Science.gov

Sample records for production chemical damage

  1. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALS USED FOR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION FOR PRODUCTION OF CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE AND SPERM-HEAD ABNORMALITIES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical oxidants are commonly added during water treatment for disinfection purposes. These chemicals have not been tested previously for their ability to induce genetic damage in vivo. Chlorine (hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid), monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, sodium chlor...

  2. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  3. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  4. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  5. [Chemicals as fire damaging factor].

    PubMed

    Basharin, V A; Grebeniuk, A N; Markizova, N F; Preobrazhenskaia, T N; Sarmanaev, S Kh; Tolkach, P G

    2015-01-01

    The article provides an overview of published scientific data about toxic chemical compounds formed during thermal degradation of various materials. In case of fire the complex of physical and chemical factors affect the human, along with injuries, thermal burns of the skin and respiratory tract there is a lack of oxygen in the inspired air and the impact of thermal degradation products. The greatest number of deaths in.a fire due to the inhalation by the victims smoke and toxic gases. The impact of the combination of toxic substances leads to the development of various forms of toxic process. The main causes of poisoning at the fires due to the effects of toxic substances and substances which can cause structural and functional disorders of the respiratory organ. Intoxication manifestations by some of them appear already in the fire zone, in other cases, in cases of poisoning by the compounds of the slow motion, there is the latent period of of intoxication. Knowledge of the spectrum of toxic products thermal destruction on the human during the fire, it is necessary to develop approaches to improve medical care and creation of tools of medical protection. PMID:25916033

  6. Oxidative damage in chemical teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wells, P G; Kim, P M; Laposa, R R; Nicol, C J; Parman, T; Winn, L M

    1997-12-12

    The teratogenicity of many xenobiotics is thought to depend at least in part upon their bioactivation by embryonic cytochromes P450, prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and lipoxygenases (LPOs) to electrophilic and/or free radical reactive intermediates that covalently bind to or oxidize cellular macromolecules such as DNA, protein and lipid, resulting in in utero death or teratogenesis. Using as models the tobacco carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin, structurally related anticonvulsants (e.g. mephenytoin, nirvanol, trimethadione, dimethadione) and the sedative drug thalidomide, we have examined the potential teratologic relevance of free radical-initiated, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative molecular target damage, genotoxicity (micronucleus formation) and DNA repair in mouse and rabbit models in vivo and in embryo culture, and in vitro using purified enzymes or cultured rat skin fibroblasts. These teratogens were bioactivated by PHS and LPOs to free radical reactive intermediary metabolites, characterized by electron spin resonance spectrometry, that initiated ROS formation, including hydroxyl radicals, which were characterized by salicylate hydroxylation. ROS-initiated oxidation of DNA (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine formation), protein (carbonyl formation), glutathione (GSH) and lipid (peroxidation), and embryotoxicity were shown for phenytoin, its major hydroxylated metabolite 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin [HPPH], thalidomide, B[a]P and NNK in vivo and/or in embryo culture, the latter indicating a teratologically critical role for embryonic, as distinct from maternal, processes. DNA oxidation and teratogenicity of phenytoin and thalidomide were reduced by PHS inhibitors. Oxidative macromolecular lesions and teratogenicity also were reduced by the free radical trapping agent phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), and the antioxidants caffeic acid and vitamin E. In embryo

  7. Chemicals and Allied Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, R. F.; Hovious, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from chemical industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) wastewater treatment by-product type; (2) biological, and physical/chemical treatments; and (3) source treatment. A list of 80 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    PubMed

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  9. Cyanobacterial chemical production.

    PubMed

    Case, Anna E; Atsumi, Shota

    2016-08-10

    The increase in global temperatures caused by rising CO2 levels necessitates the development of alternative sources of fuel and chemicals. One appealing alternative that has been receiving increased attention in recent years is the photosynthetic conversion of atmospheric CO2 to biofuels and chemical products using genetically engineered cyanobacteria. This can help to not only provide an alternate "greener" source for some of the most popular petroleum based products but it can also help to reduce atmospheric CO2. Utilizing cyanobacteria rather than plants allows for reduced land requirements and reduces competition with food crops. This review discusses advancements in the field since 2012 with a particular emphasis on production of hydrocarbons. PMID:27238233

  10. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Ramli, Siti Fatihah; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert

    2016-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2015 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management, physicochemical treatment, aerobic granular, aerobic waste treatment, anaerobic granular, anaerobic waste treatment, chemical waste, chemical wastewater, fertilizer waste, fertilizer wastewater, pesticide wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, ozonation. cosmetics waste, groundwater remediation, nutrient removal, nitrification denitrification, membrane biological reactor, and pesticide waste. PMID:27620094

  11. Inhibition of transcription by oxidative DNA damage products

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, S.; Reines, D.; Doetsch, P.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Thymine glycol is a major oxidative DNA base damage product that can be produced spontaneously in normal cells or by certain chemicals and ionizing radiation. This lesion as well as other oxidatively damaged bases are recognized and removed in eukaryotic cells by the DNA repair enzyme redoxyendonuclease which the authors have identified in a variety of cell types. Transcriptional regulation is a key element in the control of gene expression. Deficiencies in the various steps of transcription of an essential gene may have catastrophic effects for a cell. In terminally differentiated cells, the removal of RNA-polymerase blocking lesions could be viewed as a critical function for DNA repair systems in such cells. Very little information exists on the effects of oxidative base damage products on the process of transcription. The authors show here that thymine glycol containing DNA templates can inhibit transcriptional elongation when these lesions are chemically introduced into a DNA template. A DNA segment containing a region of the human H3.3 histone gene was utilized to determine the effects of oxidative DNA base damage on transcription by pure E. coli core RNA polymerase and rat liver RNA polymerase II. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic RNA polymerases are blocked by the presence of thymine glycols appearing in certain clusters of thymines in the oxidatively damaged transcription template. To obtain quantitative efficiencies of transcriptional arrest, the authors are engineering a DNA template containing a single defined oxidatively damaged residue. The authors' results support the idea that an important function of DNA repair systems in terminally differentiated cells is to ensure the efficient transcription of genes necessary for normal cellular function.

  12. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  13. Natural Products as Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products have evolved to encompass a broad spectrum of chemical and functional diversity. It is this diversity, along with their structural complexity, that enables nature’s small molecules to target a nearly limitless number of biological macromolecules and to often do so in a highly selective fashion. Because of these characteristics, natural products have seen great success as therapeutic agents. However, this vast pool of compounds holds much promise beyond the development of future drugs. These features also make them ideal tools for the study of biological systems. Recent examples of the use of natural products and their derivatives as chemical probes to explore biological phenomena and assemble biochemical pathways are presented here. PMID:20509672

  14. Health effects of chemical products.

    PubMed

    Steensberg, J

    1982-01-01

    An outline is given of the data on human health effects that are needed as a foundation for the administration of legislation on chemical substances and products. Danish data on mortality and morbidity from acute poisoning and some published clinical studies are presented. Serious problems may persist in subgroups of the population and the prevention of acute poisoning is still a basic aim of this legislation. Allergic reactions to chemicals are discussed. Not all sensitized individuals can be protected but steps should be taken to prevent contact with the sensitizing agents that are of the greatest public health importance. Chronic health effects following exposure to chemicals have influenced the recent strengthening of regulations but carcinogenic risks especially are extremely difficult for administrative and political systems to handle in an approximately rational way. While we are reducing the use of suspected carcinogenic chemicals our populations must, however, be given a greater appreciation of the cancer risk problem, particularly the fact that we cannot eliminate all cancer risks. Biological monitoring of human populations is a necessary supplement to the traditional registration of diseases as part of our health surveillance systems. Fortunately our societies have been able to pay increasing attention to the long-term public health consequences of exposures to chemical factors in our environment. PMID:6236969

  15. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  16. Computational prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Andreas; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Wichard, Jörg

    2006-10-01

    We report on the generation of computer-based models for the prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals as assessed in the in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) test. On the basis of publicly available CA-test results of more than 650 chemical substances, half of which are drug-like compounds, we generated two different computational models. The first model was realized using the (Q)SAR tool MCASE. Results obtained with this model indicate a limited performance (53%) for the assessment of a chromosome-damaging potential (sensitivity), whereas CA-test negative compounds were correctly predicted with a specificity of 75%. The low sensitivity of this model might be explained by the fact that the underlying 2D-structural descriptors only describe part of the molecular mechanism leading to the induction of chromosome aberrations, that is, direct drug-DNA interactions. The second model was constructed with a more sophisticated machine learning approach and generated a classification model based on 14 molecular descriptors, which were obtained after feature selection. The performance of this model was superior to the MCASE model, primarily because of an improved sensitivity, suggesting that the more complex molecular descriptors in combination with statistical learning approaches are better suited to model the complex nature of mechanisms leading to a positive effect in the CA-test. An analysis of misclassified pharmaceuticals by this model showed that a large part of the false-negative predicted compounds were uniquely positive in the CA-test but lacked a genotoxic potential in other mutagenicity tests of the regulatory testing battery, suggesting that biologically nonsignificant mechanisms could be responsible for the observed positive CA-test result. Since such mechanisms are not amenable to modeling approaches it is suggested that a positive prediction made by the model reflects a biologically significant genotoxic potential. An integration of the

  17. Biochemical pathology of lung damage produced by chemicals.

    PubMed

    Witschi, H; Côté, M G

    1976-01-01

    Damage to the lung may be caused by chemicals that gain access to the alveolar zone by inhalation or via the pulmonary circulation. Several agents toxic to the lung have recently been found to bind covalently to pulmonary macromolecules or to disrupt certain metabolic reactions. However, it has also been observed that extensive chemical lung injury is not necessarily preceded by a depression of pulmonary metabolic reactions. One possible explanation for this might be that biochemical changes due to cell death are often masked and/or compensated for by changes associated with lung tissue repair. Substantial cell proliferation as a response to toxic lung damage is a common phenomenon in lung pathology. This makes it necessary to develop models that permit analysis of the biochemical events triggering and accompanying cell growth in lung. We have recently examined some aspects of cell proliferation in mouse lung. Intraperitoneal injection of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) produces within 3-5 days extensive hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and general disorganization of the cellular components of the lung. Total lung weight and total DNA per lung almost double within this time and are accompanied by proportional increases in protein and lipids. RNA accumulates at a faster rate than DNA. The changes in lung composition are accompanied by dose-dependent increases in the in vivo incorporation of thymidine into DNA and of leucine into protein. The activities of several enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNA polymerase, uridine kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 5'-nucleotidase) increase substantially after BHT. Administration of BHT to mice seems to offer a convenient tool to study cell growth in the lungs of mice. PMID:1245236

  18. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  19. Chemical and Biological Consequences of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Sarah; Jarem, Daniel A.; Volle, Catherine B.; Yennie, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Of the four native nucleosides, 2′-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) is most easily oxidized. Two lesions derived from dGuo are 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (Fapy)·dGuo. Furthermore, while steady-state levels of 8-oxodGuo can be detected in genomic DNA, it is also known that 8-oxodGuo is more easily oxidized than dGuo. Thus, 8-oxodGuo is susceptible to further oxidation to form several hyperoxidized dGuo products. This review addresses the structural impact, the mutagenic and genotoxic potential, and biological implications of oxidatively damaged DNA, in particular 8-oxodGuo, Fapy·dGuo, and the hyperoxidized dGuo products. PMID:22239655

  20. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  1. Long-term skin damage due to chemical weapon exposure.

    PubMed

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Davoudi, Seyed M; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Panahi, Yunes; Dowlati, Yahya

    2011-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichlorodiethyl sulfide: SM), the protagonist of vesicant chemical weapons, was first used in July 1917. Despite prohibition of its production and use by international conventions, it has been used in several conflicts. More than 100,000 soldiers and civilians were injured due to SM exposure during Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). The acute skin lesions consist of erythema, edema, and blisters. Skin xerosis and pruritus, pigmentation disorders, scars, and cherry angiomas are among the most common long-term skin lesions after contact with SM. Although SM is a well-known carcinogenic substance, skin cancers are rarely reported. PMID:21047269

  2. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  3. Combining microbial production with chemical upgrading.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Konstantinos A; Toste, F Dean

    2016-04-01

    This review presents developments in the chemical processing of fermentation-derived compounds, focusing on ethanol, lactic acid, 2,3-butanediol and the acetone-butanol-ethanol mixture. We examine pathways from these products to biologically-derived drop-in fuels, polymers, as well as commodity chemicals, highlighting the role of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts in the development of green processes for the production of fuels and high-value-added compounds from biomass. PMID:26773758

  4. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-11-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  5. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter

    PubMed Central

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  6. Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Elizabeth; Qiao, Ming; Myren, Paul; Cortright, Randy D.; Kania, John

    2015-12-15

    Described are methods, reactor systems, and catalysts for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals in a batch and/or continuous process. The process generally involves the conversion of water insoluble components of biomass, such as hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, to volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates, such as alcohols, ketones, cyclic ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and mixtures thereof. In certain applications, the volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates can be collected and used as a final chemical product, or used in downstream processes to produce liquid fuels, chemicals and other products.

  7. Chemicals in Household Products: Problems with Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glegg, Gillian A.; Richards, Jonathan P.

    2007-12-01

    The success of a regulatory regime in decreasing point-source emissions of some harmful chemicals has highlighted the significance of other sources. A growing number of potentially harmful chemicals have been incorporated into an expanding range of domestic household products and are sold worldwide. Tighter regulation has been proposed, and the European Commission has introduced the Regulation on the Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals to address this concern. However, it is clear that in addition to the regulation, there is a potential to effect change through retailer and consumer attitudes and behaviours. Interviews were conducted with 7 key stakeholder groups to identify critical issues, which were then explored using a public survey questionnaire (1,008 respondents) and 8 subsequent focus groups. The findings demonstrated that the issue of chemicals in products is of concern to consumers for reasons of personal health rather than environmental protection. Key obstacles to the wider purchase of “green-alternative” products included perceived high cost and poor performance, lack of availability of products, and poor information concerning such products. Although improved regulation was seen as part of the solution, consumers must also play a role. It was clear from this study that consumers are not currently able to make informed choices about the chemicals they use but that they would be receptive to moving toward a more sustainable use of chemicals in the future if empowered to do so.

  8. Chemical production processes and systems

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  9. Chemical production processes and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Johnathan E; Muzatko, Danielle S; White, James F; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  10. Engineering microbes for efficient production of chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Gong, Wei; Dole, Sudhanshu; Grabar, Tammy; Collard, Andrew Christopher; Pero, Janice G; Yocum, R Rogers

    2015-04-28

    This present invention relates to production of chemicals from microorganisms that have been genetically engineered and metabolically evolved. Improvements in chemical production have been established, and particular mutations that lead to those improvements have been identified. Specific examples are given in the identification of mutations that occurred during the metabolic evolution of a bacterial strain genetically engineered to produce succinic acid. This present invention also provides a method for evaluating the industrial applicability of mutations that were selected during the metabolic evolution for increased succinic acid production. This present invention further provides microorganisms engineered to have mutations that are selected during metabolic evolution and contribute to improved production of succinic acid, other organic acids and other chemicals of commercial interest.

  11. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  12. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-17

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:26751429

  13. Engineering cyanobacteria for fuels and chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Yin

    2010-03-01

    The world's energy and global warming crises call for sustainable, renewable, carbon-neutral alternatives to replace fossil fuel resources. Currently, most biofuels are produced from agricultural crops and residues, which lead to concerns about food security and land shortage. Compared to the current biofuel production system, cyanobacteria, as autotrophic prokaryotes, do not require arable land and can grow to high densities by efficiently using solar energy, CO(2), water, and inorganic nutrients. Moreover, powerful genetic techniques of cyanobacteria have been developed. For these reasons, cyanobacteria, which carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, are attractive hosts for production of fuels and chemicals. Recently, several chemicals including ethanol, isobutanol and isoprene have been produced by engineered cyanobacteria directly using solar energy, CO(2), and water. Cyanobacterium is therefore a potential novel cell factory for fuels and chemicals production to address global energy security and climate change issues. PMID:21203966

  14. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  15. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    SciTech Connect

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-04-15

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  16. Bee Products Prevent Agrichemical-Induced Oxidative Damage in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; Santos da Rosa, João Gabriel; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L−1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased. PMID:24098336

  17. Localized planarization of optical damage using laser-based chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Guss, Gabe M.; Sridharan, Arun; Nielsen, Norman D.; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Lee, Daeho; Grigoropoulos, Costas

    2013-11-01

    We present a method to repair damaged optics using laser-based chemical vapor deposition (L-CVD). A CO2 laser is used to heat damaged silica regions and polymerize a gas precursor to form SiO2. Measured deposition rates and morphologies agree well with finite element modeling of a two-phase reaction. Along with optimizing deposition rates and morphology, we also show that the deposited silica is structurally identical to high-grade silica substrate and possesses high UV laser damage thresholds. Successful application of such a method could reduce processing costs, extend optic lifetime, and lead to more damage resistant laser optics used in high power applications.

  18. Conversion of biomass to selected chemical products.

    PubMed

    Gallezot, Pierre

    2012-02-21

    This critical review provides a survey illustrated by recent references of different strategies to achieve a sustainable conversion of biomass to bioproducts. Because of the huge number of chemical products that can be potentially manufactured, a selection of starting materials and targeted chemicals has been done. Also, thermochemical conversion processes such as biomass pyrolysis or gasification as well as the synthesis of biofuels were not considered. The synthesis of chemicals by conversion of platform molecules obtained by depolymerisation and fermentation of biopolymers is presently the most widely envisioned approach. Successful catalytic conversion of these building blocks into intermediates, specialties and fine chemicals will be examined. However, the platform molecule value chain is in competition with well-optimised, cost-effective synthesis routes from fossil resources to produce chemicals that have already a market. The literature covering alternative value chains whereby biopolymers are converted in one or few steps to functional materials will be analysed. This approach which does not require the use of isolated, pure chemicals is well adapted to produce high tonnage products, such as paper additives, paints, resins, foams, surfactants, lubricants, and plasticisers. Another objective of the review was to examine critically the green character of conversion processes because using renewables as raw materials does not exempt from abiding by green chemistry principles (368 references). PMID:21909591

  19. Pea weevil damage and chemical characteristics of pea cultivars determining their resistance to Bruchus pisorum L.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, I

    2016-04-01

    Bruchus pisorum (L.) is one of the most intractable pest problems of cultivated pea in Europe. Development of resistant cultivars is very important to environmental protection and would solve this problem to a great extent. Therefore, the resistance of five spring pea cultivars was studied to B. pisorum: Glyans, Modus; Kamerton and Svit and Pleven 4 based on the weevil damage and chemical composition of seeds. The seeds were classified as three types: healthy seeds (type one), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (type two) and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes (type three). From visibly damaged pea seeds by pea weevil B. pisorum was isolated the parasitoid Triaspis thoracica Curtis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). Modus, followed by Glyans was outlined as resistant cultivars against the pea weevil. They had the lowest total damaged seed degree, loss in weight of damaged seeds (type two and type three) and values of susceptibility coefficients. A strong negative relationship (r = -0.838) between the weight of type one seeds and the proportion of type three seeds was found. Cultivars with lower protein and phosphorus (P) content had a lower level of damage. The crude protein, crude fiber and P content in damaged seeds significantly or no significantly were increased as compared with the healthy seeds due to weevil damage. The P content had the highest significant influence on pea weevil infestation. Use of chemical markers for resistance to the creation of new pea cultivars can be effective method for defense and control against B. pisorum. PMID:26837535

  20. Novel Chemical Space Exploration via Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Rosén, Josefin; Gottfries, Johan; Muresan, Sorel; Backlund, Anders; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are a rich source of novel compound classes and new drugs. In the present study we have used the chemical space navigation tool ChemGPS-NP to evaluate the chemical space occupancy by NPs and bioactive medicinal chemistry compounds from the database WOMBAT. The two sets differ notable in coverage of chemical space, and tangible lead-like NPs were found to cover regions of chemical space that lack representation in WOMBAT. Property based similarity calculations were performed to identify NP neighbours of approved drugs. Several of the NPs revealed by this method, were confirmed to exhibit the same activity as their drug neighbours. The identification of leads from a NP starting point may prove a useful strategy for drug discovery, in the search for novel leads with unique properties. PMID:19265440

  1. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  2. Chemical modification of normal tissue damage induced by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Fingar, V. H.; Wieman, T. J.; Lindberg, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the limitations of successful use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing porphyrins is the acute and long-term cutaneous photosensitivity. This paper describes results of experiments designed to test the effects of two radiation protective agents (WR-2721, 500 mg kg-1 or WR-3689, 700 mg kg-1) on murine skin damage induced by PDT. C3H mice were shaved and depilated three days prior to injection with the photosensitiser, Photofrin (5 or 10 mg kg-1). Twenty-four hours later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with a protector 30 min prior to Argon dye laser (630 nm) exposure. The skin response was followed for two weeks post irradiation using an arbitrary response scale. A light dose response as well as a drug dose response was obtained. The results indicate that both protectors reduced the skin response to PDT, however WR-2721 was demonstrated to be the most effective. The effect of the protectors on vascular stasis after PDT was determined using a fluorescein dye exclusion assay. In mice treated with Photofrin (5 mg kg-1), and 630 nm light (180 J cm-2) pretreatment with either WR-2721 or WR-3689 resulted in significant protection of the vascular effects of PDT. These studies document the ability of the phosphorothioate class of radiation protective agents to reduce the effects of light on photosensitized skin. They do so in a drug dose-dependent fashion with maximum protection at the highest drug doses. PMID:8763855

  3. [Dangerous drugs: products containing synthetic chemicals].

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    When the patients poisoned with "dangerous drugs", that is, products containing synthetic chemicals such as synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, are transferred to the emergency facilities, the chemicals really consumed cannot be determined there. So, supportive care may be the most important strategy for treating them. For example, those with serious consciousness disturbance should be supported with ventilator after intubation. Those with remarkable excitatory CNS or sympathetic symptoms, benzodiazepines such as diazepam and midazolam, should be administered. Those with hallucination or delusion, antipsychotics such as haloperidol or risperidone should be administered. Those with rhabdomyolysis, hypermyoglobinemia and acute kidney injury, intravenous fluids and hemodialysis should be introduced. PMID:26915246

  4. Effects of solutes on damage production and recovery in zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; MacEwen, S.R.; Abromeit, C.

    1986-04-01

    Dilute zirconium-based alloys and pure zirconium were irradiated at 10 K with spallation neutrons at IPNS. Four types of alloys - Zr-Ti, Zr-Sn, Zr-Dy and Zr-Au - each with three concentration levels, were used. Low-temperature resistivity damage rates are enhanced by the presence of any of the four solutes. The greatest enhancement was produced by Au while the least by Dy. Within each alloy group, damage production also increased but at a decreasing rate, with increasing concentration. Post-irradiation annealing experiments, up to 400 K, showed that all four solutes suppress recovery due to interstitial migration, indicative of interstitial trapping by the solutes. Vacancy recovery is also suppressed by the presence of Sn, Dy or Au. The effect of Ti is to shift this stage to lower temperature. No clear correlation between the results with solute size was detected.

  5. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  6. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  7. Chemical characterization of commercial liquid smoke products

    PubMed Central

    Montazeri, Naim; Oliveira, Alexandra CM; Himelbloom, Brian H; Leigh, Mary Beth; Crapo, Charles A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine important chemical characteristics of a full-strength liquid smoke, Code 10-Poly, and three refined liquid smoke products (AM-3, AM-10 and 1291) commercially available (Kerry Ingredients and Flavors, Monterey, TN). The pH of the products were significantly different (P < 0.05) and ranged from 2.3 (Code 10-Poly) to 5.7 (1291). The pH was inversely correlated with titratable acidity (R2 = 0.87), which was significantly different (P < 0.05) among products ranging from 10.3% acetic acid (Code 10-Poly) to 0.7% acetic acid (1291). Total phenol content was quantified using the Gibbs reaction; the only liquid smoke containing appreciable level of phenolic compounds was Code 10-Poly at 3.22 mg mL−1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of liquid smoke dichloromethane extracts revealed that carbonyl-containing compounds were major constituents of all products, in which 1-hydroxy-2-butanone, 2(5H)-furanone, propanal and cyclopentenone predominated. Organic acids were detected by GC-MS in all extracts and correlated positively (R2 = 0.98) with titratable acidity. The GC-MS data showed that phenolic compounds constituted a major portion of Code 10-Poly, and were detected only in trace quantities in 1291. The refined liquid smokes had lighter color, lower acidity, and reduced level of carbonyl-containing compounds and organic acids. Our study revealed major differences in pH, titratable acidity, total phenol content, color and chemical make-up of the full-strength and refined liquid smokes. The three refined liquid smoke products studied have less flavor and color active compounds, when compared with the full-strength product. Furthermore, the three refined products studied have unique chemical characteristics and will impart specific sensorial properties to food systems. Understanding the chemical composition of liquid smokes, be these refined or full-strength products, is an important step to

  8. Chemical safety of meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Andrée, Sabine; Jira, W; Schwind, K-H; Wagner, H; Schwägele, F

    2010-09-01

    Since the Second World War the consumer behaviour in developed countries changed drastically. Primarily there existed the demand for sufficient food after a period of starvation, afterwards the desire for higher quality was arising, whereas today most people ask for safe and healthy food with high quality. Therefore a united approach comprising consistent standards, sound science and robust controls is required to ensure consumers' health and to maintain consumers' confidence and satisfaction. Chemical analysis along the whole food chain downstream (tracking) from primary production to the consumer and upstream (tracing) from the consumer to primary production is an important prerequisite to ensure food safety and quality. In this frame the focus of the following paper is the "chemical safety of meat and meat products" taking into account inorganic as well as organic residues and contaminants, the use of nitrite in meat products, the incidence of veterinary drugs, as well as a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) system assessing (prioritizing) vulnerable food chain steps to decrease or eliminate vulnerability. PMID:20510527

  9. 75 FR 8575 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 799 RIN 2070-AD16 Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of... manufacturers, importers, and processors of certain high production volume (HPV) chemicals to conduct testing to... reproductive toxicity. The chemical substances are HPV chemicals, i.e., chemical substances with a...

  10. Unit Price Scaling Trends for Chemical Products

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wei; Sathre, Roger; William R. Morrow, III; Shehabi, Arman

    2015-08-01

    To facilitate early-stage life-cycle techno-economic modeling of emerging technologies, here we identify scaling relations between unit price and sales quantity for a variety of chemical products of three categories - metal salts, organic compounds, and solvents. We collect price quotations for lab-scale and bulk purchases of chemicals from both U.S. and Chinese suppliers. We apply a log-log linear regression model to estimate the price discount effect. Using the median discount factor of each category, one can infer bulk prices of products for which only lab-scale prices are available. We conduct out-of-sample tests showing that most of the price proxies deviate from their actual reference prices by a factor less than ten. We also apply the bootstrap method to determine if a sample median discount factor should be accepted for price approximation. We find that appropriate discount factors for metal salts and for solvents are both -0.56, while that for organic compounds is -0.67 and is less representative due to greater extent of product heterogeneity within this category.

  11. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX DAMAGE AS A MEASURE OF CHEMICAL MUTAGEN EFFECTS ON MAMMALIAN GERM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As heritable chromosome anomalies are implicated in a variety of human disabilities, their induction in germ cells by environmental chemicals is viewed as a threat to health. Synaptonemal complex (SC) analysis is a novel approach for the detection of germ-line chromosomal damage....

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF RAPID TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTION OF CHEMICALLY-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid and cost-effective indicator assays are being developed which may be used as a rapid screen to assess the potential for exposure to hazardous compounds that can be related to a biological target (e.g., DNA). Chemically-induced DNA damage will be measured using surrogate DN...

  13. DNA-damaging agents in cancer chemotherapy: serendipity and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-23

    DNA-damaging agents have a long history of use in cancer chemotherapy. The full extent of their cellular mechanisms, which is essential to balance efficacy and toxicity, is often unclear. In addition, the use of many anticancer drugs is limited by dose-limiting toxicities as well as the development of drug resistance. Novel anticancer compounds are continually being developed in the hopes of addressing these limitations; however, it is essential to be able to evaluate these compounds for their mechanisms of action. This review covers the current DNA-damaging agents used in the clinic, discusses their limitations, and describes the use of chemical genomics to uncover new information about the DNA damage response network and to evaluate novel DNA-damaging compounds. PMID:23706631

  14. Production of induced volatiles by Datura wrightii in response to damage by insects: effect of herbivore species and time.

    PubMed

    Hare, J Daniel; Sun, Jia J

    2011-07-01

    Natural enemies of herbivorous insects utilize numerous chemical cues to locate and identify their prey. Among these, volatile plant compounds produced after attack by herbivores may play a significant role (hereafter herbivore-induced plant volatiles or HIPVs). One unresolved question is whether the composition of the volatile cue blends induced by different herbivore species differ consistently enough to indicate not only that the plants are damaged by herbivores but also the identity of the herbivore species causing the damage. We studied HIPV production in the undomesticated plant species Datura wrightii in the laboratory when damaged by either of two leaf-chewing herbivore species, Lema daturaphila or Manduca sexta, or when damaged by L. daturaphila and the piercing-sucking bug, Tupiocoris notatus, or both L. daturaphila and T. notatus, for 24 hr. HIPV production was monitored 1 d before induction, the day of induction, and for 7 d after induction. In all experiments, both the quantities and composition of the HIPV blends varied with the time since induction as different components reached peak production at different times after induction. HIPV blends did not differ consistently with the herbivore species causing the damage. For plants damaged by both L. daturaphila and T. notatus, greater amounts of HIPVs were produced than by plants damaged by either species alone, but the amounts did not differ from that predicted as the sum from damage inflicted by each herbivore species independently. The HIPVs of D. wrightii are a general rather than specific indicator of damage by herbivores. Because generalist predators are the most abundant natural enemies in this system, general cues of herbivore damage may be all that are required to facilitate the discovery by predators of plants damaged by any of several suitable prey species. PMID:21691808

  15. Production of Chemical Derivatives from Renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian; Nghiem, John; Donnelly, Mark; Tsai, Shih-Perng; Frye, John; Landucci, Ron; Griffin, Michael

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., (LMER), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Battelle Memorial Institute, operator of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), (collectively referred to as the 'Contractor'), and Applied Carbochemicals, Inc. (Participant) was to scale-up from bench results an economically promising and competitive process for the production of chemical derivatives from biologically produced succinic acid. The products that were under consideration for production from the succinic acid platform included 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}y-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Preliminary economic analyses indicated that this platform was competitive with the most recent petrochemical routes. The Contractors and participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties.' Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on preliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. At the time, the current need was to provide the necessary laboratory follow-up information to properly optimize, design and operate a pilot scale process. The purpose of the pilot work was to validate the integrated process, assure 'robustness' of the process, define operating conditions, and provide samples for potential customer evaluation. The data from the pilot scale process was used in design and development of a full scale production facility. A new strain, AFP111 (patented), discovered at ANL was tested and developed for process use at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL

  16. Multiphase chemical analysis of terpene oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, F.; Williams, J.; Röckmann, T.; Winterhalter, R.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-04-01

    A new technique was developed for multiphase monitoring of organic species in the gasphase and on aerosols with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS) as the detector. An advantage of the soft ionization technique of the PTRMS, is that it is possible to see the ozonolysis products with little fragmentation. When fragmentation does occur, it is limited to the loss of water from a hydroxyl or carboxyl group, thus facilitating identification. This new system gives detailed information on the chemical composition of organic aerosols, and allows the chemical evolution of condensed organics to be monitored. With this new system it is possible to identify specific chemical compounds in both gas and aerosol phases, instead of the "total organics" which have been reported previously. A series of reactions of ozone with terpenes, beta-caryophyllene and isoprene were preformed in a smog chamber. The secondary organic aerosol and VOCs in the gas phase were measured. Due to the high aerosol concentrations in the smog chamber experiments, air samples could be collected at high time resolution, and it is possible to observe the aging of the aerosol and the gas phase.

  17. Chemical and biological production of cyclotides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilong; Bi, Tao; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are fascinating naturally occurring micro-proteins (≈30 residues long) present in several plant families, and display various biological properties such as protease inhibitory, anti-microbial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and hormone-like activities. Cyclotides share a unique head-to-tail circular knotted topology of three disulfide bridges, with one disulfide penetrating through a macrocycle formed by the two other disulfides and interconnecting peptide backbones, forming what is called a cystine knot topology. This cyclic cystine knot (CCK) framework gives the cyclotides exceptional rigidity, resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, and enzymatic stability against degradation. Interestingly, cyclotides have been shown to be orally bioavailable, and other cyclotides have been shown to cross the cell membranes. Moreover, recent reports have also shown that engineered cyclotides can be efficiently used to target extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interactions, therefore making cyclotides ideal tools for drug development to selectively target protein-protein interactions. In this work we will review all the available methods for production of these interesting proteins using chemical or biological methods. PMID:27064329

  18. Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Nanocolloidal Ceria Slurry for Low-Damage Planarization of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Hoshi, Yosuke; Machii, Yoichi; Koyama, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Haruaki; Ashizawa, Toranosuke

    2012-03-01

    New chemical mechanical polishing processes using nanocolloidal ceria slurry are proposed for high-precision and low-damage planarization of silicon-dioxide-based dielectric films. In the polishing process of a shallow trench isolation structure, a hard pad and a cationic polymer additive are used in combination with the slurry. The new process is effective in improving the planarity and reducing the microscratch count in comparison with a conventional polishing process with calcined ceria slurry and a standard pad. In the polishing process of an interconnect structure with ultralow-k interlayer dielectrics (ULK-ILDs), the standard pad should be used since the ULK-ILDs are easily damaged. By employing a spin-on-type ULK-ILD having a self-planarizing effect, a high planarity is obtained when using the nanocolloidal ceria slurry with the standard pad. The electrical measurement of the interconnect structure indicates that dielectric damage due to the process is successfully suppressed.

  19. Robust, superamphiphobic fabric with multiple self-healing ability against both physical and chemical damages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Zhou, Hua; Gestos, Adrian; Fang, Jian; Lin, Tong

    2013-10-23

    Superamphiphobic coatings with excellent repellency to low surface tension liquids and multiple self-healing abilities are very useful for practical applications, but remain challenging to realize. Previous papers on self-healing superamphiphobic coatings have demonstrated limited liquid repellency with single self-healing ability against either physical or chemical damage. Herein, we describe a superamphiphobic fabric that has remarkable multi-self-healing ability against both physical and chemical damages. The superamphiphobicity was prepared by a two-step surface coating technique. Fabric after coating treatment showed exceptional liquid-repellency to low surface tension liquids including ethanol. The fabric coating was also durable to withstand 200 cycles of laundries and 5000 cycles of Martindale abrasion without apparently changing the superamphiphobicity. This highly robust, superamphiphobic fabric may find applications for the development of "smart" functional textiles for various applications. PMID:24073919

  20. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  1. Effects of neurological damage on production of formulaic language

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, D.; Canterucci, G.; Katsnelson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Early studies reported preserved formulaic language in left hemisphere damaged subjects and reduced incidence of formulaic expressions in the conversational speech of stroke patients with right hemispheric damage. Clinical observations suggest a possible role also of subcortical nuclei. This study examined formulaic language in the spontaneous speech of stroke patients with left, right, or subcortical damage. Four subjects were interviewed and their speech samples compared to normal speakers. Raters classified formulaic expressions as speech formulae, fillers, sentence stems, and proper nouns. Results demonstrated that brain damage affected novel and formulaic language competence differently, with a significantly smaller proportion of formulaic expressions in subjects with right or subcortical damage compared to left hemisphere damaged or healthy speakers. These findings converge with previous studies that support the proposal of a right hemisphere/subcortical circuit in the management of formulaic expressions, based on a dual-process model of language incorporating novel and formulaic language use. PMID:19382014

  2. . Cheminformatic exploration of the chemical landscape of consumer products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Consumer products are a primary source of chemical exposures, little information is available on the chemical ingredients of these products and the concentrations at which they are present. To address this data gap, we have created a database of chemicals in consumer pro...

  3. The U.S. Chemical Industry, the Products It Makes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1972

    1972-01-01

    This section of the annual report on the chemical industry presents data on these areas of chemical production: growth rates, man-made fibers; the 50 largest volume chemicals, major inorganics and organics, plastics, drugs, magnesium, and paint. Includes production figures for 1961, 1969, 1970, 1971 and percent change for 1970-71 and for 1961-71.…

  4. Fission products from the damaged Fukushima reactor observed in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Árpád; Dezső, Zoltán; Bujtás, Tibor; Manga, László; Lencsés, András; Dombóvári, Péter; Csige, István; Ranga, Tibor; Mogyorósi, Magdolna; Veres, Mihály

    2014-01-01

    Fission products, especially (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (NPP) were detected in many places worldwide shortly after the accident caused by natural disaster. To observe the spatial and temporal variation of these isotopes in Hungary, aerosol samples were collected at five locations from late March to early May 2011: Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI, Debrecen, East Hungary), Paks NPP (Paks, South-Central Hungary) as well as at the vicinity of Aggtelek (Northeast Hungary), Tapolca (West Hungary) and Bátaapáti (Southwest Hungary) settlements. In addition to the aerosol samples, dry/wet fallout samples were collected at ATOMKI, and airborne elemental iodine and organic iodide samples were collected at Paks NPP. The peak in the activity concentration of airborne (131)I was observed around 30 March (1-3 mBq m(-3) both in aerosol samples and gaseous iodine traps) with a slow decline afterwards. Aerosol samples of several hundred cubic metres of air showed (134)Cs and (137)Cs in detectable amounts along with (131)I. The decay-corrected inventory of (131)I fallout at ATOMKI was 2.1±0.1 Bq m(-2) at maximum in the observation period. Dose-rate contribution calculations show that the radiological impact of this event at Hungarian locations was of no considerable concern. PMID:24437973

  5. Effects of Neurological Damage on Production of Formulaic Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, Diana; Canterucci, Gina; Katsnelson, Dora

    2009-01-01

    Early studies reported preserved formulaic language in left hemisphere damaged subjects and reduced incidence of formulaic expressions in the conversational speech of stroke patients with right hemispheric damage. Clinical observations suggest a possible role also of subcortical nuclei. This study examined formulaic language in the spontaneous…

  6. A microsuspension adaptation of the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. [Detection of chemically induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, N.E.; Keech, B.H.; Piper, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    We have demonstrated the utility of an Escherichia coli microsuspension assay to detect and characterize chemical mediation of DNA damage by a wide variety of mutagens and carcinogens. The assay have been improved by the development of a microsuspension modification to the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. The addition of these gram-positive organisms has allowed detection of DNA damage induced by benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), 3-aminopyrene (3-AP), 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthrancene (DMBA), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), and 4-nitrobiphenyl (4-NBP). Data presented in this paper from tests of 61 additional compounds, including a representative number of direct and promutagenic agents, indicate that the B subtilis H17 and M45 strains provide an effective microbial system for identification of DNA damage susceptible to postreplicational repair. The results of this study further suggests that the inclusion of these strains in the microsuspension assay for DNA damage will markedly enhance the detection of agents which cannot readily penetrate the intact cell wall of E coli.

  7. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN RATS TREATED WITH POTASSIUM BROMATE AND A MIXTUE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative DNA Damage and Repair in Rats Treated with Potassium Bromate and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disint'ectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (D BPs). There is a need for m...

  8. Deoxyamphimedine, a pyridoacridine alkaloid, damages DNA via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-01-01

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity. PMID:19597581

  9. Chemical Methods for the Production of Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2008-09-15

    The goal of this research program was to develop improved methods for chemical peptide and protein synthesis, and to apply these methods to the total synthesis of small proteins (<80 amino acids) & integral membrane proteins.

  10. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  11. Synthetic Organic Chemicals: United States Production and Sales, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Roger; And Others

    This is the sixth annual report of the U.S. Trade Commission on domestic production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals and the raw materials from which they are made. The report consists of 15 sections, each covering a specified group (based primarily on use) of organic chemicals as follows: tar and tar crudes; primary products from…

  12. Endocrine Disruptors and Asthma-Associated Chemicals in Consumer Products

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Marcia; Standley, Laurel J.; Perovich, Laura J.; Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laboratory and human studies raise concerns about endocrine disruption and asthma resulting from exposure to chemicals in consumer products. Limited labeling or testing information is available to evaluate products as exposure sources. Objectives: We analytically quantified endocrine disruptors and asthma-related chemicals in a range of cosmetics, personal care products, cleaners, sunscreens, and vinyl products. We also evaluated whether product labels provide information that can be used to select products without these chemicals. Methods: We selected 213 commercial products representing 50 product types. We tested 42 composited samples of high-market-share products, and we tested 43 alternative products identified using criteria expected to minimize target compounds. Analytes included parabens, phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan, ethanolamines, alkylphenols, fragrances, glycol ethers, cyclosiloxanes, and ultraviolet (UV) filters. Results: We detected 55 compounds, indicating a wide range of exposures from common products. Vinyl products contained > 10% bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and could be an important source of DEHP in homes. In other products, the highest concentrations and numbers of detects were in the fragranced products (e.g., perfume, air fresheners, and dryer sheets) and in sunscreens. Some products that did not contain the well-known endocrine-disrupting phthalates contained other less-studied phthalates (dicyclohexyl phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, and di-n-propyl phthalate; also endocrine-disrupting compounds), suggesting a substitution. Many detected chemicals were not listed on product labels. Conclusions: Common products contain complex mixtures of EDCs and asthma-related compounds. Toxicological studies of these mixtures are needed to understand their biological activity. Regarding epidemiology, our findings raise concern about potential confounding from co-occurring chemicals and misclassification due to variability in

  13. Advanced bioreactors for enhanced production of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Scott, C.D.

    1993-06-01

    A variety of advanced bioreactors are being developed to improve production of fuels, solvents, organic acids and other fermentation products. One key approach is immobilization of the biocatalyst leading to increased rates and yields. In addition, there are processes for simultaneous fermentation and separation to further increase production by the removal of an inhibitory product. For example, ethanol productivity in immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors (FBRs) can increase more than tenfold with 99% conversion and near stoichiometric yields. Two modified FBR configurations offer further improvements by removing the inhibitory product directly from the continuous fermentation. One involves the addition and removal of solid adsorbent particles to the FBR. This process was demonstrated with the production of lactic acid by immobilized Lactobacillus. The second uses an immiscible organic extractant in the FBR. This increased total butanol yields in the anaerobic acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

  14. CHEMICALS FROM PHARMACEUTICALS AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use or consumption of natural resources often leads to ecological alteration. These changes can result from exposure of living systems to "stressors" ranging from physical alteration (such as habitat disruption) to chemical pollution. Untoward effects on wildlife and humans c...

  15. The Microbiological Production of Industrial Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eveleigh, Douglas E.

    1981-01-01

    Compares traditional and newer methods by which microorganisms are used to produce industrial chemicals. Includes a discussion of economic considerations and new genetic methods in programing microorganisms. Details methods for producing enzymes, aliphatic organic compounds, amino acids, ethanol, n-butanol, and alkene oxides. (CS)

  16. Chemical composition of fat and oil products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fats and oils are an important dietary component, and contribute to the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. This chapter focuses on the chemical composition of fats and oils, and how these compositions affect the functional properties of fats and oils in foods. The focus will remain on the mos...

  17. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo. PMID:26788916

  18. Electrifying microbes for the production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Powering microbes with electrical energy to produce valuable chemicals such as biofuels has recently gained traction as a biosustainable strategy to reduce our dependence on oil. Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) is one of the bioelectrochemical approaches developed in the last decade that could have critical impact on the current methods of chemical synthesis. MES is a process in which electroautotrophic microbes use electrical current as electron source to reduce CO2 to multicarbon organics. Electricity necessary for MES can be harvested from renewable resources such as solar energy, wind turbine, or wastewater treatment processes. The net outcome is that renewable energy is stored in the covalent bonds of organic compounds synthesized from greenhouse gas. This review will discuss the future of MES and the challenges that lie ahead for its development into a mature technology. PMID:25814988

  19. Electrifying microbes for the production of chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Powering microbes with electrical energy to produce valuable chemicals such as biofuels has recently gained traction as a biosustainable strategy to reduce our dependence on oil. Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) is one of the bioelectrochemical approaches developed in the last decade that could have critical impact on the current methods of chemical synthesis. MES is a process in which electroautotrophic microbes use electrical current as electron source to reduce CO2 to multicarbon organics. Electricity necessary for MES can be harvested from renewable resources such as solar energy, wind turbine, or wastewater treatment processes. The net outcome is that renewable energy is stored in the covalent bonds of organic compounds synthesized from greenhouse gas. This review will discuss the future of MES and the challenges that lie ahead for its development into a mature technology. PMID:25814988

  20. Biotechnology for Chemical Production: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Burk, Mark J; Van Dien, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Biotechnology offers a new sustainable approach to manufacturing chemicals, enabling the replacement of petroleum-based raw materials with renewable biobased feedstocks, thereby reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, toxic byproducts, and the safety risks associated with traditional petrochemical processing. Development of such bioprocesses is enabled by recent advances in genomics, molecular biology, and systems biology, and will continue to accelerate as access to these tools becomes faster and cheaper. PMID:26683567

  1. Antioxidative Activity of Platinum Nanocolloid and Its Protective Effect Against Chemical-Induced Hepatic Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Do, Le Thanh; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Hoon; Yu, Rina

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress, a major cause of cellular injuries, is closely associated with a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, liver diseases, degenerative brain disease and aging. In this study, we investigated antioxidant properties of platinum nanocolloid (PNC) against various oxidative stress conditions in vitro/in vivo by treating PNC on liver cell or tissue. Antioxidant activities of the PNC were determined by measuring quenching capacity on reactive oxygen species and its protective action against hydrogen peroxide or CCl4-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 cell or liver tissue of mice. In vitro study, PNC markedly suppressed the production H2O2, ·OH, α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical and nitric oxide in a dose-dependent manner. PNC also inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 hepatocytes. In vivo study with mice, PNC reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation and CCl4 induced toxicity. Our results support that platinum nanocolloid has antioxidant activities and protects hepatic cellular oxidative damage. Thus platinum nanocolloid may have a potential to be used as an antioxidant supplement. PMID:26369119

  2. Chemical Adulterants in Herbal Medicinal Products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Calahan, Jacob; Howard, Dylan; Almalki, Ahmad J; Gupta, Mahabir P; Calderón, Angela I

    2016-04-01

    Many herbal medicinal products have been found to contain synthetic prescription drugs as chemical adulterants. This has become evident by the number of toxicity cases and adverse reactions reported in which casualties were reported via analytical techniques that detected the presence of chemical adulterants in them, which could be responsible for their toxicity. The adulteration of herbal medicinal products with synthetic drugs continues to be a serious problem for regulatory agencies. This review provides up to date information on cases of toxicity, major chemical adulterants in herbal medicinal products, and current analytical techniques used for their detection. PMID:27054916

  3. Commercial production of specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    McChesney, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    The chemical substances utilized in consumer products, and for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses are generally referred to as specialty chemicals. These may be flavor or fragrance substances, intermediates for synthesis of drugs or agrochemicals or the drugs or agrochemicals themselves, insecticides or insect pheromones or antifeedants, plant growth regulators, etc. These are in contrast to chemicals which are utilized in large quantities for fuels or preparation of plastics, lubricants, etc., which are usually referred to as industrial chemicals. The specific utilization of specialty chemicals is associated with a specific important physiochemical or biological property. They may possess unique properties as lubricants or waxes or have a very desirable biological activity such as a drug, agrochemical or perfume ingredient. These unique properties convey significant economic value to the specific specialty chemical. The economic commercial production of specialty chemicals commonly requires the isolation of a precursor or the specialty chemical itself from a natural source. The discovery, development and commercialization of specialty chemicals is presented and reviewed. The economic and sustainable production of specialty chemicals is discussed.

  4. Alteration of the chemical composition of mangrove ( Laguncularia racemosa) leaf litter fall by freeze damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, William L.; Bowles, Justin W.; Erickson, Amy A.; Stafford, Nate; Bell, Susan S.; Thomas, Melanie

    2006-06-01

    Resorption, the remobilization and subsequent transport of leaf constituents (e.g. N, C, and P) into the perennial structures of the plant prior to leaf abscission, may be interrupted or prevented by stressors that interfere with the normal course of leaf senescence. Mangroves that lie along the latitudinal extremes of their distribution are susceptible to freeze damage that may periodically disrupt the normal resorptive process. On January 24, 2003, the white mangroves ( Laguncularia racemosa) in a northern portion of Tampa Bay, Florida were exposed to freezing temperatures for 8 h. The leaves of these trees were noticeably withered by this freeze event. Over a four-month period following the freeze, we compared the subsequent rate of leaf litter production at this site to that of two, apparently undamaged, fringing mangrove forests in Tampa Bay. We also examined the carbon and nitrogen concentrations of the leaf litter from the litter traps at these three sites and compared it to that of green, yellow (nearly senescent), and freeze-damaged leaves hand-picked from the mangroves. A pronounced pulse of leaf litter fall (maximum: 7 g dw m -2 d -1) was found at the putatively freeze-damaged site but not at the two comparison sites. In addition, the leaf litter at the freeze-damaged site was richer in nitrogen and carbon, and had a lower C:N than litter collected at the comparison sites. Comparison of the elemental composition of this leaf litter with leaves hand-picked from the mangroves suggests that the freeze event killed the leaves of L. racemosa, interrupting the process of resorption. This perturbation to nutrient flow may have implications for mangrove forest structure and the entry of mangrove material into food webs.

  5. Chemical-thermal quantitative methodology for carbon speciation in damage layers on building surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ghedini, Nadia; Sabbioni, Cristina; Bonazza, Alessandra; Gobbi, Giancarlo

    2006-02-01

    The issue of environment protection, including the conservation of the monumental heritage worldwide, is related to atmospheric pollution, and its future therefore depends on air pollutant reduction. Carbonaceous particles emitted by combustion processes are the main factors responsible for the blackening of buildings. The identification and evaluation of the carbon species constituting the noncarbonate fraction of total carbon in damage layers, particularly in urban areas, are required in orderto investigate atmospheric deposition on building surfaces. Since noncarbonate carbon contains organic and elemental carbon originating from various human activities, its measurement and speciation are crucial to the protection and conservation of monuments and ancient masonry, playing an important role both in the proposal of mitigation strategies and in the definition of conservation treatments. The availability of a correct, accurate, and reproducible analytical method for a complete carbon balance is essential in studying the effects of atmospheric pollutants on the environment, including those affecting cultural heritage. A chemical-thermal methodology was set up, and its sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility were tested on appropriate standard samples of composition similar to the black crusts on stones and mortars. The results indicate thatthe technique satisfactorily distinguishes among carbon species, particularly those of anthropogenic origin, allowing a reliable evaluation of their quantities in damage layers. In view of the difficulties encountered in applying the thermo-optical methods adopted for the measurement of carbon filters, the proposed methodology contributes to filling the current gap in suitable and reliable analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage protection. PMID:16509340

  6. Chemical-thermal quantitative methodology for carbon speciation in damage layers on building surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nadia Ghedini; Cristina Sabbioni; Alessandra Bonazza; Giancarlo Gobbi

    2006-02-01

    Carbonaceous particles emitted by combustion processes are the main factors responsible for the blackening of buildings. The identification and evaluation of the carbon species constituting the noncarbonate fraction of total carbon in damage layers, particularly in urban areas, are required in order to investigate atmospheric deposition on building surfaces. Since noncarbonate carbon contains organic and elemental carbon originating from various human activities, its measurement and speciation are crucial to the protection and conservation of monuments and ancient masonry, playing an important role both in the proposal of mitigation strategies and in the definition of conservation treatments. The availability of a correct, accurate, and reproducible analytical method for a complete carbon balance is essential in studying the effects of atmospheric pollutants on the environment, including those affecting cultural heritage. A chemical-thermal methodology was set up, and its sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility were tested on appropriate standard samples of composition similar to the black crusts on stones and mortars. The results indicate that the technique satisfactorily distinguishes among carbon species, particularly those of anthropogenic origin, allowing a reliable evaluation of their quantities in damage layers. In view of the difficulties encountered in applying the thermo-optical methods adopted for the measurement of carbon filters, the proposed methodology contributes to filling the current gap in suitable and reliable analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage protection. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Sustainability of biofuels and renewable chemicals production from biomass.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Manfred

    2015-12-01

    In the sectors of biofuel and renewable chemicals the big feedstock demand asks, first, to expand the spectrum of carbon sources beyond primary biomass, second, to establish circular processing chains and, third, to prioritize product sectors exclusively depending on carbon: chemicals and heavy-duty fuels. Large-volume production lines will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission significantly but also low-volume chemicals are indispensable in building 'low-carbon' industries. The foreseeable feedstock change initiates innovation, securing societal wealth in the industrialized world and creating employment in regions producing biomass. When raising the investments in rerouting to sustainable biofuel and chemicals today competitiveness with fossil-based fuel and chemicals is a strong issue. Many countries adopted comprehensive bioeconomy strategies to tackle this challenge. These public actions are mostly biased to biofuel but should give well-balanced attention to renewable chemicals as well. PMID:26256682

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL INDICES FOR GREEN CHEMICAL PRODUCTION AND USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical production, use and disposal cause adverse impacts on the environment. Consequently, much research has been conducted to develop methods for estimating the risk of chemicals and to screen them based on environmental impact. Risk assessment may be subdivide...

  9. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  10. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products.

    PubMed

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  11. Chemical Composition of Defatted Cottonseed and Soy Meal Products

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Hailin; Olk, Dan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales. PMID:26079931

  12. Ultraviolet light photobiology of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis and chemical reactivation of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The tunable dye laser was developed in order to perform UV-B and UV-C (254-320 nm) action spectra studies on several different organisms. Using the laser, action spectra studies have been performed for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces, Chlamydomonas, Caenorhabditis elegans, Paramecium, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Studies generally indicate increasing LD{sub 50} values with increasing wavelength. Two notable findings were made: (1) The action spectra does not follow the DNA absorption spectra at 280, 290 and 295 nm; (2) The repair competent/repair defective sensitization factor does not remain constant throughout the wavelength region. In addition it was found that the repair defective strain of E. coli, Bs-1, showed an increase in survival with increasing UV irradiation, at certain dose levels. Further experiments were designed to better characterize the reactivation. Tetrahymena were exposed to UV-C and reactivated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and 4-nitro quinoline oxide (4-NQO). In both cases survival was seen to increase after chemical exposure. Likewise, UV-C was found to reactivate chemical damage (MMS).

  13. Chemical production on Mars using in situ propellant production technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    In situ propellant production (ISPP) was examined in terms of its applicability to a manned Mars mission. Production of oxygen from Martian atmosphere was used as the baseline system for ISPP technology assessment. It was concluded that production of oxygen was an important element in a manned Mars mission which could be developed in terrestrial laboratories. Expert system methodology will be required to enable reliable, autonomous production of oxygen. Furthermore, while no major technical breakthroughs are required, this research requires a long lead time to permit its systematic evolution.

  14. A review of selected chemical additives in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2014-01-01

    The addition of chemical additives to consumer cosmetic products is a common practice to increase cosmetic effectiveness, maintain cosmetic efficacy, and produce a longer-lasting, more viable product. Recently, manufacturers have come under attack for the addition of chemicals including dioxane, formaldehyde, lead/lead acetate, parabens, and phthalate, as these additives may prove harmful to consumer health. Although reports show that these products may indeed adversely affect human health, these studies are conducted using levels of the aforementioned chemicals at much higher levels of exposure than those found in cosmetic products. When cosmeceuticals are used as per manufacturer's instructions, it is estimated that the levels of harmful additives found in these products are considerably lower than reported toxic concentrations. PMID:25052592

  15. 76 FR 1067 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Second Group of Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ...EPA is promulgating a final rule under section 4(a)(1)(B) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to require manufacturers, importers, and processors of certain high production volume (HPV) chemical substances to conduct testing to obtain screening level data for health and environmental effects and chemical...

  16. Old obstacles and new horizons for microbial chemical production.

    PubMed

    Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms appear as ideal catalysts for chemical conversions. Diverse metabolic routes seem to open doors to the whole range of chemistry. Indeed, a vast amount of scientific papers suggesting new microbial cell factories for old and new products is published every year. However, only very few of them reached industrial relevance. Chemical balances and some metabolic tricks allow natural microorganisms the efficient production of some chemicals, but not others. So first of all it is important to choose metabolically feasible products of value for synthetic chemistry. Here we see a clear task for the chemical and biotechnology industries to communicate for defining the right target molecules. Finally, despite our limited current knowledge, synthetic biology points to a future independent from natural strain backgrounds. PMID:25000188

  17. Resistant starch: a functional food that prevents DNA damage and chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, S D; Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Ogo, F M; Oliveira, R J

    2015-01-01

    Resistant starch is formed from starch and its degradation products and is not digested or absorbed in the intestine; thus, it is characterized as a fiber. Because fiber intake is associated with the prevention of DNA damage and cancer, the potential antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic capabilities of resistant starch from green banana flour were evaluated. Animals were treated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and their diet was supplemented with 10% green banana flour according to the following resistant starch protocols: pretreatment, simultaneous treatment, post-treatment, and pre + continuous treatment. The results demonstrated that resistant starch is not genotoxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. The results suggest that resistant starch acts through desmutagenesis and bio-antimutagenesis, as well as by reducing aberrant crypt foci, thereby improving disease prognosis. These findings imply that green banana flour has therapeutic properties that should be explored for human dietary applications. PMID:25867310

  18. Microbial production of building block chemicals and polymers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Kim, Hyun Uk; Choi, Sol; Yi, Jongho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-12-01

    Owing to our increasing concerns on the environment, climate change, and limited natural resources, there has recently been considerable effort exerted to produce chemicals and materials from renewable biomass. Polymers we use everyday can also be produced either by direct fermentation or by polymerization of monomers that are produced by fermentation. Recent advances in metabolic engineering combined with systems biology and synthetic biology are allowing us to more systematically develop superior strains and bioprocesses for the efficient production of polymers and monomers. Here, we review recent trends in microbial production of building block chemicals that can be subsequently used for the synthesis of polymers. Also, recent successful cases of direct one-step production of polymers are reviewed. General strategies for the production of natural and unnatural platform chemicals are described together with representative examples. PMID:21420291

  19. Profiling Dose-Dependent Activation of p53-Mediated Signaling Pathways by Chemicals with Distinct Mechanisms of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, Rebecca A.; Sun, Bin; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Carmichael, Paul; Efremenko, Alina; McMullen, Patrick D.; Pendse, Salil; Trask, O. J.; White, Andy; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a larger effort to provide proof-of-concept in vitro-only risk assessments, we have developed a suite of high-throughput assays for key readouts in the p53 DNA damage response toxicity pathway: double-strand break DNA damage (p-H2AX), permanent chromosomal damage (micronuclei), p53 activation, p53 transcriptional activity, and cell fate (cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, micronuclei). Dose-response studies were performed with these protein and cell fate assays, together with whole genome transcriptomics, for three prototype chemicals: etoposide, quercetin, and methyl methanesulfonate. Data were collected in a human cell line expressing wild-type p53 (HT1080) and results were confirmed in a second p53 competent cell line (HCT 116). At chemical concentrations causing similar increases in p53 protein expression, p53-mediated protein expression and cellular processes showed substantial chemical-specific differences. These chemical-specific differences in the p53 transcriptional response appear to be determined by augmentation of the p53 response by co-regulators. More importantly, dose-response data for each of the chemicals indicate that the p53 transcriptional response does not prevent micronuclei induction at low concentrations. In fact, the no observed effect levels and benchmark doses for micronuclei induction were less than or equal to those for p53-mediated gene transcription regardless of the test chemical, indicating that p53's post-translational responses may be more important than transcriptional activation in the response to low dose DNA damage. This effort demonstrates the process of defining key assays required for a pathway-based, in vitro-only risk assessment, using the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway as a prototype. PMID:25078064

  20. Enhanced nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production and damage after inhalation of silica.

    PubMed

    Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell; Robinson, Victor A; Hubbs, Ann; Willard, Patsy; Pack, Donna; Ramsey, Dawn; McLaurin, Jeff; Khan, Amir; Landsittel, Douglas; Teass, Alexander; Castranova, Vincent

    2002-08-01

    In previous reports from this study, measurements of pulmonary inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell cytokine production and nuclear factor-kappa B activation, cytotoxic damage, and fibrosis were detailed. In this study, we investigated the temporal relationship between silica inhalation, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and damage mediated by these radicals in the rat. Rats were exposed to a silica aerosol (15 mg/m(3) silica, 6 h/day, 5 days/wk) for 116 days. We report time-dependent changes in 1) activation of alveolar macrophages and concomitant production of NO and ROS, 2) immunohistochemical localization of inducible NO synthase and the NO-induced damage product nitrotyrosine, 3) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid NO(x) and superoxide dismutase concentrations, and 4) lung lipid peroxidation levels. The major observations made in this study are as follows: 1) NO and ROS production and resultant damage increased during silica exposure, and 2) the sites of inducible NO synthase activation and NO-mediated damage are associated anatomically with pathological lesions in the lungs. PMID:12114212

  1. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION-AND CHEMICALLY-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid, sensitive and simple assays for radiation- and chemically-induced DNA damage can be of significant benefit to a number of fields including radiation biology, clinical research, and environmental monitoring. Although temperature-induced DNA strand separation has been use...

  2. Label-free and selective photoelectrochemical detection of chemical DNA methylation damage using DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2013-07-16

    Exogenous chemicals may produce DNA methylation that is potentially toxic to living systems. Methylated DNA bases are difficult to detect with biosensors because the methyl group is small and chemically inert. In this report, a label-free photoelectrochemical sensor was developed for the selective detection of chemically methylated bases in DNA films. The sensor employed two DNA repair enzymes, human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, to convert DNA methylation sites in DNA films on indium tin oxide electrodes into strand breaks. A DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy)2(dppz)(2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was then used as the photoelectrochemical signal indicator to detect the DNA strand breaks. Its photocurrent signal was found to correlate inversely with the amount of 3-methyladenines (metAde) produced with a methylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The sensor detected the methylated bases produced with as low as 1 mM MMS, at which concentration the amount of metAde on the sensor surface was estimated to be 0.5 pg, or 1 metAde in 1.6 × 10(5) normal bases. Other DNA base modification products, such as 5-methylcytosine and DNA adducts with ethyl and styrene groups did not attenuate the photocurrent, demonstrating good selectivity of the sensor. This strategy can be utilized to develop sensors for the detection of other modified DNA bases with specific DNA repair enzymes. PMID:23777269

  3. Quantification of DNA damage products resulting from deamination, oxidation and reaction with products of lipid peroxidation by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, Koli; McFaline, Jose L.; Pang, Bo; Sullivan, Matthew; Dong, Min; Plummer, Elaine; Dedon, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of damage products as biomarkers of inflammation has been hampered by a poor understanding of the chemical biology of inflammation, the lack of sensitive analytical methods, and a focus on single chemicals as surrogates for inflammation. To overcome these problems, we developed a general and sensitive liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method to quantify, in a single DNA sample, the nucleoside forms of seven DNA lesions reflecting the range of chemistries associated with inflammation: 2′-deoxyuridine, 2′-deoxyxanthosine, and 2′-deoxyinosine from nitrosative deamination; 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine from oxidation; and 1,N2-etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine, 1,N6-etheno-2′-deoxyadenosine, and 3,N4-etheno-2′-deoxycytidine arising from reaction of DNA with lipid peroxidation products. Using DNA purified from cells or tissues under conditions that minimize artifacts, individual nucleosides are purified by HPLC and quantified by isotope-dilution, electrospray ionization LC/MS-MS. The method can be applied to other DNA damage products and requires 4-6 days to complete depending upon the number of samples. PMID:18714297

  4. Egg Production Constrains Chemical Defenses in a Neotropical Arachnid

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Taís M.; Machado, Glauco

    2015-01-01

    Female investment in large eggs increases the demand for fatty acids, which are allocated for yolk production. Since the biosynthetic pathway leading to fatty acids uses the same precursors used in the formation of polyketides, allocation trade-offs are expected to emerge. Therefore, egg production should constrain the investment in chemical defenses based on polyketides, such as benzoquinones. We tested this hypothesis using the harvestman Acutiosoma longipes, which produces large eggs and releases benzoquinones as chemical defense. We predicted that the amount of secretion released by ovigerous females (OFs) would be smaller than that of non-ovigerous females (NOF). We also conducted a series of bioassays in the field and in the laboratory to test whether egg production renders OFs more vulnerable to predation. OFs produce less secretion than NOFs, which is congruent with the hypothesis that egg production constrains the investment in chemical defenses. Results of the bioassays show that the secretion released by OFs is less effective in deterring potential predators (ants and spiders) than the secretion released by NOFs. In conclusion, females allocate resources to chemical defenses in a way that preserves a primary biological function related to reproduction. However, the trade-off between egg and secretion production makes OFs vulnerable to predators. We suggest that egg production is a critical moment in the life of harvestman females, representing perhaps the highest cost of reproduction in the group. PMID:26331946

  5. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Caroline E.; Van Buren, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood. PMID:27471326

  6. Structure, Chemical Synthesis, and Biosynthesis of Prodiginine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dennis X; Withall, David M; Challis, Gregory L; Thomson, Regan J

    2016-07-27

    The prodiginine family of bacterial alkaloids is a diverse set of heterocyclic natural products that have likely been known to man since antiquity. In more recent times, these alkaloids have been discovered to span a wide range of chemical structures that possess a number of interesting biological activities. This review provides a comprehensive overview of research undertaken toward the isolation and structural elucidation of the prodiginine family of natural products. Additionally, research toward chemical synthesis of the prodiginine alkaloids over the last several decades is extensively reviewed. Finally, the current, evidence-based understanding of the various biosynthetic pathways employed by bacteria to produce prodiginine alkaloids is summarized. PMID:27314508

  7. 76 FR 65385 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Third Group of Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ...EPA is promulgating this final rule under section 4(a)(1)(B) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to require manufacturers, importers, and processors to conduct testing to obtain screening level data for health and environmental effects and chemical fate for 15 high production volume (HPV) chemical substances listed in this final rule. This test data is needed in order to help EPA to......

  8. Post-irradiation chemical processing of DNA damage generates double-strand breaks in cells already engaged in repair

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wang, Minli; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar–phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that these DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. This assumption is questioned by the observation that after irradiation of naked DNA, a fraction of DSBs forms minutes to hours after exposure as a result of temperature dependent, chemical processing of labile sugar lesions. Excess DSBs also form when IR-exposed cells are processed at 50°C, but have been hitherto considered method-related artifact. Thus, it remains unknown whether DSBs actually develop in cells after IR exposure from chemically labile damage. Here, we show that irradiation of ‘naked’ or chromatin-organized mammalian DNA produces lesions, which evolve to DSBs and add to those promptly induced, after 8–24 h in vitro incubation at 37°C or 50°C. The conversion is more efficient in chromatin-associated DNA, completed within 1 h in cells and delayed in a reducing environment. We conclude that IR generates sugar lesions within clustered-damage sites contributing to DSB formation only after chemical processing, which occurs efficiently at 37°C. This subset of delayed DSBs may challenge DDR, may affect the perceived repair kinetics and requires further characterization. PMID:21745815

  9. Metabolic engineering of yeast for production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Larsson, Christer; van Maris, Antonius; Pronk, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Microbial production of fuels and chemicals from renewable carbohydrate feedstocks offers sustainable and economically attractive alternatives to their petroleum-based production. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers many advantages as a platform cell factory for such applications. Already applied on a huge scale for bioethanol production, this yeast is easy to genetically engineer, its physiology, metabolism and genetics have been intensively studied and its robustness enables it to handle harsh industrial conditions. Introduction of novel pathways and optimization of its native cellular processes by metabolic engineering are rapidly expanding its range of cell-factory applications. Here we review recent scientific progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for the production of bioethanol, advanced biofuels, and chemicals. PMID:23611565

  10. Alkaline ceramidase 2 and its bioactive product sphingosine are novel regulators of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruijuan; Wang, Kai; Mileva, Izolda; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.; Mao, Cungui

    2016-01-01

    Human cells respond to DNA damage by elevating sphingosine, a bioactive sphingolipid that induces programmed cell death (PCD) in response to various forms of stress, but its regulation and role in the DNA damage response remain obscure. Herein we demonstrate that DNA damage increases sphingosine levels in tumor cells by upregulating alkaline ceramidase 2 (ACER2) and that the upregulation of the ACER2/sphingosine pathway induces PCD in response to DNA damage by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with the DNA damaging agent doxorubicin increased both ACER2 expression and sphingosine levels in HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ACER2 overexpression increased sphingosine in HeLa cells whereas knocking down ACER2 inhibited the doxorubicin-induced increase in sphingosine in HCT116 cells, suggesting that DNA damage elevates sphingosine by upregulating ACER2. Knocking down ACER2 inhibited an increase in the apoptotic and necrotic cell population and the cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) in HCT116 cells in response to doxorubicin as well as doxorubicin-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from these cells. Similar to treatment with doxorubicin, ACER2 overexpression induced an increase in the apoptotic and necrotic cell population and PARP cleavage in HeLa cells and LDH release from cells, suggesting that ACER2 upregulation mediates PCD in response to DNA damage through sphingosine. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the upregulation of the ACER2/sphingosine pathway induces PCD by increasing ROS levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the ACER2/sphingosine pathway mediates PCD in response to DNA damage through ROS production. PMID:26943039

  11. The Importance of Premotor Cortex for Supporting Speech Production after Left Capsular-Putaminal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bagdasaryan, Juliana; Jung, Dorit E.; Price, Cathy J.

    2014-01-01

    The left putamen is known to be important for speech production, but some patients with left putamen damage can produce speech remarkably well. We investigated the neural mechanisms that support this recovery by using a combination of techniques to identify the neural regions and pathways that compensate for loss of the left putamen during speech production. First, we used fMRI to identify the brain regions that were activated during reading aloud and picture naming in a patient with left putamen damage. This revealed that the patient had abnormally high activity in the left premotor cortex. Second, we used dynamic causal modeling of the patient's fMRI data to understand how this premotor activity influenced other speech production regions and whether the same neural pathway was used by our 24 neurologically normal control subjects. Third, we validated the compensatory relationship between putamen and premotor cortex by showing, in the control subjects, that lower connectivity through the putamen increased connectivity through premotor cortex. Finally, in a lesion-deficit analysis, we demonstrate the explanatory power of our fMRI results in new patients who had damage to the left putamen, left premotor cortex, or both. Those with damage to both had worse reading and naming scores. The results of our four-pronged approach therefore have clinical implications for predicting which patients are more or less likely to recover their speech after left putaminal damage. PMID:25339747

  12. The importance of premotor cortex for supporting speech production after left capsular-putaminal damage.

    PubMed

    Seghier, Mohamed L; Bagdasaryan, Juliana; Jung, Dorit E; Price, Cathy J

    2014-10-22

    The left putamen is known to be important for speech production, but some patients with left putamen damage can produce speech remarkably well. We investigated the neural mechanisms that support this recovery by using a combination of techniques to identify the neural regions and pathways that compensate for loss of the left putamen during speech production. First, we used fMRI to identify the brain regions that were activated during reading aloud and picture naming in a patient with left putamen damage. This revealed that the patient had abnormally high activity in the left premotor cortex. Second, we used dynamic causal modeling of the patient's fMRI data to understand how this premotor activity influenced other speech production regions and whether the same neural pathway was used by our 24 neurologically normal control subjects. Third, we validated the compensatory relationship between putamen and premotor cortex by showing, in the control subjects, that lower connectivity through the putamen increased connectivity through premotor cortex. Finally, in a lesion-deficit analysis, we demonstrate the explanatory power of our fMRI results in new patients who had damage to the left putamen, left premotor cortex, or both. Those with damage to both had worse reading and naming scores. The results of our four-pronged approach therefore have clinical implications for predicting which patients are more or less likely to recover their speech after left putaminal damage. PMID:25339747

  13. Mitigation of organic laser damage precursors from chemical processing of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Baxamusa, S; Miller, P E; Wong, L; Steele, R; Shen, N; Bude, J

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the laser damage threshold of fused silica have been driven by the successive elimination of near-surface damage precursors such as polishing residue, fractures, and inorganic salts. In this work, we show that trace impurities in ultrapure water used to process fused silica optics may be responsible for the formation of carbonaceous deposits. We use surrogate materials to show that organic compounds precipitated onto fused silica surfaces form discrete damage precursors. Following a standard etching process, solvent-free oxidative decomposition using oxygen plasma or high-temperature thermal treatments in air reduced the total density of damage precursors to as low as <50 cm(-2). Finally, we show that inorganic compounds are more likely to cause damage when they are tightly adhered to a surface, which may explain why high-temperature thermal treatments have been historically unsuccessful at removing extrinsic damage precursors from fused silica. PMID:25606889

  14. Production of bulk chemicals via novel metabolic pathways in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Dong In; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has been playing important roles in developing high performance microorganisms capable of producing various chemicals and materials from renewable biomass in a sustainable manner. Synthetic and systems biology are also contributing significantly to the creation of novel pathways and the whole cell-wide optimization of metabolic performance, respectively. In order to expand the spectrum of chemicals that can be produced biotechnologically, it is necessary to broaden the metabolic capacities of microorganisms. Expanding the metabolic pathways for biosynthesizing the target chemicals requires not only the enumeration of a series of known enzymes, but also the identification of biochemical gaps whose corresponding enzymes might not actually exist in nature; this issue is the focus of this paper. First, pathway prediction tools, effectively combining reactions that lead to the production of a target chemical, are analyzed in terms of logics representing chemical information, and designing and ranking the proposed metabolic pathways. Then, several approaches for potentially filling in the gaps of the novel metabolic pathway are suggested along with relevant examples, including the use of promiscuous enzymes that flexibly utilize different substrates, design of novel enzymes for non-natural reactions, and exploration of hypothetical proteins. Finally, strain optimization by systems metabolic engineering in the context of novel metabolic pathways constructed is briefly described. It is hoped that this review paper will provide logical ways of efficiently utilizing 'big' biological data to design and develop novel metabolic pathways for the production of various bulk chemicals that are currently produced from fossil resources. PMID:23280013

  15. Melatonin behavior in restoring chemical damaged C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Salucci, Sara; Baldassarri, Valentina; Canonico, Barbara; Burattini, Sabrina; Battistelli, Michela; Guescini, Michele; Papa, Stefano; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2016-06-01

    It is known that, besides a wide range of functions, melatonin provides protection against oxidative stress, thanks to its ability to act, directly, as a free radical scavenger and, indirectly, by stimulating antioxidant enzymes production and mitochondrial electron transport chain efficiency. Oxidative stress is one of the major players in initiating apoptotic cell death in skeletal muscle, as well as in other tissues. Apoptosis is essential for skeletal muscle development and homeostasis; nevertheless, its misregulation has been frequently observed in several myopathies, in sarcopenia, as well as in denervation and disuse. Melatonin activity was investigated in undifferentiated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, after exposure to various apoptotic chemical triggers, chosen for their different mechanisms of action. Cells were pretreated with melatonin and then exposed to hydrogen peroxide, etoposide and staurosporine. Morphofunctional and molecular analyses show that in myoblasts melatonin prevents oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by chemicals following, at least in part, the mitochondria pathway. These results confirm melatonin ability to act as an antioxidant and antiapoptotic molecule in skeletal muscle cells, thus suggesting a possible therapeutic strategy for myopathies involving apoptosis misregulation. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:532-540, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059940

  16. Lymphotoxin beta receptor signaling limits mucosal damage through driving IL-23 production by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Macho-Fernandez, E; Koroleva, E P; Spencer, C M; Tighe, M; Torrado, E; Cooper, A M; Fu, Y-X; Tumanov, A V

    2015-03-01

    The immune mechanisms regulating epithelial cell repair after injury remain poorly defined. We demonstrate here that lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR) signaling in intestinal epithelial cells promotes self-repair after mucosal damage. Using a conditional gene-targeted approach, we demonstrate that LTβR signaling in intestinal epithelial cells is essential for epithelial interleukin-23 (IL-23) production and protection against epithelial injury. We further show that epithelial-derived IL-23 promotes mucosal wound healing by inducing the IL-22-mediated proliferation and survival of epithelial cells and mucus production. Additionally, we identified CD4(-)CCR6(+)T-bet(-) RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt)(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cells as the main producers of protective IL-22 after epithelial damage. Thus, our results reveal a novel role for LTβR signaling in epithelial cells in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis to limit mucosal damage. PMID:25183367

  17. PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORINATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORONATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS
    Leona H. Clark and Hugh A. Barton
    US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC

    The physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to be presente...

  18. Record of Some Chemical Residues in Poultry Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadelman, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    How pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and heavy metals might get into poultry meat or eggs is reviewed. Several case studies where chemicals were found in poultry products are discussed. It can be concluded that the poultry industry is striving and generally succeeding in producing safe and nutritious meat and eggs. (Author/EB)

  19. Cyanobacterial chassis engineering for enhancing production of biofuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinyan; Sun, Tao; Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-04-01

    To reduce dependence on fossil fuels and curb greenhouse effect, cyanobacteria have emerged as an important chassis candidate for producing biofuels and chemicals due to their capability to directly utilize sunlight and CO2 as the sole energy and carbon sources, respectively. Recent progresses in developing and applying various synthetic biology tools have led to the successful constructions of novel pathways of several dozen green fuels and chemicals utilizing cyanobacterial chassis. Meanwhile, it is increasingly recognized that in order to enhance productivity of the synthetic cyanobacterial systems, optimizing and engineering more robust and high-efficient cyanobacterial chassis should not be omitted. In recent years, numerous research studies have been conducted to enhance production of green fuels and chemicals through cyanobacterial chassis modifications involving photosynthesis, CO2 uptake and fixation, products exporting, tolerance, and cellular regulation. In this article, we critically reviewed recent progresses and universal strategies in cyanobacterial chassis engineering to make it more robust and effective for bio-chemicals production. PMID:26883347

  20. Chemical composition of defatted cottonseed and soy meal products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as ...

  1. Production of Korean Idiomatic Utterances Following Left- and Right-Hemisphere Damage: Acoustic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Seung-yun; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the effects of left- and right-hemisphere damage (LHD and RHD) on the production of idiomatic or literal expressions utilizing acoustic analyses. Method: Twenty-one native speakers of Korean with LHD or RHD and in a healthy control (HC) group produced 6 ditropically ambiguous (idiomatic or literal) sentences in 2…

  2. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICAL MUTAGENS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This novel assay is based on changes in melting/annealing behavior and facilitated using certain dyes that increase their fluorescence upon association with double stranded (ds)DNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) ra...

  3. Reduced product yield in chemical processes by second law effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Funk, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of second law effects in chemical processes, where product yield is explicitly related to the individual irreversibilities within the process to indicate a maximum theoretical yield, is presented. Examples are given that indicate differences between first and second law approaches toward process efficiency and process yield. This analysis also expresses production capacity in terms of the heating value of a product. As a result, it is particularly convenient in analyzing fuel conversion plants and their potential for improvement. Relationships are also given for the effects of irreversibilities on requirements for process heat and for feedstocks.

  4. DNA Strand Damage Product Analysis Provides Evidence that the Tumor Cell-Specific Cytotoxin Tirapazamine Produces Hydroxyl Radical and Acts as a Surrogate for O2

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Junnotula, Venkatraman; Daniels, J. Scott; Greenberg, Marc M.; Gates, Kent S.

    2010-01-01

    The compound 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine, TPZ) is a clinically-promising anticancer agent that selectively kills the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors. It has long been known that, under hypoxic conditions, TPZ causes DNA strand damage that is initiated by the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from the deoxyribose phosphate backbone of duplex DNA but exact chemical mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Here we describe detailed characterization of sugar-derived products arising from TPZ-mediated strand damage. We find that the action of TPZ on duplex DNA under hypoxic conditions generates 5-methylene-2-furanone (6), oligonucleotide 3′-phosphoglycolates (7), malondialdehyde equivalents (8 or 9), and furfural (10). These results provide evidence that TPZ-mediated strand damage arises via hydrogen atom abstraction from both the most hindered (C1′) and least hindered (C4′ and C5′) positions of the deoxyribose sugars in the double helix. The products observed are identical to those produced by hydroxyl radical. Additional experiments were conducted to better understand the chemical pathways by which TPZ generates the observed DNA-damage products. Consistent with previous work showing that TPZ can substitute for molecular oxygen in DNA damage reactions, it is found that, under anaerobic conditions, reaction of TPZ with a discrete, photogenerated C1′-radical in a DNA 2′-oligodeoxynucleotide cleanly generates the 2-deoxyribonolactone lesion (5) that serves as the precursor to 5-methylene-2-furanone (6). Overall, the results provide insight regarding the chemical structure of the DNA lesions that confront cellular repair, transcription, and replication machinery following exposure to TPZ and offer new information relevant to the chemical mechanisms underlying TPZ-mediated strand cleavage. PMID:17900117

  5. Defining the Product Chemical Space of Monoterpenoid Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Boxue; Poulter, C. Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases create diverse carbon skeletons by catalyzing complex carbocation rearrangements, making them particularly challenging for enzyme function prediction. To begin to address this challenge, we have developed a computational approach for the systematic enumeration of terpenoid carbocations. Application of this approach allows us to systematically define a nearly complete chemical space for the potential carbon skeletons of products from monoterpenoid synthases. Specifically, 18758 carbocations were generated, which we cluster into 74 cyclic skeletons. Five of the 74 skeletons are found in known natural products; some of the others are plausible for new functions, either in nature or engineered. This work systematizes the description of function for this class of enzymes, and provides a basis for predicting functions of uncharacterized enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first computational study to explore the complete product chemical space of this important class of enzymes. PMID:27517297

  6. Defining the Product Chemical Space of Monoterpenoid Synthases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Boxue; Poulter, C Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    Terpenoid synthases create diverse carbon skeletons by catalyzing complex carbocation rearrangements, making them particularly challenging for enzyme function prediction. To begin to address this challenge, we have developed a computational approach for the systematic enumeration of terpenoid carbocations. Application of this approach allows us to systematically define a nearly complete chemical space for the potential carbon skeletons of products from monoterpenoid synthases. Specifically, 18758 carbocations were generated, which we cluster into 74 cyclic skeletons. Five of the 74 skeletons are found in known natural products; some of the others are plausible for new functions, either in nature or engineered. This work systematizes the description of function for this class of enzymes, and provides a basis for predicting functions of uncharacterized enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first computational study to explore the complete product chemical space of this important class of enzymes. PMID:27517297

  7. Testing for supply-limited chemical erosion in field measurements of soil production and chemical depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Riebe, C. S.; Hahm, W. J.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the controls on chemical erosion rates in eroding landscapes is of wide interest because chemical erosion influences nutrient supply, landscape evolution, soil production, and Earth's long-term climate. Several field studies have suggested that chemical erosion rates increase in proportion to the rates that minerals are supplied to the regolith, a condition known as supply-limited chemical erosion. This condition, if broadly applicable, implies strong tectonic control of silicate weathering rates and hence Earth's long-term climate. While it is plausible that chemical erosion rates should scale with supply rates, attempts to test whether chemical erosion rates are in fact supply-limited at any given site are hampered by several difficulties. For instance, the quantities that are most frequently used to test for supply limitation (i.e., rates of chemical erosion and denudation in regolith-based studies, and fluxes of sediment and solutes in river-based studies) are artifactually correlated, which complicates attempts to regress one variable against another. Here we present a statistical method for testing for supply-limited chemical erosion, and we apply this method to a number of published datasets. Our results suggest that many datasets are inadequate for determining whether chemical erosion in regolith is or is not supply-limited, largely because the uncertainties on the regression parameters are large. This in turn suggests that new measurements across a wide range of supply rates are needed to determine the strength of tectonic controls on chemical erosion, and, ultimately, to test hypotheses about feedbacks between surface processes, silicate weathering, and the long-term evolution of Earth's climate.

  8. New Vistas in Chemical Product and Process Design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Babi, Deenesh K; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-06-01

    Design of chemicals-based products is broadly classified into those that are process centered and those that are product centered. In this article, the designs of both classes of products are reviewed from a process systems point of view; developments related to the design of the chemical product, its corresponding process, and its integration are highlighted. Although significant advances have been made in the development of systematic model-based techniques for process design (also for optimization, operation, and control), much work is needed to reach the same level for product design. Timeline diagrams illustrating key contributions in product design, process design, and integrated product-process design are presented. The search for novel, innovative, and sustainable solutions must be matched by consideration of issues related to the multidisciplinary nature of problems, the lack of data needed for model development, solution strategies that incorporate multiscale options, and reliability versus predictive power. The need for an integrated model-experiment-based design approach is discussed together with benefits of employing a systematic computer-aided framework with built-in design templates. PMID:27088667

  9. 75 FR 51734 - Testing of Certain High Production Volume Chemical Substances; Third Group of Chemical Substances...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... issue of February 25, 2010 (75 FR 8575). Any use of the term ``manufacture'' in this document will... departure. II. Background In the Federal Register issue of February 25, 2010 (75 FR 8575) (FRL-8805-8), EPA... certain high production volume (HPV) chemical substances to conduct testing to obtain screening level...

  10. Combusted but not smokeless tobacco products cause DNA damage in oral cavity cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, G L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate genomic DNA damage in human oral cavity cells after exposure to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs). The oral carcinoma cell line 101A, gingival epithelial cells HGEC, and gingival fibroblasts HGF were exposed to TPM (total particulate matter from 3R4F cigarettes), ST/CAS (2S3 smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva), and NIC (nicotine). Treatments were for 24 h using TPM at its EC-50 doses, ST/CAS and NIC at doses with equi-nicotine units, and high doses for ST/CAS and NIC. Comet assays showed that TPM, but not ST/CAS or NIC, caused substantial DNA breaks in cells; only the high ST/CAS dose caused weak DNA damage. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence for γ-H2AX protein. These data revealed that the combusted TPP caused substantial DNA damage in all cell types, whereas the two non-combusted TPPs exerted no or only minimal DNA damage. They support epidemiologic evidence on the relative risk associated with consumption of non-combusted versus combusted tobacco products, and help to understand potential genotoxic effects of such products on oral cavity cells. PMID:24780532

  11. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato.

    PubMed

    Itako, Adriana Terumi; Tolentino Júnior, João Batista; Silva Júnior, Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da; Soman, José Marcelo; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L(-1)), fluazinam (0.25 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L(-1) + 2.2 g.L(-1)), copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L(-1)), mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L(-1) + 0.60 g.L(-1)), and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L(-1))) on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease) was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar. PMID:26413050

  12. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Itako, Adriana Terumi; Tolentino, João Batista; da Silva, Tadeu Antônio Fernandes; Soman, José Marcelo; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L−1), fluazinam (0.25 g.L−1), pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L−1), pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L−1 + 2.2 g.L−1), copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L−1), mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L−1 + 0.60 g.L−1), and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L−1)) on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease) was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar. PMID:26413050

  13. Comparing Chemical Mechanisms using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. It is produced by reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight [Atkinson,2000]. The chemistry of intermediate species formed during VOC degradation show a time dependence and impacts the amount of O3 produced by the VOC [Butler et al., 2011]. Representing the intricacies of these reactions is not viable for chemical mechanisms used in global and regional models due to the computational resources available. Thus, chemical mechanisms reduce the amount of reactions either by lumping chemical species together as a model species, reducing the number of reaction pathways or both. As different chemical mechanisms use varying reduction techniques and assumptions especially with respect to the intermediate degradation species, it is important to compare the temporal evolution of ozone production obtained from differing chemical mechanisms. In this study, chemical mechanisms are compared using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials (TOPP) [Butler et al.,2011]. TOPPs measure the effect of a VOC on the odd oxygen family (Ox), which includes O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and other species whose cycling effect O3 and NO2 production. TOPP values are obtained via a boxmodel run lasting seven diurnal cycles and tagging all species produced during VOC degradation; this enables the Ox production to be attributed to the VOC. This technique enables the temporal evolution of a VOCs' Ox production to be compared between the mechanisms. Comparing the TOPP profiles of the VOCs obtained using different mechanisms shows the effect of reduction techniques implemented by the mechanism and also allows a comparison of the tropospheric chemistry represented in the mechanisms. [Atkinson,2000] Atkinson, R. (2000). Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx. Atmospheric Environment, 34:2063-2101 [Butler et al., 2011] Butler, T. M

  14. The new role of HSE in chemical product development

    SciTech Connect

    Purinton, R.J. Jr.; Manning, T.S.; Dowell, S.

    1996-11-01

    Today, Health, Safety, and Environmental issues take a more prominent role than ever before in chemical product development for the global oilfield service industry. Prior to widespread regulatory guidelines, technical problems were solved and well treatment programs were developed using the chemicals which performed the best and were the least expensive for the application. HSE concerns were sometimes addressed from a remedial standpoint, rather than a preventive one throughout the process. With a clearer understanding of the potential impact of chemicals upon people and the environment, along with the ever-increasing array of government regulations, service companies are taking a new approach to product development. HSE-related risks and costs are being assessed early and continued throughout chemical development, with both product and treatment process features then designed accordingly. One service company reflects this approach with its {open_quotes}cradle-to-grave{close_quotes} Product Development and Stewardship program. Integral to this program are planned HSE assessments at each step of development, including Feasibility, Lab Development, Field Testing, Manufacturing, and Commercial Field Introduction. These assessments provide the data necessary to {open_quotes}engineer-in{close_quotes} solutions to potential HSE-related problems, produce viable Risk Management Plans, and promote a smoother path to commercialization. This avoids arriving at the commercial launch point with a product which poses unacceptably high personal or environmental risks, may be restricted or banned in key markets, or requires lengthy and expensive government registrations. In order to optimize R&E resources and ensure continuous evaluation, decision points (to continue, modify, or abandon) are built into the process. Early HSE screenings must be accurate but also relatively quick and inexpensive to be meaningful and economical.

  15. A 'Fine' chemical industry for life science products: green solutions to chemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, A; Straathof, A J J; van der Wielen, L A M

    2003-01-01

    Modern biotechnology, in combination with chemistry and process technology, is crucial for the development of new clean and cost effective manufacturing concepts for fine-chemical, food specialty and pharmaceutical products. The impact of biocatalysis on the fine-chemicals industry is presented, where reduction of process development time, the number of reaction steps and the amount of waste generated per kg of end product are the main targets. Integration of biosynthesis and organic chemistry is seen as a key development. The advances in bioseparation technology need to keep pace with the rate of development of novel bio- or chemocatalytic process routes with revised demands on process technology. The need for novel integrated reactors is also presented. The necessary acceleration of process development and reduction of the time-to-market seem well possible, particularly by integrating high-speed experimental techniques and predictive modelling tools. This is crucial for the development of a more sustainable fine-chemicals industry. The evolution of novel 'green' production routes for semi-synthetic antibiotics (SSAs) that are replacing existing chemical processes serves as a recent and relevant case study of this ongoing integration of disciplines. We will also show some challenges in this specific field. PMID:12747542

  16. Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

    1983-06-01

    This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

  17. Ozone vegetation damage effects on gross primary productivity in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Unger, N.

    2014-09-01

    We apply an off-line process-based vegetation model (the Yale Interactive Terrestrial Biosphere model) to assess the impacts of ozone (O3) vegetation damage on gross primary productivity (GPP) in the United States during the past decade (1998-2007). The model's GPP simulation is evaluated at 40 sites of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) synthesis. The ecosystem-scale model version reproduces interannual variability and seasonality of GPP at most sites, especially in croplands. Inclusion of the O3 damage impact decreases biases of simulated GPP at most of the NACP sites. The simulation with the O3 damage effect reproduces 64% of the observed variance in summer GPP and 42% on the annual average. Based on a regional gridded simulation over the US, summertime average O3-free GPP is 6.1 g C m-2 day-1 (9.5 g C m-2 day-1 in the east of 95° W and 3.9 g C m-2 day-1 in the west). O3 damage decreases GPP by 4-8% on average in the eastern US and leads to significant decreases of 11-17% in east coast hot spots. Sensitivity simulations show that a 25% decrease in surface O3 concentration halves the average GPP damage to only 2-4%, suggesting the substantial co-benefits to ecosystem health that may be achieved via O3 air pollution control.

  18. Chemical Conversion of Energetic Materials to Higher Value Products

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A R; Hsu, P C; Coburn, M D; Schmidt, R D; Pagoria, P F; Lee, G S

    2005-04-19

    The objective of this program is to develop new processes for the disposal of surplus energetic materials. Disposal through open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) is considered less attractive today due to environmental, cost and safety concerns. The use of energetic materials as chemical feedstocks for higher value products can provide environmentally sound and cost-effective alternatives to OB/OD. Our recent studies on the conversion of surplus energetic materials (Explosive D, TNT) to higher value products will be described.

  19. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Herrgård, Markus J

    2013-09-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes associated with the development and implementation of a sustainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production. PMID:23520143

  20. Mediators of Inflammation-Induced Bone Damage in Arthritis and Their Control by Herbal Products

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Astry, Brian; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology) in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis. PMID:23476694

  1. Chemical genoprotection: reducing biological damage to as low as reasonably achievable levels

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, M; Armero, D; Martínez-Beneyto, Y; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Fernandez, H; Alcaraz-Saura, M; Canteras, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant substances present in the human diet with an antimutagenic protective capacity against genotoxic damage induced by exposure to X-rays in an attempt to reduce biological damage to as low a level as reasonably possible. Methods Ten compounds were assessed using the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) cytome test. The compounds studied were added to human blood at 25 μM 5 min before exposure to irradiation by 2 Gy of X-rays. Results The protective capacity of the antioxidant substances assessed was from highest to lowest according to the frequency of the MN generated by X-ray exposure: rosmarinic acid = carnosic acid = δ-tocopherol = l-acid ascorbic = apigenin = amifostine (P < 0.001) > green tea extract = diosmine = rutin = dimetylsulfoxide (P < 0.05) > irradiated control. The reduction in genotoxic damage with the radiation doses administered reached 58%, which represents a significant reduction in X-ray-induced chromosomal damage (P < 0.001). This degree of protection is greater than that obtained with amifostine, a radioprotective compound used in radiotherapy and which is characterised by its high toxicity. Conclusion Several antioxidant substances, common components of the human diet and lacking toxicity, offer protection from the biological harm induced by ionizing radiation. Administering these protective substances to patients before radiological exploration should be considered, even in the case of small radiation doses and regardless of the biological damage expected. PMID:21697157

  2. Hazard Classification of Household Chemical Products in Korea according to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and labeling of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to review the validity of the need for the application of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) to household chemical products in Korea. The study also aimed to assess the severity of health and environmental hazards of household chemical products using the GHS. Methods 135 products were classified as ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ and 98 products were classified as ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides.’ The current status of carcinogenic classification of GHS and carcinogenicity was examined for 272 chemical substances contained in household chemical products by selecting the top 11 products for each of the product categories. In addition, the degree of toxicity was assessed through analysis of whether the standard of the Republic of Korea’s regulations on household chemical products had been exceeded or not. Results According to GHS health and environmental hazards, “acute toxicity (oral)” was found to be the highest for two product groups, ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’, and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ (result of classification of 233 household chemical products) at 37.8% and 52.0% respectively. In an analysis of carcinogenicity assuming a threshold of IARC 2B for the substances in household chemical products, we found ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ to contain 12 chemical substances and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ 11 chemical substances. Conclusion Some of the household chemical products were found to have a high hazard level including acute toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity. Establishing a hazard information delivery system including the application of GHS to household chemical products in Korea is urgent as well. PMID:24472347

  3. Protective effect of pomegranate-derived products on UVB-mediated damage in human reconstituted skin.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Zaid, Mohammad Abu; Khan, Naghma; Dreher, Mark; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB (290-320 nm) component, is the primary cause of many adverse biological effects including photoageing and skin cancer. UVB radiation causes DNA damage, protein oxidation and induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Photochemoprevention via the use of botanical antioxidants in affording protection to human skin against UVB damage is receiving increasing attention. Pomegranate, from the tree Punica granatum, contains anthocyanins and hydrolysable tannins and possesses strong antioxidant and anti-tumor-promoting properties. In this study, we determined the effect of pomegranate-derived products--POMx juice, POMx extract and pomegranate oil (POMo)--against UVB-mediated damage using reconstituted human skin (EpiDerm(TM) FT-200). EpiDerm was treated with POMx juice (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well), POMx extract (5-10 microg/0.1 ml/well) and POMo (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well) for 1 h prior to UVB (60 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation and was harvested 12 h post-UVB to assess protein oxidation, markers of DNA damage and photoageing by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), (ii) 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), (iii) protein oxidation and (iv) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression. We also found that pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) collagenase (MMP-1), (ii) gelatinase (MMP-2, MMP-9), (iii) stromelysin (MMP-3), (iv) marilysin (MMP-7), (v) elastase (MMP-12) and (vi) tropoelastin. Gelatin zymography revealed that pomegranate-derived products inhibited UVB-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Pomegranate-derived products also caused a decrease in UVB-induced protein expression of c-Fos and phosphorylation of c-Jun. Collectively, these results suggest that all three pomegranate-derived products may be useful

  4. Production of fuels and chemicals from apple pomace

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, Y.D.

    1987-03-01

    Nearly 36 million tons of apples are produced annually in the US. Approximately 45% of the total US apple production is used for processing purposes. The primary by-product of apple processing is apple pomace. It consists of the presscake resulting from pressing apples for juice or cider, including the presscake obtained in pressing peel and core wastes generated in the manufacture of apple sauce or slices. More than 500 food processing plants in the US produce a total of about 1.3 million metric tons of apple pomace each year, and it is likely that annual disposal fees exceed $10 million. Apple pomace has the potential to be used for the production of fuels (ethanol and biogas containing 60% methane) and food-grade chemicals. These uses will be reviewed in this article.

  5. [Sustainable production of bulk chemicals by application of "white biotechnology"].

    PubMed

    Patel, M K; Dornburg, V; Hermann, B G; Shen, Li; van Overbeek, Leo

    2008-12-01

    Practically all organic chemicals and plastics are nowadays produced from crude oil and natural gas. However, it is possible to produce a wide range of bulk chemicals from renewable resources by application of biotechnology. This paper focuses on White Biotechnology, which makes use of bacteria (or yeasts) or enzymes for the conversion of the fermentable sugar to the target product. It is shown that White Biotechnology offers substantial savings of non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for nearly all of the products studied. Under favorable boundary conditions up to two thirds (67%) of the current non-renewable energy use for the production of the selected chemicals can be saved by 2050 if substantial technological progress is made and if the use of lignocellulosic feedstocks is successfully developed. The analysis for Europe (E.U. 25 countries) shows that land requirements related to White Biotechnology chemicals are not likely to become a critical issue in the next few decades, especially considering the large unused and underutilized resources in Eastern Europe. Substantial macroeconomic savings can be achieved under favourable boundary conditions. In principle, natural bacteria and enzymes can be used for White Biotechnology but, according to many experts in the fields, Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) will be necessary in order to achieve the high yields, concentrations and productivities that are required to reach economic viability. Safe containment and inactivation of GMOs after release is very important because not all possible implications caused by the interaction of recombinant genes with other populations can be foreseen. If adequate precautionary measures are taken, the risks related to the use of genetically modified organisms in White Biotechnology are manageable. We conclude that the core requirements to be fulfilled in order to make clear steps towards a bio-based chemical industry are substantial technological progress in the

  6. Diffusion of fission products and radiation damage in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Johan B.

    2013-11-01

    A major problem with most of the present nuclear reactors is their safety in terms of the release of radioactivity into the environment during accidents. In some of the future nuclear reactor designs, i.e. Generation IV reactors, the fuel is in the form of coated spherical particles, i.e. TRISO (acronym for triple coated isotropic) particles. The main function of these coating layers is to act as diffusion barriers for radioactive fission products, thereby keeping these fission products within the fuel particles, even under accident conditions. The most important coating layer is composed of polycrystalline 3C-SiC. This paper reviews the diffusion of the important fission products (silver, caesium, iodine and strontium) in SiC. Because radiation damage can induce and enhance diffusion, the paper also briefly reviews damage created by energetic neutrons and ions at elevated temperatures, i.e. the temperatures at which the modern reactors will operate, and the annealing of the damage. The interaction between SiC and some fission products (such as Pd and I) is also briefly discussed. As shown, one of the key advantages of SiC is its radiation hardness at elevated temperatures, i.e. SiC is not amorphized by neutrons or bombardment at substrate temperatures above 350 °C. Based on the diffusion coefficients of the fission products considered, the review shows that at the normal operating temperatures of these new reactors (i.e. less than 950 °C) the SiC coating layer is a good diffusion barrier for these fission products. However, at higher temperatures the design of the coated particles needs to be adapted, possibly by adding a thin layer of ZrC.

  7. Laser induced damage characteristics of fused silica optics treated by wet chemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Wei; Xu, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    Laser damage to fused silica continues a main issue of high-power/energy laser systems. HF-based etching technique is known to mitigate laser damage initiation and growth under UV laser illumination. The responses of material surface properties, especially surface damage characteristics to various etching parameters are questioned in the article. Fused silica was submerged into HF-based etchants (HF, NH4F:HF, HF:HNO3 with diverse concentrations) in an attempt to improve its laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT). The results have evidenced that the LIDT relies on, to a greater degree, the etched thickness and the etchant composition. The secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) testing was aimed at relating the LIDT to certain metallic contaminant; however, the LIDT exhibits weak direct correlation with Ce, La, Ca, Fe contaminants. The surfaces with the highest LIDT are, more often than not, such that the surface roughness is <10 nm RMS and few metallic impurities are present. In addition, we tried to link the LIDT to the hardness and Young's modulus of fused silica, but no testing data show that there exists direct dependence of the LIDT on hardness and Young's modulus, which are actually independent of the removed thickness.

  8. Improving UV laser damage threshold of fused silica optics by wet chemical etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao; Yang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Fused silica is widely used in high-power laser systems because of its good optical performance and mechanical properties. However, laser damage initiation and growth induced by 355 nm laser illumination in optical elements have become a bottleneck in the development of high energy laser system. In order to improve the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), the fused silica optics were treated by two types of HF-based etchants: 1.7%wt. HF acid and buffer oxide etchant (BOE: the mixture of 0.4%wt. HF and 12%wt. NH4F), respectively, for varied etching time. Damage testing shows that both the etchants increase the damage threshold at a certain depth of material removal, but further removal of material lowers the LIDT markedly. The etching rates of both etchants keep steady in our processing procedure, ~58 μg/min and ~85 μg/min, respectively. The micro-surface roughness (RMS and PV) increases as etching time extends. The hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) of the fused silica etched for diverse time, measured by nano-indenter, show no solid evidence that LIDT can be related to hardness or Young's modulus.

  9. Electrochemical activity evaluation of chemically damaged carbon nanotube with palladium nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Jeon, Seungwon

    2015-05-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) has unique electrical and structural properties due to it's sp2 π-conjugative structure that leads to the higher electrocatalysis. The π-conjugative structure, that allows the CNT interact with various compounds and metal nanoparticles (NPs) through π-π electronic interaction. However, the damage of π-conjugative sidewall of CNT that can be hinder the electrocatalytic activity has found. For this study, the CNT, as base material, has been prepared through a conventional acid treatment method up to 15 h; the higher degree of sidewall damage has been observed in last 5 h during treatment period. The short and long term acid treated (denoted as CNT and CNT-COOH, respectively) CNTs have been subsequently fabricated with palladium NPs (denoted as CNT/Pd and CNT-Pd, respectively) and employed as ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) catalysts. The CNT-Pd displays a poor electrocatalytic performance towards EOR than that of CNT/Pd due to the damage of π-conjugative sidewall. The kinetic parameters including poisoning tolerance have also been hampered by the surface damage. The CNT/Pd (∼3.3 folds) and CNT-Pd (∼1.5 folds) are express higher electrocatalytic activity and poisoning tolerance than that of Pd/C while Pd mass loading remains in the same amount.

  10. (WASHINGTON, DC) A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous natural and man-made agents are continuously released into the environment due to human activity. Many of these agents cause irreversible damage to the normal biological functions leading to morbidity and mortality in the exposed organisms. The possibility of deliberat...

  11. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous natural and man-made agents are continuously released into the environment due to human activity. Many of these agents cause irreversible damage to the normal biological functions leading to morbidity and mortality in the exposed organisms. The possibility of deliberat...

  12. Chemical bond structure and MOSFET device damages of electron beam cured siloxane spin-on-dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the properties of electron beam cured SOG (spin-on-glass) films in terms of the chemical bond structure and accompanying device damages. It is observed that e-beam cured SOG films do not show the Si-CH bonds in the FT-IR spectra but still have the carbons in the film which are thermally stable. As for the device damage, the experimental result shows that the threshold voltage of nMOSFET decreases by positive charging of gate oxide after e-beam curing process and it shows antenna ratio independence. Also, the variation of threshold voltage is largely affected by the cathode voltage, which determines the electron energy and interlayer dielectric thickness. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Biomedically relevant chemical and physical properties of coal combustion products.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, G L

    1983-01-01

    The evaluation of the potential public and occupational health hazards of developing and existing combustion processes requires a detailed understanding of the physical and chemical properties of effluents available for human and environmental exposures. These processes produce complex mixtures of gases and aerosols which may interact synergistically or antagonistically with biological systems. Because of the physicochemical complexity of the effluents, the biomedically relevant properties of these materials must be carefully assessed. Subsequent to release from combustion sources, environmental interactions further complicate assessment of the toxicity of combustion products. This report provides an overview of the biomedically relevant physical and chemical properties of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash is presented as a model complex mixture for health and safety evaluation of combustion processes. PMID:6337824

  14. Early quark production and approach to chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, D.; Hebenstreit, F.; Berges, J.

    2016-04-01

    We perform real-time lattice simulations of out-of-equilibrium quark production in non-Abelian gauge theory in 3 +1 dimensions. Our simulations include the backreaction of quarks onto the dynamical gluon sector, which is particularly relevant for strongly correlated quarks. We observe fast isotropization and universal behavior of quarks and gluons at weak coupling and establish a quantitative connection to previous pure glue results. In order to understand the strongly correlated regime, we perform simulations for a large number of flavors and compare them to those obtained with two light quark flavors. By doing this we are able to provide estimates of the chemical equilibration time.

  15. Reduced hazard chemicals for solid rocket motor production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1995-01-01

    During the last three years. the NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Thiokol Corporation have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem-solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this challenge.

  16. From the Cover: Specific chemical and structural damage to proteins produced by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weik, Martin; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Kryger, Gitay; McSweeney, Sean; Raves, Maria L.; Harel, Michal; Gros, Piet; Silman, Israel; Kroon, Jan; Sussman, Joel L.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation damage is an inherent problem in x-ray crystallography. It usually is presumed to be nonspecific and manifested as a gradual decay in the overall quality of data obtained for a given crystal as data collection proceeds. Based on third-generation synchrotron x-ray data, collected at cryogenic temperatures, we show for the enzymes Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase and hen egg white lysozyme that synchrotron radiation also can cause highly specific damage. Disulfide bridges break, and carboxyl groups of acidic residues lose their definition. Highly exposed carboxyls, and those in the active site of both enzymes, appear particularly susceptible. The catalytic triad residue, His-440, in acetylcholinesterase, also appears to be much more sensitive to radiation damage than other histidine residues. Our findings have direct practical implications for routine x-ray data collection at high-energy synchrotron sources. Furthermore, they provide a direct approach for studying the radiation chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids at a detailed, structural level and also may yield information concerning putative "weak links" in a given biological macromolecule, which may be of structural and functional significance.

  17. 40 CFR 799.5085 - Chemical testing requirements for first group of high production volume chemicals (HPV1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical testing requirements for first group of high production volume chemicals (HPV1). 799.5085 Section 799.5085 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND...

  18. 40 CFR 799.5087 - Chemical testing requirements for second group of high production volume chemicals (HPV2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical testing requirements for second group of high production volume chemicals (HPV2). 799.5087 Section 799.5087 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND...

  19. 40 CFR 799.5089 - Chemical testing requirements for third group of high production volume chemicals (HPV3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical testing requirements for third group of high production volume chemicals (HPV3). 799.5089 Section 799.5089 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND...

  20. Mechanism of action of lung damage caused by a nanofilm spray product.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S; Nørgaard, Asger W; Hansen, Jitka S; Sørli, Jorid B; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Foged, Camilla

    2014-08-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  1. Mechanism of Action of Lung Damage Caused by a Nanofilm Spray Product

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W.; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S.; Nørgaard, Asger W.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Sørli, Jorid B.; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  2. Product analysis of partial discharge damage to oil-impregnated insulation paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaming; Liao, Ruijin; Yang, Lijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Surface products of oil-impregnated insulation paper during the damage process caused by partial discharge (PD), as well as gas within the cavity, were studied. An optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to investigate surface morphology, while an infrared spectroscopy (IR) and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study surface products and their components. The volume variation in cavity gas was also analyzed. Furthermore, gas constituents and their relevant contents were studied using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The study results reveal the following: during the PD damage process, the total gas volume and the content of electronegative gasses alternately decline and increase, while discharge types alternate between pulse type and pseudo-glow type (or glow type); “surface droplets” and “crystalline solids” appear on the insulation surface one after another; surface droplets mainly consist of (Cdbnd O)-group-containing compounds, whereas crystalline solids are mainly carboxylic acids, with carboxyl groups also found in cellulose chains; and the discharge type related to the oxidization of decomposition products is the main factor that determines the state (liquid or solid) of the surface products.

  3. Chemical conversion of energetic materials to higher value products

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A.R.; Sanner, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    Objective of this program is to examine new routes for disposal of energetic materials, as there is need to reduce the stockpile of conventional munitions. Disposal through destruction (burning, detonation) is less feasible today due to environmental, cost and safety concerns. Chemical conversion of energetic materials to higher value products useful in civilian and military applications is one area being explored. Initial focus has been on the conversion of TNT to other materials. Reduction of TNT to aminodinitrotoluenes, diaminonitrotoluenes and triaminotoluene is well known. Conversion of these TNT reduction products to corresponding iminodiacetic acid derivatives by N-dialkylation with chloroacetic acid should provide chelators of heavy metals. The preparation and characterization of chelating resins derived from TNT-related molecules and polystyrene are described.

  4. Utilization of oleo-chemical industry by-products for biosurfactant production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are the surface active compounds produced by micro-organisms. The eco-friendly and biodegradable nature of biosurfactants makes their usage more advantageous over chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants encompass the properties of dropping surface tension, stabilizing emulsions, promoting foaming and are usually non- toxic and biodegradable. Biosurfactants offer advantages over their synthetic counterparts in many applications ranging from environmental, food, and biomedical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The important environmental applications of biosurfactants include bioremediation and dispersion of oil spills, enhanced oil recovery and transfer of crude oil. The emphasis of present review shall be with reference to the commercial production, current developments and future perspectives of a variety of approaches of biosurfactant production from the micro-organisms isolated from various oil- contaminated sites and from the by-products of oleo-chemical industry wastes/ by-products viz. used edible oil, industrial residues, acid oil, deodorizer distillate, soap-stock etc. PMID:24262384

  5. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of pristine, electrochromically damaged, and photochromically damaged KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) using surface analytical and optical spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Quagliano, J.R.; Petrin, R.R.; Trujillo, T.C.; Cockroft, N.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Maggiore, C.J.; Jacco, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    A variety of experimental techniques were employed to study the properties of electrochromically (EC) damaged, photochromically (PC) damaged, and pristine KTiOP0{sub 4} (KTP). Additionally, nonlinear optical calculations were performed to complement the experimental work in an effort to elucidate the respective mechanisms operative in producing EC and PC damage to KTP. Several independent experiments indicate that there is Ti deficiency in the EC damaged material, which is due to migration of these ions to the electrode surface. The laser experiments indicate that UV radiation can produce reversible PC damage. UV-producing SFG processes accidentally occurring in SHG cut KTP may lead to macroscopic damage. It must be emphasized that a fundamentally different mechanism is responsible for EC damaged versus PC damaged KTP.

  6. Rapid estimation of chromosomal damage in yeast due to the effects of environmental chemicals using pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, J; Tosch, M; AlBaz, I; Lochmann, E R

    1991-10-01

    We present a procedure to rapidly estimate the damage to yeast chromosomes by toxic chemicals. This procedure employs the following steps: incubation of yeast cells with the chemicals, DNA preparation in an agarose matrix, separation of chromosome-sized DNA molecules into reproducible band patterns by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and quantification of the intensity of chromosomal bands by densitometry. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and cis-Platinum(II) diamminedichloride (cisPT), both of which are known to interact with DNA, and trichlorethylen (TCE), for which such an effect has not been shown in yeast. Treatment of cells with MNNG and cisPt led to an impairment of the intensity of the band pattern to an extent dependent on the concentration of the chemicals applied. For TCE a similar effect could not be discerned. This procedure will be useful as a screening test for the estimation of the biological hazards of toxic chemicals. PMID:1769347

  7. Cerebral processing of proper and common nouns: Perception and production following left hemisphere damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Yun; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to further investigate hemispheric specialization for proper and common nouns by examining the ability of individuals with left hemisphere damage (LHD) to perceive and verbally reproduce famous names and matched common names compared with the performance of matched healthy controls (HC). Ten individuals with LHD due to stroke and 16 age- and education-matched HC completed recognition and production tasks of famous proper and common nouns. All tasks were designed as split-visual field experiments, modelled after the study done by Ohnesorge and Van Lancker. Results contribute to a better understanding of hemispheric roles in perception and production of famous proper nouns, suggesting that (1) both hemispheres can recognize famous proper nouns, possibly due to a right hemisphere role in personal relevance and (2) production of proper nouns as well as common nouns is associated with left hemisphere. PMID:25517886

  8. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  9. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  10. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  11. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  12. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pesticide chemicals and other residues... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.16 Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products. (a) Nonmeat ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or...

  13. Methods for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on human sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.

    1982-04-20

    Sperm tests provide a direct and effective way of identifying chemical agents that induce spermatogenic damage in man. Four human sperm tests are available: sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and the Y-body test. These sperm tests have numerous advantages over other approaches for assessing spermatogenic damage, and they have already been used to assess the effects of at least 85 different occupational, envionmental, and drug-related chemical exposures. When carefully controlled, seminal cytology appears to be statistically more sensitive than the other human sperm tests and should be considered an integral part of semen analysis when assessing induced spermatogenic damage.

  14. REMOTE SENSING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL PLANTS AND REFINERIES FOLLOWING HURRICANES KATRINA AND RITA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The massive destruction brought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita also impacted the many chemical plants and refineries in the region. The achievement of this rapid analysis capability highlights the advancement of this technology for air quality assessment and monitoring. Case st...

  15. A FLUORESCENCE-BASED SCREENING ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY GENOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of deliberate or accidental release of toxic chemicals in industrial, commercial or residential settings has indicated a need for rapid, cost-effective and versatile monitoring methods to prevent exposures to humans and ecosystems. Because many toxic industrial c...

  16. Geomechanical and Numerical Studies of Casing Damages in a Reservoir with Solid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadnejad, Mojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Casings damage is a usually reported incident during production in many fields. This incident is conventionally induced by compressional, tensional, burst or collapse forces applied to the casing string. Excessive anisotropic and non-uniform stresses, causing shear failure in unconsolidated reservoirs, are one of the main reasons reported for the casing failure. In this paper, geomechanical and finite element numerical analysis was applied to model hydraulic and mechanical interactions between casing, cement sheath and formations in a carbonate reservoir located in Southern of Iran. The geomechanical analysis indicated that significant in situ stresses induced as a result of the fault reactivation and pore pressure reduction due to reservoir depletion could be the potential reasons for the casing damage experienced in this field. To assess this, numerical analysis was carried out to simulate the casing in the presence of existing forces during drilling, completion and production phases. It was found that excessive and non-uniform stresses surrounding the wellbore together with pore pressure reduction caused the formation to loss its strength and fail. This shear failure results in solid production, creation of the cavities and deformation of the casing because of the excessive buckling force. In addition, a new empirical equation for prediction of ultimate strength of the casing was developed according to the parameters introduced by sensitivity analysis.

  17. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: Implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, R. A.

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation.

  18. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells.

    PubMed

    Deering, R A

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation. PMID:11539974

  19. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huijun; Smith, Catherine; Ansah, Charles; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2005-01-01

    Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent), cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid), benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular response to toxicants. PMID

  20. Disinfection by-products effect on swimmers oxidative stress and respiratory damage.

    PubMed

    Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Lucas-Cuevas, Ángel G; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Olaso-González, Gloria; Moliner-Martinez, Yolanda; Verdú-Andres, Jorge; Campins-Falco, Pilar; Gómez-Cabrera, M Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated through the reaction of chlorine with organic and inorganic matter in indoor swimming pools. Different DBPs are present in indoor swimming pools. This study evaluated the effects of different chlorinated formations in oxidative stress and lung damage in 20 swimmers after 40 min of aerobic swimming in 3 indoor pools with different characteristics. Biological samples were collected to measure lung damage (serum-surfactant-associated proteins A and B), oxidative stress parameters (plasma protein carbonylation and malondialdehyde, and whole-blood glutathione oxidation), and swimming exertion values (blood lactate) before and after exercise. Free chlorine and combined chlorine in water, and chlorine in air samples were determined in all the swimming pools. Chlorination as disinfection treatment led to the formation of chloramines in water samples, mainly mono- and dichloramine. However, free chlorine was the predominate species in ultraviolet-treated swimming pool. Levels of total chlorine increased as a function of the swimming activity in chlorinated swimming pools. The lower quality of the installation resulted in a higher content of total chlorine, especially in air samples, and therefore a higher exposure of the swimmer to DBPs. However, the concentration level of chlorinated DBPs did not result in significant variation in serum-surfactant-associated proteins A and oxidative stress parameters in swimmers. In conclusion, the quality of the installation affected the DBPs concentration; however, it did not lead to lung epithelial damage and oxidative stress parameters in swimmers. PMID:26364906

  1. Chemical lake restoration products: sediment stability and phosphorus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Flindt, Mogens R

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory experiments with sediments from three shallow Danish lakes were conducted to evaluate the effects of chemical lake restoration products during resuspension. Phosphorus (P) removal, sediment stability, sediment consolidation and color reduction were studied over time. The investigated products were aluminum (Al), Phoslock (a commercial bentonite product coated with lanthanum) and a combination of Al covered with bentonite (Al/Ben). All treatments effectively reduced the P concentration in the water. However, the treatments containing Al reduced the P concentration immediately after resuspension, whereas Phoslock required several days after resuspension to reduce the P concentration. Especially Phoslock, but also Al/Ben, increased the sediment stability threshold by 265% and 101%, respectively, whereas Al had no stabilizing effect. The fresh Al floc was resuspended 5x easier than untreated sediment. The largest consolidation of the sediment occurred with addition of Phoslock, followed by Al/Ben, while Al alone had no effect. Enhanced consolidation may be of importance for macrophyte colonisation of organic sediment. Phoslock improved the light climate moderately by removing color, whereas Al was very effective in removing color. Ben/Al showed intermediate effects on color reduction. These findings are important when decisions are made on restoration method for a specific lake, which may be more or less wind exposed. PMID:20055487

  2. Chemical contamination and transformation of soils in hydrocarbon production regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamotaev, I. V.; Ivanov, I. V.; Mikheev, P. V.; Nikonova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The current concepts of soil pollution and transformation in the regions of hydrocarbon production have been reviewed. The development of an oil field creates extreme conditions for pedogenesis. Tendencies in the radial migration, spatial distribution, metabolism, and accumulation of pollutants (oil, oil products, and attendant heavy metals) in soils of different bioclimatic zones have been analyzed. The radial and lateral mobility of pollution halos is a universal tendency in the technogenic transformation of soils and soil cover in the regions of hydrocarbon production. The biodegradation time of different hydrocarbon compounds strongly varies under different landscape conditions, from several months to several tens of years. The transformation of original (mineral and organic) soils to their technogenic modifications (mechanically disturbed, chemically contaminated, and chemo soils and chemozems) occurs in the impact zone of technogenic hydrocarbon fluxes under any physiographical conditions. The integrated use of the existing methods for the determination of the total content and qualitative composition of bituminous substances and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in combination with the chromatographic determination of normal alkanes and hydrocarbon gases, as well as innovative methods of studies, allows revealing new processes and genetic relationships in soils and studying the functioning of soils and soil cover. The study of the hydrocarbon contamination of soils is important for development of restoration measures and lays the groundwork for the ecological and hygienic regulation based on the zonation of soil and landscape resistance to different pollutants.

  3. Aerobic Damage to [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Activation Barriers for the Chemical Attachment of O2**

    PubMed Central

    Kubas, Adam; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are the best natural hydrogen-producing enzymes but their biotechnological exploitation is hampered by their extreme oxygen sensitivity. The free energy profile for the chemical attachment of O2 to the enzyme active site was investigated by using a range-separated density functional re-parametrized to reproduce high-level ab initio data. An activation free-energy barrier of 13 kcal mol−1 was obtained for chemical bond formation between the di-iron active site and O2, a value in good agreement with experimental inactivation rates. The oxygen binding can be viewed as an inner-sphere electron-transfer process that is strongly influenced by Coulombic interactions with the proximal cubane cluster and the protein environment. The implications of these results for future mutation studies with the aim of increasing the oxygen tolerance of this enzyme are discussed. PMID:24615978

  4. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  5. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production.

    PubMed

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  6. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  7. Biosynthesis and Chemical Synthesis of Presilphiperfolanol Natural Products**

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Allen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Presilphiperfolanols constitute a family of biosynthetically important sesquiterpenes that can rearrange to diverse sesquiterpenoid skeletons. While the origin of these natural products can be traced to simple linear terpene precursors, the details of the enzymatic cyclization mechanism that form the stereochemically dense tricyclic skeleton have required extensive biochemical, computational, and synthetic investigation. Parallel efforts to prepare the unique and intriguing structures of these compounds by total synthesis have also inspired novel strategies, resulting in two synthetic approaches and two completed syntheses. While the biosynthesis and chemical synthesis studies performed to date have provided much insight into the role and properties of these molecules, new questions regarding the biosynthesis of newer members of the family and subtle details of the cyclization mechanism have yet to be explored. PMID:24771653

  8. Production and physico-chemical characterisation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schulze Isfort, C; Rochnia, M

    2009-05-01

    Synthetic nanoscaled metal oxides are mainly produced by pyrogenic decomposition of precursors in the gas phase using a hot-wall or plasma reactor. Due to their low production rate and limited scalability, these processes are of minor technical relevance in manufacturing commercial quantities of nanoparticles. The most common and by far the most important industrial process is flame hydrolysis. In this process, a gaseous mixture of a metal chloride precursor, hydrogen and air is introduced in a closed and continuously operated flame reactor. The general mechanism of formation and growth of particles (e.g. silica) occurring in the flame is dominated by nucleation, coalescence (sintering) and coagulation (collision) of primary particles forming aggregated structures. The term 'aggregate' describes clusters of particles held together by strong chemical bonds. Agglomerates, however, are defined as loose accumulations of particles held together by hydrogen bonds for example. Although, a variety of physico-chemical methods exist to characterise pyrogenic oxides, the most important ones are analysis of the specific surface area by the so-called BET method, determination of the aggregate size by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and characterisation of the phase composition by means of X-ray analysis. PMID:19114092

  9. Production and Chemical Analysis of Cometary Ice Tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Gene D.; Whited, Linda J.; DeRuiter, Cynthia; Khare, Bishun N.; Patnaik, Archita; Sagan, Carl

    1996-07-01

    Organic heteropolymers that we call here ice tholin II have been produced by plasma discharge irradiation of water/methanol/carbon dioxide/ethane cocondensed ices in a rough simulation of cometary chemistry. The radiation yield of these organic heteropolymers is approximately 10-26g/eV. Intermediate products including polyalcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, and hydrocarbons are also produced. No detectable polyoxymethylene is generated in this experiment. Preliminary chemical analyses of ice tholin using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques lead to the conclusion that ice tholin contains a significant degree of polyalcohol functionality, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbon groups and carbonyl-containing groups such as ketones and esters. Ice tholin II shows some spectroscopic similarities to 1:6 ethane/water ice tholin (ice tholin I), but overall the two are chemically distinct. Ice tholins may be difficult to detect in comets due to their low volatility, but nevertheless may have been delivered to the early Earth by cometary impacts and interplanetary dust particles. These polyalcohol-containing molecules would then have been available to participate in prebiotic chemistry, such as the synthesis of acyclic nucleic acid analogues which have been suggested as the first biomacromolecules

  10. [Residual chemicals in natural rubber products for food contact use].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Nakajima, A; Yamada, T

    2001-06-01

    The residues of additives and other chemicals were investigated by GC/MS in natural rubber products for food contact, which included nipples, packing, gloves and a net for ham. The packings and gloves contained 980-6,570 micrograms/g of vulcanization accelerators, such as zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate, zinc diethyldithiocarbamate (EZ), zinc di-n-buthyldithiocarbamate (BZ) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole. Some samples contained BHT, Irganox 1076 and Yoshinox 2246R as antioxidants; dibutyl phthalate and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate as plasticizers; and palmitic acid, stearic acid, palmitamide, stearamide and hydrocarbons as lubricants. Two unknown peaks were identified as stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol, and others were estimated to be fucosterol, oryzanol and alpha-sitosterol. These sterols are widely distributed in plants, so their origin was presumed to be the rubber plants. The sterols were detected at a level of 340-2,940 micrograms/g in all natural rubber samples. A migration test was carried out for some samples. No chemicals were released into water, 4% acetic acid or 20% ethanol at 60 degrees C for 30 min, though BHT, Yoshinox 2246R, EZ, BZ and sterols were released into n-heptane at 25 degrees C for 60 min. PMID:11577390

  11. Oxidative damage induced by herbicides is mediated by thiol oxidation and hydroperoxides production.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Marzocchi, Barbara; Proietti, Fabrizio; Collodel, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2010-08-01

    Toxicological and environmental issues are associated with the extensive use of agricultural pesticides, although the knowledge of their toxic effects as commercial formulations is still far from being complete. This work investigated the impact of three herbicides as commercial formulations on the oxidative status of a wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. With yeast being a well-established model of eukaryotic cells, especially as far as regards the stress response, these results may be indicative of potential damages on higher eukaryotes. It was found that herbicide-mediated toxicity towards yeast cells could be the result of an increased production of hydroperoxides (like in the case of the herbicides Pointer and Silglif) or advanced oxidation protein products and lipid peroxidation (especially in the case of the herbicide Proper Energy). Through a redox-proteomic approach it was found also that, besides a common signature, each herbicide showed a specific pattern for protein thiols oxidation. PMID:20528566

  12. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  13. Damage to Candida albicans Hyphae and Pseudohyphae by the Myeloperoxidase System and Oxidative Products of Neutrophil Metabolism In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Richard D.; Clark, Robert A.; Haudenschild, Christian C.

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies, we noted that Candida hyphae and pseudohyphae could be damaged and probably killed by neutrophils, primarily by oxygen-dependent nonphagocytic mechanisms. In extending these studies, amount of damage to hyphae again was measured by inhibition of [14C]cytosine uptake. Neutrophils from only one of four patients with chronic granulomatous disease damaged hyphae at all, and neutrophils from this single patient damaged hyphae far less efficiently than simultaneously tested neutrophils from normal control subjects. Neutrophils from neither of two subjects with hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency damaged the hyphae. This confirmed the importance of oxidative mechanisms in general and myeloperoxidase-mediated systems in particular in damaging Candida hyphae. Several potentially fungicidal oxidative intermediates are produced by metabolic pathways of normal neutrophils, but their relative toxicity for Candida hyphae was previously unknown. To help determine this, cell-free in vitro systems were used to generate these potentially microbicidal products. Myeloperoxidase with hydrogen peroxide, iodide, and chloride resulted in 91.2% damage to hyphal inocula in 11 experiments. There was less damage when either chloride or iodide was omitted, and no damage when myeloperoxidase was omitted or inactivated by heating. Azide, cyanide, and catalase (but not heated catalase) inhibited the damage. Systems for generation of hydrogen peroxide could replace reagent hydrogen peroxide in the myeloperoxidase system. These included glucose oxidase, in the presence of glucose, and xanthine oxidase, in the presence of either hypoxanthine or acetaldehyde. In the presence of myeloperoxidase and a halide, the toxicity of the xanthine oxidase system was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase and, under some conditions, was marginally increased by this enzyme. This suggested that superoxide radical did not damage hyphae directly but served primarily as an intermediate in the

  14. Quantification of geopolymers production by chemical methods- A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyal, Ahmer Ali; Azizli, Khairun Azizi; Ismail, Lukman; Man, Zakaria; Khan, Muhammad Irfan

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic polymers are the aluminosilicate materials possessing properties superior than ordinary Portland cement. In this review paper the chemical techniques used for determining degree of reaction of fly ash or the quantity of geopolymer material produced have been discussed. These methods determine the amount of product formed in percentages. The methods include HCl method, salicylic acid method, and picric acid method. These methods are not only used for fly ash but they are being used for determining the degree of reactions of metakaolin and other pozzolanic materials. The picric acid is an explosive material and its transportation in high concentration is dangerous. During its use in laboratory there is also the risk of fire associated with it. According to the microscopic analysis results the picric acid attack dissolves small amount of fine unreacted fly ash particles also. The salicylic acid is easily available but the residue from its treatment contains unreacted fly ash particles, hydration phases, and certain parts of unreacted OPC. The residue from HCl and salicylic acid attack contains MgO particles which is the part of the hydration product. The HCl method is mostly used due to simple process and lower standard deviation.

  15. Influence of the chemical nature of implanted ions on the structure of a silicon layer damaged by implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbachev, K. D. Voronova, M. I.; Bublik, V. T.; Mordkovich, V. N. Pazhin, D. M.; Zinenko, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of the implantation of silicon single crystals by fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon ions on the distribution of strain and the static Debye-Waller factor in the crystal lattice over the implanted-layer depth has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. The density depth distribution in the surface layer of native oxide has been measured by X-ray reflectometry. Room-temperature implantation conditions have ensured the equality of the suggested ranges of ions of different masses and the energies transferred by them to the target. It is convincingly shown that the change in the structural parameters of the radiation-damaged silicon layer and the native oxide layer depend on the chemical activity of the implanted ions.

  16. Chemical damage in poly(phenylene sulphide) from fast ions: Dependence on the primary-ion stopping power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaléo, R. M.; Hallén, A.; Sundqvist, B. U. R.; Farenzena, L.; Livi, R. P.; de Araujo, M. A.; Johnson, R. E.

    1996-02-01

    Thin poly(phenylene sulphide) foils were bombarded with fast atomic ions (4He, 12C, 16O, 32S, 79Br, 127I) in the energy range between 2.5 to 78 MeV. In order to maintain the same ion track size for all impacting ions, their initial velocity was kept constant at 1.1 cm/ns. Under these conditions the deposited energy density in a single ion track changes as a result of the varying stopping power (dE/dx) of the projectiles in the material. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the irradiated targets. Damage cross sections (σ) for different chemical bonds, such as C-S and ring C-C bonds, are extracted from the IR data. For all analyzed IR bands, the values of σ scale roughly with the square of dE/dx (energy density in a single ion track). The absorption of the irradiated samples in the visible and UV region increases as a function of fluence. The rate of increase of absorption at a particular wavelength scales also as (dE/dx)n with n~=2. The observed nonlinear dependence of the damage cross sections on the deposited energy density is considered in the light of two models: a statistical model based on the fluctuations of the energy deposited by the primary ions (hit theory) and an activation (thermal spike) model. It is found that the damage cross section is not determined directly by the initial deposited energy density distribution. The best agreement between experiment and theory is obtained when transport of the deposited energy occurs.

  17. Production of organic chemicals via bioconversion: A review of the potential

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, S.A.; Ward, T.E.; Andrews, G.F.

    1991-07-01

    The United States should develop alternative feedstocks for production of organic chemicals as a step in reducing dependence on foreign oil and to protect the US economy from oil supply disruptions. Potential alternative feedstocks include lignocellulose, polysaccharides, and sugars. These feedstocks can be converted to organic chemicals via bioconversion; sources include feedstock crops (lignocellulosic, polysac-charide, and sugar crops grown specifically for use as feedstocks in organic chemicals production) and industrial, municipal, and agricultural wastes. A wide range of chemicals can be produced via bioconversion, including existing commodity chemicals and entirely new chemicals and polymers. In this review, potential feedstocks are described and are shown to be sufficient to support a bioconversion -- based organic chemicals industry. In addition, the current US organic chemicals industry is briefly described. The potential of bioconversion for production of existing commodity chemicals and entirely new chemicals and polymers is discussed. 228 refs., 21 tabs.

  18. Ultrastrong, Chemically Resistant Reduced Graphene Oxide-based Multilayer Thin Films with Damage Detection Capability.

    PubMed

    Guin, Tyler; Stevens, Bart; Krecker, Michelle; D'Angelo, John; Humood, Mohammad; Song, Yixuan; Smith, Ryan; Polycarpou, Andreas; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-03-01

    Multilayer thin films of graphene oxide (GO) and poly(vinylamine) (PVAm) were deposited via layer-by-layer assembly. Poly(vinylamine) pH was used to tailor film thickness and GO layer spacing. Graphene oxide concentration in the films was controlled through simple pH adjustment. Thermal reduction of the PVAm/GO multilayer thin films rendered them electrically conductive, which could be further tailored with PVAm pH. These reduced films also exhibited exceptionally high elastic modulus of 30 GPa and hardness of 1.8 GPa, which are among the highest of any graphene-filled polymer composite values ever reported. Cross-linking of these films with glutaraldehyde improved their chemical resistance, allowing them to survive strongly acidic or salty solutions. Additionally, scratches in the films can be instantaneously detected by a simple electrical resistance measurement. These films are promising for a variety of packaging and electronic applications. PMID:26885558

  19. 75 FR 6386 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz.... Product name: Demiditraz Technical. Active ingredient: Insecticide and Demiditraz at 100%. Proposed...., Kalamazoo, MI 49001. Product name: CA Acaricide. Active ingredient: Insecticide and Demiditraz at...

  20. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Román, R.; Maffiotte, C.; González-Casablanca, J.; Perez, R.; Hole, D.

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 °C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  1. Development of a Consumer Product Ingredient Database for Chemical ExposureScreening and Prioritization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consumer products are a primary source of chemical exposures, yet little structured information is available on the chemical ingredients of these products and the concentrations at which ingredients are present. To address this data gap, we created a database of chemicals in cons...

  2. Human exposure modeling in a life cycle framework for chemicals and products

    EPA Science Inventory

    A chemical enters into commerce to serve a specific function in a product or process. This decision triggers both the manufacture of the chemical and its potential release over the life cycle of the product. Efficiently evaluating chemical safety and sustainability requires combi...

  3. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers-Schoene, L. ); Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 60]Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants.

  4. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes): synthesis, stability and chemical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, W. L.; Pyne-Geithman, G. J.; Peat, I. R.; Clark, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) have been a subject of interest in neurosurgery because they are purported to be involved in subarachnoid hemorrhage induced cerebral vasospasm. There is a growing body of information concerning their putative role in vasospasm; however, there is a dearth of information concerning the chemical and biochemical characteristics of BOXes. A clearer understanding of the synthesis, stability and characteristics of BOXes will be important for a better understanding of the role of BOXes post subarachnoid hemorrhage. We used hydrogen peroxide to oxidize bilirubin and produce BOXes. BOXes were extracted and analyzed using conventional methods such as HPLC and mass spectrometry. Characterization of the stability BOXes demonstrates that light can photodegrade BOXes with a t1/2 of up to 10 h depending upon conditions. Mixed isomers of BOXes have an apparent extinction coefficient of ε = 6985, and a λmax of 310 nm. BOXes are produced by the oxidation of bilirubin, yielding a mixture of isomers: 4-methyl-5-oxo-3-vinyl-(1,5-dihydropyrrol-2-ylidene)acetamide (BOX A) and 3-methyl-5-oxo-4-vinyl-(1,5-dihydropyrrol-2-ylidene)acetamide (BOX B). The BOXes are photodegraded by ambient light and can be analyzed spectrophotometrically with their extinction coefficient as well as with HPLC or mass spectrometry. Their small molecular weight and photodegradation may have made them difficult to characterize in previous studies. PMID:18456996

  5. Different mechanisms for the photoinduced production of oxidative DNA damage by fluoroquinolones differing in photostability.

    PubMed

    Spratt, T E; Schultz, S S; Levy, D E; Chen, D; Schlüter, G; Williams, G M

    1999-09-01

    Several fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents exhibit an adverse phototoxic effect in humans and are photo-cocarcinogenic in mice. The UV-induced production of reactive oxygen species plays a role in the toxicity and may be involved in carcinogenicity. Four fluoroquinolones were examined for the ability to photochemically produce oxidative damage in naked DNA. The major structural difference in the fluoroquinolones that would have an effect on their photostability is the functionality at the 8-position. At this position, 1-cyclopropyl-7-(2,8-diazbicyclo[4.3.0]non-8-yl)-6, 8-difluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (BAY y3118) contains a chlorine atom, lomefloxacin a fluorine atom, ciprofloxacin a proton, and moxifloxacin a methoxy group. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) in calf thymus DNA was assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and strand breaks were measured in pBR322 with agarose gel electrophoresis. The relative photolability of the fluoroquinolones correlated to the extent of production of 8-oxodGuo and strand breaks, with both UVA and UVB irradiation, in the following order: BAY y3118 approximately lomefloxacin > ciprofloxacin > moxifloxacin. Experiments were performed to determine whether the mechanism of damage was due to a type I (radical) or type II (singlet oxygen) pathway. Nitrogen depletion of oxygen resulted in a decrease in the extent of formation of 8-oxodGuo, suggesting that oxygen was involved. The use of selective radical or singlet oxygen inhibitors was inconclusive with respect to which pathway was involved. The use of D(2)O as a solvent, which would extend the lifetime of singlet oxygen, suggested that this species is involved in the formation of 8-oxodGuo by moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not by lomefloxacin and BAY y3118. Similarly, it was found that singlet oxygen was not involved in strand break formation. Thus, the evidence suggests that fluoroquinolones can photochemically

  6. Experimental EOS and Chemical Studies of High-Pressure Detonation Products and Product Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Fried, L E; Crowhurst, J C; Hansen, D W; Howard, W M; Lee, G S; Pagoria, P F; Abramson, E H

    2002-08-06

    We present equation of state results from impulsively stimulated light scattering (ISLS) experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells on pure supercritical fluids, and supercritical fluid mixtures. We have made measurements on fluid H2O (water), CH2O (formaldehyde), and CH3OH (methanol). Sound speeds measured through ISLS have allowed us to refine existing potential models used in the Em6 detonation product library [Fried, L. E., and Howard, W. M., J. Chem. Phys. 109 (17): 7338-7348 (1998).]. The refined models allow us to more accurately assess the chemical composition at the Chapman-Jouget (C-J) state of common explosives. We predict that water and formaldehyde are present in appreciable quantities at the C-J state of HMX, RDX, and NM. Methanol is predicted to be present only in trace quantities at the C-J state. In the case of methanol, chemical decomposition and phase separation was observed at high temperatures. We are developing micro-FTIR and Raman techniques to determine the chemical composition of the phase separated detonation products.

  7. Experimental EOS and Chemical Studies of High-Pressure Detonation Products and Product Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Fried, L E; Crowhurst, J C; Hansen, D W; Howard, W M; Lee, G S; Pagoria, P F; Abramson, E H

    2002-07-01

    We present equation of state results from impulsively stimulated light scattering (ISLS) experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells on pure supercritical fluids, and supercritical fluid mixtures. We have made measurements on fluid H2O (water), CH2O (formaldehyde), and CH3OH (methanol). Sound speeds measured through ISLS have allowed us to refine existing potential models used in the EXP6 detonation product library [Fried, L. E., and Howard, W. M., J. Chem. Phys. 109 (17): 7338-7348 (1998).]. The refined models allow us to more accurately assess the chemical composition at the Chapman-Jouget (C-J) state of common explosives. We predict that water and formaldehyde are present in appreciable quantities at the C-J state of HMX, RDX, and NM. Methanol is predicted to be present only in trace quantities at the C-J state. In the case of methanol, chemical decomposition and phase separation was observed at high temperatures. We are developing micro-FTIR and Raman techniques to determine the chemical composition of the phase separated detonation products.

  8. Estimating chemical emissions from home and personal care products in China.

    PubMed

    Hodges, J E N; Holmes, C M; Vamshi, R; Mao, D; Price, O R

    2012-06-01

    China's economy has grown significantly and concomitantly so has the demand for home and personal care (HPC) products. The detection of chemicals used in HPC products is increasing in profile as China strives to improve its environmental management. China is developing robust exposure models for use in regulatory risk-based assessments of chemicals, including those chemicals used in HPC products. Accurate estimates of chemical emissions play an important role within this. A methodology is presented to derive spatially refined emissions from demographic and economic indicators with large variations in emissions calculated, showing product usage being higher in East and South China. The less affordable a product, the greater the influence per capita Gross Domestic Product has on the product distribution. Lastly, more spatially resolved input data highlights greater variation of product use. Linking product sales data with population density increased the observed variability in absolute usage distribution of HPC products at the county > province > regional > country scale. PMID:22154979

  9. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  10. Sulforaphane inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced pericyte damage by reducing expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sayaka; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) not only inhibit DNA synthesis but also play a role in diabetic retinopathy by evoking apoptosis and inflammation in retinal pericytes via interaction with a receptor for AGE (RAGE). Similarly, sulforaphane, which is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate that is found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, protects against oxidative stress-induced tissue damage. Therefore, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could inhibit AGE-induced pericytes injury through its antioxidative properties. Advanced glycation end product stimulated superoxide generation as well as RAGE gene and protein expression in bovine-cultured retinal pericytes, and these effects were prevented by the treatment with sulforaphane. Antibodies directed against RAGE also blocked AGE-evoked reactive oxygen species generation in pericytes. Sulforaphane and antibodies directed against RAGE significantly inhibited the AGE-induced decrease in DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 messenger RNA levels in pericytes. For the first time, the present study demonstrates that sulforaphane could inhibit DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and inflammatory reactions in AGE-exposed pericytes, partly by suppressing RAGE expression via its antioxidative properties. Blockade of the AGE-RAGE axis in pericytes by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25241332

  11. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  12. Loss of regional accent after damage to the speech production network

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; Dávila, Guadalupe; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Beltrán-Corbellini, Álvaro; Santana-Moreno, Daniel; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Torres-Prioris, María José; Massone, María Ignacia; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-symptom mapping studies reveal that selective damage to one or more components of the speech production network can be associated with foreign accent syndrome, changes in regional accent (e.g., from Parisian accent to Alsatian accent), stronger regional accent, or re-emergence of a previously learned and dormant regional accent. Here, we report loss of regional accent after rapidly regressive Broca’s aphasia in three Argentinean patients who had suffered unilateral or bilateral focal lesions in components of the speech production network. All patients were monolingual speakers with three different native Spanish accents (Cordobés or central, Guaranítico or northeast, and Bonaerense). Samples of speech production from the patient with native Córdoba accent were compared with previous recordings of his voice, whereas data from the patient with native Guaranítico accent were compared with speech samples from one healthy control matched for age, gender, and native accent. Speech samples from the patient with native Buenos Aires’s accent were compared with data obtained from four healthy control subjects with the same accent. Analysis of speech production revealed discrete slowing in speech rate, inappropriate long pauses, and monotonous intonation. Phonemic production remained similar to those of healthy Spanish speakers, but phonetic variants peculiar to each accent (e.g., intervocalic aspiration of /s/ in Córdoba accent) were absent. While basic normal prosodic features of Spanish prosody were preserved, features intrinsic to melody of certain geographical areas (e.g., rising end F0 excursion in declarative sentences intoned with Córdoba accent) were absent. All patients were also unable to produce sentences with different emotional prosody. Brain imaging disclosed focal left hemisphere lesions involving the middle part of the motor cortex, the post-central cortex, the posterior inferior and/or middle frontal cortices, insula, anterior putamen and

  13. Loss of regional accent after damage to the speech production network.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Marcelo L; Dávila, Guadalupe; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Beltrán-Corbellini, Álvaro; Santana-Moreno, Daniel; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Torres-Prioris, María José; Massone, María Ignacia; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-symptom mapping studies reveal that selective damage to one or more components of the speech production network can be associated with foreign accent syndrome, changes in regional accent (e.g., from Parisian accent to Alsatian accent), stronger regional accent, or re-emergence of a previously learned and dormant regional accent. Here, we report loss of regional accent after rapidly regressive Broca's aphasia in three Argentinean patients who had suffered unilateral or bilateral focal lesions in components of the speech production network. All patients were monolingual speakers with three different native Spanish accents (Cordobés or central, Guaranítico or northeast, and Bonaerense). Samples of speech production from the patient with native Córdoba accent were compared with previous recordings of his voice, whereas data from the patient with native Guaranítico accent were compared with speech samples from one healthy control matched for age, gender, and native accent. Speech samples from the patient with native Buenos Aires's accent were compared with data obtained from four healthy control subjects with the same accent. Analysis of speech production revealed discrete slowing in speech rate, inappropriate long pauses, and monotonous intonation. Phonemic production remained similar to those of healthy Spanish speakers, but phonetic variants peculiar to each accent (e.g., intervocalic aspiration of /s/ in Córdoba accent) were absent. While basic normal prosodic features of Spanish prosody were preserved, features intrinsic to melody of certain geographical areas (e.g., rising end F0 excursion in declarative sentences intoned with Córdoba accent) were absent. All patients were also unable to produce sentences with different emotional prosody. Brain imaging disclosed focal left hemisphere lesions involving the middle part of the motor cortex, the post-central cortex, the posterior inferior and/or middle frontal cortices, insula, anterior putamen and

  14. A method for computing the damage level due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration.

    PubMed

    Acquesta, Alejandro D; Sánchez, Erica Yanina; Porta, Andres; Jacovkis, Pablo M

    2011-09-01

    The calculation of damage level due to the exposure to a toxic cloud is usually not included in most popular software, or it is included using techniques that do not take into account the variation in concentration over a period of time. In this work, a method is introduced for calculating the temporal evolution of the potential damage level and to obtain a more precise and descriptive estimation of this level. The proposed goal is: to estimate the maximum and minimum damage level experienced by a population due to the exposure to an airborne chemical with a time-varying concentration; to be able to assess the damage level experienced in a progressive way, as the exposure to the airborne chemical occurs. The method relies on transformations of time-concentration pairs on a continuum of damage level curves based on the available guideline levels, obtaining maximum and minimum approximations of the expected damage level for any exposure duration. Consequently, applying this method to transport model output data and demographic information, damage evolution in relation to time and space can be predicted, as well as its effect on the local population, which enables the determination of threat zones. The comparison between the proposed method and the current (Spanish and ALOHA) ones showed that the former can offer a more precise estimation and a more descriptive approach of the potential damage level. This method can be used by atmospheric dispersion models to compute damage level and graphically display the regions exposed to each guideline level on area maps. PMID:21395635

  15. Production of thymine glycols in DNA by radiation and chemical carcinogens as detected by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Leadon, S A

    1987-06-01

    In order to understand the role in carcinogenesis of damage indirectly induced by chemical carcinogens, it is important to identify the primary DNA lesions. We have measured the formation and repair of one type of DNA modification, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), following exposure of cultured human cells to the carcinogens N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine or benzo(a)pyrene. The efficiency of production of thymine glycols in DNA by these carcinogens was compared to that by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Thymine glycols were detected using a monoclonal antibody against this product in a sensitive immunoassay. We found that thymine glycols were produced in DNA in a dose dependent manner after exposure to the carcinogens and that their production was reduced if either catalase or superoxide dismutase or both were present at the time of treatment. The efficiency of thymine glycol production following exposure to the chemical carcinogens was greater than that following equi-toxic doses of radiation. Thymine glycols were efficiently removed from the DNA of human cells following treatment with either the chemical carcinogens, ionizing radiation or ultraviolet light. PMID:3477281

  16. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  17. Production of densely sintered periclase clinker from the product of the chemical beneficiation of caustic magnesite dust

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, K.V.

    1986-11-01

    A dense clinker with a concentration of 99% MgO has been obtained from the product of the chemical beneficiation of caustic magnesite dust cleaned out from the waste gas of rotary furnaces during the firing of magnesite. The production process includes the calcination of the product of chemical beneficiation (Mg(OH)/sub 2/), the hot dry briquetting of the MgO without binder, and firing of the hot briquette with comparatively low pressing pressure and firing temperature.

  18. Methods for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on human sperm production.

    PubMed Central

    Wyrobek, A J

    1983-01-01

    Sperm tests provide a direct and effective way of identifying chemical agents that induce spermatogenic damage in man. Four human sperm tests are available: sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology) and the Y-body test. These sperm tests have numerous advantages over other approaches for assessing spermatogenic damage, and they have already been used to assess the effects of at least 85 different occupational, environmental, and drug-related chemical exposures. When carefully controlled, seminal cytology appears to be statistically more sensitive than the other human sperm tests and should be considered an integral part of semen analysis when assessing induced spermatogenic damage. Human sperm studies have complex requirements and, before sampling, careful consideration should be given to exposure details, group size and makeup, as well as animal and human data that indicate spermatogenic effects. Several study designs are possible and should include questionnaires covering medical and reproductive histories as well as known confounding factors. Animal sperm tests, such as the mouse morphology test, may be used to identify the toxic components of a complex mixture. Animal tests may also help assess the chemical effects on fertility and reproductive outcome in cases when human data are incomplete. Further efforts are needed in these areas to develop improved human sperm tests sensitive to induced spermatogenic damage, to develop improved animal models of induced spermatogenic damage, to understand the relationships among sperm changes, fertility, and reproductive outcome, and to develop sperm tests with express mutational end points. PMID:6825635

  19. Development of a consumer product ingredient database for chemical exposure screening and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, M-R; Grulke, C M; Brooks, R D; Transue, T R; Tan, Y M; Frame, A; Egeghy, P P; Edwards, R; Chang, D T; Tornero-Velez, R; Isaacs, K; Wang, A; Johnson, J; Holm, K; Reich, M; Mitchell, J; Vallero, D A; Phillips, L; Phillips, M; Wambaugh, J F; Judson, R S; Buckley, T J; Dary, C C

    2014-03-01

    Consumer products are a primary source of chemical exposures, yet little structured information is available on the chemical ingredients of these products and the concentrations at which ingredients are present. To address this data gap, we created a database of chemicals in consumer products using product Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) publicly provided by a large retailer. The resulting database represents 1797 unique chemicals mapped to 8921 consumer products and a hierarchy of 353 consumer product "use categories" within a total of 15 top-level categories. We examine the utility of this database and discuss ways in which it will support (i) exposure screening and prioritization, (ii) generic or framework formulations for several indoor/consumer product exposure modeling initiatives, (iii) candidate chemical selection for monitoring near field exposure from proximal sources, and (iv) as activity tracers or ubiquitous exposure sources using "chemical space" map analyses. Chemicals present at high concentrations and across multiple consumer products and use categories that hold high exposure potential are identified. Our database is publicly available to serve regulators, retailers, manufacturers, and the public for predictive screening of chemicals in new and existing consumer products on the basis of exposure and risk. PMID:24374094

  20. Rapid, Nonmechanical, Damage-Free Figuring Of Optical Surfaces Using Plasma-Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE): Part I Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, L. D.; Zarowin, Charles B.

    1989-01-01

    We present experimental results of an ongoing investigation demonstrating that Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE) can rapidly and controllably figure and smooth optical surfaces without mechanical contact; thus, removing the constraints on the design of optical elements imposed by mechanical processes, and, allowing higher quality optical surfaces. This process employs a plasma etch process originally developed to pattern micro-electronic circuits by etching through a relatively non-erodable lithographically patterned mask. The PACE process shapes the optical surface by removing material in a small area under a confined reactive gas plasma moved over the surface. Rates of removal as high as 10 m per minute are obtainable with accurate control. The removal footprint can be varied during the process. PACE inherently smooths or polishes while removing material, exposing a virgin surface free of process generated contamination and subsurface damage. Although other materials can also be figured by a PACE process, for this study, apparatus and processes were developed to explore the figuring of fused silica. Results will be shown demonstrating: repeatability and control of removal rate and footprint; predictability of material removal with plasma "tool" motion; and smoothing.

  1. 21 CFR 1310.16 - Exemptions for certain scheduled listed chemical products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemptions for certain scheduled listed chemical... RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.16 Exemptions for certain scheduled listed chemical products. (a) Upon the application of a manufacturer of a scheduled listed...

  2. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  3. Archaeological and chemical evidence for early salt production in China

    PubMed Central

    Flad, Rowan; Zhu, Jiping; Wang, Changsui; Chen, Pochan; von Falkenhausen, Lothar; Sun, Zhibin; Li, Shuicheng

    2005-01-01

    Salt production and trade is thought to be critical to the development of all states and emergent empires. Until now, however, scientific evidence of early salt production has rarely been presented, and no studies of early Chinese salt production have provided unequivocal proof. Here, we report x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses that demonstrate that salt was the primary product during the first millennium before Christ (B.C.) at Zhongba in Central China. This work provides an early example of salt production discovered in China and presents a methodology for evaluating salt production sites in other regions. PMID:16116100

  4. Evaluation of Consumer Product Co-occurrence to Inform Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consumer products are an important target of chemical innovation. Used daily for personal hygiene, home care, disinfection and cleaning, consumer products provide a host of benefits, and also an efficient delivery vehicle for a variety of chemicals into our homes and bodies. Al...

  5. Frost damage in citric and olive production as the result of climate degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa Requejo, A.; Díaz Alvarez, M. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Burgaz Moreno, F.; Garcia Moreno, R.

    2009-04-01

    Low temperature is one of the chief limiting factors in plant distribution. Freezing temperature shortens the growing season and may lower the yield and quality of any number of fruit crops. Minimum temperatures records for the Spanish region of Murcia were studied as limiting factor in fruit production. An analysis of temperature series since 1935 showed that the range of the absolute minimum temperatures (Tmin) on frost days in the target year, namely -0.5 °C to -4.0°C, was statistically similar to the range recorded in 1993, while the mean minimum temperatures (tmin) were found to have risen. The historical series also showed the mean minimum temperatures (tmin) to have increased, however. Through 1985, tmin ranged from 4.0 to -2.0 °C, depending on the area, while these limits shifted in more recent years to 7.0 - 0.5 °C. This increase in mean temperature produced that the frost episodes in March 2004 was considered by lemon, mandarin and olive producers as the worst in many years for frost damage since the minimum temperature was reached in a more sensitive phenological stage, despite the statistical evidence that similar freezing temperatures had been reached on similar dates in other years.

  6. Photorepair of ultraviolet-induced petite mutational damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the product of the PHR1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Green, G.; MacQuillan, A.M.

    1980-11-01

    A wild-type (phr/sup +/) diploid yeast strain showed photorepair of petite mutational damage, whereas a photoreactivation-deficient (phr1/phr1) diploid strain did not, indicating that the PHR1 gene product was required for mitochondrial photorepair.

  7. Neural Substrates of Linguistic Prosody: Evidence from Syntactic Disambiguation in the Productions of Brain-Damaged Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Amee P.; Baum, Shari R.; Dwivedi, Veena D.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation focussed on the neural substrates underlying linguistic distinctions that are signalled by prosodic cues. A production experiment was conducted to examine the ability of left- (LHD) and right- (RHD) hemisphere-damaged patients and normal controls to use temporal and fundamental frequency cues to disambiguate sentences…

  8. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic terpene production[ED1] represents an energy and carbon-efficient route for hydrocarbon fuel production. Diverse terpene structures also provide the potential to produce next-generation 'drop-in' hydrocarbon fuel molecules. However, it is highly challenging to achieve efficient redire...

  9. Production of levulinic acid and use as a platform chemical for derived products

    SciTech Connect

    Bozell, J.J.; Moens, L.; Elliott, D.C.; Wang, Y.; Neuenscwander, G.G.; Fitzpatrick, S.W.; Bilski, R.J.; Jarnefeld, J.L.

    1999-07-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced cost effectively and in high yield from renewable feedstocks in a new industrial process. The technology is being demonstrated on a one ton/day scale at a facility in South Glens Falls, New York. Low cost LA can be used as a platform chemical for the production of a wide range of value-added products. This research has demonstrated that LA can be converted to methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF), a solvent and fuel extender. MTHF is produced in {gt}80% molar yield via a single stage catalytic hydrogenation process. A new preparation of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (DALA), a broad spectrum herbicide from LA has also been developed. Each step in this new process proceeds in high ({gt}80%) yield and affords DALA (as the hydrochloride salt) in greater than 90% purity, giving a process that could be commercially viable. LA is also being investigated as a starting material for the production of diphenolic acid (DPA), a direct replacement for bisphenol A.

  10. 15 CFR 712.5 - Annual declaration requirements for facilities engaged in the production of Schedule 1 chemicals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS... production of each Schedule 1 chemical that comprises your aggregate production of Schedule 1 chemicals, you... Schedule 1 chemical. You must further declare each Schedule 1 chemical used (consumed) and stored at...

  11. 15 CFR 712.5 - Annual declaration requirements for facilities engaged in the production of Schedule 1 chemicals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS... production of each Schedule 1 chemical that comprises your aggregate production of Schedule 1 chemicals, you... Schedule 1 chemical. You must further declare each Schedule 1 chemical used (consumed) and stored at...

  12. 15 CFR 712.5 - Annual declaration requirements for facilities engaged in the production of Schedule 1 chemicals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS... production of each Schedule 1 chemical that comprises your aggregate production of Schedule 1 chemicals, you... Schedule 1 chemical. You must further declare each Schedule 1 chemical used (consumed) and stored at...

  13. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  14. The Effects of Interfaces on Radiation Damage Production in Layered Metal Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2003-12-07

    The objective of this research is to use molecular dynamics modeling to explore the effects of interfaces on cascade-producing radiation damage in nanolayered metal composites and to assess the resistance of these composites to damage by neutrons in fusion devices.

  15. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of pristine, electrochromically damaged, and photochromically damaged KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) using surface analytical and optical spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Quagliano, J.R.; Petrin, R.R.; Trujillo, T.C.; Cockroft, N.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Havrilla, G.; Maggiore, C.J.; Jacco, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Single-crystal KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) is widely used as a nonlinear optical material in optics and lasers, but it can suffer irreversible damage from intense electric and electromagnetic fields; impurities, defects, vacancies, and electron/hole transfers are probably involved. This report shows results of surface and near-surface (bulk) studies using SIMS, Rutherford backscattering, PIXE, channeling, and XRF. The electrochromic damage may occur upon reduction of Ti{sup 4+} to Ti{sup 3+} by trapping electrons passing through the ion channels. Jahn-Teller distortions and Ti{sup 3+} absorption could produce the dark macroscopi damage. The claim that Ag ions could travel through the ion channels, is discounted by the RBS and SIMS data. RBS does suggest Ti ion migration, but this is not likely, according to the KTP structure and lack of Ti ion enhancement in the white residue. The 355 nm radiation could be absorbed into the UV band edge to inititate a photochemical process (gray tracking), which could be the charge transfer from the oxide ligand to Ti{sup 4+} to create Ti{sup 3+}.

  16. Inducibility of a gene product required for UV and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bagg, A; Kenyon, C J; Walker, G C

    1981-01-01

    The product of the umuC gene is required for UV and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli. By the use of the Mud(Ap, lac) bacteriophage, we have obtained an operon fusion of the lac structural genes to the promoter/regulatory region of the umuC gene. The strain containing the umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) fusion was identified on the basis of its UV nonmutability. Strains containing this putative null allele of umuC were (i) nonmutable by UV and other agents, (ii) slightly UV sensitive, and (iii) deficient in their ability to carry out Weigle reactivation of UV-irradiation bacteriophage lambda. The UV nonmutability of the strain could be suppressed by a derivative of the mutagenesis-enhancing plasmid pKM101. beta-Galactosidase synthesis in umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) fusion strains was inducible by UV and other DNA-damaging agents. Genetic analysis of the regulation of beta-galactosidase in umuC::Mud(Ap, lac) strains suggests that the lexA protein is the direct repressor of the umuC gene and that a function of the recA protein, probably its protease activity, is required for the removal of the lexA repressor at the time of umuC induction. PMID:7029544

  17. The Effects of Hazardous Chemical Exposure on Cardiovascular Disease in Chemical Products Manufacturing Workers

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yong Lim; Ko, Kyung Sun; Heo, Kyung-Hwa; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanism of cardiovascular disease (CVD) caused by exposure to hazardous chemicals. We investigated changes in the symptoms of metabolic syndrome, which is strongly related to CVD, and in levels of other CVD risk factors, with a special emphasis on the roles of catecholamines and oxidative stress. The results revealed that neither body mass index (BMI) nor waist and hip circumferences were associated with exposure to hazardous chemicals. Among metabolic syndrome criteria, only HDL-cholesterol level increased on exposure to hazardous chemicals. Levels of epinephrine (EP) and norepinephrine (NEP) were not influenced by exposure to hazardous chemicals; however, the total antioxidative capacity (TAC) reduced because of increased oxidative stress. Both hazardous chemical exposure level and metabolite excretion were related to EP, NEP, and the oxidative stress index (OSI). Logistic regression analysis with these factors as independent variables and metabolic syndrome criteria as dependent variables revealed that EP was associated with blood pressure, and NEP with metabolic syndrome in the chemicalexposed group. In conclusion, the results suggest that reactive oxygen species generated and oxidative stress due to exposure to hazardous chemicals act as mediators and cause changes in the physiological levels of EP and NEP to increase blood pressure. This ultimately leads to the development of CVD through increase in cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood glucose levels by lipid peroxidation. PMID:24278620

  18. The effects of hazardous chemical exposure on cardiovascular disease in chemical products manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Woong; Won, Yong Lim; Ko, Kyung Sun; Heo, Kyung-Hwa; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanism of cardiovascular disease (CVD) caused by exposure to hazardous chemicals. We investigated changes in the symptoms of metabolic syndrome, which is strongly related to CVD, and in levels of other CVD risk factors, with a special emphasis on the roles of catecholamines and oxidative stress. The results revealed that neither body mass index (BMI) nor waist and hip circumferences were associated with exposure to hazardous chemicals. Among metabolic syndrome criteria, only HDL-cholesterol level increased on exposure to hazardous chemicals. Levels of epinephrine (EP) and norepinephrine (NEP) were not influenced by exposure to hazardous chemicals; however, the total antioxidative capacity (TAC) reduced because of increased oxidative stress. Both hazardous chemical exposure level and metabolite excretion were related to EP, NEP, and the oxidative stress index (OSI). Logistic regression analysis with these factors as independent variables and metabolic syndrome criteria as dependent variables revealed that EP was associated with blood pressure, and NEP with metabolic syndrome in the chemicalexposed group. In conclusion, the results suggest that reactive oxygen species generated and oxidative stress due to exposure to hazardous chemicals act as mediators and cause changes in the physiological levels of EP and NEP to increase blood pressure. This ultimately leads to the development of CVD through increase in cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood glucose levels by lipid peroxidation. PMID:24278620

  19. Metabolic Engineering for Production of Biorenewable Fuels and Chemicals: Contributions of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Zhang, Xueli; Wang, Xuan; Moore, Jonathan C.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2010-01-01

    Production of fuels and chemicals through microbial fermentation of plant material is a desirable alternative to petrochemical-based production. Fermentative production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals requires the engineering of biocatalysts that can quickly and efficiently convert sugars to target products at a cost that is competitive with existing petrochemical-based processes. It is also important that biocatalysts be robust to extreme fermentation conditions, biomass-derived inhibitors, and their target products. Traditional metabolic engineering has made great advances in this area, but synthetic biology has contributed and will continue to contribute to this field, particularly with next-generation biofuels. This work reviews the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in biocatalyst engineering for biorenewable fuels and chemicals production, such as ethanol, butanol, acetate, lactate, succinate, alanine, and xylitol. We also examine the existing challenges in this area and discuss strategies for improving biocatalyst tolerance to chemical inhibitors. PMID:20414363

  20. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  1. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi S; Huang, Lei; Csiszar, Susan A; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products through product use and environmental emissions over the product life cycle. Exposure pathways are often complex, where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during use or exchange between various indoor and outdoor compartments until sub-fractions reach humans. To consistently evaluate exposure pathways along product life cycles, a flexible mass balance-based assessment framework is presented structuring multimedia chemical transfers in a matrix of direct inter-compartmental transfer fractions. By matrix inversion, we quantify cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific product intake fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical in a product. Combining product intake fractions with chemical mass in the product yields intake estimates for use in life cycle impact assessment and chemical alternatives assessment, or daily intake doses for use in risk-based assessment and high-throughput screening. Two illustrative examples of chemicals used in personal care products and flooring materials demonstrate how this matrix-based framework offers a consistent and efficient way to rapidly compare exposure pathways for adult and child users and for the general population. This framework constitutes a user-friendly approach to develop, compare and interpret multiple human exposure scenarios in a coupled system of near-field ('user' environment), far-field and human intake compartments, and helps understand the contribution of individual pathways to overall human exposure in various product application contexts to inform decisions in different science-policy fields for which exposure quantification is relevant. PMID:27318619

  2. Trends in Exposure to Chemicals in Personal Care and Consumer Products.

    PubMed

    Calafat, Antonia M; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Ye, Xiaoyun

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic organic chemicals can be used in personal care and consumer products. Data on potential human health effects of these chemicals are limited-sometimes even contradictory-but because several of these chemicals are toxic in experimental animals, alternative compounds are entering consumer markets. Nevertheless, limited information exists on consequent exposure trends to both the original chemicals and their replacements. Biomonitoring (measuring concentrations of chemicals or their metabolites in people) provides invaluable information for exposure assessment. We use phthalates and bisphenol A-known industrial chemicals-and organophosphate insecticides as case studies to show exposure trends to these chemicals and their replacements (e.g., other phthalates, non-phthalate plasticizers, various bisphenols, pyrethroid insecticides) among the US general population. We compare US trends to national trends from Canada and Germany. Exposure to the original compounds is still prevalent among these general populations, but exposures to alternative chemicals may be increasing. PMID:26342608

  3. Serum ferritin is an important inflammatory disease marker, as it is mainly a leakage product from damaged cells.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-04-01

    "Serum ferritin" presents a paradox, as the iron storage protein ferritin is not synthesised in serum yet is to be found there. Serum ferritin is also a well known inflammatory marker, but it is unclear whether serum ferritin reflects or causes inflammation, or whether it is involved in an inflammatory cycle. We argue here that serum ferritin arises from damaged cells, and is thus a marker of cellular damage. The protein in serum ferritin is considered benign, but it has lost (i.e. dumped) most of its normal complement of iron which when unliganded is highly toxic. The facts that serum ferritin levels can correlate with both disease and with body iron stores are thus expected on simple chemical kinetic grounds. Serum ferritin levels also correlate with other phenotypic readouts such as erythrocyte morphology. Overall, this systems approach serves to explain a number of apparent paradoxes of serum ferritin, including (i) why it correlates with biomarkers of cell damage, (ii) why it correlates with biomarkers of hydroxyl radical formation (and oxidative stress) and (iii) therefore why it correlates with the presence and/or severity of numerous diseases. This leads to suggestions for how one might exploit the corollaries of the recognition that serum ferritin levels mainly represent a consequence of cell stress and damage. PMID:24549403

  4. Autophagy induced by cathepsin S inhibition induces early ROS production, oxidative DNA damage, and cell death via xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chang; Chen, Kuo-Li; Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Cathepsin S plays multiple roles in MHC class II antigen presentation, extracellular matrix degradation, angiogenesis, and tumorogenesis. Our previous study revealed that targeting cathepsin S could induce cellular cytotoxicity and reduce cell viability. For the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for targeting cathepsin S-induced cell death and its association with autophagy. Distinct from regulation of the classic autophagy pathway by reactive oxygen species (ROS), we demonstrated that autophagy is the genuine regulator of early ROS production. The molecular silencing of autophagy-dependent ATG genes (ATG5, ATG7, and LC3) and the pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA and wortmannin reduced ROS production significantly. In addition, xanthine oxidase (XO), which is upregulated by autophagy, is required for early ROS production, oxidative DNA damage, and consequent cell death. Autophagy inhibition suppresses the upregulation of XO, which is induced by cathepsin S inhibition, resulting in reduced ROS generation, DNA damage, and cell death. Collectively, our study reveals a noncanonical molecular pathway in which, after the inhibition of cathepsin S, autophagy induces early ROS production for oxidative DNA damage and cell death through XO. PMID:23892358

  5. Integrating hydrodynamic models and COSMO-SkyMed derived products for flood damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffra, Flavio; Boni, Giorgio; Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Rudari, Roberto; Fiorini, Mattia

    2015-04-01

    Floods are the most frequent weather disasters in the world and probably the most costly in terms of social and economic losses. They may have a strong impact on infrastructures and health because the range of possible damages includes casualties, loss of housing and destruction of crops. Presently, the most common approach for remotely sensing floods is the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Key features of SAR data for inundation mapping are the synoptic view, the capability to operate even in cloudy conditions and during both day and night time and the sensitivity of the microwave radiation to water. The launch of a new generation of instruments, such as TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) allows producing near real time flood maps having a spatial resolution in the order of 1-5 m. Moreover, the present (CSK) and upcoming (Sentinel-1) constellations permit the acquisition of radar data characterized by a short revisit time (in the order of some hours for CSK), so that the production of frequent inundation maps can be envisaged. Nonetheless, gaps might be present in the SAR-derived flood maps because of the limited area imaged by SAR; moreover, the detection of floodwater may be complicated by the presence of very dense vegetation or urban settlements. Hence the need to complement SAR-derived flood maps with the outputs of physical models. Physical models allow delivering to end users very useful information for a complete flood damage assessment, such as data on water depths and flow directions, which cannot be directly derived from satellite remote sensing images. In addition, the flood extent predictions of hydraulic models can be compared to SAR-derived inundation maps to calibrate the models, or to fill the aforementioned gaps that can be present in the SAR-derived maps. Finally, physical models enable the construction of risk scenarios useful for emergency managers to take their decisions and for programming additional SAR acquisitions in order to

  6. Comparative biochemical and electron-microscopic study of membrane damage to the endoplasmic reticulum by a chemical carcinogen in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Merkur'eva, R.V.; Dolinskaya, S.I.; Shekhtman, A.B.; Gasanov, T.G.; Gadzhieva, T.I.; Shakmirova, S.F.

    1987-07-01

    Results are given of a comparative biochemical and electron-microscopic study of the membrane-damaging action of the chemical carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), as a result of exposure in vivo and in vitro. Experiments were carried out on rats. A characteristic feature of development of the biological effect of NDMA both in vivo and in vitro is a decrease in activity of the membrane-bound enzymes of the endoplasmic reticulum chosen for study.

  7. Study to establish cost projections for production of Redox chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, J. F.; Greco, C. C.; Rusinko, R. N.; Wadsworth, A. L., III

    1982-01-01

    A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

  8. Epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions: Products from the improper chemical repair of 2-deoxyribose radicals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-21

    Genomic integrity is constantly challenged by DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, DNA damage can compromise the fidelity and efficiency of essential DNA metabolic processes, including replication and transcription, which may contribute significantly to the etiology of many human diseases. Here, we review one family of DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions, which arise from the improper chemical repair of the 2-deoxyribose radicals. Unlike most other DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions are indistinguishable from their corresponding unmodified nucleosides in both molecular mass and chemical reactivity. We placed our emphasis of discussion on the formation of these lesions, their impact on the structure and stability of duplex DNA, their biological consequences, their potential therapeutic relevance, and future research directions about these modified nucleosides. PMID:24517165

  9. Development of biocatalysts for production of commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Adsul, M G; Singhvi, M S; Gaikaiwari, S A; Gokhale, D V

    2011-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is recognized as potential sustainable source for production of power, biofuels and variety of commodity chemicals which would potentially add economic value to biomass. Recalcitrance nature of biomass is largely responsible for the high cost of its conversion. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce some cost effective pretreatment processes to make the biomass polysaccharides easily amenable to enzymatic attack to release mixed fermentable sugars. Advancement in systemic biology can provide new tools for the development of such biocatalysts for sustainable production of commodity chemicals from biomass. Integration of functional genomics and system biology approaches may generate efficient microbial systems with new metabolic routes for production of commodity chemicals. This paper provides an overview of the challenges that are faced by the processes converting lignocellulosic biomass to commodity chemicals. The critical factors involved in engineering new microbial biocatalysts are also discussed with more emphasis on commodity chemicals. PMID:21277771

  10. 40 CFR 799.5085 - Chemical testing requirements for certain high production volume chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... period as defined in 40 CFR 791.3(h), you are subject to this section with respect to that chemical... section solely as one or more of the following:—As a byproduct (as defined at 40 CFR 791.3(c)); —As an impurity (as defined at 40 CFR 790.3); —As a naturally occurring substance (as defined at 40 CFR...