the scheduled monthly interim inspections for material-balance purposes; in addition, the inspectors could simultaneously perform the required number of Limited-Frequency Unannounced Access (LFUA) inspections used for HEU detection. This approach would provide improved detection capabilities for a wider range of diversion activities with not much more inspection effort than at present.

  18. Regulatory Oversight of Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minjoung; Han, Euiri; Lee, Sunmi; Kim, Taegyun; Shin, Won

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety regulates gene therapy and cell therapy products as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. As with other medicinal products, gene therapy and cell therapy products are subject to approval for use in clinical trials and for a subsequent marketing authorization and to post-market surveillance. Research and development of gene therapy and cell therapy products have been progressing rapidly in Korea with extensive investment, offering great potential for the treatment of various serious diseases. To facilitate development of safe and effective products and provide more opportunities to patients suffering from severe diseases, several regulatory programs, such as the use of investigational products for emergency situations, fast-track approval, prereview of application packages, and intensive regulatory consultation, can be applied to these products. The regulatory approach for these innovative products is case by case and founded on science-based review that is flexible and balances the risks and benefits. PMID:26374218

  19. The complications of controlling agency time discretion: FDA review deadlines and postmarket drug safety.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Jacqueline; Moffitt, Susan; Nall, Clayton

    2012-01-01

    Public agencies have discretion on the time domain, and politicians deploy numerous policy instruments to constrain it. Yet little is known about how administrative procedures that affect timing also affect the quality of agency decisions. We examine whether administrative deadlines shape decision timing and the observed quality of decisions. Using a unique and rich dataset of FDA drug approvals that allows us to examine decision timing and quality, we find that this administrative tool induces a piling of decisions before deadlines, and that these “just-before-deadline” approvals are linked with higher rates of postmarket safety problems (market withdrawals, severe safety warnings, safety alerts). Examination of data from FDA advisory committees suggests that the deadlines may impede quality by impairing late-stage deliberation and agency risk communication. Our results both support and challenge reigning theories about administrative procedures, suggesting they embody expected control-expertise trade-offs, but may also create unanticipated constituency losses. PMID:22400144

  20. The future of population-based postmarket drug risk assessment: a regulator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hammad, T A; Neyarapally, G A; Iyasu, S; Staffa, J A; Dal Pan, G

    2013-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration emphasizes the role of regulatory science in the fulfillment of its mission to promote and protect public health and foster innovation. With respect to the evaluation of drug effects in the real world, regulatory science plays an important role in drug risk assessment and management. This article discusses opportunities and challenges with population-based drug risk assessment as well as related regulatory science knowledge gaps in the following areas: (i) population-based data sources and methods to evaluate drug safety issues; (ii) evidence-based thresholds to account for uncertainty in postmarket data; (iii) approaches to optimize the integration and interpretation of evidence from different sources; and (iv) approaches to evaluate the real-world impact of regulatory decisions. Regulators should continue the ongoing dialogue with multiple stakeholders to strengthen regulatory safety science and address these and other critical knowledge gaps. PMID:23739537

  1. Technical success from endovascular aneurysm repair in the post-marketing era: a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Naslund, Thomas C; Becker, Stacey Y

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of post-marketing success with the Ancure Endovascular Graft (AEG) was accomplished by review of a multicenter, prospective trial involving 46 centers and 163 patients. A second cohort of patients (n = 350) treated with the AEG under a controlled-use interval prior to the prospective trial was simultaneously evaluated. Technical success in both groups of patients (96.9% and 97.4%, respectively) was similar to what was reported in pre-market clinical trials. Operative implantation complications unique to the AEG included graft limb stenosis/occlusion in 35.6 and 31.4%, contralateral pull wire being caught on hooks in 33.7 and 28%, failure to seal (type I endoleak) in 17.2 and 18.3%, jacket guard being stuck in 12.9 and 11%, contralateral wire being stuck in 6.8 and 7.1%, high jacket retraction force in 16 and 8.5%, and inability to retract jacket in 1.8 and 0.5% of patients involved in the multicenter trial and controlled-use interval, respectively. One of four patients undergoing conversion in the prospective trial had graft misdeployment as a mode of failure. Three were converted for access failure. The 30-day mortality rate in the prospective trial was 3.7%. Interventions to resolve implantation-related events included stenting, guide catheter manipulations, wire exchanges, and delivery catheter disassembly. These interventions were successful in virtually every case. Open surgical procedures were not needed to correct these operative problems. Results from this study demonstrate excellent technical success with the AEG in the post-market era. Interventions to resolve implantation complications, when utilized, are highly successful in facilitating AEG implantation and providing technical success. PMID:12522699

  2. Analyzing search behavior of healthcare professionals for drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Odgers, David J; Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Stiglic, Gregor; Shah, Nigam H

    2015-01-01

    Post-market drug safety surveillance is hugely important and is a significant challenge despite the existence of adverse event (AE) reporting systems. Here we describe a preliminary analysis of search logs from healthcare professionals as a source for detecting adverse drug events. We annotate search log query terms with biomedical terminologies for drugs and events, and then perform a statistical analysis to identify associations among drugs and events within search sessions. We evaluate our approach using two different types of reference standards consisting of known adverse drug events (ADEs) and negative controls. Our approach achieves a discrimination accuracy of 0.85 in terms of the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) for the reference set of well-established ADEs and an AUC of 0.68 for the reference set of recently labeled ADEs. We also find that the majority of associations in the reference sets have support in the search log data. Despite these promising results additional research is required to better understand users' search behavior, biasing factors, and the overall utility of analyzing healthcare professional search logs for drug safety surveillance. PMID:25592591

  3. Large-scale combining signals from both biomedical literature and the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to improve post-marketing drug safety signal detection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Independent data sources can be used to augment post-marketing drug safety signal detection. The vast amount of publicly available biomedical literature contains rich side effect information for drugs at all clinical stages. In this study, we present a large-scale signal boosting approach that combines over 4 million records in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and over 21 million biomedical articles. Results The datasets are comprised of 4,285,097 records from FAERS and 21,354,075 MEDLINE articles. We first extracted all drug-side effect (SE) pairs from FAERS. Our study implemented a total of seven signal ranking algorithms. We then compared these different ranking algorithms before and after they were boosted with signals from MEDLINE sentences or abstracts. Finally, we manually curated all drug-cardiovascular (CV) pairs that appeared in both data sources and investigated whether our approach can detect many true signals that have not been included in FDA drug labels. We extracted a total of 2,787,797 drug-SE pairs from FAERS with a low initial precision of 0.025. The ranking algorithm combined signals from both FAERS and MEDLINE, significantly improving the precision from 0.025 to 0.371 for top-ranked pairs, representing a 13.8 fold elevation in precision. We showed by manual curation that drug-SE pairs that appeared in both data sources were highly enriched with true signals, many of which have not yet been included in FDA drug labels. Conclusions We have developed an efficient and effective drug safety signal ranking and strengthening approach We demonstrate that large-scale combining information from FAERS and biomedical literature can significantly contribute to drug safety surveillance. PMID:24428898

  4. Respiratory health surveillance in a toluene di-isocyanate production unit, 1967-97: clinical observations and lung function analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ott, M; Klees, J.; Poche, S.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To characterise irritant and allergic airway responses and assess changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) relative to exposure to toluene di-isocyanate (TDI).
METHODS—Employees (n=313) ever assigned to a TDI production unit for ⩾3 months (1967-92) were identified from personnel records along with 158 frequency matched referents without known exposure to TDI. Reports made during visits to the occupational clinic of incidents related to exposure to TDI and annual periodic examination results (questionnaire, physical findings, and spirometry) were abstracted and assessed relative to industrial hygiene estimates of exposure to TDI.
RESULTS—Mean 8 hour time weighted average estimates of TDI concentrations ranged from 9.9 ppb in jobs with potentially high exposure during the early years of plant operations to 0.5 ppb in jobs with potentially low exposure in more recent years. The corresponding rates of visits to the clinic due to incidents of exposure to TDI (including both irritant and allergic airway responses) declined from 20.5 to 1.0 visits per 100 years of employment at the unit. The annual incidence of asthma induced by TDI declined from 1.8% before 1980 to 0.7% afterwards. Neither cross sectional nor longitudinal analyses of FVC and FEV1 showed significant dose-response findings relative to exposure to TDI across the total exposed population. Among cases of occupational asthma there was an apparent initial decline in FEV1 within 2 years of first reporting symptoms, but not an accelerated rate of decline in follow up tests from 4-30 years after induction of asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—Occurrences of both asthma induced by TDI and irritant airway responses due to exposure to TDI were found in this cohort, but there was no relation between cumulative exposure to TDI and irreversible airflow obstruction as assessed by spirometry.


Keywords: toluene di-isocyanate; lung function

  5. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  6. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  7. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  8. Food and farm products surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the radiological analyses performed on food and farm samples collected during 1994. The food and farm sampling design addresses the potential influence of Hanford Site releases. Details of the sampling design and radionuclides analyzed are included in this section.

  9. Mercury Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  10. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.