Science.gov

Sample records for productivity variations recorded

  1. Late Holocene SST and primary productivity variations in the northeastern Arabian Sea as a recorder for winter monsoon variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böll, Anna; Gaye, Birgit; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Variability in the oceanic environment of the Arabian Sea region is strongly influenced by the seasonal monsoon cycle of alternating wind directions. Strong south-westerly winds during the summer monsoon induce upwelling of nutrient rich waters along the coast off Somalia, Oman and southwest India, which result in high rates of primary production. In the northeastern Arabian Sea off Pakistan on the other hand, primary production and sea surface temperatures are linked to northeast monsoonal winds that cool the sea surface and drive convective mixing and high surface ocean productivity during the winter season. In this study, we analyzed alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) variations and proxies of primary productivity (organic carbon and δ15N) in a well-laminated sediment core from the Pakistan continental margin to establish the first high-resolution record of winter monsoon variability for the late Holocene. Over the last 2400 years reconstructed SST in the northeastern Arabian Sea decreased whereas productivity increased, imaging a long-term trend of northeast monsoon strengthening in response to insolation-induced southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The comparison of our winter monsoon record with records of summer monsoon intensity suggests that summer and winter monsoon strength was essentially anti-correlated over the late Holocene throughout the Asian monsoon system. In addition, SST variations recorded off Pakistan match very well with Northern Hemisphere temperature records supporting the growing body of evidence that Asian climate is linked to Northern Hemisphere climate change. It reveals a consistent pattern of increased summer monsoon activity in the northeastern Arabian Sea during northern hemispheric warm periods (Medieval Warm Period, Roman Warm Period) and strengthened winter monsoon activity during hemispheric colder periods (Little Ice Age).

  2. Variations of the paleo-productivity in benthic foraminifera records in MIS 3 from western South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Du, J.; Huang, B.; Chen, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding climate change of last glacial age as the background information of climate forecasting is particularly important in climate research. Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 61-24 ka B.P.) is a relative warm and unstable period in the last glacial. Millennium scale abrupt climate changes, such as Heinrich events and Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, are identified in this period. Research topic on the variations of monsoon during the glacial cycles, especially in MIS 3, is critical for understanding low latitude climatic change and the global paleo-environment as a whole. Fortunately, high resolution sedimentary records in western South China Sea provide us valuable materials to uncover how East Asia Summer Monsoon (EASM) system acts in a highly fluctuating climate ambient like MIS 3. Core 17954 is located in the modern summer upwelling area off the Vietnam coast in western South China Sea (SCS), its sediments record the variations of upwelling generated by EASM. In this work, we carry out paleo-ecological analyses on planktonic ( Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides) and benthic foraminifera (Bulimina aculeate, Uvigerina peregrina, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, ect.) sampled from Core 17954 to investigate paleo-productivity and nutrition change of western SCS and its relation to EASM. The results show that benthic and planktonic foraminifera have similar responses to nutrition change. Various indicators of productivity on the basis of benthic foraminiferal analyses reflect an overall three stage change trend: productivity gradually increases from the beginning of MIS 3 (60-40 ka) to its maximum during 35-30 ka, and finally declines after 30 ka. There is also another important discovery, if we observe the climate change in MIS 3 as a whole, we can also find western SCS and Northern Hemisphere High latitude have strong correspondences in such changes: Heinrich events coincided with high productivity events in the western SCS. Further, the result of

  3. Cosmogenic Beryllium Production from Ocean Sediment Sequences Help to Construct Accurate Records of the Geodynamo Variation at the Millennial to Million Year Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Ménabréaz, L.; Bourles, D. L.; Demory, F.; Guillou, V.; Arnold, M.; Vidal, L.

    2013-12-01

    The possible contribution of the axial precession to the energy of the geodynamo was recently reintroduced by theoretical and experimental studies. It is supported by relative paleointensity stacks and deep sea floor magnetization records documenting series of geomagnetic dipole lows (GDL) with recurrence at periods ranging from 30 to 120 kyr, and intriguing phase relationships with obliquity variations and δ18O records (e.g. Fuller, 2006; Thouveny et al. 2008). Yet, these time-series are presently not precise and complete enough to validate this fundamental and debated relationship. The MAG-ORB project funded by the French "Agence nationale de la Recherche" aims at reconstructing the series of GDL over the last Ma, by coupling -on the very same sedimentary sequences- the reconstructions of paleomagnetic variations, cosmogenic10Be production variations and δ18O isotope variations. Recent results (e.g. Ménabréaz et al., 2012, 2013) demonstrate that 10Be overproduction events are systematically induced by the GDL linked with excursions and reversals -as awaited from the theoretical and empirical non linear inverse relationship established between the magnetic moment value and the penetration rate of cosmic rays and particles. The calibration of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signals using absolute Virtual (axial) Dipole Moment values allowed us to construct 10Be-derived Geomagnetic Dipole Moment records over the last millennium, the last 60 ka and the last Ma, allowing to assess the robustness of the GDL series by a method completely independent from rock and paleo-magnetic methods. These records are comparable with individuals RPI records obtained from the same cores, and with global RPI stacks (e.g. GLOPIS, SINT 800 and PISO-1500). Since the Beryllium atoms are adsorbed on the settling silicate particles, the measured 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of cosmogenic isotope overproductions accurately indicate the exact stratigraphic position of the GDL in the sedimentary

  4. 27 CFR 17.164 - Production record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production record. 17.164... PRODUCTS Records § 17.164 Production record. (a) General. Each manufacturer shall keep a production record for each batch of intermediate product and for each batch of nonbeverage product. The...

  5. 27 CFR 17.164 - Production record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... knowledge thereof. If any product is produced by a continuous process rather than by batches, the production... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production record. 17.164... PRODUCTS Records § 17.164 Production record. (a) General. Each manufacturer shall keep a production...

  6. 36 CFR 228.50 - Production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production records. 228.50 Section 228.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials General Provisions § 228.50 Production records. At least annually, the purchaser or permittee must furnish a record...

  7. Independently dated paleomagnetic secular variation records from the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, T.; Henkel, K.; Kasper, T.; Ahlborn, M.; Su, Y.; Appel, E.; St-Onge, G.; Stoner, J. S.; Daut, G.; Wang, J.; Zhu, L.; Maeusbacher, R.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphy has been serving as a valuable tool for dating and confirming chronologies of lacustrine sediments in many parts of the world. However, suitable paleomagnetic records on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and adjacent areas are extremely scarce. Here, independently radiocarbon dated sediments of two lakes on the southern central TP, Tangra Yumco and Taro Co some 250 km further west, were investigated for their potential to record paleomagnetic secular variations. Multiple sediment cores resemble a very similar inclination pattern for the past 4000 years. This demonstrates the high potential of inclination to compare records over the Tibetan Plateau and eventually date other Tibetan records stratigraphically. Comparisons to an existing record from Nam Co, a lake 350 km west of Tangra Yumco, a varve dated record from the Makran Accretionary Wedge, and a stack record from East Asia reveal many similarities. However, model output data of geomagnetic field models for the coordinates of Tangra Yumco do not agree with our findings.

  8. 36 CFR 228.50 - Production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production records. 228.50 Section 228.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials General Provisions § 228.50 Production records. At least annually,...

  9. 36 CFR 228.50 - Production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production records. 228.50 Section 228.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials General Provisions § 228.50 Production records. At least annually,...

  10. Variations on Slavnov's scalar product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2012-10-01

    We consider the rational six-vertex model on an L× L lattice with domain wall boundary conditions and restrict N parallel-line rapidities, N ≤ L/2, to satisfy length- L XXX spin-1/2 chain Bethe equations. We show that the partition function is an ( L - 2 N )- parameter extension of Slavnov's scalar product of a Bethe eigenstate and a generic state, with N magnons each, on a length- L XXX spin-1/2 chain. Decoupling the extra parameters, we obtain a third determinant expression for the scalar product, where the first is due to Slavnov [1], and the second is due to Kostov and Matsuo [2]. We show that the new determinant is Casoratian, and consequently that tree-level {N}=4 SYM structure constants that are known to be determinants, remain determinants at 1-loop level.

  11. 27 CFR 17.164 - Production record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Production record. 17.164 Section 17.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DRAWBACK ON TAXPAID DISTILLED SPIRITS USED IN MANUFACTURING...

  12. 27 CFR 17.164 - Production record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Production record. 17.164 Section 17.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DRAWBACK ON TAXPAID DISTILLED SPIRITS USED IN MANUFACTURING...

  13. 27 CFR 17.164 - Production record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Production record. 17.164 Section 17.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... quantities of all ingredients used in the manufacture of the batch (including the proof or alcohol...

  14. Variations in recorded acoustic gunshot waveforms generated by small firearms.

    PubMed

    Beck, Steven D; Nakasone, Hirotaka; Marr, Kenneth W

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of recorded acoustic gunshot signals to determine firearm waveform characteristics requires an understanding of the impulsive signal events, how the waveforms vary among different sources, and how the waveforms are affected by the environment and the recording system. This paper presents empirical results from waveforms produced by different small firearms and an analysis of their variations under different and controlled conditions. Acoustic signals were generated using multiple firearm makes and models firing different ammunition types. Simultaneous recordings from the microphones located at different distances from the source and at different azimuth angles (from the line-of-fire) were used to study source characteristics and sound propagation effects. The results indicate that recorded gunshot waveforms generally consist of multiple acoustic events, and these are observable depending on the received distance and azimuth angle. The source blast size, microphone distance, and microphone azimuth angle are the primary factors affecting the recorded muzzle blast characteristics. Ground or object reflections and ballistic shockwaves and their reflections can interfere with the muzzle blast waveform and its measurements. This experiment confirmed and quantified the wide range of correlation results between waveforms recorded from different source, microphone distance, and microphone angle configurations. PMID:21476632

  15. Olivia Records: The Production of a Movement.

    PubMed

    Morris, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at the early years of Olivia Records, setting the context for the historic release of the album Where Would I Be Without You. From its origins as a Washington, D.C.-based activist collective in 1973, Olivia became a hugely successful recording company, marketing radical lesbian recordings and performances that soon defined the "women's music" movement. Both artistically and politically, Olivia's woman-identified albums became the soundtrack for a generation awakening to lesbian activism. Pat Parker and Judy Grahn's 1976 spoken-word recording is a unique demonstration of Olivia's radical production values and expanding catalog. PMID:26075684

  16. Self-recording of attention versus productivity.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J W; Bateman, D F; Landrum, T J; Hallahan, D P

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the relative effects of self-recording of attentive behavior and self-recording of academic productivity with 5 upper elementary-aged special education students in their special education classroom. Following baseline, both self-recording treatments were introduced according to a multielement design. After the multielement phase, we assessed the pupils' performance under a choice condition, faded the overt aspects of the treatment program according to a withdrawal design, and probed maintenance over 5 weeks. Results revealed that both treatments produced clear improvements in arithmetic productivity and attention to task, neither treatment was clearly and consistently superior to the other, pupils preferred the self-recording of attention treatment, the effects were maintained for all pupils, achievement test scores improved, and pupils generally recorded accurately. PMID:2793638

  17. Use of Paleomagnetic Secular Variation, Excursion, and Reversal Records to Correlate African Lake Climate Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J.; Heil, C.; Peck, J.; Scholz, C.; Shanahan, T.; Overpeck, J.

    2005-12-01

    Geomagnetic secular variation, excursions, and reversal records can provide an excellent means for high resolution correlation of sedimentary climate records. Recent drilling projects on Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, and Lake Malawi, Malawi, have provided the opportunity to study long African climate records (<1 Ma). Magnetic studies of these sedimentary archives indicate that high quality SV records are preserved through most of the sequence despite the fact that anoxia is the usual condition of bottom waters in both lakes. We compare the magnetic records of Lake Bosumtwi and Lake Malawi to test our ability to correlate between West African and East African lakes. In addition, we compare the magnetic record of Lake Malawi to records from Lake Tanganyika in East Africa and the Indian Ocean region, and the record of Lake Bosumtwi to that of Lake Barombi Mbo in West Africa. Correlations within regions are straightforward and highly useful for intrasite correlation. Correlation between East and West Africa is also possible, although the resolution of the correlation is more limited.

  18. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... order is received by telephone, the manufacturer shall prepare the required production records. (4... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the...

  19. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the complete..., manufacturing procedures, assay requirements, and labeling of batches or production runs. The production...

  20. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the complete..., manufacturing procedures, assay requirements, and labeling of batches or production runs. The production...

  1. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the complete..., manufacturing procedures, assay requirements, and labeling of batches or production runs. The production...

  2. 21 CFR 225.102 - Master record file and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Master record file and production records. 225.102....102 Master record file and production records. (a) The Master Record File provides the complete..., manufacturing procedures, assay requirements, and labeling of batches or production runs. The production...

  3. Biomarker records of Holocene climate variations in Asian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Liu, Z.; Liu, W.; Zhao, C.; Li, S.; He, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding Holocene climate fluctuation may provide clues to projection of future climate change. Lake sediments in the arid central Asia (ACA), as an archive of past climate information, keep attracting considerable interest. We have retrieved several sediment cores from Lake Manas, an endorheic lake in Zunggar desert, Xinjiang Province, China. Biomarker proxies including alkenone Uk'37, %C37:4 and C37 concentration (C37 Conc), and physical proxies including density and magnetic susceptibility (MS) have been analyzed. We have found substantial climatic and environmental changes during the late Holocene. Density, MS and Uk'37 values are high during Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and C37 Conc is very low. During the Little Ice Age, density and MS decrease, Uk'37 values drop to near 0.1, C37 Conc is increased by 2 to 3 magnitude. Thus, warm and dry conditions dominated MWP while cold and wet conditions dominated LIA, a typical "Westerly" pattern which is opposite to the hydrological variation in Asian monsoonal regions. Biomarker records' correlation with solar irradiance (SI), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the 1000year ACA Moisture Index (ACAM), and the North Hemisphere Temperature (NHT) suggests SI as one of the forcing factor on temperature fluctuation and cold and wet LIA possibly resulting from westerly-jet shift, negative NAO oscillation and the lower evaporation induced by the decrease of temperature. Biomarker records for the whole Holocene will be also presented.

  4. 27 CFR 19.601 - Finished products records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and a daily summary record of the kind and quantity of finished products bottled or packaged within... transaction records and a daily summary record of the quantity of finished products bottled or packaged...

  5. 27 CFR 19.736 - Daily production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily production records..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Records and Reports Production Account § 19.736 Daily production records. (a) Spirits production. Each proprietor shall maintain daily...

  6. Can Dental Microwear Textures Record Inter-Individual Dietary Variations?

    PubMed Central

    Merceron, Gildas; Escarguel, Gilles; Angibault, Jean-Marc; Verheyden-Tixier, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Background Dental microwear analyses are commonly used to deduce the diet of extinct mammals. Conventional methods rely on the user identifying features within a 2D image. However, recent interdisciplinary research has lead to the development of an advanced methodology that is free of observer error, based on the automated quantification of 3D surfaces by combining confocal microscopy with scale-sensitive fractal analysis. This method has already proved to be very efficient in detecting dietary differences between species. Focusing on a finer, intra-specific scale of analysis, the aim of this study is to test this method's ability to track such differences between individuals from a single population. Methodology/Principal Findings For the purposes of this study, the 3D molar microwear of 78 individuals from a well-known population of extant roe deer (Capreolus caprelous) is quantified. Multivariate statistical analyses indicate significant seasonal and sexual differences in individual dental microwear design. These are probably the consequence of seasonal variations in fruit, seed and leaf availability, as well as differences in feeding preference between males and females due to distinct energy requirements during periods of rutting, gestation or giving birth. Nevertheless, further investigations using two-block Partial Least-Squares analysis show no strong relationship between individual stomach contents and microwear texture. This is an expected result, assuming that stomach contents are composed of food items ingested during the last few hours whereas dental microwear texture records the physical properties of items eaten over periods of days or weeks. Conclusions/Significance Microwear 3D scale-sensitive fractal analysis does detect differences in diet ranging from the inter-feeding styles scale to the intra-population between-season and between-sex scales. It is therefore a possible tool, to be used with caution, in the further exploration of the feeding

  7. NPOESS Environmental Data Record (EDR) Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R.; Grant, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Algorithms and Data Products (A&DP) organization is responsible for the algorithms that produce the EDRs, including their quality aspects. Together, IDPS and A&DP must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. In support of this activity, A&DP and IDPS continually updates the estimated performance of the NPOESS system with respect to both latency and data quality, using the latest operational implementation of the data processing software and information from instrument test activities. This presentation will illustrate and describe the processing chains that create the data products, as well as describe the

  8. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section... CONTAINERS Records and Reports § 113.100 Processing and production records. (a) Processing and production... scheduled processes used, including the thermal process, its associated critical factors, as well as...

  9. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section... CONTAINERS Records and Reports § 113.100 Processing and production records. (a) Processing and production... scheduled processes used, including the thermal process, its associated critical factors, as well as...

  10. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section... CONTAINERS Records and Reports § 113.100 Processing and production records. (a) Processing and production... the thermal process, its associated critical factors, as well as other critical factors, and...

  11. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section... CONTAINERS Records and Reports § 113.100 Processing and production records. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 11923, Mar. 3, 2011. (a) Processing and production information shall be entered at the time...

  12. Independently dated paleomagnetic secular variation records from the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, Torsten; Henkel, Karoline; Kasper, Thomas; Ahlborn, Marieke; Su, Youliang; Wang, Junbo; Appel, Erwin; St-Onge, Guillaume; Stoner, Joseph; Daut, Gerhard; Zhu, Liping; Mäusbacher, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Magnetostratigraphy has been serving as a valuable tool for dating and confirming chronologies of lacustrine sediments in many parts of the world. Suitable paleomagnetic records on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and adjacent areas are, however, extremely scarce. Here, we derive paleomagnetic records from independently radiocarbon-dated sediments from two lakes separated by 250 km on the southern central TP, Tangra Yumco and Taro Co. Studied through alternating field demagnetization of u-channel samples, characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions document similar inclination patterns in multiple sediment cores for the past 4000 years. Comparisons to an existing record from Nam Co, a lake 350 km east of Tangra Yumco, a varve-dated record from the Makran Accretionary Wedge, records from Lakes Issyk-Kul and Baikal, and a stack record from East Asia reveal many similarities in inclination. This regional similarity demonstrates the high potential of inclination to compare records over the Tibetan Plateau and eventually date other Tibetan records stratigraphically. PSV similarities over such a large area (>3000 km) suggest a large-scale core dynamic origin rather than small scale processes like drift of the non-dipole field often associated with PSV records.

  13. 27 CFR 19.751 - Records of finished products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records of finished products. 19.751 Section 19.751 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Account § 19.751 Records of finished products. Each processor shall maintain by proof gallons...

  14. 16 CFR 1015.9 - Fees for production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for production of records. 1015.9... OR PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) § 1015.9 Fees for production of records. (a) The Commission will provide, at no...

  15. 16 CFR 1015.9 - Fees for production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fees for production of records. 1015.9... OR PRODUCTION OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) § 1015.9 Fees for production of records. (a) The Commission will provide, at no...

  16. 30 CFR 870.22 - Maintaining required production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintaining required production records. 870.22... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND-FEE COLLECTION AND COAL PRODUCTION REPORTING § 870.22 Maintaining required production records. (a) If you engage in or conduct a surface...

  17. Centennial Scale Variations in Lake Productivity Linked to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englebrecht, A.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ingram, L.; Byrne, R.

    2012-12-01

    Solar variations on both decadal and centennial timescales have been associated with climate phenomena (van Loon et al., 2004; Hodell et al., 2001; White et al., 1997). The energy received by the Earth at the peak of the solar cycle increases by <0.1%; so the question has remained of how this could be amplified to produce an observable climate response. Recent modeling shows that the response of the Earth's climate system to the 11-year solar cycle may be amplified through stratosphere and ocean feedbacks and has the potential to impact climate variability on a multidecadal to centennial timescales (Meehl et al., 2009). Here, we report a 1000-year record of changes in the stratigraphy and carbon isotope composition of varved lake sediment from Isla Isabela (22°N, 106°W) in the subtropical northeast Pacific. Stable carbon isotopes and carbonate stratigraphy can be used to infer surface productivity in the lake. Our analysis shows variations in primary productivity on centennial timescales and suggests that solar activity may be an important component of Pacific climate variability. A possible response during solar maxima acts to keep the eastern equatorial Pacific cooler and drier than usual, producing conditions similar to a La Niña event. In the region around Isla Isabela peak solar years were characterized by decreased surface temperatures and suppressed precipitation (Meehl et al., 2009), which enhance productivity at Isabela (Kienel et al. 2011). In the future, we plan to analyze the data using advanced time series analysis techniques like the wavelets together with techniques to handle irregularly spaced time series data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-571672

  18. VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE RECORD BOOK FOR PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1966

    FORMS ARE PROVIDED FOR RECORDING FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPERVISED FARM PROGRAM ENTERPRISES BY INDIVIDUAL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE STUDENTS. THE BOOK IS DESIGNED ON AN ENTERPRISE BASIS AND PROVIDES SPACE FOR AGREEMENTS, INVENTORIES, EXPENSES, INCOME, SUMMARIES, AND ANALYSES. ASSISTANCE FOR TEACHERS USING THIS RECORD BOOK IS AVAILABLE IN "GUIDE…

  19. Semiannual Variation in the Number of Energetic Electron Precipitation Events Recorded in the Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stozhkov, Y. Ivanovich; Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Svirkhevskaya, A. K.; Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Mailin, S. Y.

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of the monthly numbers of Electron Precipitation Events (EPEs) recorded at Olenya station (Murmansk region) during 1970-1987, shows the semiannual variation with two maxima centered on April and September. We analyse the interplanetary plasma and geomagnetic indices data sets associated with the EPEs recorded. The possible relationship of this variation and RusselMcPherron, Equino ctial and Axial effects is discussed.

  20. Arctic tree rings as recorders of variations in light availability

    PubMed Central

    Stine, A. R.; Huybers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Annual growth ring variations in Arctic trees are often used to reconstruct surface temperature. In general, however, the growth of Arctic vegetation is limited both by temperature and light availability, suggesting that variations in atmospheric transmissivity may also influence tree-ring characteristics. Here we show that Arctic tree-ring density is sensitive to changes in light availability across two distinct phenomena: explosive volcanic eruptions (P<0.01) and the recent epoch of global dimming (P<0.01). In each case, the greatest response is found in the most light-limited regions of the Arctic. Essentially no late 20th century decline in tree-ring density relative to temperature is seen in the least light-limited regions of the Arctic. Consistent results follow from analysis of tree-ring width and from individually analysing each of seven tree species. Light availability thus appears an important control, opening the possibility for using tree rings to reconstruct historical changes in surface light intensity. PMID:24805143

  1. A GUIDE ON RECORD KEEPING AND ANALYSIS IN THE VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE RECORD BOOK FOR PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUNCAN, A.O.; TOBEN, GEORGE E.

    BASED UPON "VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE RECORD BOOK FOR PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE," DEVELOPED DURING 1965, THIS GUIDE FOR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS AND STUDENTS ILLUSTRATES THE USE OF THE RECORD BOOK, EXPLAINS SELECTED FEATURES, AND PROVIDES ASSISTANCE WITH RECORD KEEPING AND ANALYSIS. IT WAS DEVELOPED UNDER A U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION (USOE)…

  2. 21 CFR 225.202 - Formula, production, and distribution records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula, production, and distribution records. 225.202 Section 225.202 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Records § 225.202 Formula, production, and...

  3. 28 CFR 513.33 - Production of records in court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... forth in 28 CFR part 16, subpart B. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production of records in court. 513.33... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information General Provisions and Procedures § 513.33 Production...

  4. A new high-resolution record of Holocene geomagnetic secular variation from New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G. M.; Howarth, J. D.; de Gelder, G. I. N. O.; Fitzsimons, S. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first full Holocene palaeomagnetic secular variation record from New Zealand. The 11 500 year-long record, from the sediments of Mavora Lakes, comprises composite declination, inclination and relative palaeointensity logs, compiled from two six-metre long cores and the uppermost 1.5 m of another. An age model has been developed from 28 AMS radiocarbon age determinations on fragments of southern beech (Lophozonia menziesii and Fuscospora cliffortioides) leaves. The excellent between-core correlation in all three components of the field results in a high-resolution palaeosecular variation record, with precise and accurate age control. The variations change in character from high amplitude in-phase declination and inclination swings in the earliest part of the record to low amplitude variations in the middle part and declination and inclination swings that are 90° out of phase, leading to broad looping of the vector in the upper part of the record, that is consistent with westward drifting sources in the outer core. The present-day field at the site (Dec = 24.2°E, Inc = - 70.7 °, F = 59 μT) represents a rare steep and easterly extreme direction, but close to average intensity. The palaeointensity is inferred to have varied between about 40 and 90 μT, with variations that, to some extent, mirror variations in the virtual axial geomagnetic dipole moment seen from global data, but also show some notable differences, particularly in the past few thousand years.

  5. Centennial-scale variations in diatom productivity off Peru over the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Sophie; Crosta, Xavier; Schneider, Ralph; Blanz, Thomas; Ther, Olivier; Martinez, Philippe; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    The Peruvian coastal upwelling is one of the most productive systems in the global ocean, with important impacts on the carbon cycle. Primary productivity there displays strong variations at the inter-annual to decadal timescales. However, down-core investigations rarely reach sufficient temporal resolution to assess the response of productivity to climatic variations at these timescales beyond the instrumental and historical periods. We here analyzed diatom assemblages, sea-surface temperatures, nitrogen and organic carbon contents on a laminated sediment core from the Peruvian continental shelf to trace variations in regional productivity over the last 3000 years. Our record provides evidence for different climatic and oceanic conditions with more humid and less productive conditions older than 2500 Cal years BP and drier and more productive conditions younger than 2500 Cal years BP. The last 2500 years also present much stronger centennial-scale variability with the occurrence of six intervals with higher total diatom abundances and stronger percentages in upwelling-related diatom species, representative of intensified productivity, congruent to lower percentages in benthic diatoms, indicative of reduced rainfall. These six periods were synchronous to intervals of enhanced Walker circulation, suggesting a strong imprint of the Pacific zonal circulation on productivity variations off Peru. Our record also demonstrates that SSTs did not vary in phase with productivity, arguing against the idea of regional SSTs controlled by the upwelling intensity, but were rather in agreement to SST records off southern Chile, suggesting that Peruvian SSTs variations were largely controlled by oceanic currents at southern high latitudes.

  6. 27 CFR 40.183 - Record of tobacco products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Record of tobacco products. 40.183 Section 40.183 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  7. 27 CFR 40.183 - Record of tobacco products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Record of tobacco products. 40.183 Section 40.183 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  8. 27 CFR 40.183 - Record of tobacco products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Record of tobacco products. 40.183 Section 40.183 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  9. Seasonal sub-layer variations of a varved record from the Czechowskie Lake, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, F.; Brademann, B.; Słowiński, M.; Dulski, P.; Plesssen, B.; Blaszkiewicz, M.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Most evidences for Late Holocene climate changes in Poland are provided from historical data and model based reconstructions (Luterbacher et al. 2010). In order to determine inter-annual and decadal-scale variability of climate and environmental change on larger timescales we investigated a new varved lake sediment record from Lake Czechowskie, Northern Poland. Analytical procedures included micro-facies analyses together with X-ray fluorescence element scanning (µ-XRF) at sub-mm resolution and carbon and nitrogen analyses (TOC, TC, TN) at five year resolution. The floating chronology comprises 1.500 varve years where abrupt changes in seasonal layer thickness indicate distinct short-term climatic and environmental variability. Detailed microscopic analyses show that biogenic calcite varves are formed by five different sub-layers. A thin layer of chrysophyte cysts deposited in early spring is followed by two calcite layers. A lower coarser-grained (10-20 µm) and an upper fine-grained (2-5 µm) layer. The calcite sub-layers are followed by a distinct diatom layer. The end of annual cycle is marked by a mixed sub-layer consisting of epiphytic diatoms and organic remains. The diatom sub-layer is predominantly responsible for a threefold increase in total varve thickness (approx. 1.4 to 5.0 mm/year) during three distinct periods each with a length of 100 to 200 years. We assume that diatom layer thickness is controlled by lake productivity and thus can be applied as a proxy for water column mixing and nutrient supply. The Lake Czechowskie sediment record and especially variations in diatom layer thickness indicate a high sensitivity of the lake towards changes in wind activity. The aim of the on-going investigations is to disentangle both natural and climate variations and human impact in the lake and its catchment. The Czechowskie varved sediment record extends back at least in to the early Holocene and this has the potential to extend historical climate and

  10. Interannual Variations in Global Vegetation Phenology Derived from a Long Term AVHRR and MODIS Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Friedl, M. A.; Yu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface phenology metrics are widely retrieved from satellite observations at regional and global scales, and have been shown to be valuable for monitoring terrestrial ecosystem dynamics in response to extreme climate events and predicting biological responses to future climate scenarios. While the response of spring vegetation greenup to climate warming at mid-to-high latitudes is well-documented, understanding of diverse phenological responses to climate change over entire growing cycles and at broad geographic scales is incomplete. Many studies assume that the timing of individual phenological indicators in responses to climate forcing is independent of phenological events that occur at other times during the growing season. In this paper we use a different strategy. Specifically, we hypothesize that integrating sequences of key phenological indicators across growing seasons provides a more effective way to capture long-term variation in phenology in response to climate change. To explore this hypothesis we use global land surface phenology metrics derived from the Version 3 Long Term Vegetation Index Products from Multiple Satellite Data Records data set to examine interannual variations and trends in global land surface phenology from 1982-2010. Using daily enhanced vegetation index (EVI) data at a spatial resolution of 0.05 degrees, we model the phenological trajectory for each individual pixel using piecewise logistic models. The modeled trajectories were then used to detect phenological indicators including the onset of greenness increase, the onset of greenness maximum, the onset of greenness decrease, the onset of greenness minimum, and the growing season length, among others at global scale. The quality of land surface phenology detection for individual pixels was calculated based on metrics that characterize the EVI quality and model fits in annual time series at each pixel. Phenological indicators characterized as having good quality were then

  11. Variation of solar activity recorded in Korean chronicles during the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Jin; Jeon, Junhyeok

    2015-08-01

    Korea has a long history in astronomy, which is proved by many observational records written in Korean chronicles. There are 43 sunspot records in Goryeo dynasty (918-1392) and 13 records in Joseon dynasty (1392-1910). According to analysis of Korean historical records, it is known that sunspot records in Goryeo dynasty show well in match with the well-known solar activity of 11.3 years. It means that Korean historical sunspot records show real solar phenomena. Korean sunspot records also show that solar activity decrease in Joseon dynasty compared with the previous ~500 years. In order to know the change of solar activity in detail, we examine Korean historical atmospheric records which can indicate climate change. We first analyze historical frost records. Korean chronicles have around 600 frost records during the last millennium. We find that the climate change shows sign of cooling down when check the variation of epoch that the first and last frost events in each year are written. This result is well in accord with that of historical sunspot records. Therefore, we claim that solar activity decrease during the last thousand years.

  12. 9 CFR 381.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Processing and production records. 381.306 Section 381.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative chain speed, shall...

  13. 9 CFR 318.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Processing and production records. 318.306 Section 318.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... retort operation. Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative...

  14. 9 CFR 381.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Processing and production records. 381.306 Section 381.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative chain speed, shall...

  15. 9 CFR 318.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Processing and production records. 318.306 Section 318.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... retort operation. Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative...

  16. 9 CFR 318.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Processing and production records. 318.306 Section 318.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... retort operation. Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative...

  17. 9 CFR 381.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Processing and production records. 381.306 Section 381.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative chain speed, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 318.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing and production records. 318.306 Section 318.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... retort operation. Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative...

  19. 9 CFR 381.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing and production records. 381.306 Section 381.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative chain speed, shall...

  20. 9 CFR 318.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Processing and production records. 318.306 Section 318.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... retort operation. Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative...

  1. 9 CFR 381.306 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Processing and production records. 381.306 Section 381.306 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Container conveyor speed, and for agitating hydrostatic retorts, the rotative chain speed, shall...

  2. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section 113.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION THERMALLY PROCESSED LOW-ACID FOODS PACKAGED IN HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINERS Records and Reports §...

  3. 21 CFR 211.188 - Batch production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Batch production and control records. 211.188 Section 211.188 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  4. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports §...

  5. 21 CFR 211.186 - Master production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master production and control records. 211.186 Section 211.186 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  6. 21 CFR 211.186 - Master production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Master production and control records. 211.186 Section 211.186 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  7. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports §...

  8. 21 CFR 211.188 - Batch production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Batch production and control records. 211.188 Section 211.188 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  9. 21 CFR 211.188 - Batch production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Batch production and control records. 211.188 Section 211.188 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  10. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports §...

  11. 21 CFR 211.186 - Master production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Master production and control records. 211.186 Section 211.186 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  12. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports §...

  13. 21 CFR 211.186 - Master production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Master production and control records. 211.186 Section 211.186 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  14. 21 CFR 211.188 - Batch production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Batch production and control records. 211.188 Section 211.188 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  15. 21 CFR 211.186 - Master production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Master production and control records. 211.186 Section 211.186 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  16. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports §...

  17. 21 CFR 211.188 - Batch production and control records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Batch production and control records. 211.188 Section 211.188 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records...

  18. Study about geomagnetic variations from data recorded at Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Asimopolos, Natalia-Silvia; Sandulescu, Agata Monica; Niculici, Eugen

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents statistical and spectral analysis of data from Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory that contributing to study of geomagnetic variations. Thus were highlighted, for long series of records over several solar cycles, periodicities of 22 years and 11 years. Following the same procedures for medium recording series (multi-annual) have highlighted annual, seasonal and monthly periodicities. For shorter data series, we highlighted diurnal, semidiurnal, 8 hours and even lower periodicities. For very short series with a high sample rate and for few magnetotellurics records, we highlight different types of pulsations (Pc2 - Pc5 and Pi 2). Geomagnetic signals are the convolution product of the atomic stationary signals mono-frequential of different amplitudes associated to phenomena with a very broad band of periodicities and nondeterministic signals associated with geomagnetic disturbances and non-periodic phenomena. Among analysis processes used for discrete series of geomagnetic data with different lengths and sampling rates, can conclude the following: Moving average works as a low pass filter in frequency or high pass in time. By eliminating high frequency components (depending on mobile window size used) can be studied preferential periodicities greater than a given value. Signal linearization (using least squares) provides information on linear trend of the entire series analyzed. Thus, for the very long data series (several decades) we extracted the secular variation slope for each geomagnetic component, separately. The numeric derivative of signal versus time proved to be a very reliable indicator for geomagnetic disturbed periods. Thus, the derivative value may be increased by several orders of magnitude during periods of agitation in comparisons to calm periods. The correlation factor shows significant increases when between two time series a causal relationship exists. Variation of the correlation factor, calculated for a mobile window containing k

  19. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.; Katz, Richard F.; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H.; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth’s interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor.

  20. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Crowley, John W; Katz, Richard F; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-13

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor. PMID:25766231

  1. A new Holocene record of geomagnetic secular variation from Windermere, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Rachael S.; Xuan, Chuang; Kemp, Alan E. S.; Bull, Jonathan M.; Cotterill, Carol J.; Fielding, J. James; Pearce, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records serve as valuable independent stratigraphic correlation and dating tools for marine and terrestrial sediment sequences. The master Holocene UK PSV record, used to date regional Holocene sediment sequences, was established over three decades ago using older radiocarbon techniques and discrete sediment samples from Windermere and two other lakes (Turner and Thompson, 1981). We present a new radiocarbon-dated record of Holocene geomagnetic secular variation from Windermere, with a view to updating the UK master PSV curve. Our analyses used u-channel samples taken from the centre of four sediment cores retrieved from Windermere in 2012.The natural remnant magnetisation (NRM) of each U-channel was measured before and after stepwise alternating field demagnetisation on a 2G Enterprises superconducting rock magnetometer at 0.5 cm resolution for the first core, and 1 cm resolution for the remaining cores. The NRM data reveal a stable and well-defined primary magnetization. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) directions of the four Windermere cores, especially the inclination records, appear to correlate well on their independent radiocarbon age models. The new Windermere PSV records compare well with the existing UK master curve on millennial timescales, as well as with records from other European lakes and northern North Atlantic marine records. These observations suggest that millennial scale secular variations of the Earth's magnetic field in the Europe- North Atlantic region shared common driving mechanisms during the Holocene. The new Windermere PSV record may thus be used in a regional context for correlating and dating sediment sequences through the Holocene.

  2. Paleosecular variation during the PCRS based on a new database of sedimentary and volcanic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldan, M. M.; Langereis, C. G.; Evans, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    We present a paleosecular variation study using a generalised global paleomagnetic sedimentary and volcanic database. We made use of all available (and suitable) - published and some new- sedimentary and volcanic paleomagnetic records corresponding to the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron (PCRS) interval to reanalyse all data. We focused on records with a sufficient number of samples, and acquired - whenever possible - the original data, or - as a second choice - parametrised published site means. Analysis of these paleomagnetic data in terms of latitude variation of the scatter of the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) suggests that careful data selection is required and that some of the older studies may need to be redone using more modern methods, both in terms of sampling and laboratory treatment. In addition, high (southern and especially northern hemisphere) latitudes are notably lacking in published records. The transitional data is removed using a variable VGP cut-off angle which varies with latitude. We use also our extended sedimentary records from Permian red beds from the Lodève and Dôme de Barrot basins (S. France), a new detailed paleomagnetic study of the Permian volcanics in the Oslo graben (Norway), as well as new data from Carboniferous-Permian sediments from the Donbas basin (Ukraine). We compare our results with those from published paleosecular variation models and with recent (re)analyses of VGP scatter during different periods of the geological archive.

  3. A full variational calculation based on a tensor product decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senese, Frederick A.; Beattie, Christopher A.; Schug, John C.; Viers, Jimmy W.; Watson, Layne T.

    1989-08-01

    A new direct full variational approach exploits a tensor (Kronecker) product decomposition of the Hamiltonian. Explicit assembly and storage of the Hamiltonian matrix is avoided by using the Kronecker product structure to form matrix-vector products directly from the molecular integrals. Computation-intensive integral transformations and formula tapes are unnecessary. The wavefunction is expanded in terms of spin-free primitive kets rather than Slater determinants or configuration state functions, and the expansion is equivalent to a full configuration interaction expansion. The approach suggests compact storage schemes and algorithms which are naturally suited to parallel and pipelined machines.

  4. Incidence and Variation of Discrepancies in Recording Chronic Conditions in Australian Hospital Administrative Data

    PubMed Central

    Assareh, Hassan; Achat, Helen M.; Stubbs, Joanne M.; Guevarra, Veth M.; Hill, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic data routinely collected for hospital admitted patients and used for case-mix adjustment in care provider comparisons and reimbursement are prone to biases. We aim to measure discrepancies, variations and associated factors in recorded chronic morbidities for hospital admitted patients in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Of all admissions between July 2010 and June 2014 in all NSW public and private acute hospitals, admissions with over 24 hours stay and one or more of the chronic conditions of diabetes, smoking, hepatitis, HIV, and hypertension were included. The incidence of a non-recorded chronic condition in an admission occurring after the first admission with a recorded chronic condition (index admission) was considered as a discrepancy. Poisson models were employed to (i) derive adjusted discrepancy incidence rates (IR) and rate ratios (IRR) accounting for patient, admission, comorbidity and hospital characteristics and (ii) quantify variation in rates among hospitals. The discrepancy incidence rate was highest for hypertension (51% of 262,664 admissions), followed by hepatitis (37% of 12,107), smoking (33% of 548,965), HIV (27% of 1500) and diabetes (19% of 228,687). Adjusted rates for all conditions declined over the four-year period; with the sharpest drop of over 80% for diabetes (47.7% in 2010 vs. 7.3% in 2014), and 20% to 55% for the other conditions. Discrepancies were more common in private hospitals and smaller public hospitals. Inter-hospital differences were responsible for 1% (HIV) to 9.4% (smoking) of variation in adjusted discrepancy incidences, with an increasing trend for diabetes and HIV. Chronic conditions are recorded inconsistently in hospital administrative datasets, and hospitals contribute to the discrepancies. Adjustment for patterns and stratification in risk adjustments; and furthermore longitudinal accumulation of clinical data at patient level, refinement of clinical coding systems and standardisation of comorbidity

  5. Incidence and Variation of Discrepancies in Recording Chronic Conditions in Australian Hospital Administrative Data.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Achat, Helen M; Stubbs, Joanne M; Guevarra, Veth M; Hill, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic data routinely collected for hospital admitted patients and used for case-mix adjustment in care provider comparisons and reimbursement are prone to biases. We aim to measure discrepancies, variations and associated factors in recorded chronic morbidities for hospital admitted patients in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Of all admissions between July 2010 and June 2014 in all NSW public and private acute hospitals, admissions with over 24 hours stay and one or more of the chronic conditions of diabetes, smoking, hepatitis, HIV, and hypertension were included. The incidence of a non-recorded chronic condition in an admission occurring after the first admission with a recorded chronic condition (index admission) was considered as a discrepancy. Poisson models were employed to (i) derive adjusted discrepancy incidence rates (IR) and rate ratios (IRR) accounting for patient, admission, comorbidity and hospital characteristics and (ii) quantify variation in rates among hospitals. The discrepancy incidence rate was highest for hypertension (51% of 262,664 admissions), followed by hepatitis (37% of 12,107), smoking (33% of 548,965), HIV (27% of 1500) and diabetes (19% of 228,687). Adjusted rates for all conditions declined over the four-year period; with the sharpest drop of over 80% for diabetes (47.7% in 2010 vs. 7.3% in 2014), and 20% to 55% for the other conditions. Discrepancies were more common in private hospitals and smaller public hospitals. Inter-hospital differences were responsible for 1% (HIV) to 9.4% (smoking) of variation in adjusted discrepancy incidences, with an increasing trend for diabetes and HIV. Chronic conditions are recorded inconsistently in hospital administrative datasets, and hospitals contribute to the discrepancies. Adjustment for patterns and stratification in risk adjustments; and furthermore longitudinal accumulation of clinical data at patient level, refinement of clinical coding systems and standardisation of comorbidity

  6. Towards Structural Analysis of Audio Recordings in the Presence of Musical Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Meinard; Kurth, Frank

    2006-12-01

    One major goal of structural analysis of an audio recording is to automatically extract the repetitive structure or, more generally, the musical form of the underlying piece of music. Recent approaches to this problem work well for music, where the repetitions largely agree with respect to instrumentation and tempo, as is typically the case for popular music. For other classes of music such as Western classical music, however, musically similar audio segments may exhibit significant variations in parameters such as dynamics, timbre, execution of note groups, modulation, articulation, and tempo progression. In this paper, we propose a robust and efficient algorithm for audio structure analysis, which allows to identify musically similar segments even in the presence of large variations in these parameters. To account for such variations, our main idea is to incorporate invariance at various levels simultaneously: we design a new type of statistical features to absorb microvariations, introduce an enhanced local distance measure to account for local variations, and describe a new strategy for structure extraction that can cope with the global variations. Our experimental results with classical and popular music show that our algorithm performs successfully even in the presence of significant musical variations.

  7. The Holocene (5000-6000. yrs B.P.) paleosecular variation record from a Portuguese speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte, Jorge; Font, Eric; Veiga-Pires, Cristina; Marcel-Hillaire, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies pointed speleothems as excellent recorders of the Earth's magnetic field. Here we apply a high resolution paleomagnetic study in a well-dated (5000-6000. yrs B.P., U-Th methods) speleothem from Algarve, Portugal, in order to i) check for the reliability of the magnetic remanence recorder in speleothem, and ii) provide new paleosecular variation data for the studied Holocene interval. In addition, we applied a new technique (by using the MIRONE software) in order to calculate the sedimentation rate of the calcite growth. Our results show that the magnetic remanence recorded in our samples is primary (detrital remanent magnetization) and carried by maghemite/magnetite. Magnetic directions are stable with satisfactory statistical criteria (alpha95<(2.2°). Mean directions are oriented N°0 with a mean inclination of 46.4°. We compared the results with a geomagnetic model based on archaeomagnetic and lava flow paleomagnetic data (Sha.dif.14k) and that our data well fit the model Sha.dif.14k for the concerned time interval. These new results provide the first paleomagnetic data at 5000-6000 yrs. B.P., which are crucial for the improvement of the paleosecular variation models. Key-words: Speleothems, palaeomagnetism, Paleosecular Variation, Holocene Funded by FCT (PTDC/CTE-GIX/117298/2010)

  8. Farm Business and Production Management Program Course Competency Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Area Technical Coll., WI.

    This course competency record is intended to help teachers rate development of student competencies in a farm business and production management program. Competencies are listed for six courses: operating the farm business, soil management, crop management, livestock nutrition, livestock management/farmstead equipment management, and farm records…

  9. 30 CFR 870.22 - Maintaining required production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintaining required production records. 870.22 Section 870.22 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND-FEE COLLECTION AND COAL...

  10. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Product testing results and records. 229.313 Section 229.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics §...

  11. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Product testing results and records. 229.313 Section 229.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics §...

  12. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Product testing results and records. 229.313 Section 229.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics §...

  13. Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Petra

    2016-01-01

    A challenge for most theoretical and computational accounts of linguistic reference is the observation that language users vary considerably in their referential choices. Part of the variation observed among and within language users and across tasks may be explained from variation in the cognitive resources available to speakers and listeners. This paper presents a computational model of reference production and comprehension developed within the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Through simulations with this ACT-R model, it is investigated how cognitive constraints interact with linguistic constraints and features of the linguistic discourse in speakers’ production and listeners’ comprehension of referring expressions in specific tasks, and how this interaction may give rise to variation in referential choice. The ACT-R model of reference explains and predicts variation among language users in their referential choices as a result of individual and task-related differences in processing speed and working memory capacity. Because of limitations in their cognitive capacities, speakers sometimes underspecify or overspecify their referring expressions, and listeners sometimes choose incorrect referents or are overly liberal in their interpretation of referring expressions. PMID:27092101

  14. Stable Isotopic Variations in Columnar Cacti: are Responses to Climate Recorded in Spines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, N. B.; Dettman, D. L.; Williams, D. G.

    2004-12-01

    The behavior of the North American monsoon (NAM), particularly with respect to times of continental drought and its relationship to the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern and the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is of great interest to paleoclimatologists and water managers. Long-term instrumental precipitation and tree ring records in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico at low elevations are sparse and this has hindered research on NAM variability at interannual timescales. Saguaro cacti (Carnegiea gigantea) and other columnar cacti in North and South America are long-lived and have the potential to record climate variability on land with high temporal and spatial resolution. The vertical sequence of spines on the saguaro's exterior represents a high resolution (4 to 6 per year), and long (over 150 years) record of environmental change. We present results from an experiment where we tracked the oxygen isotopic values in the source waters, stem tissue waters and spine tissue for three treatments over the course of three months. These data are then compared to a previously developed mechanistic model of isotopic variation that reflects the physiological responses of Saguaro to climate variation over seasonal to century long time-scales. We also present the rationale for a new method to determine the growth rate of columnar cacti using the radiocarbon bomb spike. Our measurements reveal that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic variation among the sequentially produced and persistent spines covering the saguaro body record fluctuations in saguaro water balance. The model successfully predicts isotopic variation in spines and constrains controlling variables, yielding a powerful and high-resolution stable isotope index of water stress in the low desert. The development and refinement of an isotopic model for saguaro will serve as the basis for models applied to other species of columnar cacti in North and South America. The role of the

  15. Near east paleomagnetic secular variation recorded in sediments from the Sea of Galilee (Lake Kinneret)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R.; Turner, G. M.; Stiller, M.; Kaufman, A.

    1985-03-01

    Paleomagnetic records of declination and inclination from sediments recovered from the bed of Lake Kinneret (32.4°N, 35.7°E) have been dated by radiocarbon techniques. The sediments span the last 5000 yr. The changes in inclination down the sediment cores are more pronounced than the declination fluctuations and are repeatable between the three coring sites, which are several kilometers apart. Magnetic susceptibility logs display 13 maxima in the 5-m-long sequences, with a pronounced susceptibility minimum about 1000 yr B.P. Many of the susceptibility maxima and minima can be easily correlated between coring sites and are shown to be dominantly related to changes in sediment carbonate content. The natural remanent magnetization intensity follows a similar pattern to that of susceptibility, and the natural remanence of the Kinneret sediments is presumed to reside in detrital magnetite grains carried into the lake by the river Jordan from the basalt-rich bedrock of the rift floor and the Golan Heights. The 14C chronology is strongly supported by a pollen study in which pronounced changes in the proportion of olive pollen were interpreted as being due to extensive cultivation of olives around Galilee in the Hellenistic and Byzantine periods. The Kinneret paleosecular variation records, if accurately dated, point to a complex spatial pattern of Holocene secular variation with significant variations over distances as small as 1000-2000 km.

  16. High-resolution records of non-dipole variations derived from volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Biggin, A. J.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the short-term behavior of the Earth's magnetic field is currently mainly hampered by a lack of coeval high-resolution records of geomagnetic intensity variations that are well distributed over the globe. Lavas are the only recorder of short-term fluctuations of the geomagnetic field that are available for all parts of the world and on geological time scales. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve the methodology to obtain reliable estimates of the paleointensity from igneous rocks over the past decades. It is well known that some paleointensity methods will work on certain lavas with specific thermomagnetic behavior, but fail for others. We therefore propose a ';multi-method paleointensity approach' that consists of Thellier-style, multispecimen-style, and calibrated pseudo-Thellier-style (AGU fall 2012 contribution GP43A-1122, submitted) experiments to construct high-resolution records of regional variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field. With our new approach we obtain a reliable estimate of the paleointensity for 60-70 percent of all cooling units sampled. By applying our new approach to suites of lavas from Hawai'i (USA), and the Canary Islands (Spain) we obtain important constraints for short-term local geomagnetic intensity highs, and insight into their possible driving mechanisms. Our new record for Hawai'i indicates that, approximately 1000 years ago, the local field intensity increased on the order of 50% for 200 years - a qualitatively similar phenomenon observed 200 years earlier in western Europe (Gallet et al., 2005; Gómez-Paccard et al., 2012) and 500 years later in southwestern USA (Bowles et al., 2002). When these records are combined with a record for Japan (Yu, 2012), a coherent picture emerges that includes the dipole component decaying steadily since at least 1000 years ago. Superimposed onto this decay are strong but shorter-term intensity variations at a regional level whose asynchronicity

  17. High-resolution records of non-dipole variations derived from volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart; Biggin, Andrew; Dekkers, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Our understanding of the short-term behavior of the Earth's magnetic field is currently mainly hampered by a lack of coeval high-resolution records of geomagnetic intensity variations that are well distributed over the globe. Lavas are the only recorder of short-term fluctuations of the geomagnetic field that are available for all parts of the world and on geological time scales. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve the methodology to obtain reliable estimates of the paleointensity from igneous rocks over the past decades. It is well known that some paleointensity methods will work on certain lavas with specific thermomagnetic behaviour, but fail for others. We therefore propose a 'multi-method paleointensity approach' that consists of Thellier-style, multispecimen-style, and calibrated pseudo-Thellier-style experiments to construct high-resolution records of regional variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field. With our new approach we obtain a reliable estimate of the paleointensity for 60-70 percent of all cooling units sampled. By applying our new approach to suites of lavas from Hawaii (USA), and the Canary Islands (Spain) we obtain important constraints for short-term local geomagnetic intensity highs, and insight into their possible driving mechanisms. Our new record for Hawai'i indicates that, approximately 1000 years ago, the local field intensity increased on the order of 50% for 200 years - a qualitatively similar phenomenon observed 200 years earlier in western Europe (Gallet et al., 2005; Gomez-Paccard et al., 2012) and 500 years later in southwestern USA (Bowles et al., 2002). When these records are combined with a record for Japan (Yu, 2012), a coherent picture emerges that includes the dipole component decaying steadily since at least 1000 years ago. Superimposed onto this decay are strong but shorter-term intensity variations at a regional level whose asynchronicity necessitates a highly non-dipolar nature. Our

  18. Variations of cosmogenic radionuclide production rates along the meteorite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Laubenstein, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Ustinova, G. K.

    2015-08-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in meteorites during their motion in space are natural detectors of the GCR intensity and variations along the meteorite orbits. On the basis of measured and calculated contents of cosmogenic radionuclides in the freshly fallen Chelyabinsk and Košice chondrites some peculiarities of generation of cosmogenic radionuclides of different half-lives in the chondrites of different orbits and dates of fall onto the Earth are demonstrated. Dependence of production rates of the radionuclides on the GCR variations in the heliosphere is analyzed. Using radionuclides with different half-lives it is possible to compare the average GCR intensity over various time periods. The measurement and theoretical analysis of cosmogenic radionuclides in consecutively fallen chondrites provide a unique information on the space-time continuum of the cosmogenic radionuclide production rates and their variations over a long time scale, which could be useful in correlative analyses of processes in the heliosphere. Some applications of cosmogenic radionuclide depth distribution in chondrites for estimation of their pre-atmospheric sizes are illustrated.

  19. The environmental magnetic record of palaeoenvironmental variations during the past 3100 years: A possible solar influence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, K.; Shankar, R.; Warrier, Anish K.; Weijian, Z.; Xuefeng, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Sediments from Pookot Lake (PK) in southern India have provided a record of local environmental changes and catchment processes during the past 3100 cal. years B.P. Variations in the rock magnetic parameters (χlf, χfd, χARM and IRM's at different field strengths) of sediments from two AMS 14C-dated cores reflect climate-induced changes in the catchment of Pookot Lake. Assuming that rainfall is most likely the dominant driving mechanism behind the rock magnetic variations of PK sediments, the environmental history of the site has been reconstructed. Rock magnetic parameters exhibit significant variations during the past 3100 years. The palaeoenvironmental history of the Pookot Lake region may be divided into three phases. During the first phase (~ 3100 to 2500 cal. years B.P.), catchment erosion and detrital influx were high, indicating a strong monsoon. The second phase, which lasted from 2500 to 1000 cal. years B.P., was characterised by low and steady rainfall, resulting in a low and uniform catchment erosion and detrital influx. Phase 2 was interspersed with brief intervals of strong monsoon and characterised by frequent drying up of the lake. During Phase 3 (~ 1000 cal. years B.P. to the present), catchment erosion was high, indicating a shift to strong monsoonal conditions. It appears that monsoonal rainfall in the region is influenced by solar activity, with periods of high total solar irradiance being characterised by high rainfall and vice versa; it was relatively low during the Little Ice Age and high during the Medieval Warm Period. The magnetic susceptibility (χlf) data exhibit a number of periodicities which might have a solar origin. The χlf record exhibits similarities with other continental and marine palaeoclimatic records from the region, indicating that regional trends in the monsoon during the Late Holocene are broadly similar.

  20. Central European temperature variations over the past two millennia recorded in a stalagmite from western Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitmann, Dominik; Hasenfratz, Adam; Häuselmann, Anamaria; Lehner, Flavio; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Lawrence; Leuenberger, Markus; Raible, Christoph C.; Broecker, Jochen; Luterbacher, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    European temperature reconstructions covering the last two millennia are almost entirely based on tree rings and therefore clearly biased towards summer. Reconstructions of mean annual air or cold season temperatures are much rarer. To fill this distinct data gap, we present a bi-annually resolved 2000 year-long speleothem-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) record from Milandre Cave in western Switzerland. Calibration of the Milandre Cave δ18O record using observational and reconstructed temperature data reveals that calcite δ18O values are closely related to changes in cold-season (fall-winter-spring) temperatures. The M6 δ18O record unveils temperature variations of up to 2°C during the last two millennia, with the temperature difference between the warmest decade of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (950-1250 CE) and the coldest decade of the Little Ice Age (1400-1700 CE) amounting to ~1.7°C. In general, higher cold season temperatures prevailed between 450 and 600 CE and 1000 and1150 CE. Lower temperatures were recorded between 650 and 900 CE and 1350 and1700 CE. Modeled cold season temperatures for the past millennium compare remarkably well with our reconstruction, and confirm the importance of both, solar forcing and internal variability, in driving Central European cold season temperatures.

  1. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Crowley, J. W.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between the oceans and continents, causing long-wavelength changes of static pressure in the upper mantle. Previous work has shown that subaerial, glaciated volcanoes respond to these changes with variation in eruption rates (Jull & McKenzie 1996, Huybers & Langmuir 2009), and has suggested that the magmatic flux at mid-ocean ridges may vary with changes in sea-level (Huybers & Langmuir 2009, Lund & Asimow 2011). The latter is speculative, however, because previous theory has assumed highly simplified melt transport and neglected the dependence of the ridge thermal structure on spreading rate. Moreover, it remains a challenge to connect model predictions of variations arising from sea-level change with sea-floor observations. Here we present results from a theoretical model of a mid-ocean ridge based on conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and composition for two phases (magma & mantle) and two thermodynamic components (enriched & depleted) (Katz 2008, 2010). The model is driven by imposed variations in the static pressure within the mantle. We consider both the geochemically inferred record of past sea-level variation, as well as simpler harmonic and instantaneous variations. The output of these models is compared with observations of bathymetry at ridges that are undisturbed by off-axis volcanism. The comparison is preliminary but suggests that some abyssal hills on the sea-floor are, at least in part, the result of glacial cycles. To understand the simulation results in more detail, we develop analytical solutions for a reduced-complexity model. This model is derived according to the idea that the melting induced by sea-level changes can be thought of as a small perturbation to a steady-state system. We obtain a Green's function solution for crustal thickness as a function of sea-level change with the associated dependencies on geophysical parameters of the magma/mantle system. We show that this solution captures much of the

  2. Holocene cyclic climatic variations and the role of the Pacific Ocean as recorded in varved sediments from northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Guoqiang; Sun, Qing; Xie, Manman; Lin, Yuan; Shang, Wenyu; Zhu, Qingzen; Shan, Yabing; Xu, Deke; Rioual, Patrick; Wang, Luo; Liu, Jiaqi

    2014-10-01

    We present an n-alkane and compound-specific carbon isotope record of the past 9 ka from the annually laminated sedimentary sequence of Lake Xiaolongwan, northeastern China. The n-alkane distribution suggests that Lake Xiaolongwan has undergone a shift from an oligotrophic state with low algal production and little emergent/submerged macrophytes in the early Holocene, to a eutrophic state with high algal production and abundant emergent/submerged macrophytes since the middle Holocene. The pattern of variation observed in the biomarker proxies ACL (the n-alkane average chain length), Paq (aquatic macrophyte versus aquatic macrophyte and terrestrial plant ratio), and LPTP (lake productivity/terrigenous organic production) is throughout the record similar to that of the total organic carbon. The variation of compound-specific carbon isotopic values in the middle- and short-chain alkanes was mainly regulated by lake productivity and the accumulating organic pool through time. In this forested region, where the vegetation is dominated by C3 plants, the long-chain n-alkanes (C27-C31) are predominantly derived from leaf wax lipids. The compound-specific δ13C27-31 value is sensitive to effective precipitation, and therefore represents a useful indicator of regional monsoonal precipitation. Spectral analysis on the δ13C27-31 time series reveals significant periodicities of 87-89, 205-212, 1020-1050 and 1750-2041 years. On the centennial timescale, the quasi-periodicities around 88 and 210 years suggest a strong link between solar activity and monsoon rainfall. The millennial monsoon cycle in northeastern China is associated with sea surface temperature (SST) variations in two active centers of the summer monsoon, the western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH) and the Okhotsk High. Increasing SST in the subtropical sea may cause a northwards shift of the WPSH, which extends the monsoon rain band (Meiyu) to northeastern China, and thus increasing rainfall in that region

  3. 21 CFR 111.255 - What is the requirement to establish a batch production record?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control... relating to the production and control of each batch; (c) Your batch production record must...

  4. 21 CFR 111.255 - What is the requirement to establish a batch production record?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control... relating to the production and control of each batch; (c) Your batch production record must...

  5. Geomagnetic Secular Variation record from a mid-latitude Brazilian speleothem: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaqueto, P.; Trindade, R. I.; Hartmann, G. A.; Novello, V.; Cruz, F. W.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic study of speleothems is a new way to investigate the continuous record of the geomagnetic field. Recent improvements in magnetic instrumentation and analytical techniques provide the means to accurately measure the magnetic signal of the weakly magnetic speleothems and better characterize their magnetic mineralogy. At the same time, this material is suitable for high-precision U-Th dating and can also be easily correlated through stable isotopes. Continuous geomagnetic records in South America are rare, and the systematic paleomagnetic study of stalagmites could contribute significantly to improve the continent's database. As part of this effort, here we report preliminary magnetic results from a stalagmite located at 14.8°S, 56.4°W, in Mato Grosso State, (Brazil) with ages varying from 500 AD to 1900 AD. Magnetic properties, obtained with Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) and Alternating Gradient Magnetometer (AGM), are very homogeneous throughout the stalagmite comprising partly oxidized PSD magnetite. Magnetic inclinations were obtained after stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetization with a resolution of 0.5 cm (temporal resolution of ~30 yrs). Our preliminary results agree within error with models CALS3k.3 and SED3K for the well-defined 1700-1900 AD period. For older periods, when models are much less constrained, our data does not match CALS3k.3 and SED3K inclinations. The agreement between our data and the well-constrained recent sector of the model suggests the speleothem is likely recording the geomagnetic field throughout its whole extension. From these preliminary tests we expect the continental record from stalagmites to provide a more refined picture of the spatial and temporal variations of the magnetic field over South America. We are currently working in order to improve the age model of the speleothem through the comparison of its δ180 record with well-dated "sister" speleothems from the same cave.

  6. High resolution Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation records from Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usapkar, A.; Dewangan, P.; Badesab, F. K.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K. S.; Basavaiah, N.

    2016-03-01

    We present high resolution paleosecular variation (PSV) records up to 8 cal. kyr BP from three piston cores, MD161/8, MD161/11 and MD161/13 acquired in the Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin, Bay of Bengal. During the Holocene period, high sedimentation rates are recorded at MD161/8 (38.8-248.3 cm/kyr), MD161/11 (137-336 cm/kyr) and MD161/13 (∼573 cm/kyr). Rock magnetic data analysis suggests that the remanence signal is carried by titanomagnetite/titanohematite grains in stable single domain (SSD)/pseudo single domain (PSD) state. The PSV records of MD161/11 and MD161/13 show good correlation in the uppermost sediments despite significant variation in the sedimentation rates; however, poor correlation of PSV records is observed for the core MD161/8 probably due to local effects. Paleoinclination records of MD161/8, MD161/11 and MD161/13 show a low between ∼2.4 and 2.0 cal. kyr BP, an increase between 2.0 and 1.4 cal. kyr BP and a decrease towards the present. To varying degrees these trends can be observed in the other Asian PSV records of Shuangchiling (SCL) and Biwa lakes. However, the magnitude of the observed inclination anomaly in KG basin is higher (∼40°) compared to those reported from SCL (∼25°) and Biwa (∼10°) lakes. Paleodeclination records of MD161/11 and MD161/13 show a decline between ∼4.0 and 2.9 cal. kyr BP, an increase between 2.9 and 2.1 cal. kyr BP, a substantial decrease between ∼2.1 and 1.0 cal. kyr BP and an increase towards the present. Similar trends can be observed in the other Asian PSV records of SCL and Biwa lakes with a minor age offset of 0.2-0.5 kyr. The available models CALS7k.2 and CALS10k.1 are evaluated for their capability in predicting the inclination and declination anomalies from the Asian regions. The CALS7k.2 model can predict most of the inclination anomalies while the CALS10k.1 is unable to predict many of them. The CALS7k.2 model shows that the observed inclination anomalies can be attributed to the presence of

  7. Observed diurnal variation changes of Jakarta precipitation from 144 available meteorological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto, Siswanto; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Hurk, Bart; Jilderda, Rudmer

    2013-04-01

    Using a long available meteorological observation for almost 114 years hourly and daily record from Jakarta Observatory, the temporal heterogeneity of climate trends and its variability over Jakarta, Indonesia has been studied. The analyses showed that the number of wet days has decreased between 1880 and 2010, while the precipitation exceeding 50 mm is observed to be slightly increased. An increased trend of heavy rainfall in the 80% and 95% percentile between April and September was detected. Diurnal variation of Jakarta precipitation and temperature changed markedly. In the wet season (DJF), the morning rainfall has increased in intensity, while in other seasons; delayed amplitude of late afternoon rainfall peak is observed. The diurnal variation of night time temperature considerably increased while daytime temperature remains similar. Changes in temporal characteristics of light and heavy precipitation, as well as the diurnal variation of precipitation and temperature lead to hypotheses concerning anthropogenic influence. Some theoretical arguments on Urban Heat Island and aerosol effect precipitation could be linked to our results. Jakarta is a metropolitan city where its development is characterized by mixing of many different land uses and economic activities, including large-scale housing projects, industrial estates, and agricultural activities. In the future, the separation of local response to large scale and local changes will be investigated.

  8. Solar total irradiance variations and the global sea surface temperature record

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, G.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1991-02-20

    The record of globally averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total irradiance (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total irradiance from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between irradiance and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of irradiance values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to global climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.

  9. Geographical variation in sound production in the anemonefish Amphiprion akallopisos

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, E; Lagardère, J.P; Vandewalle, P; Fine, M.L

    2005-01-01

    Because of pelagic-larval dispersal, coral-reef fishes are distributed widely with minimal genetic differentiation between populations. Amphiprion akallopisos, a clownfish that uses sound production to defend its anemone territory, has a wide but disjunct distribution in the Indian Ocean. We compared sounds produced by these fishes from populations in Madagascar and Indonesia, a distance of 6500 km. Differentiation of agonistic calls into distinct types indicates a complexity not previously recorded in fishes' acoustic communication. Moreover, various acoustic parameters, including peak frequency, pulse duration, number of peaks per pulse, differed between the two populations. The geographic comparison is the first to demonstrate ‘dialects’ in a marine fish species, and these differences in sound parameters suggest genetic divergence between these two populations. These results highlight the possible approach for investigating the role of sounds in fish behaviour in reproductive divergence and speciation. PMID:16087425

  10. Geomagnetic Secular Variation Recorded in Volcanic Rocks: The End of the Geocentric Axial Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.; Robinson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most paleomagnetic textbooks ascribe secular variation (SV) to the movement and waxing/waning of non-dipole magnetic features in the fluid core, perhaps joined by wobble of a geocentric axial dipole (GAD). The actuality of a GAD is profoundly limited by the existence of the static, solid inner core, and the dynamic nature of the fluid outer core. A study of >560 Brunhes Epoch Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGP) suggests that geomagnetic field behavior arises from the waxing/waning of three approximately "stationary" offset dipoles (OD) situated in the middle of the ring of the outer core. These OD have been loosely fixed to preferred longitudes of 40°E, 120°E, and 280°E for at least the past 17Ma. The three offset dipoles in these positions determine transitional and excursional paths, and also normal SV. An extended literature documents these longitude corridors as paths of preferred VGP movement, guided by the polarity inversion of one of the three OD. Analysis of volcanic rock and archeomagnetic SV records shows a three-fold symmetric movement of local magnetic directions, guided by the variation in strength of the three OD. Preliminary data indicates that in the recent past the dominant OD at a given time yields to the next OD in movement toward greater east longitude. The frequency of OD dominance exchange is ~400 years, with return to the original OD in ~1200 years. Archeomagnetic "jerks", not easily explained by a single dominant, inertial GAD, are more easily understood with 3 waxing/waning and exchanging OD. The particular analysis of Hawaiian SV with regard to the three OD suggests that tropical locales, far from the three spin axis-parallel OD, may still record true non-dipole influences.

  11. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  12. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  13. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  14. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Records § 212.110 How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility or another...

  15. Sustained production of multi-decadal climate records - Lessons from the NOAA Climate Data Record Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's Climate Data Record (CDR) Program was designed to be responsive to the needs of climate monitoring, research, and services with the ultimate aim of serving decision making across a spectrum of users for the long term. It requires the sustained production of high quality, multidecadal time series data describing the global atmosphere, oceans, and land surface that can be used for informed decision making. The challenges of a long-term program of sustaining CDRs, as contrasted with short-term efforts of traditional three-year research programs, are substantial and different. The sustained production of CDRs requires collaboration between experts in the climate community, data management, and software development and maintenance. It is also informed by scientific application and associated user feedback on the accessibility and usability of the produced CDRs. The CDR Program has developed a metric for assessing the maturity of CDRs with respect to data management, software, and user application and applied it to over 28 CDRs. The main/primary lesson learned over the past seven years is that a rigorous, team approach to data management, employing subject matter experts at every step, is critical to open and transparent production. This approach also makes it much easier to support the needs of users who want near-real-time production of "interim" CDRs for monitoring and users who want to use CDRs for tailored authoritative information, such as a drought index. This talk will review of the history of the CDR program, current status, and plans.

  16. 12 CFR 404.29 - Restrictions on testimony and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURE Demands for Testimony of Current and Former Ex-Im Bank Personnel and for Production of Ex-Im Bank Records § 404.29 Restrictions on testimony and production of records. Ex-Im Bank personnel may not...

  17. 12 CFR 404.29 - Restrictions on testimony and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURE Demands for Testimony of Current and Former Ex-Im Bank Personnel and for Production of Ex-Im Bank Records § 404.29 Restrictions on testimony and production of records. Ex-Im Bank personnel may not...

  18. Centennial record of wind-field variations from a coastal dune (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, Sebastian; Costas, Iria; Betzler, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We show that coastal wandering dunes bear a valuable climate record on time scales of seasons to years and can provide data on past wind-field variations for regions and/or time spans where no instrumental weather observations exist. To access this archive, we propose a combined approach, integrating sedimentological and geophysical methods. Sedimentary architecture and grain-size properties of a 32 m high parabolic dune on the barrier island Sylt (southern North Sea) were investigated using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and laser-diffraction particle-size analyzer. A chronostratigraphic framework was established based on a series of historical aerial images covering the time period 1936 to 2009. GPR data reveal the internal sedimentary architecture of the dune with an effective resolution of about 0.3 m. Large inland-dipping foresets, being the result of the predominance of onshore winds, form the building block of the dune. The dune exhibits a complex internal architecture comprising numerous unconformities, i.e. gaps in the sedimentary record, slumps, top-lap geometries and shifting depocenters. Therefore, careful mapping of the dunes architectural elements prior to sediment sampling is essential. Grain-size statistics are based on 4900 samples taken equidistantly in a 245 m long trench parallel to the direction of dune movement. Sedimentological proxy data were calibrated using a time series of instrumental weather observations from a meteorological station, 2 km off the dune. These data reach back until the year 1950. Variations in wind speed are best reflected by the sorting of the grain-size distribution: periods of weaker winds result in better sorted sediments, whereas higher wind speeds yield a wider grain-size spectrum. This approach allows us to present a reconstruction of variations in the strength of onshore directed winds covering approximately the last 100 years. Our data show slightly increased wind speeds at the beginning of the 20th century

  19. Variational Monte Carlo simulations using tensor-product projected states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Olga; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chou, Chung-Pin; Pollmann, Frank; Kao, Ying-Jer

    2015-04-01

    We propose an efficient numerical method, which combines the advantages of recently developed tensor-network based methods and standard trial wave functions, to study the ground-state properties of quantum many-body systems. In this approach, we apply a projector in the form of a tensor-product operator to an input wave function, such as a Jastrow-type or Hartree-Fock wave function, and optimize the tensor elements via variational Monte Carlo. The entanglement already contained in the input wave function can considerably reduce the bond dimensions compared to the regular tensor-product state representation. In particular, this allows us to also represent states that do not obey the area law of entanglement entropy. In addition, for fermionic systems, the fermion sign structure can be encoded in the input wave function. We show that the optimized states provide good approximations of the ground-state energy and correlation functions in the cases of two-dimensional bosonic and fermonic systems.

  20. Melatonin production in healthy infants: evidence for seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Y; Laudon, M; Tauman, R; Zisapel, N

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the normal range of nocturnal urinary excretion of the major melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6SMT) in a large sample of healthy full-term infants (8 and 16 wk old) and assess whether the endogenous production of melatonin changes with season. 6SMT was assessed in urine samples extracted from disposable diapers removed from full-term, 8- (n = 317) and 16-wk-old (n = 93) infants over the nocturnal period (19:00-08:00 h). In addition, 6SMT was assessed in 8-wk-old (n = 35) healthy infants over the entire 24-h period. 6SMT was determined by an ELISA assay. 6SMT excretion at 8 wk of age exhibited diurnal variations with (mean +/- SD) 61 +/- 18% of the daily production excreted during the nocturnal period regardless of season. The nocturnal 6SMT values in the entire cohort (at 8 as well as 16 wk of age) were found to significantly depart from normal distribution (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test). A normal distribution was obtained using a natural base logarithmic (ln) transformation of the data. The normal range (2.5-97.5 percentile of the ln 6SMT excretion per night) was thus defined as 4.66-8.64 (106-5646 ng/night) for 8-wk-old and 5.19-9.67 (180-15,820 ng/night) for 16-wk-old infants. A significant effect of the month of birth on 6SMT production at the age of 8 wk was found (ANOVA, p < 0.002) with maximal levels produced by infants born in June (summer solstice) and minimal excretion in infants born in December (winter solstice). Short-photoperiod-born infants excreted on average about threefold less 6SMT compared with long-photoperiod-born infants (t test, p = 0. 01). The seasonal variations were no longer present at 16 wk of age. No effect of breast-feeding at the time of sampling on seasonality of 6SMT was found. Normal ranges for the nocturnal urinary excretion of 6SMT in full-term infants at 8 and 16 wk of age are defined. This enables the evaluation of nocturnal 6SMT excretion as a prognostic and diagnostic factor

  1. 32 CFR 720.31 - Production of official records in the absence of court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Production of Official Records § 720.31 Production of official records in the absence of court order. (a... CFR 18.14, and part 21, subpart B) ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production of official records in the absence...

  2. 32 CFR 720.30 - Production of official records in response to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Production of Official Records § 720.30 Production of official records in response to court order. (a... court order for production of Department of the Navy records is deemed inappropriate for any reason... that Bureau (20 CFR 1.21). In case of doubt, the matter should be handled in accordance with...

  3. Historic records on the commercial production of infant formula.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Industrialized food production first appeared in 1856, pioneered by Borden in the USA, Liebig in Germany, Nestlé in Switzerland, and Mellin in the UK. Their products differed remarkably and deviated from human and cow's milk, and physicians discussed the importance of minute variations in protein, fat and carbohydrates. Proprietary formulas were free of bacteria, and the companies prospered with mass production, international marketing and aggressive advertising. From 1932 on, medical societies restricted advertising to the laity. In 1939 Williams in Singapore and in 1970 Jelliffe in Jamaica suspected that commercial formula may be increasing infant mortality in the Third World. Breastfeeding continued to decline during the early 20th century, falling in 1970 below 10% in the USA. The Swiss 'Third World Group' and the US 'Infant Formula Action Coalition' linked infant mortality and industry marketing in the Third World. The controversy of 1970-1984 led to the WHO Code, which regulated the advertising and marketing of baby food. This was one of several public health statements contributing to the resurgence of breastfeeding. PMID:25012139

  4. Annual, orbital, and enigmatic variations in tropical oceanography recorded by the Equatorial Atlantic amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Equatorial Atlantic surface waters respond directly to changes in zonal and meridional lower tropospheric winds forced by annual insolation. This mechanism has its maximum effect along the equatorial wave guide centered on 10 deg W. The result is to amplify even subtle tropical climate changes such that they are recorded by marked amplitude changes in the proxy signals. Model realizations, NCAR AGCM and OGCM for 0 Ka and 126 Ka (January and July), and paleoceanographic proxy data show that these winds are also forced by insolation changes at the orbital periods of precession and obliquity. Perhelion in boreal summer produces a strengthened monsoon, e.g., increase meridional and decrease zonal wind stress. This reduces oceanic Ekman divergence and thermocline/nutricline shallowing. The result, in the equatorial Atlantic, is reduced primary productivity and higher euphotic zone temperatures; vice versa for perihelion in boreal winter. Perihelion is controlled by precession. Thus, the dominant period in spectra from a stacked SST record (0-252 Ka BP) at the site of the equatorial Atlantic amplifier is 23 Ky (53 percent of the total variance). This precessional period is coherent (k = 0.920) and in phase with boreal summer insolation. Oscillations of shorter period are present in records from cores sited beneath the amplifier region. These occur between 12.5 and 74.5 Ka BP, when eccentricity modulation of precession is at a minimum. Within this time interval there are 21 cycles with mean periods of 3.0 plus or minus 0.5 Ky. Similar periods have been documented from high latitude regions, e.g., Greenland ice cores from Camp Century. The Camp Century signal in this same time interval contains 21 cycles. A subjective correlation was made between the Camp Century and the equatorial records; the signals were statistically similar, r = 0.722 and k = 0.960.

  5. Pervasive multidecadal variations in productivity within the Peruvian Upwelling System over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, S.; Martinez, P.; Crosta, X.; Charlier, K.; Billy, I.; Hanquiez, V.; Blanz, T.; Schneider, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    There is no agreement on the pluri-decadal expression of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Pacific over the last millennium. Marine records from the Peruvian margin indicate humid conditions (El Niño-like mean conditions) over the Little Ice Age, while precipitation records from the eastern equatorial Pacific infer arid conditions (La Niña-like mean conditions) for the same period. We here studied diatom assemblages, nitrogen isotopes, and major and minor elements at the lamination level in three laminated trigger cores located between 11°S and 15°S on the Peruvian shelf within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to reconstruct precipitation and ocean productivity at the multiannual to multidecadal timescales over the last millennium. We respected the sediment structure, thus providing the first records of the mean climatic conditions at the origin of the lamination deposition, which ones represent several years. Light laminations were deposited under productive and dry conditions, indicative of La Niña-like mean conditions in the system, while dark laminations were deposited under non-productive and humid conditions, representative of El Niño-like mean conditions. La Niña-like mean conditions were predominant during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP; 1000-600 years BP) and Current Warm Period (CWP; 150 years BP to present), while El Niño-like mean conditions prevailed over the Little Ice Age (LIA; 600-150 years BP). We provide evidence for persistent multidecadal variations in productivity over the last millennium, which were disconnected from the mean climate state. Multidecadal variability has been stronger over the last 450 years concomitantly to increased variability in the NAO index. Two intervals of strong multidecadal variability were also observed over the MWP, congruent to decreased solar irradiance and increased volcanic activity.

  6. Explaining Spatial Variation in the Recording Effort of Citizen Science Data across Multiple Taxa.

    PubMed

    Mair, Louise; Ruete, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The collation of citizen science data in open-access biodiversity databases makes temporally and spatially extensive species' observation data available to a wide range of users. Such data are an invaluable resource but contain inherent limitations, such as sampling bias in favour of recorder distribution, lack of survey effort assessment, and lack of coverage of the distribution of all organisms. Any technical assessment, monitoring program or scientific research applying citizen science data should therefore include an evaluation of the uncertainty of its results. We use 'ignorance' scores, i.e. spatially explicit indices of sampling bias across a study region, to further understand spatial patterns of observation behaviour for 13 reference taxonomic groups. The data is based on voluntary observations made in Sweden between 2000 and 2014. We compared the effect of six geographical variables (elevation, steepness, population density, log population density, road density and footpath density) on the ignorance scores of each group. We found substantial variation among taxonomic groups in the relative importance of different geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores. In general, road access and logged population density were consistently important variables explaining bias in sampling effort, indicating that access at a landscape-scale facilitates voluntary reporting by citizen scientists. Also, small increases in population density can produce a substantial reduction in ignorance score. However the between-taxa variation in the importance of geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores demonstrated that different taxa suffer from different spatial biases. We suggest that conservationists and researchers should use ignorance scores to acknowledge uncertainty in their analyses and conclusions, because they may simultaneously include many correlated variables that are difficult to disentangle. PMID:26820846

  7. Explaining Spatial Variation in the Recording Effort of Citizen Science Data across Multiple Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Louise; Ruete, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The collation of citizen science data in open-access biodiversity databases makes temporally and spatially extensive species’ observation data available to a wide range of users. Such data are an invaluable resource but contain inherent limitations, such as sampling bias in favour of recorder distribution, lack of survey effort assessment, and lack of coverage of the distribution of all organisms. Any technical assessment, monitoring program or scientific research applying citizen science data should therefore include an evaluation of the uncertainty of its results. We use ‘ignorance’ scores, i.e. spatially explicit indices of sampling bias across a study region, to further understand spatial patterns of observation behaviour for 13 reference taxonomic groups. The data is based on voluntary observations made in Sweden between 2000 and 2014. We compared the effect of six geographical variables (elevation, steepness, population density, log population density, road density and footpath density) on the ignorance scores of each group. We found substantial variation among taxonomic groups in the relative importance of different geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores. In general, road access and logged population density were consistently important variables explaining bias in sampling effort, indicating that access at a landscape-scale facilitates voluntary reporting by citizen scientists. Also, small increases in population density can produce a substantial reduction in ignorance score. However the between-taxa variation in the importance of geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores demonstrated that different taxa suffer from different spatial biases. We suggest that conservationists and researchers should use ignorance scores to acknowledge uncertainty in their analyses and conclusions, because they may simultaneously include many correlated variables that are difficult to disentangle. PMID:26820846

  8. Evidence for Solar-Cycle Forcing and Secular Variation in the Armagh Observatory Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    A prominent feature of previous long-term temperature studies has been the appearance of warming since the 1880s, this often being taken as evidence for anthropogenic-induced global warming. In this investigation, the long-term, annual, mean temperature record (1844-1992) of the Armagh Observatory (Armagh, North Ireland), a set of temperature data based on maximum and minimum thermometers that predates the 1880s and correlates well with northern hemispheric and global standards, is examined for evidence of systematic variation, in particular, as related to solar-cycle forcing and secular variation. Indeed, both appear to be embedded within the Armagh data. Removal of these effects, each contributing about 8% to the overall reduction in variance, yields residuals that are randomly distributed. Application of the 10-year moving average to the residuals, furthermore, strongly suggests that the behavior of the residuals is episodic, inferring that (for extended periods of time) temperatures at Armagh sometimes were warmer or cooler (than expected), while at other times they were stable. Comparison of cyclic averages of annual mean temperatures against the lengths of the associated Hale cycles (i.e., the length of two, sequentially numbered, even-odd sunspot cycle pairs) strongly suggests that the temperatures correlate inversely (r = -0.886 at less than 2% level of significance) against the length of the associated Hale cycle. Because sunspot cycle 22 ended in 1996, the present Hale cycle probably will be shorter than average, implying that temperatures at Armagh over this Hale cycle will be warmer (about 9.31 q 0.23 C at the 90% confidence level) than average (= 9.00 C).

  9. A terrestrial PETM record of variations in carbon and hydrologic cycles from Northern Italian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, B. J.; Dirghangi, S. S.; Krishnan, S.; Agnini, C.; Galeotti, S.; Domenico, R.; Pagani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) represents an interval of rapid global warming overprinted on an already warm global climate ~55 million years ago. While carbon cycle and temperature perturbations to marine environments are well established, changes to terrestrial environments are not well constrained. Here we present hydrogen and carbon isotope records of terrestrial plant-derived n-alkanes during the PETM from a Tethyan section in northern Italy. Carbon isotope compositions of n-alkanes reveal a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of 3.5‰ while bulk marine carbonates show a -4.0‰ CIE. Both the marine and terrestrial carbon isotope records are in phase and indicate a similar recovery to baseline carbon isotope values. Hydrogen isotope values demonstrate an ~30‰ enrichment in 2H prior to the CIE and become 10‰ more negative immediately following the onset of the CIE. Hydrogen isotope ratios remain relatively stable during the body of the CIE and gradually become more negative during the recovery phase. We interpret changes in n-alkane δ2H values as variations in precipitation δ2H value and/or evapotranspiration. However, increased evapotranspiration prior to the CIE relative to peak warming is unlikely. Further, we observe a decrease in the average n-alkane chain length prior to the CIE and a steady increase across the body of the CIE before returning to baseline values. The available evidence suggests that shorter n-alkane chain lengths can be associated with wetter conditions, and thus changes prior to the CIE likely indicate an early shift the δ2H value of precipitation.

  10. Seasonal and spatial variations of diurnal variations of the VLF pulsed flux of the natural electromagnetic field recorded in middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguslaeva, I. B.; Bashkuev, Yu. B.; Dembelov, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    A database of continuous measurements of the VLF pulsed flux of the natural electromagnetic field of the Earth (NEMFE) in southern Siberia during the period from March 31, 2008 to the present was created. Analysis of long-term continuous observations has shown that NEMFE diurnal variations have stable seasonal changes. A high interannual correlation coefficient of NEMFE diurnal variations for the same months in 2008-2014 was discovered. The analysis of data from spaced recorders has shown a high degree of spatial correlation, which indicates a single local mechanism of the NEMFE formation.

  11. The origin of variations in the isotopic record of scleractinian corals: II. Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. K.; Leder, J. J.; Szmant, A. M.; Dodge, R. E.

    1996-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between the δ13C of the skeleton of a zooxanthellate coral ( Montastraea annularis) growing on the Florida Reef Tract and environmental variables (insolation and temperature), physiological variables (growth rate, respiration, calcification, and photosynthesis). Colonies of this species were grown in the field for a 2 1/2 year study period, during which the rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification were measured on fifteen separate occasions, spaced approximately equally throughout the study period. The corals were stained with alizarin-red S within seven days after each set of physiological measurements. At the end of the period the corals were sacrificed and their skeletal extension, density, and skeletal δ13C determined. Despite substantial high-frequency variations, a strong seasonal cycle was evident in the skeletal δ13C records of all the corals throughout the experimental period. The skeletal δ13C and δ18O values varied approximately in phase, and showed a weak, but statistically significant positive relationship with each other. The δ13C of the coral skeletons, when corrected for changes in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), exhibited an inverse correlation with P/R, a finding opposite to what was expected based on current models of isotopic fractionation in coral skeletons. Although such findings tend to support the model of Erez (1978) that increases in photosynthesis act to isotopically deplete the δ13C of the coral skeleton, we note that the inverse association between δ13C and P/R arises because of a slight positive association between δ13C and respiration. We therefore believe that the association may be a result of seasonal variation in some parameters of the system which was not constrained in our study. Alternatives include (1) variations in the δ13C of the DIC which are translated into the δ13C of the food chain, (2) changes from heterotrophy to autotrophy, and (3) changes

  12. 32 CFR 720.30 - Production of official records in response to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... documents demanding information from, or the production of, service or medical records in the custody of the... the service, employment, pay or medical records (including medical records of dependents) of persons... other than medical records may be produced upon receipt of a court order without procuring...

  13. 27 CFR 19.780 - Record of distilled spirits shipped to manufacturers of nonbeverage products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Record of distilled... and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Records and Reports Other Records § 19.780 Record of distilled spirits shipped...

  14. Localizing the Holy Grail: Glacial/interglacial variations in atmospheric CO2 and oceanic deepwater production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2003-04-01

    The 'Holy Grail' of glacial/interglacial CO_2 research is to identify the major driver for variations in atmospheric CO_2 on this time scale. A simple mechanism has hitherto remained elusive. I use an entirely new approach to the problem, namely a global vertical advection-diffusion balance of tracers in the ocean which shows that the ocean's deepwater production (DWP) is the sought-after physical mechanism. The model adequately reproduces modern pCO_2 and vertical profiles of temperature, ΣCO_2, Alkalinity, PO_4, and O_2 in the ocean. Based on recently advanced compelling evidence for reduced glacial DWP, the model will then be shown to explain the glacial pCO_2 of 200~μatm. over a full glacial/interglacial transition (20~ky), model results excellently reproduce the observed temporal evolution of atmospheric CO_2 and deep ocean CaCO_3 saturation. The mechanism also explains the remarkable correlation between Antarctic temperature and CO_2 as recorded in ice cores. The ocean's deepwater production rate is hence identified as the dominant driver of glacial/interglacial CO_2 variations through its effect on the vertical distribution of heat and elements in the sea, initially set into motion in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. 21 CFR 226.102 - Master-formula and batch-production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in manufacturing a stated weight of the Type A medicated article(s). (3) A complete formula for each... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master-formula and batch-production records. 226... Records and Reports § 226.102 Master-formula and batch-production records. (a) For each Type A...

  16. 21 CFR 226.102 - Master-formula and batch-production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in manufacturing a stated weight of the Type A medicated article(s). (3) A complete formula for each... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Master-formula and batch-production records. 226... Records and Reports § 226.102 Master-formula and batch-production records. (a) For each Type A...

  17. 21 CFR 226.102 - Master-formula and batch-production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in manufacturing a stated weight of the Type A medicated article(s). (3) A complete formula for each... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Master-formula and batch-production records. 226... Records and Reports § 226.102 Master-formula and batch-production records. (a) For each Type A...

  18. 21 CFR 226.102 - Master-formula and batch-production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in manufacturing a stated weight of the Type A medicated article(s). (3) A complete formula for each... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Master-formula and batch-production records. 226... Records and Reports § 226.102 Master-formula and batch-production records. (a) For each Type A...

  19. 21 CFR 226.102 - Master-formula and batch-production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in manufacturing a stated weight of the Type A medicated article(s). (3) A complete formula for each... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Master-formula and batch-production records. 226... Records and Reports § 226.102 Master-formula and batch-production records. (a) For each Type A...

  20. Climate Variations and Alaska Tundra Vegetation Productivity Declines in Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, U. S.; Walker, D. A.; Bieniek, P.; Raynolds, M. K.; Epstein, H. E.; Comiso, J. C.; Pinzon, J. E.; Tucker, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    While sea ice has continued to decline, vegetation productivity increases have declined particularly during spring in Alaska as well as many parts of the Arctic tundra. To understand the processes behind these features we investigate spring climate variations that includes temperature, circulation patterns, and snow cover to determine how these may be contributing to spring browning. This study employs remotely sensed weekly 25-km sea ice concentration, weekly surface temperature, and bi-weekly NDVI from 1982 to 2014. Maximum NDVI (MaxNDVI, Maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), Time Integrated NDVI (TI-NDVI), Summer Warmth Index (SWI, sum of degree months above freezing during May-August), atmospheric reanalysis data, dynamically downscaled climate data, meteorological station data, and snow water equivalent (GlobSnow, assimilated snow data set). We analyzed the data for the full period (1982-2014) and for two sub-periods (1982-1998 and 1999-2014), which were chosen based on the declining Alaska SWI since 1998. MaxNDVI has increased from 1982-2014 over most of the Arctic but has declined from 1999 to 2014 southwest Alaska. TI-NDVI has trends that are similar to those for MaxNDVI for the full period but display widespread declines over the 1999-2014 period. Therefore, as the MaxNDVI has continued to increase overall for the Arctic, TI-NDVI has been declining since 1999 and these declines are particularly noteworthy during spring in Alaska. Spring declines in Alaska have been linked to increased spring snow cover that can delay greenup (Bieniek et al. 2015) but recent ground observations suggest that after an initial warming and greening, late season freezing temperature are damaging the plants. The late season freezing temperature hypothesis will be explored with meteorological climate/weather data sets for Alaska tundra regions. References P.A. Bieniek, US Bhatt, DA Walker, MK Raynolds, JC Comiso, HE Epstein, JE Pinzon, CJ Tucker, RL Thoman, H Tran, N M

  1. Multiple 10Be records revealing the history of cosmic-ray variations across the Iceland Basin excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho; Kamata, Kanae; Maejima, Shun; Sasaki, Sho; Sasaki, Nobuyoshi; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Fujita, Shuji; Motoyama, Hideaki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is a proxy of cosmic-ray flux, and its natural records provide vital information about the past intensity variability of the geomagnetic field and solar activity. 10Be records also serve as powerful tools for global synchronization among a variety of paleoarchives and for elucidating sedimentary processes on natural remanent magnetization acquisition. However, high-resolution (multi-decadal to multi-centennial) records of 10Be are scarce, especially those older than several tens of thousands of years. Here we present multiple high-resolution 10Be records of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion interval (ca. 170-200 kyr ago) obtained from sediment cores (authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio) and an ice core (atmospheric 10Be flux). Comparing sedimentary 10Be records with relative paleointensity from the same cores, we found differences in the magnetic lock-in depth, even between adjacent cores. The 10Be-proxy records from the sediment and ice cores exhibit common characteristics: an asymmetric large-scale variation, a ∼7-kyr quasi-plateau around the maximum with a characteristic mid-term depression, and multi-millennial fluctuations in cosmic-ray flux during this interval. Minimal-synchronized and stacked 10Be records show that maximum cosmic-ray flux occurred 188.5-190.0 kyr ago and was double the present flux. A wavelet analysis of the stacked curve reveals dominant 4-kyr and secondary 8-kyr periodicities, both of which can be interpreted as intrinsic geomagnetic cycles. The wavelet spectrum of the high-resolution ice-core record shows a periodicity of 1.7 kyr and somewhat intermingled multi-centennial cycles around the maxima of 10Be, which likely represent solar cycles in this period. High-resolution 10Be records from multiple paleoarchives provide both a robust proxy record of cosmic-ray flux and a valuable tool for detailed global synchronization based on cosmic-ray variations.

  2. Effect of media property variations on shingled magnetic recording channel bit error rate and signal to noise ratio performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Maria Yu; Teo, Kim Keng; Chan, Kheong Sann

    2015-05-01

    Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) is an upcoming technology to see the hard disk drive industry over until heat assisted magnetic recording or another technology matures. In this work, we study the impact of variations in media parameters on the raw channel bit error rate (BER) through micromagnetic simulations and the grain flipping probability channel model in the SMR situation. This study aims to provide feedback to media designers on how media property variations influence the SMR channel performance. In particular, we analyse the effect of variations in the anisotropy constant (Ku), saturation magnetization (Ms), easy axis (ez), grain size (gs), and exchange coupling (Ax), on the written micromagnetic output and the ensuing hysteresis loop. We also compare these analyses with the channel performance on signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the raw channel BER.

  3. Composition and variation of noise recorded at the Yellowknife Seismic Array, 1991-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koper, K.D.; De Foy, B.; Benz, H.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze seismic noise recorded on the 18 short-period, vertical component seismometers of the Yellowknife Seismic Array (YKA). YKA has an aperture of 23 km and is sited on cratonic lithosphere in an area with low cultural noise. These properties make it ideal for studying natural seismic noise at periods of 1-3 s. We calculated frequency-wave number spectra in this band for over 6,000 time windows that were extracted once per day for 17 years (1991-2007). Slowness analysis reveals a rich variety of seismic phases originating from distinct source regions: Rg waves from the Great Slave Lake; Lg waves from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Oceans; and teleseismic P waves from the north Pacific and equatorial mid-Atlantic regions. The surface wave energy is generated along coastlines, while the body wave energy is generated at least in part in deep-water, pelagic regions. Surface waves tend to dominate at the longer periods and, just as in earthquake seismograms, Lg is the most prominent arrival. Although the periods we study are slightly shorter than the classic double-frequency microseismic band of 4-10 s, the noise at YKA has clear seasonal behavior that is consistent with the ocean wave climate in the Northern Hemisphere. The temporal variation of most of the noise sources can be well fit using just two Fourier components: yearly and biyearly terms that combine to give a fast rise in microseismic power from mid-June through mid-October, followed by a gradual decline. The exception is the Rg energy from the Great Slave Lake, which shows a sharp drop in noise power over a 2-week period in November as the lake freezes. The L g noise from the east has a small but statistically significant positive slope, perhaps implying increased ocean wave activity in the North Atlantic over the last 17 years. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. A 700-year paleoecological record of boreal ecosystem responses to climatic variation from Alaska.

    PubMed

    Tinner, Willy; Bigler, Christian; Gedye, Sharon; Gregory-Eaves, Irene; Jones, Richard T; Kaltenrieder, Petra; Krähenbühl, Urs; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2008-03-01

    Recent observations and model simulations have highlighted the sensitivity of the forest-tundra ecotone to climatic forcing. In contrast, paleoecological studies have not provided evidence of tree-line fluctuations in response to Holocene climatic changes in Alaska, suggesting that the forest-tundra boundary in certain areas may be relatively stable at multicentennial to millennial time scales. We conducted a multiproxy study of sediment cores from an Alaskan lake near the altitudinal limits of key boreal-forest species. Paleoecological data were compared with independent climatic reconstructions to assess ecosystem responses of the forest tundra boundary to Little Ice Age (LIA) climatic fluctuations. Pollen, diatom, charcoal, macrofossil, and magnetic analyses provide the first continuous record of vegetation fire-climate interactions at decadal to centennial time scales during the past 700 years from southern Alaska. Boreal-forest diebacks characterized by declines of Picea mariana, P. glauca, and tree Betula occurred during the LIA (AD 1500-1800), whereas shrubs (Alnus viridis, Betula glandulosa/nana) and herbaceous taxa (Epilobium, Aconitum) expanded. Marked increases in charcoal abundance and changes in magnetic properties suggest increases in fire importance and soil erosion during the same period. In addition, the conspicuous reduction or disappearance of certain aquatic (e.g., Isoetes, Nuphar, Pediastrum) and wetland (Sphagnum) plants and major shifts in diatom assemblages suggest pronounced lake-level fluctuations and rapid ecosystem reorganization in response to LIA climatic deterioration. Our results imply that temperature shifts of 1-2 degrees C, when accompanied by major changes in moisture balance, can greatly alter high-altitudinal terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic ecosystems, including conversion between boreal-forest tree line and tundra. The climatic and ecosystem variations in our study area appear to be coherent with changes in solar irradiance

  5. Environmental Magnetism as an Instrument for Characterizing Paleoclimatic Variations in the Sediment Record of Lake Tanganyika, East Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, L.; Verosub, K.; Acton, G.; Russell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Due to their age and their continuous record of sedimentation, the lacustrine sediments of Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, provide an excellent resource for paleoclimatic research. During an eight-day cruise in July of 2004, participants in the Nyanza Project collected four Kullenburg piston cores in the vicinity of the Kalya horst, a mid-lake topographic high located south of the Mahale Mountains. Thirty meters of core were recovered. Initial lithologic analysis of the cores revealed that they consist of massive silty clay beds alternating with laminated diatomaceous oozes. U-channel samples were collected from the cores in order to obtain a continuous record of paleomagnetic directions recorded by the sediments as well as an environmental record of changes in the composition and concentration of magnetic minerals. In conjunction with other techniques, the directional record will help to provide a chronology for the cores, which are thought to extend well into Marine Isotope Stage 3. This chronology will be used to place the evolution of the lake system and its sedimentary processes within the context of global climate variability. The environmental magnetic record will provide information about both large-scale and small-scale climatic variations. The paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic information obtained from these cores will make it possible to draw definitive conclusions about past climate variations, current atmospheric composition, and the present-day quality of the lake.

  6. SPCZ- and ENSO-related Salinity Variations Recorded in the Skeletal Geochemistry of a Porites Coral from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbourne, K. H.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Delcroix, T.; Gouriou, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Variations in sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) are important components of climate variability in the tropical ocean-atmosphere system. Instrumental SST time series are much more readily available than are instrumental SSS time series, which are exceedingly rare. SSS variations are strongly linked to seawater δ 18O variations in the tropics, thus coral-based reconstructions of seawater δ 18O offer an opportunity to reconstruct the history of SSS variations in the tropical oceans. Seawater δ 18O is obtained by combining coral skeletal δ 18O, which varies in response to changes in seawater δ 18O and SST, with coral skeletal Sr/Ca, which varies in response to SST changes. This method has great potential for reconstructing past salinity variations. We explore this potential using a monthly-resolved, 65-year record of skeletal δ 18O and Sr/Ca variations in a Porites coral from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu (16.0° S, 166.7° E). Santo is well positioned for such a study because ENSO-related climate variability strongly influences local salinity through changes in the position of the center of South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) convection/precipitation and associated salinity front movements. Moreover, a 24-year record of SSS variations is available from this region, which permits a ground-truth assessment of the robustness of the coral-based seawater δ 18O-SSS reconstruction. Investigation into different methods of combining coral δ 18O and Sr/Ca to reconstruct SSS reveals that the coral δ 18O anomaly time series provides the best fit to the SSS time series. A post-1976/1977 freshening trend in the δ 18O anomaly time series, which has been documented in other proxy time series, increases our confidence that this time series accurately reflects changes in the hydrologic balance in the western tropical Pacific. The Vanuatu coral δ 18O anomaly time series also correlates strongly with the Southern Oscillation Index, the Niño 3.4 SST

  7. 30 CFR 250.804 - Production safety-system testing and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production safety-system testing and records... SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.804 Production safety-system testing and records. (a...-controlled subsurface safety device installed in a well, including such devices in shut-in and...

  8. 30 CFR 250.804 - Production safety-system testing and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Production safety-system testing and records... Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.804 Production safety-system testing and records. (a) Inspection... installed in a well, including such devices in shut-in and injection wells, shall be tested in place...

  9. 30 CFR 250.804 - Production safety-system testing and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production safety-system testing and records... Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.804 Production safety-system testing and records. (a) Inspection... installed in a well, including such devices in shut-in and injection wells, shall be tested in place...

  10. 30 CFR 250.804 - Production safety-system testing and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production safety-system testing and records... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.804 Production safety-system testing and records. (a) Inspection and testing. The...

  11. 28 CFR 16.33 - Fee for production of identification record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fee for production of identification record. 16.33 Section 16.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production of FBI Identification Records in Response to Written Requests...

  12. Climate, productivity, and intermediate water nutrients: new records from bamboo coral Ba/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Spero, H. J.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    A geochemical nutrient proxy from deep-sea corals would provide decadal to centennial scale records of intermediate-water nutrient dynamics. Such records could be used to determine how intermediate water masses (300-2000m) are affected by decadal scale climate change (e.g. Pacific Decadal Oscillation) via carbon cycling, export production, and intermediate water-mass circulation/ventilation. Because seawater barium (BaSW ) has a nutrient-like distribution in the water-column (similar to silicate), Ba/Ca records have been used to trace upwelled nutrient supply in shallow water surface corals isolated from terrestrial barium sources. Here we show the first calibration of a nutrient proxy from skeletal barium preserved in the calcitic internodes of bamboo corals. Our calibration was calculated from a depth transect (500-2000m) of Isidella and Keratoisis corals spanning a silicate and (BaSW ) gradient on the California Margin (Ba/Ca coral (µmol/mol) = 0.117 BaSW (nmol/kg ) + 0.835; R2 = 0.88; n = 29). The strong linear correlation between Ba/Ca coral and BaSW suggests that coral Ba/Ca is a reliable recorder of seawater barium (and, therefore, silicate). We find a distribution coefficient (DBa) for bamboo coral Ba/Ca of 1.3±0.1, similar to that of other corals (surface and deep-sea dwelling) and inorganic calcium carbonate precipitation experiments (DBa = 1.2-1.5). This implies that, as true for other carbonates, Ba incorporation is primarily driven by ionic substitution and holds promise as a globally applicable nutrient proxy in bamboo corals. High-resolution Ba/Ca timeseries records sampled via LA-ICP-MS in two co-located California Margin corals (Pioneer Seamount; 830m; 37°22’27”N) co-vary with ~decadal-scale variations in silicate and nitrate measured at 500m depth (CalCOFI line 80 sta. 60; 34°8’60”N). This suggests that high-resolution records of bamboo coral Ba/Ca can be used to reconstruct broad changes in intermediate water nutrients driven by

  13. Tooth counts through growth in diapsid reptiles: implications for interpreting individual and size-related variation in the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Brown, Caleb Marshall; VanBuren, Collin S; Larson, Derek W; Brink, Kirstin S; Campione, Nicolás E; Vavrek, Matthew J; Evans, David C

    2015-04-01

    Tooth counts are commonly recorded in fossil diapsid reptiles and have been used for taxonomic and phylogenetic purposes under the assumption that differences in the number of teeth are largely explained by interspecific variation. Although phylogeny is almost certainly one of the greatest factors influencing tooth count, the relative role of intraspecific variation is difficult, and often impossible, to test in the fossil record given the sample sizes available to palaeontologists and, as such, is best investigated using extant models. Intraspecific variation (largely manifested as size-related or ontogenetic variation) in tooth counts has been examined in extant squamates (lizards and snakes) but is poorly understood in archosaurs (crocodylians and dinosaurs). Here, we document tooth count variation in two species of extant crocodylians (Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus) as well as a large varanid lizard (Varanus komodoensis). We test the hypothesis that variation in tooth count is driven primarily by growth and thus predict significant correlations between tooth count and size, as well as differences in the frequency of deviation from the modal tooth count in the premaxilla, maxilla, and dentary. In addition to tooth counts, we also document tooth allometry in each species and compare these results with tooth count change through growth. Results reveal no correlation of tooth count with size in any element of any species examined here, with the exception of the premaxilla of C. porosus, which shows the loss of one tooth position. Based on the taxa examined here, we reject the hypothesis, as it is evident that variation in tooth count is not always significantly correlated with growth. However, growth trajectories of smaller reptilian taxa show increases in tooth counts and, although current samples are small, suggest potential correlates between tooth count trajectories and adult size. Nevertheless, interspecific variation in growth patterns

  14. Using the Deming quality improvement method to manage medical record department product lines.

    PubMed

    Postal, S N

    1990-06-01

    The above application of the quality improvement cycle provides insight into the use of the Deming method to address one of several identified customer needs and expectations obtained during the managing phase of product-line administration. Implementation of the quality improvement method requires a major commitment from all team members. Process improvement requires a willingness to be detail oriented. Gathering of statistics--such as analysis turn-around time--and evaluation are critical. This objective view of processes requires accountability and a commitment to change. Improvements focus on long-term problem resolution, not the quick fixes that result from addressing symptoms of problems. True problem resolution occurs by solving the root causes of variations. Medical record departments must move from being outcome oriented to being process focused. It is no longer feasible to be constantly putting out fires in an environment that demands well-planned and well-designed products that meet customers' expectations. The long-term management of product lines requires a systematic method of planning, doing, checking, and acting. The Deming quality improvement method provides a framework for positive change that focuses on quality processes resulting in a quality product that meets consumers' needs. PMID:10106656

  15. Variations in productivity and eolian fluxes in the northeastern Arabian Sea during the past 110 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmand, Ali; Marcantonio, Franco; Schulz, Hartmut

    2004-04-01

    High-resolution (one to two samples/ka) radionuclide proxy records from core 93KL in the northeastern Arabian Sea provide evidence for millennial climate variability over the past 110 ka. We interpret 230Th-normalized 232Th fluxes as a proxy for eolian input, and authigenic uranium concentrations as a proxy for past productivity. We attribute orbital and suborbital variations in both proxies to changes in the intensity of the southwest Indian Ocean monsoon. The highest 230Th-normalized 232Th fluxes occur at times that are consistent with the timing of the Younger Dryas, Heinrich events 1-7 and cold Dansgaard-Oeschger stadial events recorded in the GISP2 ice core. Such high dust fluxes may be due to a weakened southwest monsoon in conjunction with strengthened northwesterlies from the Arabian Peninsula and Mesopotamia. Authigenic uranium concentrations, on the other hand, are highest during warm Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadials when the southwest monsoon is intensified relative to the northwesterly winds. Our results also indicate that on orbital timescales maximum average eolian fluxes coincide with the timing of marine isotopic stage (MIS) 2 and 4, while minimum fluxes occur during MIS 1, 3 and 5. Although the forcing mechanism(s) controlling suborbital variabilities in monsoonal intensity is still debated, our findings suggest an atmospheric teleconnection between the low-latitude southwest monsoon and North Atlantic climate.

  16. Actual timing of neodymium isotopic variations recorded by Fe-Mn crusts in the western North Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, K.W.; Lee, D.-C.; Christensen, J.N.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts from the western North Atlantic record variations in the Nd and Pb isotopic composition of Cenozoic deep water preserved during their growth. The timing and cause of the most striking change have been the subject of debate. Some have proposed that the shift took place after 4 Ma in response to the closure of the Panama gateway. Others have argued that the major change in isotope composition occurred as early as 8 Ma. This study presents high-resolution Nd isotope records for crusts previously dated using 10Be/9Be chronology. These data confirm that the shifts in Nd occurred after 4 Ma, consistent with a likely relationship with the closure of the Central American Isthmus and intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation, and in accordance with changes seen in other physical and chemical records. These results illustrate the need for both a robust chronological framework and high-resolution records before a reliable paleoceanographic interpretation can be made of the variations recorded by Fe-Mn crusts.

  17. Correlation of Late Pleistocene Terrestrial Climate Variation From Mono Lake, USA, With Global Records Using Relative Paleointensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, S.; Hemming, S.; Kent, D.

    2004-12-01

    In order to assess different models of global climate variation, it is crucial to be able to accurately correlate terrestrial climate records with each other and with marine climate records. This problem is especially challenging in intervals older than 30 kyr, when problems with accuracy and precision of 14C ages become significant. Recently published stacks of global, high-resolution variation in intensity of Earth's past magnetic field (North and South Atlantic PaleoIntensity Stacks, NAPIS and SAPIS) enable correlation of high-quality terrestrial records of paleointensity with the GISP2 timescale. The lacustrine sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation (Mono Basin, CA) are known to be excellent recorders of Pleistocene climate and geomagnetic field variation, and are the type locality for the Mono Lake paleomagnetic excursion (MLE). Here we present rock magnetic analyses showing that the sediments also fit the criteria required for good recorders of paleomagnetic intensity, with a magnetic fraction dominated by fine-grained magnetite with concentration variation <3. Both the type section and South Shore cliffs were sampled continuously at 2 cm resolution, and susceptibility and Natural, Anhysteretic, and Isothermal Remnant Magnetizations (NRM, ARM, and IRM) were measured on all samples. IRM was chosen to normalize the NRM for paleointensity, though NRM/ARM produces a similar curve. The resulting records are similar both to each other and to the NAPIS and SAPIS curves, allowing correlation of the Wilson Creek sediments to the GISP2 timescale. We have used two independent age constraints to frame our correlation to NAPIS and SAPIS; first, carbonate 14C and tephra 40Ar/39Ar ages agree to 32 ka, which is thus used as an upper tie point. Second, the lakes of the Great Basin have been shown to be strongly controlled by the 100 ka cycle, and so we infer lake transgression over the Wilson Creek site at the M.I.S. 5/4 boundary, fixing the maximum age of sediment

  18. Historical variation of structural novelty in a natural product library.

    PubMed

    Kong, De-Xin; Guo, Ming-Yue; Xiao, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the potential of natural products as novel structure suppliers, a historical analysis was performed on the structural novelty of a natural product library, viz., the Chapman & Hall/CRC Dictionary of Natural Products. The results show that although the unexplored natural product universe is still ample, it is more and more difficult to find novel agents from nature, with the discovery probability of novel structures and scaffolds being lower than 50% in the near future, which mainly results from the intrinsic redundancy of natural products and, thus, is unlikely to be reversed merely through technical progresses. PMID:22083910

  19. 21 CFR 20.2 - Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production of records by Food and Drug Administration employees. 20.2 Section 20.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... records by Food and Drug Administration employees. (a) Any request for records of the Food and...

  20. 21 CFR 212.110 - How must I maintain records of my production of PET drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PET drugs? 212.110 Section 212.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of PET drugs? (a) Record availability. Records must be maintained at the PET drug production facility... loss, and readily available for review and copying by FDA employees. (c) Record retention period....

  1. 21 CFR 111.255 - What is the requirement to establish a batch production record?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control... batch of a dietary supplement; (b) Your batch production record must include complete...

  2. Climatic change controls productivity variation in global grasslands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingzhu; Zhu, Wenquan; Schwartz, Mark W; Ganjurjav, Hasbagan; Wan, Yunfan; Qin, Xiaobo; Ma, Xin; Williamson, Matthew A; Li, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Detection and identification of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems have been core issues in climate change research in recent years. In this study, we compared average annual values of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with theoretical net primary productivity (NPP) values based on temperature and precipitation to determine the effect of historic climate change on global grassland productivity from 1982 to 2011. Comparison of trends in actual productivity (NDVI) with climate-induced potential productivity showed that the trends in average productivity in nearly 40% of global grassland areas have been significantly affected by climate change. The contribution of climate change to variability in grassland productivity was 15.2-71.2% during 1982-2011. Climate change contributed significantly to long-term trends in grassland productivity mainly in North America, central Eurasia, central Africa, and Oceania; these regions will be more sensitive to future climate change impacts. The impacts of climate change on variability in grassland productivity were greater in the Western Hemisphere than the Eastern Hemisphere. Confirmation of the observed trends requires long-term controlled experiments and multi-model ensembles to reduce uncertainties and explain mechanisms. PMID:27243565

  3. Climatic change controls productivity variation in global grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qingzhu; Zhu, Wenquan; Schwartz, Mark W.; Ganjurjav, Hasbagan; Wan, Yunfan; Qin, Xiaobo; Ma, Xin; Williamson, Matthew A.; Li, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Detection and identification of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems have been core issues in climate change research in recent years. In this study, we compared average annual values of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with theoretical net primary productivity (NPP) values based on temperature and precipitation to determine the effect of historic climate change on global grassland productivity from 1982 to 2011. Comparison of trends in actual productivity (NDVI) with climate-induced potential productivity showed that the trends in average productivity in nearly 40% of global grassland areas have been significantly affected by climate change. The contribution of climate change to variability in grassland productivity was 15.2–71.2% during 1982–2011. Climate change contributed significantly to long-term trends in grassland productivity mainly in North America, central Eurasia, central Africa, and Oceania; these regions will be more sensitive to future climate change impacts. The impacts of climate change on variability in grassland productivity were greater in the Western Hemisphere than the Eastern Hemisphere. Confirmation of the observed trends requires long-term controlled experiments and multi-model ensembles to reduce uncertainties and explain mechanisms.

  4. Climatic change controls productivity variation in global grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingzhu; Zhu, Wenquan; Schwartz, Mark W.; Ganjurjav, Hasbagan; Wan, Yunfan; Qin, Xiaobo; Ma, Xin; Williamson, Matthew A.; Li, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Detection and identification of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems have been core issues in climate change research in recent years. In this study, we compared average annual values of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with theoretical net primary productivity (NPP) values based on temperature and precipitation to determine the effect of historic climate change on global grassland productivity from 1982 to 2011. Comparison of trends in actual productivity (NDVI) with climate-induced potential productivity showed that the trends in average productivity in nearly 40% of global grassland areas have been significantly affected by climate change. The contribution of climate change to variability in grassland productivity was 15.2–71.2% during 1982–2011. Climate change contributed significantly to long-term trends in grassland productivity mainly in North America, central Eurasia, central Africa, and Oceania; these regions will be more sensitive to future climate change impacts. The impacts of climate change on variability in grassland productivity were greater in the Western Hemisphere than the Eastern Hemisphere. Confirmation of the observed trends requires long-term controlled experiments and multi-model ensembles to reduce uncertainties and explain mechanisms. PMID:27243565

  5. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2013-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of four phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First, we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production ((is)approximately 50%, the equivalent of 20 PgC·y1). Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed approximately 20% ((is) approximately 7 PgC·y1) of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10% ((is) approximately 4 PgC·y1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in the high latitudes ((is) greater than 40 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4% (1-2 PgC·y1). We assessed the effects of climate variability on group-specific primary production using global (i.e., Multivariate El Niño Index, MEI) and "regional" climate indices (e.g., Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p (is) less than 0.05) between the MEI and the group-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatoms/cyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect

  6. Development of a Method to Compensate for Signal Quality Variations in Repeated Auditory Event-Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Paukkunen, Antti K. O.; Leminen, Miika M.; Sepponen, Raimo

    2010-01-01

    Reliable measurements are mandatory in clinically relevant auditory event-related potential (AERP)-based tools and applications. The comparability of the results gets worse as a result of variations in the remaining measurement error. A potential method is studied that allows optimization of the length of the recording session according to the concurrent quality of the recorded data. In this way, the sufficiency of the trials can be better guaranteed, which enables control of the remaining measurement error. The suggested method is based on monitoring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and remaining measurement error which are compared to predefined threshold values. The SNR test is well defined, but the criterion for the measurement error test still requires further empirical testing in practice. According to the results, the reproducibility of average AERPs in repeated experiments is improved in comparison to a case where the number of recorded trials is constant. The test-retest reliability is not significantly changed on average but the between-subject variation in the value is reduced by 33–35%. The optimization of the number of trials also prevents excessive recordings which might be of practical interest especially in the clinical context. The efficiency of the method may be further increased by implementing online tools that improve data consistency. PMID:20407635

  7. 29 CFR 70.40 - Charges assessed for the production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... component's system of records will be treated under the fee provisions at 29 CFR 71.6. ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Charges assessed for the production of records. 70.40 Section 70.40 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR...

  8. 29 CFR 70.40 - Charges assessed for the production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... component's system of records will be treated under the fee provisions at 29 CFR 71.6. ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Charges assessed for the production of records. 70.40 Section 70.40 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR...

  9. 29 CFR 70.40 - Charges assessed for the production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... component's system of records will be treated under the fee provisions at 29 CFR 71.6. ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Charges assessed for the production of records. 70.40 Section 70.40 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR...

  10. 29 CFR 70.40 - Charges assessed for the production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... component's system of records will be treated under the fee provisions at 29 CFR 71.6. ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Charges assessed for the production of records. 70.40 Section 70.40 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR...

  11. 29 CFR 70.40 - Charges assessed for the production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... component's system of records will be treated under the fee provisions at 29 CFR 71.6. ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Charges assessed for the production of records. 70.40 Section 70.40 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR...

  12. 27 CFR 19.601 - Finished products records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for redistillation; (7) Withdrawn for research, development or testing (including government samples... finished product; and (11) Disposed of as samples of the finished product. (26 U.S.C. 5207)...

  13. Variation in the pulmonary hypertensive responsiveness of broilers to lipopolysaccharide and innate variation in nitric oxide production by mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bowen, O T; Wideman, R F; Anthony, N B; Erf, G F

    2006-08-01

    Variability among broilers in their pulmonary hypertensive (PH) responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appears to reflect innate variation in the types or proportions of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors released by leukocytes and endothelial cells. Two experiments were designed to evaluate possible correlations between the PH responsiveness to LPS in vivo and the quantities of nitric oxide (NO; a potent pulmonary vasodilator) produced by mononuclear cells in vitro. In Experiment 1, blood samples were collected from male broilers from a base population (control group) and from survivors of a 60% lethal dose i.v. injection of cellulose microparticles (MP survivor group). In Experiment 2, blood samples were collected from male broilers from a relaxed line and from lines known to be susceptible or resistant to pulmonary hypertension syndrome. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) from each blood sample were cultured at 2 million cells per well, remained unstimulated, or were stimulated with LPS to elicit the expression of inducible NO synthase, and the 24-h production of NO was measured. In both experiments, unstimulated PMNC cultures did not produce consistently detectable levels of NO, whereas LPS-stimulated cultures produced quantities of NO that varied widely among individuals. Nitric oxide production by cultured PMNC also was evaluated by flow cytometry, demonstrating that LPS-stimulated PMNC produced substantially more NO than did unstimulated cells in all of the groups evaluated. Moreover, NO-producing PMNC were identified to be monocytes. The same broilers from which PMNC had been isolated were catheterized subsequently to record pulmonary arterial pressure, LPS was injected i.v. to assess the amplitudes of peak and postpeak PH responses, then N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester was injected to inhibit ongoing NO production. In Experiment 1, the amplitude of the peak and postpeak PH responses to LPS were correlated with the quantity of NO produced by LPS

  14. Pleistocene - Holocene Rainfall and Productivity Records in Alfonso Basin Baja California Sur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Perez, V. D. R.; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, O.; Mejia-Pina, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Northwesterly winds dominate the southern Gulf of California during most of the year and are associated with high primary productivity due to upwelling. The North American Monsoon causes the wind direction to reverse during the summer months and this brings humid and warms conditions to the region. This climatic temporal-variation generates alternate sedimentation and as a consequence laminated deposits of biogenic and terrigenous composition, preserved by the presence of an oxygen minimum zone. A 5.4 m long piston core (36N) was recovered from Cuenca Alfonso during the DIPAL IV cruise on May 2011. The core was sampled at 1 cm intervals to produce high-resolution proxy records of primary productivity (biogenic opal, total organic carbon and carbonate content) and rainfall (terrigenous content). The core spans from late Pleistocene to the present and it's the longest analyzed record for the basin for the above-mentioned proxies. In general, the proxies show a negative trend towards the present, suggesting a more productive basin and wetter climate in the past. During climatic events like the Bølling-Allerød and the Holocene climatic optimum (HCO) CaCO3 content decreased and opal content increased; suggesting the presence of stronger NW winds and nutrient-richer waters. In contrast, during the Younger Dryas and 8.2 Kyr events the opal content decrease and the CaCO3 increase. At 5.5 KyBP the negative trends in all components intensify, especially during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP). An exception to this occurs during the little ice Age (LIA) where the opal and CaCO3 increase. The organic carbon content increases at the end of the HCO and during the MWP, and decreases during the BA, YD, 8.2 Kyr and LIA. The terrigenous content follows the 24°N summer insolation trend, but shows an increase during warm events (BA, HCO and MWP), and can be attributed to migration of the average position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone driven by variations in solar insolation.

  15. The austral peregrine falcon: Color variation, productivity, and pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The austral peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus cassini) was studied in the Andean foot- hills and across the Patagonian steppe from November to December 1981. The birds under study (18 pairs) were reproducing at or near normal (pre-DDT) levels for other races. Pesticide residues, while elevated, were well below the values associated with reproductive failure in other populations. With one exception, eggshells were not abnormally thin. The peregrine falcon in Patagonia exhibits extreme color variation. Pallid birds are nearly pure white below (light cream as juveniles), whereas normally pigmented birds are black-crowned and conspicuously barred with black ventrally. Rare individuals of the Normal Phase display black heads, broad black ventral barring, and warm reddish-brown ventral background coloration.

  16. UNDERSTANDING PRODUCTIVITY VARIATION ON UN-IRRIGATED CLAYPAN SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high clay-content argillic horizon occurring 10 to 100 cm below the surface restricts soil water movement and reduces nutrient efficiency of claypan soils, which affect soil quality related to production and environmental buffering. The objective of this study was to determine the impacts of long-...

  17. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienen, Roel J. W.; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  18. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ18O and amount effects in the south of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ18Otr). Interannual variation in δ18Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ13C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ18Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly 18O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ18Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ18Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ18O and that interannual variation in δ18Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ18O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in disentangling the processes

  19. 27 CFR 40.183 - Record of tobacco products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES... inventory; (e) Removed subject to tax (itemize large cigars by sale price in accordance with § 40.22,...

  20. 27 CFR 40.183 - Record of tobacco products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES... inventory; (e) Removed subject to tax (itemize large cigars by sale price in accordance with § 40.22,...

  1. Distribution and morphological variation of Eleutherodactylus mercedesae Lynch & McDiarmid, 1987 (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae) with first record for Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padial, J.M.; McDiarmid, R.; De la Riva, I.

    2006-01-01

    We report new distributional information for Eleutherodactylus mercedesae in Bolivia, and provide the first record for Peru based on an adult female. This species, previously endemic to Bolivia, now ranges across about 1000 km in cloud forests on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes from southern Peru to central Bolivia. We provide the first morphological description of females based on two specimens, compare them with the male type and paratype, add some observations to the original description, and comment on variation in the species.

  2. Distribution and morphological variation of Eleutherodactylus mercedesae Lynch & McDiarmid, 1987 (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae) with first record for Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padial, J.M.; McDiarmid, R.; De la Riva, I.

    2006-01-01

    We report new distributional information for Eleutherodactylus mercedesae in Bolivia, and provide the first record for Peru based on an adult female. This species, previously endemic to Bolivia, now ranges across about 1000 km in cloud forests on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes from southern Peru to central Bolivia. We provide the first morphological description of females based on two specimens, compare them with the male type and paratype, add some observations to the original description, and comment on variation in the species. Copyright ?? 2006 Magnolia Press.

  3. Annual biomarker record for export production in the central Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Dymond, Jack; Sparrow, Margaret A.

    The record for plankton biomarkers in sediment trap samples from a one-year experiment in the central Arabian Sea (AS4: 15°59'N 61°30'E) shows variations that reflect changing biological conditions in surface waters. Particulate fluxes of C 37-39 alkenones, highly branched C 25 isoprenoids (HBI), dinosterol, nC 28 12-hydroxy fatty acid, 24-ethylcholesterol, and a C 30-34 series of pentacyclic triterpanols all displayed distinct maxima at the start and stop of the Northeast (NE) and Southwest (SW) Monsoons. Surface mixing conditions changed rapidly at these times, altering light and nutrient availability, thereby triggering these biomarker signals of export production. Temporal offsets noted in individual biomarker concentrations (per g total organic carbon) at the start of the SW Monsoon suggest succession occurs in the phytoplankton community contributing to organic matter export. Comparable offsets were neither apparent at the start of the less dynamic NE Monsoon nor at the end of the NE or SW Monsoons. Broad concentration maxima for HBI also were observed at the beginning and end of the time-series during the relatively quiescent Fall Intermonsoon period when such features were conspicuously absent for other biomarkers. HBI are reputed biomarkers of Rhizoselenia and Haslea spp., two recognized dominants of diatom biomass in the Arabian Sea. These peaks in biomarker concentration could reflect either changes in the relative proportion of specific organisms that contribute to the upper ocean productivity or enhanced preservation of the biomarkers during times of high export production. In either case, the biomarker record in sediment traps reflects important changes in the biological condition of the upper ocean. All biomarkers except HBI were measurable in surface sediments deposited beneath the trap site. Comparison with concentrations in average sediment trap particles showed each was sensitive to significant (˜99%) degradation, displaying depletion factors

  4. Coral oxygen isotope records of interdecadal climate variations in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, Stefan; Linsley, Braddock K.; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.; Salinger, Jim

    2005-06-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), a region of high rainfall, is a major feature of subtropical Southern Hemisphere climate and contributes to and interacts with circulation features across the Pacific, yet its past temporal variability and forcing remain only partially understood. Here we compare coral oxygen isotopic (δ18O) series (spanning A.D. 1997-1780 and A.D. 2001-1776) from two genera of hermatypic corals in Fiji, located within the SPCZ, to examine the fidelity of these corals in recording climate change and SPCZ interdecadal dynamics. One of these coral records is a new 225-year subannually resolved δ18O series from the massive coral Diploastreaheliopora. Diploastrea's use in climate reconstructions is still relatively new, but this coral has shown encouragingly similar interannual variability to Porites, the coral genus most commonly used in Pacific paleoclimate studies. In Fiji we observe that interdecadal δ18O variance is also similar in these two coral genera, and Diploastrea contains a larger-amplitude interdecadal signal that more closely tracks instrumental-based indices of Pacific interdecadal climate change and the SPCZ than Porites. Both coral δ18O series record greater interdecadal variability from ˜1880 to 1950, which is consistent with the observations of Folland et al. (2002), who reported higher variability in SPCZ position before 1945. These observations indicate that Diploastrea will likely provide a significant new source of long-term climate information from the SPCZ region.

  5. Automated Analysis of Child Phonetic Production Using Naturalistic Recordings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Dongxin; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Gilkerson, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Conventional resource-intensive methods for child phonetic development studies are often impractical for sampling and analyzing child vocalizations in sufficient quantity. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on early language development by an automated analysis of child phonetic production using naturalistic…

  6. Record of Some Chemical Residues in Poultry Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadelman, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    How pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and heavy metals might get into poultry meat or eggs is reviewed. Several case studies where chemicals were found in poultry products are discussed. It can be concluded that the poultry industry is striving and generally succeeding in producing safe and nutritious meat and eggs. (Author/EB)

  7. 78 FR 72850 - Production of Nonpublic Records and Testimony of OPIC Employees in Legal Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...This rule proposes revisions to the Overseas Private Investment Corporation's (``OPIC'') regulations governing the production of nonpublic testimony or records for court proceedings, commonly known as Touhy regulations after Touhy v. Ragen, 340 U.S. 462...

  8. 28 CFR 16.33 - Fee for production of identification record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production of FBI Identification Records in Response to Written Requests by... directions of the Attorney General of the United States, the Director of the FBI may from time to...

  9. 28 CFR 16.33 - Fee for production of identification record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production of FBI Identification Records in Response to Written Requests by... directions of the Attorney General of the United States, the Director of the FBI may from time to...

  10. 28 CFR 16.33 - Fee for production of identification record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production of FBI Identification Records in Response to Written Requests by... directions of the Attorney General of the United States, the Director of the FBI may from time to...

  11. 28 CFR 16.33 - Fee for production of identification record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Production of FBI Identification Records in Response to Written Requests by... directions of the Attorney General of the United States, the Director of the FBI may from time to...

  12. Variation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions with furosemide injection.

    PubMed

    Mills, D M; Rubel, E W

    1994-06-15

    Cochlear function was monitored in adult gerbils using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) during intraperitoneal injection of furosemide. All stimulus parameters were varied independently over a wide range, the stimulus frequencies f1 and f2 from 1 to 16 kHz, and the stimulus levels L1 and L2 from 20 to 80 dB SPL. The observed emissions at 2f1-f2 and 3f1-2f2 could be considered to be made up of two distinct components: (1) an 'active' source which depended in a complex way on the stimulus frequencies and levels, which was dominant at low and moderate stimulus levels, and which, by definition, was eliminated by sufficient furosemide intoxication; and (2) a 'passive' source which was essentially the same at all frequencies, with a level dependence given approximately by a simple power law distribution. The change from the active to the passive source was usually accompanied by an abrupt shift in emission phase angle. A simple summation model was shown to account for the observed form of this transition. The amount of the decrease in 2f1-f2 emission amplitude after furosemide injection was approximately independent of frequency and consistent for the middle frequency ratios and intensity levels (f2/f1 approximately equal to 1.3, L1 x L2 approximately equal to 55 x 50 dB SPL). It was concluded that the combination of DPOAE with furosemide injection can usefully be employed as a probe of active cochlear mechanics. PMID:7928730

  13. Stature variation in the British American Colonies: French and Indian War records, 1755-1763.

    PubMed

    Steegmann, A T; Haseley, P A

    1988-03-01

    Personnel records kept by military units of American colonials during the French and Indian War (1755-1763) are analyzed for relationships between environmental factors and stature. A robust American economy and direct access to high-quality food were apparently critical to tallness of this white American male sample. American-born men were taller at all ages than those who had migrated from Europe. January temperatures, rural versus urban birth, and ethnicity also showed stature relationships within the American-born group; thermal effects were by far the strongest of the non-nutritional factors. PMID:3284379

  14. A 33 kyr Paleomagnetic Secular Variation Record from Fish Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, B. T.; Stoner, J. S.; Hatfield, R. G.; Ziegler, L. B.; Abbott, M. B.; Larsen, D. J.; Hillman, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new North American lacustrine PSV record spanning the last ~ 33 ka from Fish Lake, Utah. Eleven meters of sediment were recovered from three holes with overlapping drives using a UWITECH coring system. Magnetic susceptibility was measured in the field to ensure stratigraphic completeness and to provide real time information on the material recovered. The recovered lake stratigraphy includes three distinct facies, interpreted to represent the post-glacial (0.75-6.75 m), last glacial maximum (LGM)/deglaciation (6.75-9.5 m), and pre-LGM period (9.5-11.75 m), with an initial chronology constrained by ten radiocarbon dates. CT scans were made on each section and used to monitor for coring deformation and establish precise stratigraphic correlation. Magnetic remanence was studied using AF demagnetization of u-channel samples measured on the OSU 2-G Enterprises u-channel magnetometer. The NRM is characterized by a viscous remanent magnetization (VRM), present throughout the core but successfully removed by 20 mT AF demagnetization. Weak NRM intensities in the post-glacial interval (3-6 x 10-4 A/m before AF demagnetization and 1-3 x 10-4 A/m following 20 mT AF demagnetization) approach the sensitivity of the u-channel magnetometer with increasing demagnetization and result in high MAD values during PCA analysis. Accordingly, we choose to use the NRM measured after 20 mT AF demagnetization for the post-glacial sediments to avoid both the VRM overprint and noise introduced due to week intensities at higher demagnetization steps. Major inclination features are consistent with other western North American PSV records providing confidence in this approach. NRM intensities are significantly higher below 6.75 m, reflecting increased terrigenous input during the LGM/deglaciation and pre LGM periods. A stable magnetization is isolated using a PCA over the 20-60 mT AF demagnetization steps, yielding MAD values of <1 and ~2, respectively. Declination is rotated to a mean

  15. δ18O in the Tropical Conifer Agathis robusta Records ENSO-Related Precipitation Variations

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Bjorn M. M.; Evans, Michael N.; Baker, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-lived trees from tropical Australasia are a potential source of information about internal variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), because they occur in a region where precipitation variability is closely associated with ENSO activity. We measured tree-ring width and oxygen isotopic composition (O) of -cellulose from Agathis robusta (Queensland Kauri) samples collected in the Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia. Standard ring-width chronologies yielded low internal consistency due to the frequent presence of false ring-like anatomical features. However, in a detailed examination of the most recent 15 years of growth (1995–2010), we found significant correlation between O and local precipitation, the latter associated with ENSO activity. The results are consistent with process-based forward modeling of the oxygen isotopic composition of -cellulose. The O record also enabled us to confirm the presence of a false growth ring in one of the three samples in the composite record, and to determine that it occurred as a consequence of anomalously low rainfall in the middle of the 2004/5 rainy season. The combination of incremental growth and isotopic measures may be a powerful approach to development of long-term (150+ year) ENSO reconstructions from the terrestrial tropics of Australasia. PMID:25062034

  16. Oxygen Isotope Variations at the Margin of a CAI Records Circulation Within the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Simon, Steven B.; Matzel, Jennifer E. P.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Grossman, Lawrence; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-03-01

    Micrometer-scale analyses of a calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) and the characteristic mineral bands mantling the CAI reveal that the outer parts of this primitive object have a large range of oxygen isotope compositions. The variations are systematic; the relative abundance of 16O first decreases toward the CAI margin, approaching a planetary-like isotopic composition, then shifts to extremely 16O-rich compositions through the surrounding rim. The variability implies that CAIs probably formed from several oxygen reservoirs. The observations support early and short-lived fluctuations of the environment in which CAIs formed, either because of transport of the CAIs themselves to distinct regions of the solar nebula or because of varying gas composition near the proto-Sun.

  17. Hydrogen isotope ratios of palmitic acid in lacustrine sediments record late Quaternary climate variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongsong; Shuman, Bryan; Wang, Yi; Webb, Thompson, III

    2002-12-01

    The rich paleoclimate information preserved in lacustrine sedimentary organic matter can be difficult to extract because of the mixed terrestrial and aquatic inputs. Herein we demonstrate that compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of palmitic acid, (PA), a ubiquitous compound in lacustrine sediments, captures the δD signals of lake water. Samples collected across a diverse range of 33 North American lakes show a strong correlation between water and δDPA values. At Crooked Pond, Massachusetts, the δDPA changes in a 14 k.y. sediment record parallel temperature trends inferred from fossil pollen. Downcore changes reveal differences between climatic trends in New England and in Greenland that are consistent with important regional differences in climate controls.

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a Southeastern Tibetan glacier: variations, sources and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, H.; Zhang, R.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Zhao, S.; Wu, G.; Zhao, H.; Joswiak, D. R.; Li, J.; Xie, Y.

    2014-07-01

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956-2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of OC / BC ratio with higher values in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source-receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia is a primary contributor during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and on an annual basis (74%), followed by East Asia (14% and 21%, respectively). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia as the primary contributor. Moreover, the increasing trend of OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice core record.

  19. The history of consumer magnetic video tape recording, from a rarity to a mass product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitjens, S. B.; Rijckaert, A. M. A.

    1999-03-01

    Since the first experiments on magnetic recording by Valdemar Poulsen in 1898 the use of this technology has grown tremendously and magnetic storage is used in almost every home in the world. A special challenge was the recording of video signals which need a high bandwidth. In the 1950s, television broadcasts had started which created a need for storage in the broadcast world. The first broadcast recorder was the Quadruplex from Ampex in 1956. Later solutions were found for application in the consumer market. Better mechanics, magnetic tapes and recording heads allowed the mass production of a cheap consumer recorder. The size and weight decreased tremendously and portable camcorders are very common. Recording of broadcasts, video rental and home movies are now very popular. The factors which contributed to the maturing of this technology will be reviewed in this paper.

  20. Variation in tobacco and mainstream smoke toxicant yields from selected commercial cigarette products.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, A; Betson, T R; Gama, M Vinicius; McAdam, K

    2015-04-01

    There is a drive toward the mandated lowering and reporting of selected toxicants in tobacco smoke. Several studies have quantified the mainstream cigarette emissions of toxicants, providing benchmark levels. Few, however, have examined how measured toxicant levels within a single product vary over time due to natural variation in the tobacco, manufacturing and measurement. In a single centre analysis, key toxicants were measured in the tobacco blend and smoke of 3R4F reference cigarette and three commercial products, each sampled monthly for 10 months. For most analytes, monthly variation was low (coefficient of variation <15%); but higher (⩾ 20%) for some compounds present at low (ppb) levels. Reporting toxicant emissions as a ratio to nicotine increased the monthly variation of the 9 analytes proposed for mandated lowering, by 1-2 percentage points. Variation in toxicant levels was generally 1.5-1.7-fold higher in commercial cigarettes compared with 3R4F over the 10-month period, but increased up to 3.5-fold for analytes measured at ppb level. The potential error (2CV) associated with single-point-in-time sampling averaged ∼ 20%. Together, these data demonstrate that measurement of emissions from commercial cigarettes is associated with considerable variation for low-level toxicants. This variation would increase if the analyses were conducted in more than one laboratory. PMID:25620723

  1. A Middle-Late Pleistocene lacustrine record of humidity variation at the SE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, E.; Hu, S.; Goddu, S. R.; Herb, C.

    2013-12-01

    Both the East-Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and Indian summer monsoon (ISM) affect the SE Tibetan Plateau (TP). The fine-grained lacustrine sediments from Heqing basin in NW Yunnan provide an excellent archive for long-term high-resolution paleoclimate studies. We analysed data from a 168 m core that spans the period from 900-30 ka, and performed a catchment study. Carbonate content (CC) and magnetic susceptibility (χ) data show clear 100 kyr eccentricity variations. The carbonate (mean CC 38.7%) stems from weathering of the widely occurring and very weakly magnetic limestones (mostly χ<0) in the catchment. Modern red soils around the basin are carbonate-free and strongly magnetic (χ ~10-5 m3kg-1). Magnetite (Mt) and maghemite (Mgh) mainly control χ, but hematite (Ht) is also present. Superparamagnetic (SP) ultra-fine particles (probably pedogenic) are dominating, evidenced by high xfd (7.5-16.7%), in addition to a larger-sized fraction (likely inherited from bedrocks). Much lower χ values and very low xfd (1.1%) in sediments from a stream entering the basin suggest that SP particles are easily dissolved in surface water. The catchment study delivers some clues for the interpretation of the proxy parameters: (i) During more humid times stronger chemical weathering caused higher CC. Soil material was transported into the lake by surface water and wind; river water led to strong dissolution of SP particles. (ii) During less humid times (less vegetation cover) a relatively higher fraction of soil material was transported by wind and a larger fraction of SP particles was preserved, leading to higher χ values. (iii) Humidity has another impact through low-temperature oxidation (LTO) of Mt that can be semi-quantified by magnetic parameters (ARM/SIRM, S-ratio). LTO will be stronger during more humid times, and as CC increases in such phases we can explain the observed first-order anti-correlation of CC and χ. From FCM cluster analysis and a suitable humidity index

  2. Osmium isotope variations in the oceans recorded by Fe-Mn crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, K.W.; Bourdon, B.; Birck, J.-L.; Allegre, C.J.; Hein, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents osmium (Os) isotope data for recent growth surfaces of hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In general, these data indicate a relatively uniform Os isotopic composition for modern seawater, but suggest that North Atlantic seawater is slightly more radiogenic than that of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. The systematic difference in the Os isotopic composition between the major oceans probably reflects a greater input of old continental material with a high Re/Os ratio in the North Atlantic Ocean, consistent with the distribution of Nd and Pb isotopes. This spatial variation in the Os isotope composition in seawater is consistent with a residence time for Os of between 2 and 60 kyr. Indian Ocean samples show no evidence of a local source of radiogenic Os, which suggests that the present-day riverine input from the Himalaya-Tibet region is not a major source for Os. Recently formed Fe-Mn crusts from the TAG hydrothermal field in the North Atlantic yield an Os isotopic composition close to that of modern seawater, which indicates that, in this area, the input of unradiogenic Os from the hydrothermal alteration of oceanic crust is small. However, some samples from the deep Pacific (???4 km) possess a remarkably unradiogenic Os isotope composition (187Os/186Os ratios as low as 4.3). The compositional control of Os incorporation into the crusts and mixing relationships suggest that this unradiogenic composition is most likely due to the direct incorporation of micrometeoritic or abyssal peridotite particles, rather than indicating the presence of an unradiogenic deep-water mass. Moreover, this unradiogenic signal appears to be temporary, and local, and has had little apparent effect on the overall evolution of seawater. These results confirm that input of continental material through erosion is the dominant source of Os in seawater, but it is not clear whether global Os variations are due to the input

  3. Vegetation productivity during Termination III inferred from a speleothem δ13C record (Ejulve Cave, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Mejías, Carlos; Moreno, Ana; Sancho, Carlos; Bartolomé, Miguel; Stoll, Heather; Cacho, Isabel; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    The timing of Termination III, in contrast to TI and TII, is poorly known. Although TIII has been described in pollen sequences from marine cores whose chronology was tuned to orbital parameters, only few continental records with absolute dates have been published. Then, new records of this period are particularly required to test the hypothetical synchronicity at planetary scale of this event or to explore leads and lags between different proxies. Here we present the record of ARTEMISA stalagmite from Ejulve cave (NE Spain) that covers this period with exceptional resolution and constrained by a robust chronological framework obtained from 24 U-Th dates. The largest shift in δ13C record (3 per mil of variation) occurs at 241±2.3 kyr evidencing the TIII inception, in agreement with both Sanbao Cave record in China (within age uncertainties) and the shift to interglacial values of CH4 and CO2 in Antarctica, thus supporting its global synchrony. Interpreting δ13C data in Ejulve Cave is supported by 3 years of monitoring tasks allowing the association of this proxy with vegetation productivity. Thus, more positive values of δ13C, together with higher values in Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in present-day farmed calcite occurred during dry summer seasons. Besides, these periods are also characterized by the lowest amount of calcite precipitating in the cave. On the contrary, more negative values are obtained during wetter periods, even if they are cooler, showing the highest calcite precipitation rates. During TIII, a spectacular increase in growth rate in the stalagmite is observed, that reaches its maximum (20-30 mm/kyr) during the following 4 kyr. Coherently, both δ13C and trace elements ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) mark an increase in humidity at 242 kyr that would last until 227 kyr BP delineating the duration of Stage 7e in this Mediterranean region. Other dry events highlighted by this record are shown at 247 kyr, 245-243 kyr and 221-219 kyr BP suggesting periods of forest

  4. Do High-elevation Lakes Record Variations in Snowfall and Atmospheric Rivers in the Sierra Nevada of California?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashford, J.; Sickman, J. O.; Lucero, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the underlying causes of interannual variation in snowfall and extreme hydrologic events in the Sierra Nevada is hampered by short instrumental records and the difficulties in reconstructing climate using a traditional paleo-record such as tree-rings. New paleo proxies are needed to provide a record of snowpack water content and extreme precipitation events over millennial timescales which can be used to test hypotheses regarding teleconnections between Pacific climate variability and water supply and flood risk in California. In October 2013 we collected sediment cores from Pear Lake (z = 27 m), an alpine lake in Sequoia National Park. The cores were split and characterized by P-wave velocity, magnetic susceptibility and density scanning. Radiocarbon dates indicate that the Pear Lake cores contain a 13.5K yr record of lake sediment. In contrast to other Sierra Nevada lakes previously cored by our group, high-resolution scanning revealed alternating light-dark bands (~1 mm to 5 mm thick) for most of the Pear Lake core length. This pattern was interrupted at intervals by homogenous clasts (up to 75 mm thick) ranging in grain size from sand to gravel up to 1 cm diameter. We hypothesize that the light-dark banding results from the breakdown of persistent hypolimnetic anoxia during spring snowmelt and autumn overturn. We speculate that the thicknesses of the dark bands are controlled by the duration of anoxia which in turn is controlled by the volume and duration of snowmelt. The sand to gravel sized clasts are most likely associated with extreme precipitation events resulting from atmospheric rivers intersecting the southern Sierra Nevada. We hypothesize that centimeter-sized clasts are deposited in large avalanches and that the sands are deposited in large rain events outside of the snow-cover period.

  5. The study of morphological variation in the hominid fossil record: biology, landmarks and geometry

    PubMed Central

    O'HIGGINS, PAUL

    2000-01-01

    This review considers some recent advances in shape analysis based on landmark data, and focuses on the application of these methods to the study of skeletal evolution in primates. These advances have provoked some controversy. The major aims of this review are to put these debates in context and to provide an overview for the nonmathematician. The purpose of morphometric studies is considered, together with issues relating to the nature, significance and identification of landmarks before turning to a review of available technologies for the analysis of morphological variation. These are considered in terms of underlying models and assumptions in order to clarify when each is appropriate. To illustrate the application of these methods, 3 example studies are presented. The first examines differences amongst ancient and modern adult human crania using 2-dimensional data. The second illustrates the extension of these methods into 3 dimensions in a study of facial growth in monkeys. The third presents an application to the analysis of the form of the hominoid talus. The review ends with an account of available software resources for shape analysis. PMID:10999273

  6. Isotopic variation in Indian Monsoon precipitation: Records from Bombay and New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S. K.; Froehlich, K.; Aggarwal, P. K.; Kulkarni, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    The stable isotope composition and the tritium content of precipitation analysed within the framework of the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) have been evaluated for the Indian stations Bombay and New Delhi representing two different regions of the Indian Monsoon. The rainfall at New Delhi is controlled by north-west moving depressions with diverse routes and variable transit times over the land subsequent to their formation at the head of Bay of Bengal. In contrast, Bombay rains are caused by spatially locked cyclonic vortices on the west coast of India with continuous supply of oceanic moisture resulting in negligible isotopic variation over the rainy months. The evaluation of the long-term isotope data of the two stations provided specific information on monsoon rain formation mechanism and the moisture source of the monsoon rains. The average isotope ratios clearly represent an imprint of oceanic moisture during the summer monsoon and of continental moisture during the winter monsoon period. The rainout efficiency is about 30% in case of Bombay (representative of west coast region) and about 56% in case of New Delhi (representative of north Indian Plains). Furthermore, the isotope data indicate that the moisture for low-intensity rains during the post-monsoon phase originates from the Asian continent.

  7. Late Holocene Indian summer monsoon variations recorded at Lake Erhai, Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai; Zhou, Xinying; Lan, Jianghu; Liu, Bin; Sheng, Enguo; Yu, Keke; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Feng; Hong, Bin; Yeager, Kevin M.; Xu, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    In this study we report changes in Indian summer monsoon (ISM) intensity during the past ~ 3500 yr inferred from proxy indices at Lake Erhai, southwestern China. Both the pollen concentrations and other proxy indices, including sediment grain size, total organic carbon contents (TOC), and elemental contents (e.g., Fe, Al), clearly indicate a long term decreasing trend in ISM intensity over the late Holocene. During the period from approximately AD 750 to AD 1200, pollen concentrations of conifer and broadleaf trees, and herbs reached the lowest levels over the past ~ 3500 yr; while the pollen percentages of both herbs and broadleaf trees increased, suggesting a significant medieval drought. The grain size, TOC, and elemental contents also support an arid climate during the medieval period. The Little Ice Age (LIA) at Lake Erhai was characterized as cold and wet. The medieval and LIA climatic patterns at Lake Erhai were similar to those over most of the ISM areas, but anti-phase with those over East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) areas. We suspect that sea surface temperature variations in the Indo-Pacific oceans and the related land-sea thermal contrasts may be responsible for such hydroclimatic differences between EASM and ISM areas.

  8. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  9. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  10. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  11. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  12. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  13. 30 CFR 250.804 - Production safety-system testing and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production safety-system testing and records. 250.804 Section 250.804 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.804...

  14. 19 CFR 163.6 - Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties. 163.6 Section 163.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.6 Production...

  15. 19 CFR 163.6 - Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties. 163.6 Section 163.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.6 Production...

  16. Trace metals in contemporary and seventeenth-century Galapagos coral: Records of seasonal and annual variations

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, L.J.; Delaney, M.L.; Druffel, E.R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors report trace element/calcium ratios for modern (Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, Cd/Ca and Pb/Ca) and seventeenth-century (Cu/Ca, Mn/Ca, and Pb/Ca) specimens of Pavona clavus collected in the Galapagos Islands. These data include the first reliable measurements of Cu/Ca ratios in coralline aragonite. They estimate that the ratio of Cu/Ca in the lattice to that in seawater (i.e., the effective distribution coefficient) is {approx} 0.3, lower than the value of 1 observed for several other divalent elements; they estimate the effective distribution coefficient for Mn is {approx} 1. Distribution coefficients in coral aragonite for 8 divalent metals are near unity despite different ionic radii and chemical speciation in seawater. In a modern Hood Island coral, quarter-annually sampled from 1964-73, Cu/Ca ratios decrease twofold from the late 1960s to early 1970s. Mn/Ca and Cd/Ca ratios vary seasonally with upwelling and the generic El Nino. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events of 1965, 1969, and 1972 are marked by suppression of Cd/Ca ratios by about 2.5 nmol/mol, while the Mn/Ca ratio is highest during the strong 1972 ENSO. Pb/Ca ratios were relatively constant throughout this period. From the Cu/Ca record of a seventeenth-century Urvina Bay coral annually sampled from 1600-1725 and the estimated Cu distribution coefficient, surface seawater Cu concentrations at Galapagos during the seventeenth century were similar to present day at 0.7-1.4 nmol/kg. Estimated Pb concentrations were lower at 5-20 pmol/kg, and Mn concentrations were slightly higher at 1.6-2.8 nmol/kg.

  17. Ovine mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and its association with production and reproduction traits within an Afec-Assaf flock.

    PubMed

    Reicher, S; Seroussi, E; Weller, J I; Rosov, A; Gootwine, E

    2012-07-01

    Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) protein- and tRNA-coding genes were shown to be associated with various diseases in humans as well as with production and reproduction traits in livestock. Alignment of full length mitochondria sequences from the 5 known ovine haplogroups: HA (n = 3), HB (n = 5), HC (n = 3), HD (n = 2), and HE (n = 2; GenBank accession nos. HE577847-50 and 11 published complete ovine mitochondria sequences) revealed sequence variation in 10 out of the 13 protein coding mtDNA sequences. Twenty-six of the 245 variable sites found in the protein coding sequences represent non-synonymous mutations. Sequence variation was observed also in 8 out of the 22 tRNA mtDNA sequences. On the basis of the mtDNA control region and cytochrome b partial sequences along with information on maternal lineages within an Afec-Assaf flock, 1,126 Afec-Assaf ewes were assigned to mitochondrial haplogroups HA, HB, and HC, with frequencies of 0.43, 0.43, and 0.14, respectively. Analysis of birth weight and growth rate records of lamb (n = 1286) and productivity from 4,993 lambing records revealed no association between mitochondrial haplogroup affiliation and female longevity, lambs perinatal survival rate, birth weight, and daily growth rate of lambs up to 150 d that averaged 1,664 d, 88.3%, 4.5 kg, and 320 g/d, respectively. However, significant (P < 0.0001) differences among the haplogroups were found for prolificacy of ewes, with prolificacies (mean ± SE) of 2.14 ± 0.04, 2.25 ± 0.04, and 2.30 ± 0.06 lamb born/ewe lambing for the HA, HB, and the HC haplogroups, respectively. Our results highlight the ovine mitogenome genetic variation in protein- and tRNA coding genes and suggest that sequence variation in ovine mtDNA is associated with variation in ewe prolificacy. PMID:22266988

  18. Variation in aeolian environments recorded by the particle size distribution of lacustrine sediments in Ebinur Lake, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Wu, Jinglu; Abuduwaili, Jilili

    2016-01-01

    Particle size analysis of lacustrine core sediments and atmospheric natural dust were conducted in the drainage area of Ebinur Lake in arid northwest China. Using a combination of (137)Cs and (210)Pb dating, a continuous record of aeolian transportation to the lake sediments and related factors over about the past 150 years was analyzed. Factor analysis revealed the particle-size distributions of riverine and aeolian sediments composed of the terrigenous materials of the lake deposits. Compared with the grain-size distributions of natural dust samples, the results showed that the coarser particle size fraction of lake sediments was mainly derived from the sediments that had experienced aeolian transport to the drainage surface, and the finer sediments came from hydraulic inputs. Then, the method of variations in particle-size standard deviation was used to extract the grain size intervals with the highest variability along a sedimentary sequence. The coarser grain-size populations dominated the variation patterns of the sedimentary sequence. During the last 150 years, strong intensity aeolian transportation occurred during three periods, 1915-1935, 1965-1975 and since the beginning of the 2000s. The climate was dry around 1910s-1930s in this region associated with the appropriate dynamic condition, which provided the enhanced source materials and wind power for the aeolian dust transport. Since 1950s, the climate controlled the foundation of aeolian dust transport, and the aeolian dust transport won't be increased under the humid climate. PMID:27217996

  19. Variations in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation since 1853 in a coral record from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenfeng; Wei, Gangjian; Xie, Luhua; Ke, Ting; Wang, Zhibing; Zeng, Ti; Liu, Ying

    2013-05-01

    The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) has been shown to have significant climatic and environmental impacts across the Pan-Pacific Basin; however, there are no records of PDO activity from the South China Sea (SCS), the largest marginal sea in the northwest Pacific Ocean. This study suggests that a series of geochemical profiles obtained from a modern coral in the northern SCS records annual PDO activity dating back to 1853. These geochemical data are significantly correlated with the PDO index, and their patterns of variation closely match those of the PDO index over the last century. The relationship between the PDO and coral geochemistry may be related to the influence of the PDO on rainfall on Hainan Island. Rainfall patterns influence the volume of terrestrial runoff, which, in turn, is a primary determinant of δ18O and Δδ18O values in coral; however, coral δ13C values are also influenced by the 13C Suess effect. The results indicate that Sr/Ca ratios in coral are affected by a combination of sea surface temperature and terrestrial runoff.

  20. Variations of magnetic properties in thin lava flow profiles: Implications for the recording of the Laschamp Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vérard, Christian; Leonhardt, Roman; Winklhofer, Michael; Fabian, Karl

    2012-06-01

    Two blocks have been cut in two lava flows from the Skalamaelifell Hill (Iceland) known to have recorded the Laschamp magnetic excursion (40.4 ± 2.0 ka). Detailed sampling and analyses have revealed multiple magnetic components. The high temperature/coercivity component corresponds to the primary magnetisation, with corresponding pole position close to the equator in the Pacific Ocean (φ = 251.90°/λ = -06.49°; dp = 0.74°/dm = 2.12°) and palaeo-intensity determinations below 5 μT. The different VGPs, however, vary in relation with the position of samples in the profiles. It could not be firmly established whether this distribution is associated with a change in the Earth magnetic field during lava cooling. In any case, variations are related with zones in the profiles marked, in particular, by the presence of vesicles. Moreover, the other components are interpreted to be linked with alteration inside the rocks, caused by interactions between vesicles content and the surrounding matrix. Secondary component, however, is interpreted as recording an excursional magnetic field, and should be of greater consideration in studies of Earth magnetic field excursions or reversals.

  1. Robust SMO methodology for exposure tool and mask variations in high volume production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takaki; Kai, Yasunobu; Masukawa, Kazuyuki; Nojima, Shigeki; Kotani, Toshiya

    2013-04-01

    A robust source mask optimization (RSMO) methodology has been developed for the first time to decrease variations of critical dimension (CD) and overlay displacement on wafer caused by extremely complex exposure tools and mask patterns. The RSMO methodology takes into account exposure tool variations of source shape, aberrations and mask as well as dose and focus to get source shapes and mask patterns robust to the exposure tool variations. A comparison between the conventional SMO and the new RSMO found that the RSMO improved the edge placement error (EPE) and displacement sensitivity to coma and astigmatism aberrations by 14% and 40%, respectively. Interestingly, even a greatly-simplified source from the RSMO provides totally smaller EPE than uselessly complex source shape from the conventional SMO. Thus, the RSMO methodology is much more effective for semiconductor products with high volume production.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Seasonal and Anthropogenic Ground Movements Recorded by Continuous GPS in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H. E.; Harper, H.; Marshall, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in many locations around the world record mm-scale quasiperiodic motions that may arise due to seasonal variations in precipitation, and/or anthropogenic groundwater removal. The causes and spatial patterns of these motions are difficult to determine because diffuse GPS station spacing. In southern California, a dense GPS network, large seasonal motions, and seasonally variable precipitation make the region ideal for characterizing both seasonal and anthropogenic motions. In this study, we utilize data from 57 permanent GPS sites in the Plate Boundary Observatory network. In order to quantify periodic seasonal motions, we perform a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) on detrended GPS time series to calculate the phases and amplitudes of the annual harmonics. To compare ground motions to precipitation patterns, we also perform a DFT on monthly NOAA precipitation data, which allows us to calculate phase differences between the rainfall and GPS recorded motions. Phase calculations show that sites overlying the Santa Ana aquifer and sites not overlying the aquifer have phase differences of 45 and 180 days suggesting that many sites respond quickly to seasonal rainfall patterns. We find that ground movement above the Santa Ana aquifer has significantly different characteristics than the surrounding ground movement suggesting an anthropogenic source. Furthermore, existing InSAR data shows significant localized motions, which have been proposed to be anthropogenic. This suggests that anomalous annual phases and/or amplitudes in GPS time series may help to identify stations that are recording significant anthropogenic motions without the need for other data. To remove these hydrologic motions from the secular velocity estimates, we use inverse dislocation models that simulate aquifer compaction. These models are then used to effectively "correct" the GPS velocities to yield more accurate tectonic estimates of motion.

  3. Product-line administration: a framework for redefining medical record department services.

    PubMed

    Postal, S N

    1990-06-01

    Product-line administration is a viable approach for managing medical records services in an environment that demands high quantity and quality service levels. Product-line administration directs medical record department team members to look outside of the department and seek input from the customers it is intended to serve. The feedback received may be alarming at first, as the current state of products usually reveals a true lack of customer input. As the planning, defining, managing, and marketing phases are implemented, the road will not be easy and rewards will be slow to come. Product-line administration does not provide quick fixes, but it does provide long-term problem resolution as products are refined and new products developed to meet customer needs and expectations. In addition to better meeting the needs of the department's external customers, the department's internal customers' needs and expectations will be addressed. The participative management approach will help nurture each team member's creativity. The team members will have the opportunity to reach their full potential while reaping the rewards and benefits of providing products and services that meet the needs and expectations of all department customers. The future of the health care industry promises more changes as the country moves toward some form of prospective payment in the ambulatory setting. Reactive management and the constant struggle to catch up can no longer be accepted as a management approach. It is imperative that the medical record department be viewed as a business with product lines composed of quality products. The planning, defining, managing, and marketing components of product-line administration afford responsiveness to the current situation and the development of quality products that will ensure that medical record departments are prepared for the future. PMID:10106655

  4. An Application of Variational Theory to an Integrated Walrasian Model of Exchange, Consumption and Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, M. B.; Milasi, M.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-09-01

    An existence result of a Walrasian equilibrium for an integrated model of exchange, consumption and production is obtained. The equilibrium model is characterized in terms of a suitable generalized quasi-variational inequality; so the existence result comes from an original technique which takes into account tools of convex and set-valued analysis.

  5. Comparative genomics reveals multiple causes of variation in mycotoxin production among Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collectively, species of Fusarium produce a structurally diverse array of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites (SMs), but individual species contribute to only a fraction of this diversity. To elucidate causes of variation in SM production among species, we are examining the distribution and e...

  6. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureswaran, Deepa S.; Sullivan, Brian T.; Ayres, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signalling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxical. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An alternative hypothesis is that aggregation behaviour dilutes the contribution of individuals to the trait under selection and reduces the efficacy of natural selection on pheromone production by individuals. We compared pheromone measurements from traditional hindgut extractions of female southern pine beetles with those obtained by aerating individuals till they died. Aerations showed greater total pheromone production than hindgut extractions, but coefficients of variation (CV) remained high (60-182%) regardless of collection technique. This leaves the puzzle of high variation unresolved. A novel but simple explanation emerges from considering bark beetle aggregation behaviour. The phenotype visible to natural selection is the collective pheromone plume from hundreds of colonisers. The influence of a single beetle on this plume is enhanced by high variation among individuals but constrained by large group sizes. We estimated the average contribution of an individual to the pheromone plume across a range of aggregation sizes and showed that large aggregation sizes typical in mass attacks limit the potential of natural selection because each individual has so little effect on the overall plume. Genetic variation in pheromone production could accumulate via mutation and recombination, despite strong effects of the pheromone plume on the fitness of individuals within the aggregation. Thus, aggregation behaviour, by limiting the efficacy of natural selection, can allow the persistence of extreme phenotypes in nature.

  7. Authigenic 10Be/9Be Ratio Signatures of the Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Linked to Geomagnetic Dipole Moment Variation During and Since the Brunhes/Matuyama Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Ménabréaz, L.; Valet, J. P.; Valery, G.; Choy, S.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rate of cosmogenic nuclides is linked to the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) by a non-linear inverse relationship. Large amplitude GDM variations associated with reversals and excursions can potentially be reconstructed using time variation of the cosmogenic beryllium-10 (10Be) production recorded in ocean sediments. Downcore profiles of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) in oceanic cores provide independent and additional records of the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity and complete previous information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI). Here are presented new authigenic 10Be/9Be results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and from the top of core MD05-2930 collected in the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Completing data of Ménabréaz et al. (2012, 2014), these results provide the first continuous 10Be production rate sedimentary record covering the last 800 ka. Along these cores, authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio peaks are recorded - within methodological errors - at the stratigraphic level of RPI lows. High-resolution chronologies (δ18O-derived) lead to interpret these peaks as successive global 10Be overproduction events triggered by geomagnetic dipole lows present in the PISO-1500 and Sint-2000 stacks. The largest amplitude 10Be production enhancement is synchronous to the very large decrease of the dipole field associated with the last polarity reversal (772 ka). It is consistent in shape and duration with the peak recorded in core MD90-0961 from the Maldive area (Indian Ocean) (Valet et al. 2014). Two significant 10Be production enhancements are coeval with the Laschamp (41 ka) and Icelandic basin (190 ka) excursions, while 10Be production peaks of lower amplitude correlate to other recognized excursions such as the Blake (120 ka), Pringle-Falls (215 ka), Portuguese Margin (290 ka), Big Lost (540 ka) among others. This study provides new data on the amplitude and timing of dipole field variations

  8. Rhodolith-forming coralline red algae from New Caledonia (SW Pacific) record half a century of sea-surface temperature variations and mining history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrenougue, N.; De Deckker, P.; Eggins, S. M.; Payri, C. E.; Fallon, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a continuous, high-resolution tropical record of Mg/Ca and trace elements back to the 1960s, using laser ablation ICP-MS on rhodoliths (i.e. free living forms of coralline red algae) of the species Sporolithon durum. The analysed rhodoliths are composed entirely of branched system forming mostly spherical specimens of 8-10 cm in diameter. Chronology was constrained by 20 radiocarbon dates calibrated with the 1960s-70s atomic bomb-spike curve, in conjunction with commonly used growth band counting and Mg/Ca minima-maxima peaks. Mg/Ca variations are reproducible between different branches of a single specimen as well as between three distinct rhodoliths from the same site in the SW lagoon of New Caledonia. All records present a significant correlation with the local sea-surface temperatures at a monthly to inter-annual resolution (respectively, 0.59< r <0.70 and 0.62< r <0.72; p<0.0001), thus confirming the global potential of coralline red algae for palaeo-temperature reconstructions, as suggested by recent studies from the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans (e.g. Halfar et al. 2000, Kamenos et al. 2008, Hetzinger et al., 2009). Compared to the youngest part of the record, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca and Ni/Ca ratios present significantly higher values for the period prior to 1980, which corresponds to the high production period of an open-air, Ni-extraction mine located in the water catchment area of the Coulée River, ~10km from the studied rhodolith bed. The mining production at the site ceased in 1981. After that date, Mn, Fe and Ni concentrations in the rhodoliths show a steady decline. Co/Ca, however, shows no such trend, indicating different behaviour and availability for these metals, all related to the weathering of exposed laterite formations. Average metal records corrected from the anthropogenic mining effect (except for Co/Ca) present significant correlations with the inter-annual local rainfall signal (r=0.62, r=0.60, r=0.48; p<0.0001 for Mn/Ca, Fe

  9. Longitudinal and depth variation of bacterioplankton productivity and related factors in a temperate estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peierls, Benjamin L.; Paerl, Hans W.

    2011-11-01

    Bacterioplankton productivity (BP) spatial variation was investigated in relation to potential resources, including primary productivity and dissolved organic matter, in the micro-tidal Neuse River-Pamlico Sound estuarine system, North Carolina, USA. Estuarine BP was predicted to correlate with the trophic gradient, decreasing along the salinity gradient in parallel with the decrease in organic matter and primary productivity. This prediction was tested over four years at spatial scales ranging from kilometers to meters along the riverine axis and with depth. The general pattern of BP across the salinity gradient was unimodal and matched the phytoplankton patterns in peak location and variability. Peak locations varied with discharge, especially in 2003 when above average discharge moved peaks downstream. Spatial coherence of BP with other variables was much less at short time scales. The effect of temperature, nutrients, and phytoplankton on BP varied by location, especially fresh versus brackish stations, although only temperature explained more than 20% of the BP variation. Depth variation of BP was as great as longitudinal variation and bottom samples were often higher than surface. BP was strongly correlated with particulate organic carbon at the pycnocline and bottom, highlighting the importance of particulate matter as a resource. Station-averaged BP and phytoplankton data corresponded well with two published meta-analyses, although the offset of the freshwater station suggested longitudinal differences in community composition or resource availability.

  10. Temporal δ13C records from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) reflect variation in foraging location and global carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossman, S. L.; Barros, N. B.; Ostrom, P. H.; Gandhi, H.; Wells, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    With four decades of data on a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) resident to Sarasota Bay (SB), The Sarasota Dolphin Research Program offers an unparalleled platform for ground-truthing stable isotope data and exploring bottlenose dolphin ecology in a natural setting. We explored carbon isotope value fidelity to habitat utilization by comparing δ13C data from whole teeth and muscle to the individual dolphin's proclivity towards foraging in seagrass beds based on observational data. We then examined variation in habitat use based on temporal isotope records. Whole tooth protein isotope values do not show a significant correlation with the observed percentage of foraging in seagrass habitat. In contrast, δ13C values from muscle showed a significant positive relationship with the observational data. Differences in the degree of tissue turn over may account for this distinction between tooth and muscle. Dolphin teeth consist of annually deposited layers that are inert once formed. Thus, the isotopic composition of protein in annuli reflect foraging at the time of deposition. In addition to incorporating variation associated with differences in foraging over the lifetime of the individual, whole tooth isotope values are confounded because a disproportionate amount of tooth protein derives from the first few years of life. Given the turnover time of muscle tissue, isotope values reflect diet over the past several months. From 1991 to 2008, muscle δ13C values showed a significant decline, -13.5‰ to -15.1‰.This time period encompasses a state wide net fishing ban (1995) however other factors such as a series of red tide harmful algal blooms, a decline in predators, increases in shallow water boat traffic and an increase in string ray abundance may also contribute to the temporal isotope trend. To examine changes in dolphin foraging habitat further back in time we analyzed the tip of crown of the tooth which records the isotopic signal from the

  11. Crowdsourcing: It Matters Who the Crowd Are. The Impacts of between Group Variations in Recording Land Cover.

    PubMed

    Comber, Alexis; Mooney, Peter; Purves, Ross S; Rocchini, Duccio; Walz, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Volunteered geographical information (VGI) and citizen science have become important sources data for much scientific research. In the domain of land cover, crowdsourcing can provide a high temporal resolution data to support different analyses of landscape processes. However, the scientists may have little control over what gets recorded by the crowd, providing a potential source of error and uncertainty. This study compared analyses of crowdsourced land cover data that were contributed by different groups, based on nationality (labelled Gondor and Non-Gondor) and on domain experience (labelled Expert and Non-Expert). The analyses used a geographically weighted model to generate maps of land cover and compared the maps generated by the different groups. The results highlight the differences between the maps how specific land cover classes were under- and over-estimated. As crowdsourced data and citizen science are increasingly used to replace data collected under the designed experiment, this paper highlights the importance of considering between group variations and their impacts on the results of analyses. Critically, differences in the way that landscape features are conceptualised by different groups of contributors need to be considered when using crowdsourced data in formal scientific analyses. The discussion considers the potential for variation in crowdsourced data, the relativist nature of land cover and suggests a number of areas for future research. The key finding is that the veracity of citizen science data is not the critical issue per se. Rather, it is important to consider the impacts of differences in the semantics, affordances and functions associated with landscape features held by different groups of crowdsourced data contributors. PMID:27458924

  12. Crowdsourcing: It Matters Who the Crowd Are. The Impacts of between Group Variations in Recording Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Peter; Purves, Ross S.; Rocchini, Duccio; Walz, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Volunteered geographical information (VGI) and citizen science have become important sources data for much scientific research. In the domain of land cover, crowdsourcing can provide a high temporal resolution data to support different analyses of landscape processes. However, the scientists may have little control over what gets recorded by the crowd, providing a potential source of error and uncertainty. This study compared analyses of crowdsourced land cover data that were contributed by different groups, based on nationality (labelled Gondor and Non-Gondor) and on domain experience (labelled Expert and Non-Expert). The analyses used a geographically weighted model to generate maps of land cover and compared the maps generated by the different groups. The results highlight the differences between the maps how specific land cover classes were under- and over-estimated. As crowdsourced data and citizen science are increasingly used to replace data collected under the designed experiment, this paper highlights the importance of considering between group variations and their impacts on the results of analyses. Critically, differences in the way that landscape features are conceptualised by different groups of contributors need to be considered when using crowdsourced data in formal scientific analyses. The discussion considers the potential for variation in crowdsourced data, the relativist nature of land cover and suggests a number of areas for future research. The key finding is that the veracity of citizen science data is not the critical issue per se. Rather, it is important to consider the impacts of differences in the semantics, affordances and functions associated with landscape features held by different groups of crowdsourced data contributors. PMID:27458924

  13. Data management in the cell therapy production facility: the batch process record (BPR).

    PubMed

    Janssen, We

    2008-01-01

    The activities of cell therapy establishments are associated with substantial amounts of information. For reasons of best practice, regulation and adherence to prevailing standards, the data generated in the course of cell therapy product processing must be recorded and retained in an organized manner. Because cell therapy products are functionally pharmaceuticals, the paradigm of the pharmaceutical manufacturing batch process record (BPR) is proposed as a unit for collecting the data resulting from processing. Considerations for cell-processing facilities for the design of BPR and possible selection of electronic data-recording tools are reviewed, including data to collect in response to regulatory or accreditation mandates and different types of electronic data management tools that may be employed. Additionally, considerations for selection, qualification and validation of computer software for maintenance of the BPR are addressed. PMID:18418768

  14. Extended record of 10Be at EPICA Dome C during the last 800 000 years and its synchronization with geomagnetic paleointensity variations from marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquoin, Alexandre; Raisbeck, Grant; Jouzel, Jean; Bard, Edouard; Aster Team

    2013-04-01

    Polar ice cores are exceptional archives that permit the reconstruction of many parameters (variations of temperature, atmospheric composition...) and the reconstitution of the past variations of the Earth climate and environment. They also give access to beryllium-10 (10Be) fallout, an isotope of cosmogenic origin, created by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR, constituted of high energy charged particles) with the upper atmosphere. The cosmic rays being modulated by solar activity and Earth's magnetic field intensity, the 10Be production is inversely related to the intensity of these two parameters. Most 10Be produced is quickly removed from the atmosphere (residence time in the stratosphere ~1-2 years) and, on the Antarctic plateau, falls mainly by dry deposition as aerosols. So, 10Be can be used as a proxy of paleointensity. It has allowed the improvement of ice cores chronologies thanks to absolute stratigraphic markers linked to excursions and inversions of the geomagnetic field such as the Laschamp excursion [1] or the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal [2, 3]. EPICA Dome C (75° 06' S, 123° 21' E) is a 3270 meter ice core drilled in East Antarctica in the framework of an international project. It offers a complete climate record over the last 800 000 years. As shown at the IPICS 2012 meeting, for the 355 - 800 ka period [4], a continuous high-resolution (11 cm) 10Be profile in this core can be synchronized with continuous variations of paleointensity (PISO-1500) recorded in marine sediments [5] in order to obtain a continuous relative chronology of climate proxies (δD and δ18O respectively) for these two reservoirs. Here, we extend this synchronization down to 269 ka, thus including termination IV and interstadial MIS 9. [1]. Raisbeck et al. (2007) Clim.Past, 3, 541 - 547. [2]. Raisbeck et al. (2006) Nature, 444, 82 - 84. [3]. Dreyfus et al. (2008) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 274, 151 - 156. [4]. G.Raisbeck et al. (2012) IPICS Open Science Conference

  15. Modelling natural grass production and its spatio-temporal variations in a semiarid Mediterranean watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Maneta-López, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Natural grasses are found in semiarid rangelands with disperse tree cover of part of the Iberian Peninsula and constitute a resource with high ecologic and economic value worth, being an important source of food for livestock, playing a significant role in the hydrologic cycle, controlling the soil thermal regime, and are a key factor in reducing soil erosion and degradation. However, increasing pressure on the resources, changes in land use as well as possible climate variations threaten the sustainability of natural grasses. Despite of their importance, the spatio-temporal variations of pasture production over whole watersheds are poorly known. In this sense, previous studies by other authors have indicated its dependence on a balance of positive and negative effects brought about by the main limiting factors: water, light, nutrients and space. Nevertheless, the specific weight of each factor is not clear because they are highly variable due to climate characteristics and the structure of these agroforestry systems. We have used a physical spatially-distributed ecohydrologic model to investigate the specific weight of factors that contribute to pasture production in a semiarid watershed of 99.5 ha in western Spain. This model couples a two layer (canopy and understory) vertical local closure energy balance scheme, a hydrologic model and a carbon uptake and vegetation growth component, and it was run using a synthetic daily climate dataset generated by a stochastic weather generator, which reproduced the range of climatic variations observed under mediterranean current climate. The modelling results reproduced satisfactorily the seasonality effects of climate as precipitation and temperatures, as well as annual and inter-annual variations of pasture production. Spatial variations of pasture production were largely controlled by topographic and tree effects, showing medium-low values depending of considered areas. These low values require introduction of feed to

  16. THE USE OF SCHOOL FOOD PRODUCTION RECORDS AS A SURROGATE MEASURE OF STUDENT INTAKE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    National School Lunch Program meals provide an important source of fruit, vegetables, and milk for students. In intervention studies, measuring individual dietary intake is expensive. This study investigated whether food production records could be used as a surrogate measure of student consumption....

  17. 78 FR 11114 - Production of FHFA Records, Information, and Employee Testimony in Legal Proceedings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... published February 8, 2013, at 78 FR 9336, is April 9, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James P... rule FR Doc. 2013-02908, beginning on page 9336 in the issue of February 8, 2013, make the following...; ] FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY 12 CFR Part 1215 RIN 2590-AA51 Production of FHFA Records, Information,...

  18. The Technique of the Sound Studio: Radio, Record Production, Television, and Film. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbett, Alec

    Detailed explanations of the studio techniques used in radio, record, television, and film sound production are presented in as non-technical language as possible. An introductory chapter discusses the physics and physiology of sound. Subsequent chapters detail standards for sound control in the studio; explain the planning and routine of a sound…

  19. Glacial/interglacial temperature variations in Soreq cave speleothems as recorded by ‘clumped isotope’ thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affek, Hagit P.; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Ayalon, Avner; Matthews, Alan; Eiler, John M.

    2008-11-01

    'Clumped isotope' thermometry is based on analyzing mass 47 in CO 2 extracted from carbonates and uses the tracer mass 47 anomaly (Δ 47). Δ 47 is defined as the deviation of R47 from that expected for a random distribution of isotopologues and reflects a temperature dependent preference of 13C and 18O to create a bond with each other in CO 2 or in the carbonate lattice. Being an internal characteristic of the carbonate mineral, it is independent of the isotopic composition of the water in which equilibrium precipitation of the carbonate occurs and can therefore be used to independently determine carbonate growth temperatures. This work provides a first examination of the applicability of 'clumped isotopes' thermometry to reconstructing the growth temperatures of speleothems, by examining the glacial/interglacial variations of the Δ 47 values of speleothem carbonates from Soreq cave, Israel. The results indicate that the last glacial maximum temperatures were 6-7 °C colder than modern day temperature and a sample at 56 Ky BP was 3 °C colder than the modern. Early Holocene temperatures were slightly above modern day, and late Holocene temperatures were slightly below modern day. These temperature variations are similar to those previously estimated for Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water. Cave water was 18O depleted in the Holocene compared to modern day (by 0.6-1‰) and 1.1‰ more enriched in the last glacial maximum. Comparison of these cave water δ 18O values with fluid inclusion δ D values indicated a late Holocene d-excess value within the range of modern rainfall, implying ˜45% relative humidity. Last glacial maximum and early Holocene d-excess values were significantly lower, suggesting relative humidity of ˜60% and ˜70%, respectively. The temperatures reported in this study were empirically corrected for a non-equilibrium artifact observed in a modern speleothem. The similarity of the temperature variations obtained here to other, independent

  20. Decadal variations of Pacific North Equatorial Current bifurcation from multiple ocean products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Fangguo; Wang, Qingye; Wang, Fujun; Hu, Dunxin

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we examine the decadal variations of the Pacific North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcation latitude (NBL) averaged over upper 100 m and underlying dynamics over the past six decades using 11 ocean products, including seven kinds of ocean reanalyzes based on ocean data assimilation systems, two kinds of numerical simulations without assimilating observations and two kinds of objective analyzes based on in situ observations only. During the period of 1954-2007, the multiproduct mean of decadal NBL anomalies shows maxima around 1965/1966, 1980/1981, 1995/1996, and 2003/2004, and minima around 1958, 1971/1972, 1986/1987, and 2000/2001, respectively. The NBL decadal variations are related to the first Empirical Orthogonal Function mode of decadal anomalies of sea surface height (SSH) in the northwestern tropical Pacific Ocean, which shows spatially coherent variation over the whole region and explains most of the total variance. Further regression and composite analyzes indicate that northerly/southerly NBL corresponds to negative/positive SSH anomalies and cyclonic/anticyclonic gyre anomalies in the northwestern tropical Pacific Ocean. These decadal circulation variations and thus the decadal NBL variations are governed mostly by the first two vertical modes and attribute the most to the first baroclinic mode. The NBL decadal variation is highly positively correlated with the tropical Pacific decadal variability (TPDV) around the zero time lag. With a lead of about half the decadal cycle the NBL displays closer but negative relationship to TPDV in four ocean products, possibly manifesting the dynamical role of the circulation in the northwestern tropical Pacific in the phase-shifting of TPDV.

  1. Characterization, Genetic Variation, and Combining Ability of Maize Traits Relevant to the Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, A. J.; Coors, J. G.; de Leon, N.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Hames, B. R.; Sluiter, A. D.; Weimer, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) stover has been identified as an important feedstock for the production of cellulosic ethanol. Our objectives were to measure hybrid effect and combining ability patterns of traits related to cellulosic ethanol production, determine if germplasm and mutations used for silage production would also be beneficial for feedstock production, and examine relationships between traits that are relevant to selective breeding. We evaluated grain hybrids, germplasm bred for silage production, brown-midrib hybrids, and a leafy hybrid. Yield and composition traits were measured in four environments. There was a 53% difference in stover yield between commercial grain hybrids that were equivalent for other production-related traits. Silage germplasm may be useful for increasing stover yield and reducing lignin concentration. We found much more variation among hybrids than either in vitro ruminal fermentability or polysaccharide concentration. Correlations between traits were mostly favorable or nonexistent. Our results suggest that utilizing standing genetic variation of maize in breeding programs could substantially increase the amount of biofuels produced from stover per unit area of land.

  2. East Asian Summer Monsoon variations in the past 12.5 ka: High-resolution δ18O record from a precisely dated aragonite stalagmite in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui-Ling; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Feng, Yue-Xing; Lin, Yu-Shi; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Guo-Hui

    2013-09-01

    stalagmite records from South China. The comparison among these records shows that the Holocene Optimum was synchronous across Asian continental region influenced by the EASM and Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM), lasting from ∼10.6 to 4.2 ka BP, as reflected by consistently lighter δ18O values among all these records regardless of their latitudinal difference. These records do not support previously reported asynchronism between EASM and ISM. In details, the long-term δ18O trend in LH2 is punctuated by a number of centennial fluctuations. For instance, two weak monsoon events occurred at 9232 ± 57 yr BP and 8137 ± 21 yr BP, correlating in time with cooling events in Greenland ice cores. The latest weak monsoon event centered at 302 ± 8 yr BP which is related to the Little Ice Age (LIA). In addition, the monsoon intensity derived from our record also shows a strong connection with latitudinal migration of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) as recorded in the Cariaco Basin sediments. Spectral analysis of δ18O values shows that significant peaks match with solar periodicities of 208 yr (de Vries cycle), 86 yr (Gleissberg cycle) or related to Δ14C production suggesting shorter-term monsoon variations are forced by solar radiation. Overall, our study suggests that the δ18O record in the aragonite stalagmite is highly consistent with those derived from calcite stalagmites, suggesting that aragonite stalagmites are suitable for palaeoclimate reconstruction, especially for the Holocene period, as aragonite-calcite transformation has not occurred.

  3. Holocene climate-dynamics of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon-a record built by centennial paleoflood variations superimposed upon millennial cycles of grade change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    background grade of the channel. The shorter, superimposed wavelength of flood variability builds terrace deposits while on the rising limb of millennial grade, but when on the falling limb, clusters of large floods tend to produce inset deposits with a low preservation potential. This implies that the paleoflood paradigm is pertinent at century timescales, whereas over millennia the shifting grade of the system should confound both preservation and estimates of paleoflood magnitude. In terms of climate drivers, other research suggests the river aggraded or incised over millennia in response to sediment production in canyon tributaries, perhaps related to variations in winter-frontal versus monsoonal precipitation. Yet millennial climate changes that can be linked to this response in Grand Canyon are elusive, suggesting sensitivity of the system to subtle shifts in regional climate. At shorter timescales, several studies have linked alluvial deposits of the plateau to ~200-500 yr wet-dry cycles, including the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Optimum as possibly linked to ENSO. Still, the pertinent driver is specifically annual snowmelt flooding from the headwaters, and tree-ring records of drought across the catchment and lake records of winter moisture in the Rockies more directly reflect such variations.

  4. Seasonal variation of chemical composition and biomethane production from the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Xia, Ao; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-09-01

    Ascophyllum nodosum, an abundant Irish brown seaweed, shows significant seasonal variation in chemical composition and biogas production. The polyphenol content is shown to be a more important factor in biogas production than ash content. High polyphenol content in summer months adversely affected biogas production; suggesting two potential harvest dates, March and October. A. nodosum harvested in October showed a relatively low level of polyphenols (2% of TS) and ash (23% of volatile solids), and exhibited a specific methane yield of 215LCH4kgVS(-1), which was 44% of theoretical yield. The highest yield per wet weight of 47m(3)CH4t(-1) was achieved in October, which is 2.9 times higher than the lowest value (16m(3)CH4t(-1)), obtained in December. The gross energy yield of A. nodosum based on the optimal biogas production can achieve 116GJha(-1)yr(-1) in October. PMID:27240238

  5. Sources of variation in developmental language disorders: evidence from eye-tracking studies of sentence production

    PubMed Central

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier

    2014-01-01

    Skilled sentence production involves distinct stages of message conceptualization (deciding what to talk about) and message formulation (deciding how to talk about it). Eye-movement paradigms provide a mechanism for observing how speakers accomplish these aspects of production in real time. These methods have recently been applied to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and specific language impairment (LI) in an effort to reveal qualitative differences between groups in sentence production processes. Findings support a multiple-deficit account in which language production is influenced not only by lexical and syntactic constraints, but also by variation in attention control, inhibition and social competence. Thus, children with ASD are especially vulnerable to atypical patterns of visual inspection and verbal utterance. The potential to influence attentional focus and prime appropriate language structures are considered as a mechanism for facilitating language adaptation and learning. PMID:24324237

  6. Intra-to multidecadel variations of snowpack and streamflow records in the Andes of Chile and Argentina between 30 degrees and 37 degrees S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional composites of winter snowpack (1951-2008) and mean annual river discharges (1906-2007) are used to evaluate the main intra- to multi-decadal hydrologic variations in the Andes of Chile and Argentina between 30° and 37°S. The streamflow record shows a non-significant negative trend but two s...

  7. Spatial-temporal analysis on climate variation in early Qing dynasty (17th -18th century) using China's chronological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuan-Hui Elaine; Wang, Pao-Kuan; Fan, I.-Chun; Liao, Yi-Chun; Liao, Hsiung-Ming; Pai, Pi-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Global climate change in the form of extreme, variation, and short- or mid-term fluctuation is now widely conceived to challenge the survival of the human beings and the societies. Meanwhile, improving present and future climate modeling needs a comprehensive understanding of the past climate patterns. Although historical climate modeling has gained substantive progress in recent years based on the new findings from dynamical meteorology, phenology, or paleobiology, less known are the mid- to short-term variations or lower-frequency variabilities at different temporal scale and their regional expressions. Enabling accurate historical climate modeling would heavily rely on the robustness of the dataset that could carry specific time, location, and meteorological information in the continuous temporal and spatial chains. This study thus presents an important methodological innovation to reconstruct historical climate modeling at multiple temporal and spatial scales through building a historical climate dataset, based on the Chinese chronicles compiled in a Zhang (2004) edited Compendium of Chinese Meteorological Records of the Last 3,000 Years since Zhou Dynasty (1100BC). The dataset reserves the most delicate meteorological data with accurate time, location, meteorological event, duration, and other phonological, social and economic impact information, and is carefully digitalized, coded, and geo-referenced on the Geographical Information System based maps according to Tan's (1982) historical atlas in China. The research project, beginning in January 2015, is a collaborative work among scholars across meteorology, geography, and historical linguistics disciplines. The present research findings derived from the early 100+ years of the Qing dynasty include the following. First, the analysis is based on the sampling size, denoted as cities/counties, n=1398 across the Mainland China in the observation period. Second, the frequencies of precipitation, cold

  8. Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Environmental Data Records: Algorithm Status and Product Maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csiszar, I. A.; Feeley, J.; Zhou, L.; Gottshall, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System's (JPSS) Data Processing Segment generates a number of environmental data products from measurements by sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched on October 28, 2011. The JPSS Environmental Data Record (EDR) Algorithm Development and Validation teams have been carrying out detailed evaluation of the products. This work is stabilizing the EDR products and proposing the implementation of product improvements and major algorithm changes. Building on validation stages established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for their Earth Observing System program and adapted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Working Group on Calibration and Validation, the JPSS program defined program-specific algorithm maturity stages. The JPSS definitions provide the rigor and comprehensiveness necessary for algorithm validation while serving the compliance needs for product requirements verification. Based on specific algorithm readiness levels, the JPSS EDR product teams established a schedule of anticipated dates for the algorithms to achieve Beta, Provisional and Validated Stage 1, 2 and 3 statuses. These schedules account for the products' dependencies on the maturity of input Sensor Data Records (SDRs), Intermediate Products, and upstream EDRs. Declaring EDR product maturity is the result of a specific review of artifacts that document that the products meet a series of criteria defined for each maturity stage. During 2012, after the SDR products achieved Beta maturity, a number of fundamental EDRs also achieved Beta status. They are now or will shortly become available to the public through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In the presentation, we will provide an overview of the latest EDR algorithm updates and the maturity schedule going forward.

  9. Modeling vocalization with ECoG cortical activity recorded during vocal production in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Saunders, Richard C; Fujii, Naotaka; Averbeck, Bruno B; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2014-01-01

    Vocal production is an example of controlled motor behavior with high temporal precision. Previous studies have decoded auditory evoked cortical activity while monkeys listened to vocalization sounds. On the other hand, there have been few attempts at decoding motor cortical activity during vocal production. Here we recorded cortical activity during vocal production in the macaque with a chronically implanted electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrode array. The array detected robust activity in motor cortex during vocal production. We used a nonlinear dynamical model of the vocal organ to reduce the dimensionality of `Coo' calls produced by the monkey. We then used linear regression to evaluate the information in motor cortical activity for this reduced representation of calls. This simple linear model accounted for circa 65% of the variance in the reduced sound representations, supporting the feasibility of using the dynamical model of the vocal organ for decoding motor cortical activity during vocal production. PMID:25571556

  10. Late Miocene carbon isotope records and marine biological productivity: Was there a (dusty) link?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diester-Haass, Liselotte; Billups, Katharina; Emeis, Kay C.

    2006-12-01

    We examine whether or not a relationship exists between the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (˜7.6-6.6 Ma) and marine productivity at four sites from the Indian and Pacific Oceans (Ocean Drilling Program Sites 721, 1146, 1172, and 846). We use a multiproxy approach based on benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, elemental ratios, and dissolution indices, and we compare these data to benthic foraminiferal δ13C values measured on the same samples. Although some of these sites have been targeted previously in studies of either the late Miocene/early Pliocene "biogenic bloom" (Sites 721 and 846) or the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (Site 1172), our records are the first to establish paired proxy records of carbon isotopes and paleoproductivity allowing a direct assessment of a potential link. Our results indicate that at all sites, productivity increased sometime during the δ13C shift; at three sites (721, 1146, and 846), productivity increased at the beginning of the shift. The correlation coefficients derived from linear regression between micropaleontologically derived productivity and foraminiferal δ13C values are relatively high during the time interval containing the late Miocene δ13C shift (and statistically significant at three of the sites). Carbon flux and isotope mass balance considerations illustrate that transfer of organic matter between the terrestrial and marine reservoirs together with enhanced oceanic upwelling best approximates observed changes in carbon isotope records and paleoproductivity. We note that long-term trend in the Site 846 paleoproductivity record can be correlated to the long-term trend in the Site 848 eolian flux reconstructions of Hovan (1995) hinting at a link between strengthened wind regime and productivity during the late Miocene.

  11. Seasonal variations recorded in cave monitoring results and a 10 year monthly resolved speleothem δ18O and δ13C record from the Han-sur-Lesse cave, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rampelbergh, M.; Verheyden, S.; Allan, M.; Quinif, Y.; Keppens, E.; Claeys, P.

    2014-04-01

    Speleothems provide paleoclimate information on multi-millennial to decadal scales in the Holocene. However seasonal or even monthly resolved records remain scarce. They require fast growing stalagmites and a good understanding of the proxy transfer function on very short time scales. The Proserpine stalagmite from the Han-sur-Less cave (Belgium) displays seasonal layers of 0.5 to 2 mm thickness that reconstruct paleoclimates at a monthly scale. Through a regular cave monitoring, we acquired a good understanding of how δ18O and δ13C signals in modern calcite reflect climate variations on sub-seasonal scale. Cave parameters vary seasonally in response to the activity of the vegetation cover and outside air temperature. From December to June, the cave remains in "winter-mode". Outside temperatures are cold inducing low cave air and water temperatures. Bio-productivity in the soil is limited leading to low pCO2, higher δ13C composition of the CO2 in the cave air and high discharge due to the inactivity of the plant coverage. From June to December, the cave switches to "summer-mode" and the measured factors display an opposite behavior. The δ18O and δ13C signals of fresh calcite precipitated on glass slabs vary seasonally. Lowest δ18O values occur during the summer-mode when the δ13C values are high. The δ18O composition of the calcite is in equilibrium with the drip water δ18O and display seasonal variations due to changes in the cave air and water temperature. In contrast to the δ18O signal, δ13C values of the calcite precipitated on the glass slabs do not reflect equilibrium conditions. Highest δ13C values occur during summer, when discharge rates are low increasing the evaporation effect on the thin water film covering the stalagmite. This same antithetical behavior of the δ18O vs. the δ13C signals is seen in the monthly resolved speleothem record that covers the period between 1976 and 1985 AD. Dark layers are formed during summer, while light layers

  12. Uncertainties in the production of p nuclei in massive stars obtained from Monte Carlo variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, T.; Nishimura, N.; Hirschi, R.; Cescutti, G.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear data uncertainties in the production of p nuclei in massive stars have been quantified in a Monte Carlo procedure. Bespoke temperature-dependent uncertainties were assigned to different types of reactions involving nuclei from Fe to Bi. Their simultaneous impact was studied in postprocessing explosive trajectories for three different stellar models. It was found that the grid of mass zones in the model of a 25 M⊙ star, which is widely used for investigations of p nucleosynthesis, is too crude to properly resolve the detailed temperature changes required for describing the production of p nuclei. Using models with finer grids for 15 M⊙ and 25 M⊙ stars with initial solar metallicity, it was found that most of the production uncertainties introduced by nuclear reaction uncertainties are smaller than a factor of two. Since a large number of rates were varied at the same time in the Monte Carlo procedure, possible cancellation effects of several uncertainties could be taken into account. Key rates were identified for each p nucleus, which provide the dominant contribution to the production uncertainty. These key rates were found by examining correlations between rate variations and resulting abundance changes. This method is superior to studying flow patterns, especially when the flows are complex, and to individual, sequential variation of a few rates.

  13. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L.Y.; Cusson, B.K.

    2003-08-26

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7 deg. tilt implants have progressed to 0 deg. implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0 deg. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5 deg. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  14. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L. Y.; Cusson, B. K.

    2003-08-01

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7° tilt implants have progressed to 0° implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0°. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5°. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave™, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  15. Cross-language comparisons of contextual variation in the production and perception of vowels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, Winifred

    2005-04-01

    In the last two decades, a considerable amount of research has investigated second-language (L2) learners problems with perception and production of non-native vowels. Most studies have been conducted using stimuli in which the vowels are produced and presented in simple, citation-form (lists) monosyllabic or disyllabic utterances. In my laboratory, we have investigated the spectral (static/dynamic formant patterns) and temporal (syllable duration) variation in vowel productions as a function of speech-style (list/sentence utterances), speaking rate (normal/rapid), sentence focus (narrow focus/post-focus) and phonetic context (voicing/place of surrounding consonants). Data will be presented for a set of languages that include large and small vowel inventories, stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed prosody, and that vary in the phonological/phonetic function of vowel length, diphthongization, and palatalization. Results show language-specific patterns of contextual variation that affect the cross-language acoustic similarity of vowels. Research on cross-language patterns of perceived phonetic similarity by naive listeners suggests that listener's knowledge of native language (L1) patterns of contextual variation influences their L1/L2 similarity judgments and subsequently, their discrimination of L2 contrasts. Implications of these findings for assessing L2 learners perception of vowels and for developing laboratory training procedures to improve L2 vowel perception will be discussed. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  16. Inter- and intra-annual variations of clumping index derived from the MODIS BRDF product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liming; Liu, Jane; Chen, Jing M.; Croft, Holly; Wang, Rong; Sprintsin, Michael; Zheng, Ting; Ryu, Youngryel; Pisek, Jan; Gonsamo, Alemu; Deng, Feng; Zhang, Yongqin

    2016-02-01

    Clumping index quantifies the level of foliage aggregation, relative to a random distribution, and is a key structural parameter of plant canopies and is widely used in ecological and meteorological models. In this study, the inter- and intra-annual variations in clumping index values, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF product, are investigated at six forest sites, including conifer forests, a mixed deciduous forest and an oak-savanna system. We find that the clumping index displays large seasonal variation, particularly for the deciduous sites, with the magnitude in clumping index values at each site comparable on an intra-annual basis, and the seasonality of clumping index well captured after noise removal. For broadleaved and mixed forest sites, minimum clumping index values are usually found during the season when leaf area index is at its maximum. The magnitude of MODIS clumping index is validated by ground data collected from 17 sites. Validation shows that the MODIS clumping index can explain 75% of variance in measured values (bias = 0.03 and rmse = 0.08), although with a narrower amplitude in variation. This study suggests that the MODIS BRDF product has the potential to produce good seasonal trajectories of clumping index values, but with an improved estimation of background reflectance.

  17. Short-term absence from industry: II Temporal variation and inter-association with other recorded factors

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, P.

    1970-01-01

    Froggatt, P. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 211-224. Short-term absence from industry. II. Temporal variation and inter-association with other recorded factors. This paper (a) extends the previous analysis (Froggatt, 1970b) of short-term absence from work among groups of male and female industrial personnel and clerks in government service, and (b) studies other recorded variables, particularly lateness, long-term sickness absence, and passes from work both `medical' and `works'. Multiple regression shows one-day absences to be generally associated with two-day absences, lateness, and medical passes but independent of works passes and long-term sickness absence; and two-day absences to be generally associated with one-day absences and long-term sickness absence but not with lateness or passes from work. Higher order correlations show lateness and works passes, medical passes and works passes, and lateness and age to be (weakly) associated, the last negatively. Irrespective of season, one-day absences were consistently most prevalent on Monday and least so on Friday, with a subsidiary peak for the male groups on Wednesday; two-day absences - as measured by the day each absence starts - were consistently most prevalent on Monday and least so on Thursday (Friday was omitted) and during the summer months. Medical passes were generally independent of the day of the week and the period of the year; lateness was greatest on Friday and during the winter, though the increase was slight; but works passes were relatively prevalent on Friday. Correlation and regression show the association between numbers of one-day absences taken in two periods of time (each one year) to be marked (r = 0·5 to 0·7), unaffected by transforming to normal functions, and explicable on a linear hypothesis, but the value of r to increase as the periods of time increase and to decrease as the interval between the periods of time lengthens. Similar analyses for two-day absences show r = 0·25 to

  18. Strain variation in microalgal lipid production during mixotrophic growth with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Kiran; Leite, Gustavo B; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2016-03-01

    Algal cultivation at high latitudes is challenged by the relatively low annual solar flux. One possible scenario to overcome this limitation is the use of mixotrophic growth to potentially boost biomass and lipid production. Here the effect of glycerol addition on the growth and lipid production by twelve indigenous microalgae was examined. The results show that there is considerable strain dependent variation in the maximum growth rate under mixotrophic conditions with the addition of glycerol causing in some cases up to a 2.4-fold increase in growth rate and a up to a 1.9-fold increase in biomass. In addition, glycerol increased total lipid production 40-60% in some strains. These results also show the value in screening culture collections for desired traits independent of strain identification since here one (PCH02) of the five Chlorella strains showed a large increase in lipid with glycerol. PMID:26773947

  19. Case study of polychlorinated naphthalene emissions and factors influencing emission variations in secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Guorui; Wang, Mei; Liu, Wenbin; Tang, Chen; Li, Li; Zheng, Minghui

    2015-04-01

    Secondary aluminum production has been recognized as an important source of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs). Large variations in PCN emissions as the smelting process proceeds have not been determined. In this study, solid and gaseous discharges, including fly ash, slag, and stack gas samples collected from four secondary smelting plants during different smelting stages were analyzed for PCNs. The average emission factor of ∑(1-8)PCNs to air was calculated to be 17.4 mg t(-1), with a range of 4.3-29.5 mg t(-1). The average emission factors of ∑(1-8)PCNs from fly ash and slag were 55.5 ng t(-1) and 0.13 ng t(-1), respectively. The derived emission factors may enable a more accurate estimation of annual emissions and a more comprehensive knowledge of the distribution of PCNs emitted from secondary aluminum production. The emission levels and characteristics of PCNs during different smelting stages were compared. Possible factors, including the organic impurities from aluminum scrap, fuel, and chloride additives, which could contribute to variations in PCN emissions and characteristics were discussed. These results may provide useful information for developing better control strategies for reducing PCN emissions in secondary aluminum production. PMID:25637821

  20. SEBAL For Detecting Spatial Variation Of Water Productivity For Wheat In The Yaqui Valley, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwart, S. J.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Watts, C. J.

    2006-08-01

    Although the use of water productivity is gaining importance for evaluating good management practices, there is no standardized framework that aids the calculations. A methodology has been developed to quantify spatial variation of crop yield, evapotranspiration (ET) and water productivity (WPET) using the SEBAL algorithm and high and low resolution satellite images. SEBAL estimated ET was validated over a wheat dominated area in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico and proved to be accurate. Estimated average wheat yields of 5.5 ton ha-1 were well within the range of measured yields reported in the literature. Area average WPET was 1.37 kg m-3 and could be considered high compared to other irrigated systems around the world It is concluded that the proposed methodology is accurate and that better knowledge of the spatial variation of WP provides valuable information for regional water managers to seek local solutions for boosting the productivity of agricultural water use by means of sharing and exchanging good management practices.

  1. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  2. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  3. Prediction of seasonal climate-induced variations in global food production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Toshichika; Sakuma, Hirofumi; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Luo, Jing-Jia; Challinor, Andrew J.; Brown, Molly E.; Sakurai, Gen; Yamagata, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Consumers, including the poor in many countries, are increasingly dependent on food imports and are thus exposed to variations in yields, production and export prices in the major food-producing regions of the world. National governments and commercial entities are therefore paying increased attention to the cropping forecasts of important food-exporting countries as well as to their own domestic food production. Given the increased volatility of food markets and the rising incidence of climatic extremes affecting food production, food price spikes may increase in prevalence in future years. Here we present a global assessment of the reliability of crop failure hindcasts for major crops at two lead times derived by linking ensemble seasonal climatic forecasts with statistical crop models. We found that moderate-to-marked yield loss over a substantial percentage (26-33%) of the harvested area of these crops is reliably predictable if climatic forecasts are near perfect. However, only rice and wheat production are reliably predictable at three months before the harvest using within-season hindcasts. The reliabilities of estimates varied substantially by crop--rice and wheat yields were the most predictable, followed by soybean and maize. The reasons for variation in the reliability of the estimates included the differences in crop sensitivity to the climate and the technology used by the crop-producing regions. Our findings reveal that the use of seasonal climatic forecasts to predict crop failures will be useful for monitoring global food production and will encourage the adaptation of food systems toclimatic extremes.

  4. High-resolution record of last post-glacial variations of sea-ice cover and river discharge in the western Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. H.; Hörner, T.; Fahl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here, we provide a high-resolution reconstruction of sea-ice cover variations in the western Laptev Sea, a crucial area in terms of sea-ice production in the Arctic Ocean and a region characterized by huge river discharge. Furthermore, the shallow Laptev Sea was strongly influenced by the post-glacial sea-level rise that should also be reflected in the sedimentary records. The sea Ice Proxy IP25 (Highly-branched mono-isoprenoid produced by sea-ice algae; Belt et al., 2007) was measured in two sediment cores from the western Laptev Sea (PS51/154, PS51/159) that offer a high-resolution composite record over the last 18 ka. In addition, sterols are applied as indicator for marine productivity (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and input of terrigenous organic matter by river discharge into the ocean (campesterol, ß-sitosterol). The sea-ice cover varies distinctly during the whole time period and shows a general increase in the Late Holocene. A maximum in IP25 concentration can be found during the Younger Dryas. This sharp increase can be observed in the whole circumarctic realm (Chukchi Sea, Bering Sea, Fram Strait and Laptev Sea). Interestingly, there is no correlation between elevated numbers of ice-rafted debris (IRD) interpreted as local ice-cap expansions (Taldenkova et al. 2010), and sea ice cover distribution. The transgression and flooding of the shelf sea that occurred over the last 16 ka in this region, is reflected by decreasing terrigenous (riverine) input, reflected in the strong decrease in sterol (ß-sitosterol and campesterol) concentrations. ReferencesBelt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Organic Geochemistry 38 (1), 16e27. Taldenkova, E., Bauch, H.A., Gottschalk, J., Nikolaev, S., Rostovtseva, Yu., Pogodina, I., Ya, Ovsepyan, Kandiano, E., 2010. History of ice-rafting and water mass evolution at the northern Siberian continental margin (Laptev Sea) during Late

  5. Variation of the reactivity of solids near the interface reagent-product of the topochemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, V. V.; Lomovsky, O. I.; Zaikova, T. O.; Gavrilov, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    During the topochemical decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and copper hypophosphite an enhanced acid concentration occurs near the reagent-product interface. Concentration profiles of the acid were observed after the treatment of the partially decomposed crystals by indicator solution and by microphotometry. Profiles exhibit the diffusive characteristics. The diffusion coefficient is 10 -10 cm 2/sec for ammonium perchlorate and 10 -9 cm 2/sec for copper hypophosphite at 20°C. It is concluded that the variation of the reactivity near the interface is due to the enhanced acid concentration.

  6. Global Precipitation Variations and Long-term Changes Derived from the GPCP Monthly Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Gu, Guojun; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Global and large regional rainfall variations and possible long-term changes are examined using the 25-year (1979-2004) monthly dataset from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). The emphasis is to discriminate among the variations due to ENSO, volcanic events and possible long-term changes. Although the global change of precipitation in the data set is near zero, the data set does indicate an upward trend (0.13 mm/day/25yr) and a downward trend (-0.06 mm/day/25yr) over tropical oceans and lands (25S-25N), respectively. This corresponds to a 4% increase (ocean) and 2% decrease (land) during this time period. Techniques are applied to attempt to eliminate variations due to ENSO and major volcanic eruptions. The impact of the two major volcanic eruptions over the past 25 years is estimated to be about a 5% reduction in tropical rainfall. The modified data set (with ENSO and volcano effect removed) retains the same approximate change slopes, but with reduced variance leading to significance tests with results in the 90-95% range. Inter-comparisons between the GPCP, SSWI (1988-2004), and TRMM (1998-2004) rainfall products are made to increase or decrease confidence in the changes seen in the GPCP analysis.

  7. Interannual variation in climate-potential net primary productivity relationships in differing ecosystems of California

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.W.; Randerson, J.T. )

    1994-06-01

    The seasonality and interannual variation in potential net primary production (NPP) were examined in differing vegetation types in California over three years of contrasting precipitation using co-registered maps of climate, vegetation, and 1km biweekly NDVI derived from high resolution satellite AVHRR data. Differences in seasonality of the vegetation types (annual grassland, chamise chaparral, deciduous oak woodland, and evergreen oak) were clearly evident and corresponded well to patterns observed in field studies. In years and locations having high precipitation the annual peak in NDVI occurred later in all vegetation classes. The annual sum of biweekly NDVI was correlated with annual precipitation in all vegetation types, although the slopes and intercepts of the regressions differed among types. Annual grassland showed the largest increase in sumNDVI per unit increase in total precipitation and most of the variation in grassland sumNDVI was explained by variation in autumn precipitation. In general the ratio of sumNDVI to annual precipitation was dependent on the temporal distribution of precipitation with respect to the long-term average pattern. Published relationships between precipitation and NPP were used to develop equations relating annual NDVI sum to NPP.

  8. Nitric oxide production by haemocytes from Mytilus galloprovincialis shows seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Novas, Ana; Barcia, Ramiro; Ramos-Martínez, Juan Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been identified as an important physiological modulator, with evidence of its role as a signalling molecule throughout the whole phylogenetic scale. In marine molluscs, it intervenes in processes related to the immune function of haemocytes. The presented results indicate that basal NO production by haemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis shows seasonal variations, with summer values statistically higher than those of winter. The presence of IL-2 increased NO production in winter. In summer, incubating the haemocytes with TNF-alpha for 6h slightly increased NO production. LPS, TGF-beta1 or PDGF did not induce significant effects on NO production by the haemocytes. Immunoblotting experiments detected two proteins that bind to vertebrate iNOS and eNOS antibodies, with different seasonal expression: the protein that binds to anti-iNOS antibody was expressed throughout the year, whereas the anti-eNOS antibody bound with a protein that was only detected in winter. IL-2 is suggested to start a signalling system dependent on the seasonal presence of winter protein. Such a system would activate the enzyme, thus favouring the higher NO production detected in winter. PMID:17574865

  9. [Evaluation of the actual traceability of labile blood products using medical records].

    PubMed

    Ingrand, P; Salmi, L R; Benz-Lemoine, E; Dupuis, M

    1998-12-01

    The traceability of blood products is an essential part of haemovigilance and transfusion safety. A pilot survey assessed the actual traceability by analysing transfusion information collected from medical records of a representative sample of 390 labile blood products transfused in a French university hospital. Transfusion and distribution forms were missing in 2.3% and 6.9% respectively. Availability and validity of transfusion information varied according to the nature of the expected information, elements of patients' records and types of wards. The location where the transfusion was performed was false or ambiguous in 38% of cases in surgery. Crude traceability, evaluated by the feedback of validated distribution forms, was estimated at 85.2% whereas actual traceability was estimated at 81.9% (SD 1.7%). High availability (98.7%) of at least one of the two sheets of the distribution form in medical records, or in the blood bank, revealed that a significant improvement of traceability should come from a better compliance to the rules of information transmission. The actual traceability differed significantly according to clinical services (worse in surgery) and was lower in case of autologous or absence of previous transfusion. An analysis of markers of good traceability should suggest efficient evolution of organization and information systems. This pilot study shows the relevance and feasibility of this kind of survey which could interestingly be performed on a large national representative random sample. PMID:9894331

  10. Variation Trend and Driving Factors of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Chinese Magnesium Production.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Liu, Yu; Nie, Zuo-Ren; Gong, Xianzheng; Wang, Zhihong

    2015-11-01

    As the largest magnesium producer in the world, China is facing a great challenge of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. In this paper, the variation trend and driving factors of GHG emissions from Chinese magnesium production were evaluated and the measures of technology and policy for effectively mitigating GHG emissions were provided. First, the energy-related and process-oriented GHG inventory is compiled for magnesium production in China. Then, the driving forces for the changes of the energy-related emission were analyzed by the method of Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) decomposition. Results demonstrated that Chinese magnesium output from 2003 to 2013 increased by 125%, whereas GHG emissions only increased by 16%. The emissions caused by the fuels consumption decline most significantly (from 28.4 to 6.6 t CO2eq/t Mg) among all the emission sources. The energy intensity and the energy structure were the main offsetting factors for the increase of GHG emissions, while the scale of production and the international market demand were the main contributors for the total increase. Considering the improvement of technology application and more stringent policy measures, the annual GHG emissions from Chinese primary magnesium production will be controlled within 22 million tons by 2020. PMID:26458120

  11. Variation in the production rate of biosonar signals in freshwater porpoises.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoko; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Wang, Ding; Li, Songhai; Wang, Kexiong; Yoda, Ken

    2013-05-01

    The biosonar (click train) production rate of ten Yangtze finless porpoises and their behavior were examined using animal-borne data loggers. The sound production rate varied from 0 to 290 click trains per 10-min time interval. Large individual differences were observed, regardless of body size. Taken together, however, sound production did not differ significantly between daytime and nighttime. Over the 172.5 h of analyzed recordings, an average of 99.0% of the click trains were produced within intervals of less than 60 s, indicating that during a 1-min interval, the number of click trains produced by each porpoise was typically greater than one. Most of the porpoises exhibited differences in average swimming speed and depth between day and night. Swimming speed reductions and usage of short-range sonar, which relates to prey-capture attempts, were observed more often during nighttime. However, biosonar appears to be affected not only by porpoise foraging, but also by their sensory environment, i.e., the turbid Yangtze River system. These features will be useful for passive acoustic detection of the porpoises. Calculations of porpoise density or abundance should be conducted carefully because large individual differences in the sound production rate will lead to large estimation error. PMID:23654415

  12. Intra-tooth variations in δ 18O (PO 4) of mammalian tooth enamel as a record of seasonal variations in continental climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, Henry C.; Clyde, William C.; O'Neil, James R.

    1998-06-01

    Regular intra-tooth variations in the δ 18O value of mammalian tooth enamel phosphate (δ 18O p) have been considered a potential measure of seasonal changes in continental climate variables since they were first observed. In order to investigate this possibility in more detail, analyses were made of teeth from a number of mammalian herbivores (sheep, cattle, elk, and pigs) that lived over a wide range of geographic locations, ecological settings, and climatic conditions (Iowa, Florida, Wyoming, Iceland, England, Croatia, and the Philippines). The lack of intra-tooth δ 18O p variations in teeth of cattle that were given tap water to drink provides strong evidence that the underlying cause of observed intra-tooth variations is primarily a change in the isotopic composition of ingested water. In concert with this interpretation, the range of intra-tooth δ 18O p values and their absolute values from each locality mirror observed differences in the range and absolute δ 18O values of local precipitation (δ 18O pt) and in climate variables. Thus intra-tooth δ 18O p values can indeed be considered a qualitative measure of seasonal climate change in continental settings. Quantitative use of intra-tooth δ 18O p values as a climate proxy is possible, but is hindered by lack of detailed information on aspects of mammalian physiology, behavior, and perhaps local hydrology that may also play a role in influencing δ 18O p. This problem is exemplified by the different range in δ 18O p values measured for sheep and cattle from the same locality around York, UK (3.4 vs. 2.6‰, respectively). The observed difference most likely reflects a difference in the relative amount of leaf water ingested by the two species. Future studies of well-constrained samples are required to test physiological models and to develop empirical relations that accurately relate δ 18O p to δ 18O pt. In addition to their use as indicators of seasonality, intra-tooth variations in δ 18O p values

  13. Prediction of Seasonal Climate-induced Variations in Global Food Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iizumi, Toshichika; Sakuma, Hirofumi; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Luo, Jing-Jia; Challinor, Andrew J.; Brown, Molly E.; Sakurai, Gen; Yamagata, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Consumers, including the poor in many countries, are increasingly dependent on food imports and are therefore exposed to variations in yields, production, and export prices in the major food-producing regions of the world. National governments and commercial entities are paying increased attention to the cropping forecasts of major food-exporting countries as well as to their own domestic food production. Given the increased volatility of food markets and the rising incidence of climatic extremes affecting food production, food price spikes may increase in prevalence in future years. Here we present a global assessment of the reliability of crop failure hindcasts for major crops at two lead times derived by linking ensemble seasonal climatic forecasts with statistical crop models. We assessed the reliability of hindcasts (i.e., retrospective forecasts for the past) of crop yield loss relative to the previous year for two lead times. Pre-season yield predictions employ climatic forecasts and have lead times of approximately 3 to 5 months for providing information regarding variations in yields for the coming cropping season. Within-season yield predictions use climatic forecasts with lead times of 1 to 3 months. Pre-season predictions can be of value to national governments and commercial concerns, complemented by subsequent updates from within-season predictions. The latter incorporate information on the most recent climatic data for the upcoming period of reproductive growth. In addition to such predictions, hindcasts using observations from satellites were performed to demonstrate the upper limit of the reliability of crop forecasting.

  14. Photosynthetic production in the central Arctic Ocean during the record sea-ice minimum in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Méndez, M.; Katlein, C.; Rabe, B.; Nicolaus, M.; Peeken, I.; Bakker, K.; Flores, H.; Boetius, A.

    2015-06-01

    The ice-covered central Arctic Ocean is characterized by low primary productivity due to light and nutrient limitations. The recent reduction in ice cover has the potential to substantially increase phytoplankton primary production, but little is yet known about the fate of the ice-associated primary production and of the nutrient supply with increasing warming. This study presents results from the central Arctic Ocean collected during summer 2012, when sea-ice extent reached its lowest ever recorded since the onset of satellite observations. Net primary productivity (NPP) was measured in the water column, sea ice and melt ponds by 14CO2 uptake at different irradiances. Photosynthesis vs. irradiance (PI) curves were established in laboratory experiments and used to upscale measured NPP to the deep Eurasian Basin (north of 78° N) using the irradiance-based Central Arctic Ocean Primary Productivity (CAOPP) model. In addition, new annual production has been calculated from the seasonal nutrient drawdown in the mixed layer since last winter. Results show that ice algae can contribute up to 60% to primary production in the central Arctic Ocean at the end of the productive season (August-September). The ice-covered water column has lower NPP rates than open water due to light limitation in late summer. As indicated by the nutrient ratios in the euphotic zone, nitrate was limiting primary production in the deep Eurasian Basin close to the Laptev Sea area, while silicate was the main limiting nutrient at the ice margin near the Atlantic inflow. Although sea-ice cover was substantially reduced in 2012, total annual new production in the Eurasian Basin was 17 ± 7 Tg C yr-1, which is within the range of estimates of previous years. However, when adding the contribution by sub-ice algae, the annual production for the deep Eurasian Basin (north of 78° N) could double previous estimates for that area with a surplus of 16 Tg C yr-1. Our data suggest that sub-ice algae are an

  15. A Framework for Evaluating the Software Product Quality of Pregnancy Monitoring Mobile Personal Health Records.

    PubMed

    Idri, Ali; Bachiri, Mariam; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    Stakeholders' needs and expectations are identified by means of software quality requirements, which have an impact on software product quality. In this paper, we present a set of requirements for mobile personal health records (mPHRs) for pregnancy monitoring, which have been extracted from literature and existing mobile apps on the market. We also use the ISO/IEC 25030 standard to suggest the requirements that should be considered during the quality evaluation of these mPHRs. We then go on to design a checklist in which we contrast the mPHRs for pregnancy monitoring requirements with software product quality characteristics and sub-characteristics in order to calculate the impact of these requirements on software product quality, using the ISO/IEC 25010 software product quality standard. The results obtained show that the requirements related to the user's actions and the app's features have the most impact on the external sub-characteristics of the software product quality model. The only sub-characteristic affected by all the requirements is Appropriateness of Functional suitability. The characteristic Operability is affected by 95% of the requirements while the lowest degrees of impact were identified for Compatibility (15%) and Transferability (6%). Lastly, the degrees of the impact of the mPHRs for pregnancy monitoring requirements are discussed in order to provide appropriate recommendations for the developers and stakeholders of mPHRs for pregnancy monitoring. PMID:26643080

  16. The Drexon Product Family For Laser Recording And Digital-Data Storage --A Status Report--

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Jerome

    1983-11-01

    The Drexon medium is no longer a research project. After six years of research, development, and product engineering, it has emerged into a family of optical-data storage products. First delivered as a 30-cm disk in November 1980, this material is now available in card, tape, and minidisk formats. The card and tape products evolved from a fundamental differentiation--mass memories versus compact memories. Our original work concentrated in the mass memory area where 0.8-micron holes and 2 gigabytes per disk are desired. Today, approximately one-half of our effort is in this area. The other half is directed at compact optical data storage, using 5-micron holes and data capacities of 2 to 50 megabytes. The appearance of this market for compact memories parallels the emergence of the personal computer age. Our goal in the mass memory disk area is to develop long-life, low-cost products with sufficient sensitivity, CNR, and bit-error rate performance for advanced digital-data storage systems. Our goal for compact memories with similar qualities is to link our laser recordable cards, software ROM cards, and microtape cassettes to personal computers, video game machines, and office automation products.

  17. A probabilistic model framework for evaluating year-to-year variation in crop productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozawa, M.; Iizumi, T.; Tao, F.

    2008-12-01

    Most models describing the relation between crop productivity and weather condition have so far been focused on mean changes of crop yield. For keeping stable food supply against abnormal weather as well as climate change, evaluating the year-to-year variations in crop productivity rather than the mean changes is more essential. We here propose a new framework of probabilistic model based on Bayesian inference and Monte Carlo simulation. As an example, we firstly introduce a model on paddy rice production in Japan. It is called PRYSBI (Process- based Regional rice Yield Simulator with Bayesian Inference; Iizumi et al., 2008). The model structure is the same as that of SIMRIW, which was developed and used widely in Japan. The model includes three sub- models describing phenological development, biomass accumulation and maturing of rice crop. These processes are formulated to include response nature of rice plant to weather condition. This model inherently was developed to predict rice growth and yield at plot paddy scale. We applied it to evaluate the large scale rice production with keeping the same model structure. Alternatively, we assumed the parameters as stochastic variables. In order to let the model catch up actual yield at larger scale, model parameters were determined based on agricultural statistical data of each prefecture of Japan together with weather data averaged over the region. The posterior probability distribution functions (PDFs) of parameters included in the model were obtained using Bayesian inference. The MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) algorithm was conducted to numerically solve the Bayesian theorem. For evaluating the year-to-year changes in rice growth/yield under this framework, we firstly iterate simulations with set of parameter values sampled from the estimated posterior PDF of each parameter and then take the ensemble mean weighted with the posterior PDFs. We will also present another example for maize productivity in China. The

  18. Seasonal dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations driven by cave ventilation: Implications for and modeling of speleothem paleoclimate records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Corinne I.; Banner, Jay L.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2011-06-01

    caves is likely: (1) speleothem trace-element records may provide seasonal signals, and (2) such records may be biased toward recording climate conditions during the season when calcite is depositing. Additionally, we use our results to construct a forward model that illustrates the types of speleothem Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations that would result from varying controls on dripwater compositions. The model provides a basis for interpreting paleo-dripwater controls from high frequency Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations for speleothems from caves at which long term monitoring studies are not feasible.

  19. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  20. [Variation trends of natural vegetation net primary productivity in China under climate change scenario].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-sheng; Wu, Shao-hong; Yin, Yun-he

    2011-04-01

    Based on the widely used Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ) for climate change study, and according to the features of natural environment in China, the operation mechanism of the model was adjusted, and the parameters were modified. With the modified LPJ model and taking 1961-1990 as baseline period, the responses of natural vegetation net primary productivity (NPP) in China to climate change in 1991-2080 were simulated under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) B2 scenario. In 1961-1990, the total NPP of natural vegetation in China was about 3.06 Pg C a(-1); in 1961-2080, the total NPP showed a fluctuant decreasing trend, with an accelerated decreasing rate. Under the condition of slight precipitation change, the increase of mean air temperature would have definite adverse impact on the NPP. Spatially, the NPP decreased from southeast coast to northwest inland, and this pattern would have less variation under climate change. In eastern China with higher NPP, especially in Northeast China, east of North China, and Loess Plateau, the NPP would mainly have a decreasing trend; while in western China with lower NPP, especially in the Tibetan Plateau and Tarim Basin, the NPP would be increased. With the intensive climate change, such a variation trend of NPP would be more obvious. PMID:21774310

  1. Anthropogenic emissions and combustion products recorded in a Colle Gnifetti ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrieli, J.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Zennaro, P.; Lim, S.; Laj, P.; Barbante, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ice cores provide direct and highly resolved records of atmospheric parameters that record both climate signals and forcing factors. European Alpine glaciers are located near densely populated and industrialized areas and provide excellent archives of past air pollution. Ice cores to bedrock on Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa (45°55'51''N, 07°52'34''E; 4450 m a.s.l.) permit centennial to millennial reconstruction of past regional climate, while snow pit and shallow core studies from the same site allow multiple parameter reconstructions of anthropogenic emissions. Air pollution includes fossil fuel and biomass burning products that influence regional smog and contain trace elements hazardous to human health. Here, we examine a high-resolution suite of anthropogenic and natural emissions (black carbon, levoglucosan, trace elements, heavy metals) and climate proxies (major ions and stable isotopes) in a 12 m Colle Gnifetti ice core to determine seasonal changes in anthropogenic emissions and their interaction with climate parameters. This is the first study to compare black carbon (a fossil fuel and biomass combustion tracer) with levoglucosan (a fire activity biomarker) in a European ice core. The combination of these two proxies can determine changing combustion product sources through time. Our results demonstrate that anthropogenic emissions influence the summer aerosol flux while crustal sources dominate the winter aerosol flux. These ice core chemical data are consistent with observational data and boundary layer dynamics that transport pollutants concentrated in the Po Valley and similar industrial lowland regions to glacier surfaces during the summer.

  2. Relevance of variation in use of terminology to define generic pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elize Massard da

    2015-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) promotes the use of generic drug policies to foster competition in the pharmaceutical sector, reduce drug prices, and increase access to therapeutic drugs. However, little is known about how countries implement these policies. This article describes different terminology adopted by national regulatory authorities to define generic versus proprietary drug products in developing countries, including those in Latin America, and challenges that arise in their application of WHO guidelines, such as labeling issues. The author concludes that variation in generics terminology in these countries is a result of institutional context (i.e., the public sector setting as well as the body of laws and regulations that exists in the country) and policy legacies, such as intellectual property regimes, and highlights the need for further analysis of pharmaceutical regulations to improve understanding of the barriers and political implications of generic drug policies. PMID:25915016

  3. [Investigation of variation of the production of biological and chemical compounds of Hyssopus officinalis L].

    PubMed

    Varga, E; Hajdú, Z; Veres, K; Máthé, I; Németh, E; Pluhár, Z; Bernáth, J

    1998-05-01

    Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae family) has been cultivated in Central Europe for a long time. This essential oil containing species serves not only as spice but in many countries including Hungary, it is used as a folk medicine against certain respiratory diseases. Despite this fact, little is known about the variation of its productivity under Central European climatic conditions. The cultivated populations of hyssop can be characterised by a significant heterogenity. In the course of its breeding the uniformity of flower colour (e.g. blue form), and increase in the oil content are the main achievable purposes. The purpose of this work was to investigate both the variability of strains of different crigin and the time-dependent variations of its production parameters. The optimum of phytomass was obtained at the beginning of July. The essential oil content as well as compounds of the non volatile fractions were also investigated. The non volatile fractions for rosmarinic, caffeic acids were analysed mainly by TLC and densitometry. Both compounds were present in all samples and they are suitable for the characterisation of the plant. The essential oils were gained with Water Steam Distillation (WSD) and Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with CO2. The oils were analysed by GC, GC-MS techniques. In the essential oil composition of the populations studied significant heterogenity could be observed. In the case of applying SFE extraction the oil composition is more uniform, similarly to the obtained by WSD adding hexane. The heterogenity can be experienced in the offsprings, too. If only the main four components (beta-pinene, limonene, pinocamphone, isopinocamphone) are regarded, among the offsprings clear and mixed lines alike can be found. Results of these experiments justify the necessity and usefulness of selection which is going on. PMID:9703705

  4. Normal amplitude Brunhes paleosecular variation at low-latitudes - A paleomagnetic record from the trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia; del Pozzo, Ana Lillian Martin; Boehnel, Harald

    1986-12-01

    Ancient secular variation in Central Mexico was determined from paleomagnetic measurements on 45 independent lava flows ranging in age (C-14 and K-Ar dates) from 2,500 to 580,000 years B.P. All the analyzed flows are characterized by a normal polarity placing them within the Brunhes Chron. The paleosecular variation analysis yielded an angular standard deviation from the field of an axial dipole of 15.3 deg with 95 percent confidence limits f 13.4 deg and 17.9 deg, and that of the corresponding Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) of 13.9 deg with confidence limits of 12.1 deg and 16.1 deg. These values are in agreement with those predicted by most statistical models of secular variation, but divergent from those obtained from low latitudes (19 deg N) such as Hawaii and Pagan Is.

  5. Seasonal Variations in Alkenone Concentration and Production in the Oligotrophic North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, B.; Prahl, F.; Sparrow, M.; Rust, T.

    2003-04-01

    Since its introduction in 1986, the alkenone unsaturation index (UK37) has been used extensively by the paleoceanographic community to determine variations in past sea-surface temperature (SST). Despite this widespread use, however, surprisingly little is yet known about where and when the UK37 signal exported to sediments is produced in the euphotic zone. Independent lines of empirical evidence suggest subsurface production within the euphotic zone to be an important source of alkenone export in subtropical regions of the Pacific and perhaps other oligotrophic parts of the world ocean. In the present study, we examined evidence for subsurface alkenone production in the oligotrophic subtropical North Pacific gyre at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series station ALOHA (22o 45N, 158oW) in three different seasons. Highest alkenone production rates, as determined by uptake of 13C-labeled inorganic carbon into alkenones during 24-hour in situ incubations, and highest alkenone standing stocks were found within (Spring, Fall) or just below (Summer) the surface mixed layer. Lowest alkenone standing stocks and lowest production rates were found within the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Measured UK37 values were converted into growth temperature (gT) estimates using a culture-based calibration equation (UK37 = 0.034 T + 0.039; Prahl et al., 1988) and compared with water temperatures actually measured by CTD at the depth of sample collection. In most cases, alkenone gT under-estimated actual water temperature by 2-3oC when alkenone production rates were high and over-estimated actual water temperature by 3-4oC when production rates were low. These results suggest a non-thermal, physiological control on alkenone unsaturation and indicate that light-limited alkenone production at the DCM in the oligotrophic North Pacific is quantitatively unimportant. The physiological mechanisms responsible for these observations and the implication of these results for improved confidence in UK37

  6. Variations of Carbon Isotopes during Shale Gas Production from the Horn River Basin, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norville, G.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical and stable isotope compositions of natural gases are key parameters for characterizing gas and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Produced gases were obtained from eight wells at multi-well pad sites located in the Horn River Basin (HRB), NE British Columbia. Shale gas wells were drilled and completed in the Devonian Muskwa, Otter Park and Evie Formations of the HRB, and gases collected as time series over short term (~50 days) and long term periods (~ 1250 days). δ13C of gases from HRB formations confirm high thermal maturity and the shale gases frequently showed partial or full isotope reversals among hydrocarbon components. A 10‰ variation in δ13C values of methane was observed during production. In general, during early phases of production shale gases appear enriched in 12C compared to gases sampled at later stages and δ13Cmethane values were approximately between -38‰ and -35‰ during times up to 50 days. The majority of cases of carbon isotope reversals between methane and ethane components of gases (δ13Cmethane > δ13Cethane) were observed at times greater than 100 days, while ethane and propane reversals were common throughout production. Gas production rates differed significantly among the sampled wells from ~ 50 to 400 e3m3/d. Higher rates were frequently associated with gases showing 12Cmethane enrichment. Subsequent to periods of well 'shut in' a change in the carbon isotope composition was detected with enrichment in 13Cmethane of gases. Carbon isotope signatures of produced gases likely reflect a combination of both the in-situ shale gas isotope signature as well as effects of isotope fractionation which may occur during transport through pores and fractures of the shale.

  7. Genotypic variation and slime production among blood and catheter isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Branchini, M L; Pfaller, M A; Rhine-Chalberg, J; Frempong, T; Isenberg, H D

    1994-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity and slime production among 31 isolates of C. parapsilosis from individual patients with bloodstream or catheter infections. DNA subtyping was performed by using electrophoretic karyotyping plus restriction endonuclease analysis with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Slime production was evaluated by growing organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Overall there were 14 DNA subtypes among the 31 isolates. Eighty percent of the isolates produced slime; 67% of the isolates were moderately to strongly positive, 13% were weakly positive, and 20% were not slime producers. The ability of isolates of a given DNA type to produce slime under these conditions was variable. The results of these studies indicate moderate genotypic variation among clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis. The propensity of these isolates to form slime in glucose-containing solutions suggests that this phenotypic characteristic may contribute to the ability of C. parapsilosis to adhere to plastic catheters and cause infections. PMID:8150956

  8. Variation in the link between oxygen consumption and ATP production, and its relevance for animal performance

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K.; Rey, Benjamin; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    It is often assumed that an animal's metabolic rate can be estimated through measuring the whole-organism oxygen consumption rate. However, oxygen consumption alone is unlikely to be a sufficient marker of energy metabolism in many situations. This is due to the inherent variability in the link between oxidation and phosphorylation; that is, the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated per molecule of oxygen consumed by mitochondria (P/O ratio). In this article, we describe how the P/O ratio can vary within and among individuals, and in response to a number of environmental parameters, including diet and temperature. As the P/O ratio affects the efficiency of cellular energy production, its variability may have significant consequences for animal performance, such as growth rate and reproductive output. We explore the adaptive significance of such variability and hypothesize that while a reduction in the P/O ratio is energetically costly, it may be associated with advantages in terms of somatic maintenance through reduced production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we discuss how considering variation in mitochondrial efficiency, together with whole-organism oxygen consumption, can permit a better understanding of the relationship between energy metabolism and life history for studies in evolutionary ecology. PMID:26203001

  9. Variation in the link between oxygen consumption and ATP production, and its relevance for animal performance.

    PubMed

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K; Rey, Benjamin; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2015-08-01

    It is often assumed that an animal's metabolic rate can be estimated through measuring the whole-organism oxygen consumption rate. However, oxygen consumption alone is unlikely to be a sufficient marker of energy metabolism in many situations. This is due to the inherent variability in the link between oxidation and phosphorylation; that is, the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated per molecule of oxygen consumed by mitochondria (P/O ratio). In this article, we describe how the P/O ratio can vary within and among individuals, and in response to a number of environmental parameters, including diet and temperature. As the P/O ratio affects the efficiency of cellular energy production, its variability may have significant consequences for animal performance, such as growth rate and reproductive output. We explore the adaptive significance of such variability and hypothesize that while a reduction in the P/O ratio is energetically costly, it may be associated with advantages in terms of somatic maintenance through reduced production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we discuss how considering variation in mitochondrial efficiency, together with whole-organism oxygen consumption, can permit a better understanding of the relationship between energy metabolism and life history for studies in evolutionary ecology. PMID:26203001

  10. Marginal Lands Gross Primary Production Dominate Atmospheric CO2 Interannual Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlström, A.; Raupach, M. R.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Jung, M.; Reichstein, M.; Smith, B.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 1960s terrestrial ecosystems have acted as a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2, sequestering about one quarter of anthropogenic emissions in an average year. Variations in this land carbon sink are also responsible for most of the large interannual variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. While most evidence places the majority of the sink in highly productive forests and at high latitudes experiencing warmer and longer growing seasons, the location and the processes governing the interannual variations are still not well characterised. Here we evaluate the hypothesis that the long-term trend and the variability in the land CO2 sink are respectively dominated by geographically distinct regions: the sink by highly productive lands, mainly forests, and the variability by semi-arid or "marginal" lands where vegetation activity is strongly limited by water and therefore responds strongly to climate variability. Using novel analysis methods and data from both upscaled flux-tower measurements and a dynamic global vegetation model, we show that (1) the interannual variability in the terrestrial CO2 sink arises mainly from variability in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP); (2) most of the interannual variability in GPP arises in tropical and subtropical marginal lands, where negative anomalies are driven mainly by warm, dry conditions and positive anomalies by cool, wet conditions; (3) the variability in the GPP of high-latitude marginal lands (tundra and shrublands) is instead controlled by temperature and light, with warm bright conditions resulting in positive anomalies. The influence of ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) on the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 concentrations is mediated primarily through climatic effects on GPP in marginal lands, with opposite signs in subtropical and higher-latitude regions. Our results show that the land sink of CO2 (dominated by forests) and its interannual variability (dominated by marginal lands) are

  11. Presence and seasonal variation of deep diving foraging odontocetes around Kauai, Hawaii using remote autonomous acoustic recorders.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Giorli, Giacomo; Chen, Jessica; Copeland, Adrienne; Lammers, Marc O; Richlen, Michael; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

    2014-01-01

    Ecological acoustic recorders (EARs) were moored off the bottom in relatively deep depths (609-710 m) at five locations around the island of Kauai. Initially, the EARs had an analog-to-digital sample rate of 64 kHz with 30-s recordings every 5 min. After the second deployment the sampling rate was increased to 80 kHz in order to better record beaked whale biosonar signals. The results of the 80 kHz recording are discussed in this manuscript and are the results of three deployments over a year's period (January 2010 to January 2011). Five categories of the biosonar signal detection of deep diving odontocetes were created, short-finned pilot whales, sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and unknown dolphins. During any given day, at least one species of these deep diving odontocetes were detected. On many days, several species were detected. The biosonar signals of short-finned pilot whales were detected the most often with approximately 30% of all the signals, followed by beaked and sperm whales approximately 22% and 21% of all clicks, respectively. The seasonal patterns were not very strong except in the SW location with distinct peak in detection during the months of April-June 2010 period. PMID:24437792

  12. Revised estimates of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ variations based on the tree ring /sup 13/C record

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.; Freyer, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    The composite mean /sup 13/C record for the Northern Hemisphere was revised. The overall decrease of delta /sup 13/C from 1800 to 1980 was estimated to be about -1.5/sup 0///sub 00/, which is 0.5/sup 0///sub 00/ less than the previous estimate. Therefore, the contribution of /sup 13/C-depleted CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere from the forest and soil source was reevaluated, using the modified box-diffusion ocean model and Freyer's revised /sup 13/C record. On the basis of the assumption that this revised tree ring /sup 13/C record represents changes in the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio induced in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ due to deforestation and soil manipulation and combustion of fossil fuels, the following results are obtained: (1) the magnitude of the integrated CO/sub 2/ release from the terrestrial biosphere since 1800 is about 90% of that from fossil fuel; (2) over the two-decade period covered by the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO/sub 2/ record, the input from the forest plus soil source is about 15% of that from fossil fuels; (3) the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C trend over the last two decades has been dominated by the input of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/; and (4) the pre-1850 atmospheric CO/sub 2/ content is estimated to be about 266 x 10/sup -6/ atm. 15 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  13. Temporal variation of thoron decay product concentration in the atmosphere and comparison with radon decay product concentration.

    PubMed

    Winkler, R; Aehlig, K

    1998-04-01

    Seasonal and long-term variation of the airborne 212Pb concentration, representative of the equilibrium equivalent concentration of thoron decay products (EECRn220), was investigated from 1989 through 1996 at a semi-natural location in southern Germany. Continuous measurement yielded a long-term average concentration of 0.082 Bq m-3, while daily mean concentrations varied from < or = 0.01 to 0.34 Bq m-3. An average annual effective dose of 1.4 mSv due to outdoor thoron progeny concentration was estimated. This is about 2% of the dose due to the average short-lived radon progeny concentration (EECRn222) of 8.4 Bq m-3 measured for this location in the same period. In most years the seasonal pattern of 212Pb activity concentration in the atmosphere is characterized by two maxima: the first in May and the second one in September. Low concentrations are observed from November through February of each year. This is in contrast to the behaviour of the short-lived 222Rn progeny which exhibit enhanced concentrations exactly during these months. The most probable reason for the different temporal behaviour of 212Pb is the extremely reduced flux of thoron gas from the ground during the winter months. PMID:9615341

  14. Classification of Intended Phoneme Production from Chronic Intracortical Microelectrode Recordings in Speech-Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Brumberg, Jonathan S.; Wright, E. Joe; Andreasen, Dinal S.; Guenther, Frank H.; Kennedy, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a neurophysiological study of attempted speech production in a paralyzed human volunteer using chronic microelectrode recordings. The volunteer suffers from locked-in syndrome leaving him in a state of near-total paralysis, though he maintains good cognition and sensation. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of supervised classification techniques for prediction of intended phoneme production in the absence of any overt movements including speech. Such classification or decoding ability has the potential to greatly improve the quality-of-life of many people who are otherwise unable to speak by providing a direct communicative link to the general community. We examined the performance of three classifiers on a multi-class discrimination problem in which the items were 38 American English phonemes including monophthong and diphthong vowels and consonants. The three classifiers differed in performance, but averaged between 16 and 21% overall accuracy (chance-level is 1/38 or 2.6%). Further, the distribution of phonemes classified statistically above chance was non-uniform though 20 of 38 phonemes were classified with statistical significance for all three classifiers. These preliminary results suggest supervised classification techniques are capable of performing large scale multi-class discrimination for attempted speech production and may provide the basis for future communication prostheses. PMID:21629876

  15. Assessment of 10-Year Global Record of Aerosol Products from the OMI Near-UV Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Global observations of aerosol properties from space are critical for understanding climate change and air quality applications. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption and dark surface albedo in the UV spectral region. These unique features enable us to retrieve both aerosol extinction optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) successfully from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nm by the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV). Recent improvements to algorithms in conjunction with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) carbon monoxide data also reduce uncertainties due to aerosol layer heights and types significantly in retrieved products. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. We also compare the OMI SSA against the inversion made by AERONET as well as an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability. The OMAERUV 10-year global aerosol record is publicly available at the NASA data service center web site (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/data-holdings/OMI/omaeruv_v003.shtml).

  16. Analysis of cell line variation in biochemical production of protoporphyrin IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; Chen, Bin; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2006-02-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is produced via the heme synthesis pathway by the cell following administration of aminolevulinic acid (ALA). ALA synthase, the enzyme that produces ALA in the cell from glycine and succinyl-coenzyme A, is inhibited in a feedback mechanism by heme and thus is the rate limiting enzyme in the heme synthesis pathway. Since ALA is administered systemically, the rate limiting step that naturally exists in the cells is bypassed, however it is currently unclear why cells have different rate limiting steps in the ALA-PpIX synthesis pathway, and more specifically which types of cancer cells are most productive. It has been determined that when the same amount of ALA is administered to a wide panel of cancer cells in vitro that vastly differing amounts of PpIX are produced. The steps for the ALA-PpIX pathway occur in and around the mitochondria of the cell, but interestingly no correlation is seen between PpIX production and mitochondrial content of the cell, following ALA administration. However, total cell area shows positive correlation with PpIX production. Administration of the iron chelator, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridone (L1) in combination with ALA allows the final step in the heme synthesis pathway, conversion of PpIX to heme, to be delayed and thus increases the detectable amount of PpIX in each cell line. The cell lines that have the lowest PpIX production following administration of ALA alone show the largest increase in production following the combined administration of ALA and L1. PpIX fluorescence is thought to be a measure of cellular activity and the goal of the current study was to determine which cell lines would be the most promising targets for fluorescence detection or monitoring response to therapy. The results indicate that the cells with larger size and larger numbers of mitochondria may be good potential targets for this therapy. While this conclusion may appear obvious, it is not universally true, and cellular specific

  17. Late Pleistocene temperature and productivity variations in the Benguela Current System (ODP Leg 175, Site 1082)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, C.; Rullkötter, J.

    2003-04-01

    Site 1082 (Walvis Basin) is located close to the major upwelling cells along the Southwest African coast with a year-round upwelling activity. Sediment samples spanning the last 770 kyr were investigated to reconstruct the paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic conditions in the Benguela upwelling system off Namibia. Alkenone-derived paleo-sea surface temperatures (calculated from the Uk'37index) roughly follow the 18O variations of planktonic foraminifera. The core shows warmer SST values (18-20°C) during interglacial stages and colder SST values (14-16°C) during glacial stages. Two long-term trends were observed: a decrease in SST values by 1°C from 770 kyr to 450 kyr and an increase in SST values by 2°C for the last 450 kyr. SST values in the northern Benguela System confirm the onset of the dominant 100 ka cycles associated with Northern Hemisphere glaciation over the past 650 kyr. One important result is the observed warming trend in the Benguela Current region over the last 450 kyr. In this period, the trend to warmer sea surface temperatures is more evident during glacials, suggesting a southward migration of the polar and subpolar frontal systems and an intensification of the influence of the warm Agulhas Current on the Benguela Current System during glacial stages 10, 8, 6 and 4. Another possible mechanism that could be responsible for such a warming trend of the eastern South Atlantic is a weakening of the cross-equatorial heat transport from the South to the North Atlantic as a result of a weakening of the thermohaline circulation. The accumulation profile of the alkenones indicates an elevated marine surface productivity may have fluctuated over time due to the upwelling activity in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. The fluctuations in marine productivity are not related to the glacial-interglacial cycles which exhibit increased productivity during glacials at other locations. The marine biomarker distributions indicate that periods of higher

  18. Tettigettalna josei (Boulard, 1982) (Hemiptera: Cicadoidea): first record in Spain, with notes on the distribution, genetic variation and behaviour of the species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The small cicada Tettigettalna josei (Boulard, 1982) was until recently only known from southern Portugal and was considered endemic to this country. Fieldwork in 2013 led to the first record of the species in Spain, expanding its known eastern range to Andalusia. The northern limits remain poorly defined but it appears that the distribution of Tettigettalna josei is restricted to the south Atlantic coastline in the Iberian Peninsula, with the highest densities found in Algarve. Some notes on behaviour and genetic variation of Tettigettalna josei are also given. PMID:24891819

  19. Full-vector paleomagnetic secular variation records from latest quaternary sediments of Lake Malawi (10.0°S, 34.3°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steve; Platzman, Ellen; Johnson, Tom

    2016-07-01

    We have conducted a paleomagnetic study of Late Quaternary sediments from Lake Malawi, East Africa, in order to develop a high-resolution record of paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV). This study has recovered PSV records from two cores (3P, 6P) in northern Lake Malawi (10.0°S, 34.3°E). The PSV appears to be recorded in fine-grained detrital magnetite/titanomagnetite grains. Detailed af demagnetization of the natural remanence (NRM) shows that a distinctive characteristic remanence (ChRM) is demagnetized from ∼20 to 80 mT, which decreases simply toward the origin. The resulting directional PSV records for 3P and 6P are easily correlatable with 29 distinct inclination features and 29 declination features. The statistical character of the PSV in both cores is consistent with Holocene PSV noted at other Holocene equatorial sites. Radiocarbon dating of the cores is based on 18 independent radiocarbon dates and four dated stratigraphic horizons that can be correlated into each core. The final directional PSV time series cover the last 24,000 years with an average sediment accumulation rate of ∼30 cm/kyr. We have also developed a relative paleointensity estimate for these PSV records based on normalizing the NRM (after 20 mT af demagnetization) by the SIRM (after 20 mT af demagnetization). Changing sedimentation patterns complicate any attempt to develop a single paleointensity record for the entire core lengths. We have developed a relative paleointensity record for the last 6000 years that has 14 correlatable features including 5 notable peaks in intensity. Three of these peaks are synchronous with paleointensity highs farther north in SE Europe/SW Asia/Egypt but two of the peaks are at times of low paleointensity farther north. We interpret this to indicate that Lake Malawi (10°S) is at least partly under the influence of a different flux-regeneration region of the outer-core dynamo. A relative paleointensity record was also developed for ∼11,000-24,000 YBP

  20. 31 CFR 1.11 - Testimony or the production of records in a court or other proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... testimony. (1) Subject to 5 CFR 2635.805, an employee or former employee shall not provide, with or without... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testimony or the production of... production of records in a court or other proceeding. (a) Applicability. (1) This section sets forth...

  1. 31 CFR 1.11 - Testimony or the production of records in a court or other proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... testimony. (1) Subject to 5 CFR 2635.805, an employee or former employee shall not provide, with or without... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testimony or the production of... production of records in a court or other proceeding. (a) Applicability. (1) This section sets forth...

  2. 31 CFR 1.11 - Testimony or the production of records in a court or other proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... testimony. (1) Subject to 5 CFR 2635.805, an employee or former employee shall not provide, with or without... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Testimony or the production of... production of records in a court or other proceeding. (a) Applicability. (1) This section sets forth...

  3. Neotropical mammal diversity and the Great American Biotic Interchange: spatial and temporal variation in South America's fossil record

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Juan D.; Forasiepi, Analía; Jaramillo, Carlos; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    The vast mammal diversity of the Neotropics is the result of a long evolutionary history. During most of the Cenozoic, South America was an island continent with an endemic mammalian fauna. This isolation ceased during the late Neogene after the formation of the Isthmus of Panama, resulting in an event known as the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). In this study, we investigate biogeographic patterns in South America, just before or when the first immigrants are recorded and we review the temporal and geographical distribution of fossil mammals during the GABI. We performed a dissimilarity analysis which grouped the faunal assemblages according to their age and their geographic distribution. Our data support the differentiation between tropical and temperate assemblages in South America during the middle and late Miocene. The GABI begins during the late Miocene (~10–7 Ma) and the putative oldest migrations are recorded in the temperate region, where the number of GABI participants rapidly increases after ~5 Ma and this trend continues during the Pleistocene. A sampling bias toward higher latitudes and younger records challenges the study of the temporal and geographic patterns of the GABI. PMID:25601879

  4. Paleo-ocean chemistry based on records in marine sedimentary opal: implications for effect of Fe and other trace elements on biological productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D.; Charles, C. D.; Vacher, L.; Jull, A. J.; McHargue, L.

    2005-05-01

    We report on our discovery that marine opal contains a high fidelity record of dissolved oceanic concentrations of cosmic ray-produced radionuclides, 10Be and 26Al, while also capturing temporal variations in a large number of trace elements such as Ti, Fe, Zn, and Mn. This finding is based on our studies of trace elements (and two cosmogenic nuclides) in biogenic opal, over the last full ice age cycle, in opal derived from the site 1093 and its companion piston core TN057-13 (49o 59'S, 5o 52'E), near the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front. The data show potential for determining the controls on global ocean productivity -- in particular, the extent to which marine production can be modulated by external sources of micronutrients. Despite clear evidence for iron limitation in the modern ocean, the sedimentary record of "paleoproductivity" has not as yet offered any clear picture of the possible relationship between the changes in dust flux (known to have occurred over ice age cycles, for example), and regional or global productivity. Thus, with one sedimentary phase and in single sedimentary sections, we now have the potential to compare directly a proxy for aeolian input of micronutrients (e.g. Fe or Ti), with a proxy for production (e.g. 26Al/Al ratios). We expect that studies of the temporal records of trace elements and cosmogenic nuclides in contrasting regions of upwelling and productivity, which exhibit different sensitivities to global climate fluctuations and micronutrient inputs, would lead to a direct and comprehensive test of ideas such as Martin's hypothesis of iron control of atmospheric carbon dioxide Martin (1990), in different oceanic provinces during glacial cycles. Reference: Martin, J.H. Glacial-interglacial CO2 change: the iron hypothesis. Paleoceanography 5, 1-13, 1990.

  5. Factors driving spatial and temporal variation in production and production/biomass ratio of stream-resident brown trout (Salmo trutta) in Cantabrian streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lobon-Cervia, J.; Gonzalez, G.; Budy, P.

    2011-01-01

    1.The objective was to identify the factors driving spatial and temporal variation in annual production (PA) and turnover (production/biomass) ratio (P/BA) of resident brown trout Salmo trutta in tributaries of the Rio Esva (Cantabrian Mountains, Asturias, north-western Spain). We examined annual production (total production of all age-classes over a year) (PA) and turnover (P/BA) ratios, in relation to year-class production (production over the entire life time of a year-class) (PT) and turnover (P/BT) ratio, over 14years at a total of 12 sites along the length of four contrasting tributaries. In addition, we explored whether the importance of recruitment and site depth for spatial and temporal variations in year-class production (PT), elucidated in previous studies, extends to annual production. 2.Large spatial (among sites) and temporal (among years) variation in annual production (range 1.9-40.3gm-2 per year) and P/BA ratio (range 0.76-2.4per year) typified these populations, values reported here including all the variation reported globally for salmonids streams inhabited by one or several species. 3.Despite substantial differences among streams and sites in all production attributes, when all data were pooled, annual (PA) and year-class production (PT) and annual (P/BA) and year-class P/BT ratios were tightly linked. Annual (PA) and year-class production (PT) were similar but not identical, i.e. PT=0.94 PA, whereas the P/BT ratios were 4+P/BA ratios. 4.Recruitment (Rc) and mean annual density (NA) were major density-dependent drivers of production and their relationships were described by simple mathematical models. While year-class production (PT) was determined (R2=70.1%) by recruitment (Rc), annual production (PA) was determined (R2=60.3%) by mean annual density (NA). In turn, variation in recruitment explained R2=55.2% of variation in year-class P/BT ratios, the latter attaining an asymptote at P/BT=6 at progressively higher levels of recruitment

  6. Phenotypic variation of Staphylococcus epidermidis slime production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Christensen, G D; Baddour, L M; Simpson, W A

    1987-12-01

    Clinical studies performed by us and others have found an association between slime production and strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci that infect indwelling medical devices. By serial low-speed centrifugation of broth cultures we have isolated a stable, weakly adherent strain (RP62A-NA) from a strongly adherent, slime-producing, pathogenic strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis sensu stricto (RP62A, ATCC 35984). We obtained a second strain from RP62A-NA (RP62A-NAR) by serial subculture of glass-adherent cells of RP62A-NA. All three strains had the same pattern of biochemical reactions, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and plasmid analysis. Transmission electron micrograph sections stained with the mucopolysaccharide-specific stain alcian blue demonstrated that the adherent strains RP62A and RP62A-NAR were covered with an extracellular coat of polysaccharide-rich material. In contrast, the nonadherent RP62A-NA strain lacked this external coat. All three strains were used in a mouse model of foreign body infection and a rat model of catheter-induced infective endocarditis. The adherence characteristics of isolates of RP62A and RP62A-NA recovered from experimental animals were relatively stable, although we noted a slight but a significant increase in the adherence of RP62A-NA isolates recovered from the foreign body model. The adherence characteristics of RP62A-NAR isolates recovered from infected animals were variable; in general these isolates were less adherent than the laboratory strain of RP62A-NAR. In both models the 50% infective dose (calculated by the Reed and Muench method) was three times greater for the RP62A-NA strain than for the RP62A strain. The phenotypic expression of slime production is subject to both in vitro and in vivo variation and could play a role in the pathogenesis of foreign body infection. PMID:3679536

  7. Deglacial 14C plateau suites recalibrated by Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record - Revised 14C reservoir ages from three ocean basins corroborate extreme surface water variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Balmer, S.; Grootes, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) reservoir/ventilation ages (Δ14C) provide unique insights into the dynamics of ocean water masses over LGM and deglacial times. The 14C plateau-tuning technique enables us to derive both an absolute chronology for marine sediment records and a high-resolution record of changing Δ14C values for deglacial surface and deep waters (Sarnthein et al., 2007; AGU Monogr. 173, 175). We designate as 14C plateau a sediment section in the age-depth profile with several almost constant planktic 14C ages - variation less than ×100 to ×300 yr - which form a plateau-shaped scatter band that extends over ~5 to 50 and up to 200 cm in sediment cores with sedimentation rates of >10 cm/ky. Previously, a suite of >15 plateau boundary ages were calibrated to a joint reference record of U/Th-dated 14C time series measured on coral samples, the Cariaco sediment record, and speleothems (Fairbanks et al., 2005, QSR 24; Hughen et al., 2006, QSR 25; Beck et al., 2001, Science 292). We now used the varve-counted atmospheric 14C record of Lake Suigetsu (Ramsey et al., 2012, Science 338, 370) to recalibrate the boundary ages and average ages of 14C plateaus and apply the amended plateau-tuning technique to a dozen Δ14C records from the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. Main results are: (1) The Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record reflects all 14C plateaus, their internal structures and relative length previously identified, but implies a rise in the average plateau age by <200 14C yr during the LGM, >700 yr at its end, and <200 yr in the Bølling-Allerød. (2) Based on different 14C ages of coeval atmospheric and planktic 14C plateaus surface water Δ14C may have temporarily dropped to an equivalent of 200 yr in low-latitude stratified waters, such as off northwestern South America, and in turn reached values corresponding to an age difference of >2500 14C yr in stratified subpolar regions and upwelled waters such as in the South China Sea, values that differ significantly from a

  8. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  9. Seasonal variation of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Wu, Laosheng; Chang, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of 14 endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in influents, effluents and sludge from five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in southern California was studied in winter and summer. All 14 compounds were detected in influent samples from the five WWTPs except for estrone. Paracetamol, naproxen and ibuprofen were the dominant compounds, with mean concentrations of 41.7, 35.7 and 22.3 μg/L, respectively. The treatment removal efficiency for most compounds was more than 90% and concentrations in the effluents were relatively low. Seasonal variation of the compounds' concentration in the wastewater was significant: the total concentration of each compound in the wastewater was higher in winter than in summer, which is attributed to more human consumption of pharmaceuticals during winter and faster degradation of the compounds in summer. The highest concentrations of triclosan and octylphenol were detected in sewage sludge, with mean concentrations of 1505 and 1179 ng/g, respectively. Risk quotients (RQs), expressed as the ratios of environmental concentrations and the predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC), were less than unity for all the compounds except for estrone in the effluents, indicating no immediate ecological risk is expected. However, RQs were higher than unity for 2 EDCs (estrone and octylphenol) and carbamazepine in sludge samples, indicating a significant ecotoxicological risk to human health. Therefore, appropriate treatment of sewage sludge is required before its application. PMID:23178835

  10. Approache Pluraliste du Developpement et Etude des Variations Procedurals en Production D'Orthographes Inventees. [A Pluralistic Approach to the Development and Study of Procedural Variations in the Production of Invented Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelet, Isabelle Montesinos

    2002-01-01

    This study used a pluralistic model to examine the procedures used by two preschoolers to achieve written productions using invented orthographies. The model allows children's procedural variations to be taken into consideration by understanding the hierarchy of different processing modes available to children in completing the task and…

  11. Modeling temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates recorded by corals in the Simeulue-Nias region, Sumatra: How can we explain them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, L. L.; Meltzner, A. J.; Hill, E. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Sieh, K.

    2014-12-01

    How large can temporal variations in interseismic deformation rates be? Meltzner et al. (2014, in review) reported that fossil coral microatolls on Simeulue and the Banyak Islands of Sumatra, Indonesia, show contemporaneous temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates. For example, a fossil coral microatoll located at Bangkaru, in the Banyak Islands, reveals interseismic subsidence for a 10-year period between 1956 and 1966, followed by a reversal to interseismic uplift for ~ 15 years from 1966 to 1981, before reverting back to interseismic subsidence after 1981. These temporal variations can neither be accounted for by regional or local sea level changes, nor by postseismic deformation following major historic megathrust earthquakes. These coral observations span a period of ~ 260 years. Such an extensive temporal record of interseismic deformation at subduction zones is rare, and it offers us a unique opportunity to better understand what physical processes likely control the behavior of this portion of the megathrust. In this study, we use elastic dislocation models to explore the extent to which the observed spatio-temporal variations can be consistently explained by tectonic processes. Possible processes include temporal changes in either the width of the locked fault zone or the interseismic coupling coefficient, and/or slow-slip event occurrence. Our models incorporate a realistic fault dip geometry and subduction rate. Our results suggest that a change in the width of the locked zone with time can explain temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates on Simeulue Island. In addition, the reversal of the sense of vertical displacement at Bangkaru can be explained by the occurrence of a large, long, slow-slip event on the underlying megathrust.

  12. El Niño-Southern Oscillation-related salinity variations recorded in the skeletal geochemistry of a Porites coral from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbourne, K. Halimeda; Quinn, Terrence M.; Taylor, Frederick W.; Delcroix, Thierry; Gouriou, Yves

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeletal geochemistry offers the potential to reconstruct the sea surface salinity (SSS) history of the tropical oceans on seasonal to interannual and perhaps centennial timescales because of the strong link between variation in SSS and seawater δ18O in tropical regions. We explore this potential using a monthly resolved, 65-year record of skeletal δ18O and Sr/Ca variations in a Porites coral from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu. We demonstrate that El Niño-Southern Oscillation-related climate variability strongly influences coral δ18O at Santo through local salinity changes associated with the position of the South Pacific Convergence Zone and the movement of its associated salinity front. Such a demonstration provides the "ground truth" data that can be used to place paleoclimate variability estimated using existing fossil coral records from this region into a modern conceptual framework. We also evaluate different methods of combining coral δ18O and Sr/Ca to reconstruct SSS and conclude that the coral δ18O anomaly time series provides the best fit to recent in situ SSS data at Santo.

  13. Reconstruction of Pleistocene Paleo-Hydrology and Climate Variations in Western Asia as Recorded in Speleothems from West-Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehterian, S.; Pourmand, A.; Sharifi, A.; Lahijani, H. A. K.; Naderi, M.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Extending from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the northwest Indian Ocean and modern Iran, West Asia represents one of the most climatically dynamic regions in the northern hemisphere. The regional climate of West Asia is governed by interactions between the mid-latitude Westerlies, the Siberian Anticyclone and the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon. In recent years, sparse records of Pleistocene climate variability have emerged from cave deposits (speleothems) in East Asia, the Arabian Peninsula and eastern Mediterranean. However, there remains a large gap in our understanding of abrupt and long-term climate variability in this region. We present for the first time δ18O data from speleothem and water samples that were collected from two cave systems in west-central Iran at similar latitudes, 60km apart: Qaleh Kord Cave (QKC, 35°47'50"N, 48°51'25"E) and Kataleh Khor Cave (KKC, 35°50'09"N, 48°09'41"E). U-Th geochronometry in two stalagmites from QKC yielded ages that range from 73,000 to 118,000 years B.P. Likewise, two stalagmites dated from KKC yielded ages 214,000-260,000 years B.P. and 300,000-500,000 years B.P. The analysis of additional speleothems from these caves should help to establish a continuous half million year multi-proxy record of δ18O variations, trace metal composition (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca), and radiogenic Sr isotopes in these cave systems. High-resolution δ18O analyses of QKC stalagmites show patterns of variation that can be attributed to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a and 5b. Since both these caves sit at relatively high elevations (QKC: 2,160 masl, KKC: 1,695 masl) far from major seas (1,100km from Mediterranean Sea, 1,500km from North Indian Ocean), this record potentially reflects the synoptic interactions between the Westerlies and the Siberian Anticyclone during this time interval, as opposed to direct variations caused by sea level fluctuations. Measurements of drip water composition and modern environmental parameters (temperature, relative

  14. Measures Earth System Data Records (ESDR) of Ice Motion in Antarctica: Status, Impact and Future Products.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.

    2014-12-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data is an extremely useful tool for providing relevant information about the ice sheet ECV: ice vector velocity, grounding line position, and ice front location. Here, we provide an overview of the SAR Earth System Data Records (ESDR) for Antarctica part of MEaSUREs that includes: the first complete map of surface ice vector velocity in Antarctica, a map of grounding line positions around Antarctica, ice velocity time series for selected regions: Ross and Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelves and associated drainage basins, the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica which is the largest contributor to sea level rise from Antarctica and the focus of rapid ice sheet retreat, and Larsen-B and -C ice shelves which is the second largest contribution to sea level rise from Antarctica. Other products include a database of ice shelf boundaries and drainage basins based on ice motion mapping and digital elevation models generated independently. Data continuity is a crucial aspect of this work and a fundamental challenge for the continuation of these products due to the lack of a dedicated interferometric mission on the cryosphere until the SAR mission under consideration between NASA and ISRO is approved. Four SAR missions ceased operations since IPY. CSA's RADARSAT-2 has provided important bridging data between these missions in Greenland and Antarctica. In 2014, ESA launched Sentinel-1a and JAXA launched ALOS-2 PALSAR, for which we will have limited data access. The Polar Space Task Group (PSTG) created by WMO has established a mandate to support cryospheric products from scientific research using international SARs which continues to play an active role in securing key data acquisitions over ice sheets. We will provide an overview of current efforts. This work was conducted at UC Irvine, Department of Earth System Science under a contract with NASA's MEaSUREs program.

  15. Paleomagnetic directions and thermoluminescence dating from a bread oven-floor sequence in Lübeck (Germany): A record of 450 years of geomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Pucher, Rudolf; Goedicke, Christian; Manzano, Ana; Müller, Uwe; Lanos, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    A record of about 450 years of geomagnetic secular variation is presented from a single archaeological site in Lübeck (Germany) where a sequence of 25 bread oven floors has been preserved in a bakery from medieval times until today. The age dating of the oven-floor sequence is based on historical documents, 14C-dating and thermoluminescence dating. It confines the time interval from about 1300 to 1800 A.D. Paleomagnetic directions have been determined from each oven floor by means of 198 oriented hand samples. After alternating field as well as thermal demagnetization experiments, the characteristic remanent magnetization direction was obtained using principal component analysis. The mean directions of 24 oven floors are characterized by high Fisherian precision parameters (>146) and small α95 confidence limits (1.2°-4.6°). For obtaining a smooth curve of geomagnetic secular variation for Lübeck, a spherical spline function was fitted to the data using a Bayesian approach, which considers not only the obtained ages, but also stratigraphic order. Correlation with historical magnetic records suggests that the age estimation for the upper 10 layers was too young and must date from the end of the sixteenth to the mid of the eighteenth century. For the lowermost 14 layers, dating is reliable and provides a secular variation curve for Germany. The inclination shows a minimum in the fourteenth century and then increases by more than 10°. Declination shows a local minimum around 1400 A.D. followed by a maximum in the seventeenth century. This is followed by the movement of declination about 30° to western directions.

  16. The VirtPresenter Lecture Recording System: Automated Production of Web Lectures with Interactive Content Overviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Robert; Ketterl, Markus; Vornberger, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Lecture recordings can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures and they can even serve as a main content source in a number of didactic scenarios. If users can quickly locate relevant passages in a recording, the recording combines the ease of search that comes with electronic text based media with the authenticity and wealth of information…

  17. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weinkauf, Manuel F G; Kunze, José G; Waniek, Joanna J; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size-weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size-weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  18. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weinkauf, Manuel F. G.; Kunze, José G.; Waniek, Joanna J.; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size–weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size–weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  19. Drivers of variation in aboveground net primary productivity and plant community composition differe across a broad precipitation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has long been a goal of ecology to determine what factors drive variation in aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Total annual precipitation has been shown to be a strong predictor of ANPP across broad spatial scales, but a poor predictor at local scales. Here we aim to determine the amount...

  20. Variations of the Geomagnetic Field During the Holocene-Pleistocene: Relative Paleointensity Records From South-Western Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogorza, C. S.

    2008-05-01

    I present a review of the research carried out by the Group of Geomagnetism at Universidad Nacional del Centro (Argentina) on paleointensity records from bottom sediments from three lakes: Escondido (Gogorza et al., 2004), Moreno (Gogorza et al., 2006) and El Trébol (Gogorza et al., 2007; Irurzun et al., 2008) (South-Western Argentina, 41° S, 71° 30'W). Based on these studies, we construct a first relative (RPI) stack for South-Western Argentina covering the last 21,000 14C years BP. The degree of down-core homogeneity of magnetic mineral content as well as magnetic mineral concentration and grain sizes vary between all lakes and are quantified by high-resolution rock magnetic measurements. Rock magnetic studies suggest that the main carriers of magnetization are ferrimagnetic minerals, predominantly pseudo-single domain magnetite The remanent magnetization at 20 mT (NRM20mT) was normalized using the anhysteric remanent magnetization at 20mT (ARM20mT), the saturation of the isothermal remanent at 20 mT (SIRM20mT) and the low field magnetic susceptibility {k}. Coherence function analysis indicates that the normalised records are free of environmental influences. Our paleointensity (NRM20mT/ ARM20mT) versus age curve shows a good agreement with published records from other parts of the world suggesting that, in suitable sediments, paleointensity of the geomagnetic field can give a globally coherent, dominantly dipolar signal. References Gogorza, C.S.G., Irurzun, M.A., Chaparro, M.A.E., Lirio, J.M., Nuñez, H., Bercoff, P.G., Sinito, A.M. Relative Paleointensity of the Geomagnetic Field over the last 21,000 years bp from Sediment Cores, Lake El Trébol, (Patagonia, Argentina). Earth, Planets and Space. V58(10), 1323-1332. 2006. Gogorza, C.S.G., Sinito, A.M., Lirio, J.M., Nuñez, H., Chaparro, M.A.E., Bertorello, H.R. Paleointensity Studies on Holocene-Pleistocene Sediments from Lake Escondido, Argentina. Physical of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Elsevier, ISSN

  1. Variation in Holocene El Niño frequencies: Climate records and cultural consequences in ancient Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandweiss, Daniel H.; Maasch, Kirk A.; Burger, Richard L.; Richardson, James B., III; Rollins, Harold B.; Clement, Amy

    2001-07-01

    Analysis of mollusks from archaeological sites on the north and central coasts of Peru indicates that between ca. 5800 and 3200 2800 cal yr B.P., El Niño events were less frequent than today, with modern, rapid recurrence intervals achieved only after that time. For several millennia prior to 5.8 ka, El Niño events had been absent or very different from today. The phenomena called El Niño have had severe consequences for the modern and colonial (historically recorded) inhabitants of Peru, and El Niño events also influenced prehistoric cultural development: the onset of El Niño events at 5.8 ka correlates temporally with the beginning of monumental temple construction on the Peruvian coast, and the increase in El Niño frequency after 3.2 2.8 ka correlates with the abandonment of monumental temples in the same region.

  2. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a southeastern Tibetan glacier: analysis of temporal variations and model estimates of sources and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, H.; Zhang, R.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Zhao, S.; Wu, G.; Zhao, H.; Joswiak, D. R.; Li, J.; Xie, Y.

    2015-02-01

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956-2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of BC and OC with higher respective concentrations but a lower OC / BC ratio in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source-receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia has the largest contribution to the present-day (1996-2005) mean BC deposition at the ice-core drilling site during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and all year round (74%), followed by East Asia (14% to the non-monsoon mean and 21% to the annual mean). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from the late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia (as the primary contributor to annual mean BC deposition). Moreover, the increasing trend of the OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and/or biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing potential influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice-core record.

  3. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a southeastern Tibetan glacier: analysis of temporal variations and model estimates of sources and radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Mo; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhao, Shuyu; Wu, Guangjian; et al

    2015-02-02

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956–2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of BC and OC with higher respective concentrations but a lower OC / BC ratio in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source–receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia hasmore » the largest contribution to the present-day (1996–2005) mean BC deposition at the ice-core drilling site during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and all year round (74%), followed by East Asia (14% to the non-monsoon mean and 21% to the annual mean). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from the late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia (as the primary contributor to annual mean BC deposition). Moreover, the increasing trend of the OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and/or biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing potential influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice-core record.« less

  4. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a southeastern Tibetan glacier: analysis of temporal variations and model estimates of sources and radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mo; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhao, Shuyu; Wu, Guangjian; Zhao, Huabiao; Joswiak, Daniel R.; Li, Jiule; Xie, Ying

    2015-02-02

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956–2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of BC and OC with higher respective concentrations but a lower OC / BC ratio in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source–receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia has the largest contribution to the present-day (1996–2005) mean BC deposition at the ice-core drilling site during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and all year round (74%), followed by East Asia (14% to the non-monsoon mean and 21% to the annual mean). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from the late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia (as the primary contributor to annual mean BC deposition). Moreover, the increasing trend of the OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and/or biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing potential influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice-core record.

  5. Holocene size variations in two diatom species off East Antarctica: Productivity vs environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Xavier

    2009-11-01

    I here present a biometric investigation on two diatom species, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis (O'Meara) Hustedt and Fragilariopsis curta (Van Heurck) Hustedt, in Holocene samples from sediment core MD03-2601 from the Antarctic Continental Shelf off Adélie Land, East Antarctica. Apical valve length measurements of the two species are compared to their respective absolute and relative abundances as a proxy for the species productivity. Fragilariopsis kerguelensis valves were longer and more abundant during the warmer Mid-Holocene period and smaller and less abundant during the colder Late-Holocene period. Conversely, F. curta valves were smaller and less abundant during the warmer Mid-Holocene period and longer and more abundant during the colder Late-Holocene period. Mean apical valve length variations even follow centennial-to-millennial oscillations in the species abundances. Maximal valve length and minimal valve length were also larger during the warmer Mid-Holocene period and during the colder Late-Holocene period for F. keguelensis and F. curta, respectively. The observed positive size-abundance relationships are linked to the environmental conditions at the core location that stands today at the lower ecological limit for F. kerguelensis and upper ecological limit for F. curta. More favourable environmental conditions (warmer, less icy for F. kerguelensis and colder, icier for F. curta) allowed for sexual reproduction at the upper range of the sexually inducible size window and subsequent restoration of larger initial cells which, in turn, resulted in overall bigger size of the species populations, though vegetative multiplication was more frequent.

  6. Texture-specific Si isotope variations in Barberton Greenstone Belt cherts record low temperature fractionations in early Archean seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefurak, Elizabeth J. T.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Lowe, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Sedimentary cherts are unusually abundant in early Archean (pre-3.0 Ga) sequences, suggesting a silica cycle that was profoundly different than the modern system. Previously applied for the purpose of paleothermometry, Si isotopes in ancient cherts can offer broader insight into mass fluxes and mechanisms associated with silica concentration, precipitation, diagenesis, and metamorphism. Early Archean cherts contain a rich suite of sedimentological and petrographic textures that document a history of silica deposition, cementation, silicification, and recrystallization. To add a new layer of insight into the chemistry of early cherts, we have used wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy and then secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to produce elemental and Si and O isotope ratio data from banded black-and-white cherts from the Onverwacht Group of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. This geochemical data is then interpreted in the framework of depositional and diagenetic timing of silica precipitation provided by geological observations. SIMS allows the comparison of Si and O isotope ratios of distinct silica phases, including black carbonaceous chert beds and bands (many including well-defined sedimentary grains), white relatively pure chert bands including primary silica granules, early cavity-filling cements, and later quartz-filled veins. Including all chert types and textures analyzed, the δ30Si dataset spans a range from -4.78‰ to +3.74‰, with overall mean 0.20‰, median 0.51‰, and standard deviation 1.30‰ (n = 1087). Most samples have broadly similar δ30Si distributions, but systematic texture-specific δ30Si differences are observed between white chert bands (mean +0.60‰, n = 750), which contain textures that represent primary and earliest diagenetic silica phases, and later cavity-filling cements (mean -1.41‰, n = 198). We observed variations at a ∼100 μm scale indicating a lack of Si isotope homogenization at this scale during

  7. Middle Pleistocene climate variations south off Greenland: the Marine Isotope Stage 9 to 15 record of IODP Site U1305

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje; Ventura, Cristina; de Vernal, Anne; Teboulle, Oury; Henry, Maryse; de Abreu, Lucia; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2016-04-01

    As a region where deep-water convection occurs, the Labrador Sea is a key area to study the impact of climate change on the North Atlantic's subpolar gyre and subsequently the thermohaline circulation itself. IODP Site U1305 (57.5°N, 48.5°W) was retrieved from the Eirik ridge at a water depth of 3460 m. At this Site activity of the Western Boundary Undercurrent (WBUC) led to higher sedimentation rates during interglacial periods (Hillaire-Marcel et al., 2011 in Mar. Geol.) making it ideal to study interglacial climate variability. With its position south of the polar front, it is mostly influenced by the warmer, saline Irminger Current waters and reflects conditions in the "inner" Labrador Sea. In order to evaluate the inner Labrador Sea's response to climate change during the mid-Brunhes interval from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 9 to 15a (315-570 ka) we generated centennial-scale proxy records reflecting surface (dinocyst assemblage derived), subsurface (N. pachyderma isotope and abundance data) and deep water (benthic isotope data) conditions. In addition, the abundance of lithic fragments >150μm indicates ice-rafting episodes. In the inner Labrador Sea, ice-rafting events coincided with lower sea-surface salinities (SSS) and are restricted to the glacial periods of MIS 14, 12 and 10 as well as the stadial periods during the MIS 11 to MIS 10 transition. Climate variability during the three interglacial periods varied significantly. MIS 9e recorded the influence of Irminiger Current waters with a reduced number of N. pachyderma and SSS close to 35. The high abundance of the pelagic diatom species Coscinodiscus during the late deglaciation and the onset of the interglacial period confirms the presence of Atlantic waters in the vicinity of Site U1305. Climate during MIS 11c can be dived into three phases. During the deglaciation of MIS 12 and the onset of the MIS 11c (420-430 ka) surface water conditions were very variable with frequent incursions of polar (cold

  8. Temporal and spatial variation of factors controlling metabolism and primary productivity in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Argerich, A.; Ashkenas, L.

    2013-12-01

    Headwater streams account for 60-80 percent of stream-channel length in river networks, yet the variability among these streams is often simplified or neglected. Better understanding of the drivers and ways to characterize this variability are crucial as we evaluate the contributions of headwaters to downstream ecosystems. Metrics of ecosystem processes, such as whole stream metabolism, incorporate numerous factors across trophic levels and are considered fundamental descriptors of ecosystem function. Because metabolism integrates the activity of all organisms carrying out photosynthesis and aerobic respiration, it has been proposed as useful in evaluating contributions from multiple headwaters to downstream sites as well as measuring how stream communities respond to environmental changes. Here we explore the spatial and temporal variation in ecosystem metabolism and primary productivity across multiple forested headwater streams and their cumulative downstream sites. We also quantify the environmental factors that most influence these processes, including stream chemistry, temperature, chlorophyll a, benthic and algal biomass, fine sediment, forest cover and shading in 14 headwater streams and four downstream sites. This study occurred as part of the pre-treatment research in the Trask River Watershed Study, which is a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research project designed to evaluate the impacts of current forest management practices on headwater and downstream aquatic ecosystems in NW Oregon. Over the four years, we consistently found the headwater and downstream reaches to be highly heterotrophic with P:R ratios less than 0.05. However nutrient concentrations were not good predictors of metabolism rates or the biomass and activity of primary producers. Even though all sites were within a 3000 ha catchment and had similar amounts of forest cover and riparian shading, we observed high spatial variability in concentrations of stream nutrients (C, N, P) and

  9. Virulence genes in a probiotic E. coli product with a recorded long history of safe use

    PubMed Central

    Zschüttig, Anke; Beimfohr, Claudia; Geske, Thomas; Auerbach, Christian; Cook, Helen; Zimmermann, Kurt; Gunzer, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The probiotic product Symbioflor2 (DSM 17252) is a bacterial concentrate of six different Escherichia coli genotypes, whose complete genome sequences are compared here, between each other as well as to other E. coli genomes. The genome sequences of Symbioflor2 E. coli components contained a number of virulence-associated genes. Their presence seems to be in conflict with a recorded history of safe use, and with the observed low frequency of adverse effects over a period of more than 6 years. The genome sequences were used to identify unique sequences for each component, for which strain-specific hybridization probes were designed. A colonization study was conducted whereby five volunteers were exposed to an exceptionally high single dose. The results showed that the probiotic E. coli could be detected for 3 months or longer in their stools, and this was in particular the case for those components containing higher numbers of virulence-associated genes. Adverse effects from this long-term colonization were absent. Thus, the presence of the identified virulence genes does not result in a pathogenic phenotype in the genetic background of these probiotic E. coli. PMID:25883796

  10. Towards an effective record of dipole moment variations since the Precambrian using new reliability criteria and outputs from numerical dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Suttie, N.; Paterson, G. A.; Aubert, J.; Hurst, E.; Clarke, A.

    2013-12-01

    On timescales over which mantle convection may be affecting the geodynamo (10-100s of million years), magnetic reversal frequency is the best documented aspect of geomagnetic behaviour. Suitable, continuous recorders of this parameter become very sparse before a few hundreds of millions of years however presenting a major challenge to documenting and understanding geomagnetic variations on the timescale of even the most recent supercontinent cycle. It is hypothetically possible to measure the absolute geomagnetic palaeointensity from any geological material that has cooled from above the Curie Temperature of its constituent magnetic remanence carriers. Since igneous rocks are abundant in the geological record, estimates of dipole moment from these present a vital resource in documenting geomagnetic variations into deep time. In practice, a host of practical problems makes obtaining such measurements reliably from geological materials challenging. Nevertheless, the absolute palaeointensity database PINT, newly linked to the comprehensive Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) database, already contains 3,941 published dipole moment estimates from rocks older than 50,000 years ago and continues to grow rapidly. In order that even the existing record may be used to maximum effectiveness in characterising geomagnetic behaviour, two challenges must be met. 1. The variable reliability of individual measurements must be reasonably assessed 2. The impact of the inhomogeneous distribution of dipole moment estimates in space and time must be ascertained. Here, we will report efforts attempting to address these two challenges using novel approaches. A new set of quality criteria for palaeointensity data (QPI) has been developed and tested by application to studies recently incorporated into PINT. To address challenge 1, we propose that every published dipole moment estimate eventually be given a QPI score indicating the number of these criteria fulfilled. To begin to

  11. Genetic parameters and selection efficiency using part-records for production traits in strawberries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D V

    1989-10-01

    The efficiency of selection for yield and fruit size using parts of the complete-season record was evaluated using data collected for individual strawberry seedlings (Fragaria x annanasa) in four genetic tests. Part-records were generated for each trait using cumulative weekly sums, and these were compared with complete records to assess the value of extended data collection. In addition, part-records were generated using data from alternate weeks of harvest. Scoring separate sets of seedlings in alternate weeks was assumed to allow a doubling of the unselected population size, halving the selection proportion and increasing selection intensity. Heritabilities estimated for part-records were often larger for mid-season cumulative part-records than for the complete-season records. Seasonal patterns for broad-sense and narrow-sense heritabilities differed, suggesting temporal expression of genes that condition yield and fruit size. Predicted genetic gains were largest using cumulative part-records between 4 and 12 weeks of the 15-week season, depending on trait and breeding objective (breeding value versus clonal value), with 8-9 weeks as a reasonable compromise. Selection using alternate-weeks records was identified as an efficient alternative to selection using total complete-season records. Superiority of the alternate-weeks option depends on the balance between increased selection intensity and decreased individual genetic information, and will differ for specific traits and program designs. PMID:24225686

  12. Individual variation and repeatability of methane production from dairy cows estimated by the CO₂ method in automatic milking system.

    PubMed

    Haque, M N; Cornou, C; Madsen, J

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the individual variation, repeatability and correlation of methane (CH4) production from dairy cows measured during 2 different years. A total of 21 dairy cows with an average BW of 619 ± 14.2 kg and average milk production of 29.1 ± 6.5 kg/day (mean ± s.d.) were used in the 1st year. During the 2nd year, the same cows were used with an average BW of 640 ± 8.0 kg and average milk production of 33.4 ± 6.0 kg/day (mean ± s.d.). The cows were housed in a loose housing system fitted with an automatic milking system (AMS). A total mixed ration was fed to the cows ad libitum in both years. In addition, they were offered concentrate in the AMS based on their daily milk yield. The CH4 and CO2 production levels of the cows were analysed using a Gasmet DX-4030. The estimated dry matter intake (EDMI) was 19.8 ± 0.96 and 23.1 ± 0.78 (mean ± s.d.), and the energy-corrected milk (ECM) production was 30.8 ± 8.03 and 33.7 ± 5.25 kg/day (mean ± s.d.) during the 1st and 2nd year, respectively. The EDMI and ECM had a significant influence (P<0.001) on the CH4 (l/day) yield during both years. The daily CH4 (l/day) production was significantly higher (P<0.05) during the 2nd year compared with the 1st year. The EDMI (described by the ECM) appeared to be the key factor in the variation of CH4 release. A correlation (r=0.54) of CH4 production was observed between the years. The CH4 (l/day) production was strongly correlated (r=0.70) between the 2 years with an adjusted ECM production (30 kg/day). The diurnal variation of CH4 (l/h) production showed significantly lower (P<0.05) emission during the night (0000 to 0800 h). The between-cows variation of CH4 (l/day, l/kg EDMI and l/kg ECM) was lower compared with the within-cow variation for the 1st and 2nd years. The repeatability of CH4 production (l/day) was 0.51 between 2 years. In conclusion, a higher EDMI (kg/day) followed by a higher ECM (kg/day) showed a higher CH4 production

  13. A detailed record of paleomagnetic field change from Searles Lake, California: 1. Long-term secular variation bounding the Gauss/Matuyama polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Coe, Robert S.

    1999-06-01

    More than 33 m of 2.5 Ma sediment from Searles Lake, California was studied in order to construct a record of secular variation (SV) across the Gauss/Matuyama (G/M) normal-to-reverse polarity transition. The behavior of the field preceding and following the reversal is considered here, while in a companion paper [Glen et al., this issue] the details of the transition are discussed. The record encompasses an interval of roughly 183,000 years beginning 50 kyr (9 m) before and extending more than 128 kyr (23 m) beyond the transition, while the main phase of the transition lasts for nearly 5 kyr (1 m). Because the core was rotary drilled, and declinations lost, SV was characterized by the inclination and its angular dispersion. Inclination-only statistics reveal that (1) the record displays overall higher than expected values of angular dispersion (normal S˜20°; reverse S˜19°; expected S˜15.5°), suggesting that the field proximal to transitions may be more noisy than the distal field. In addition, normal data from immediately before the transition display higher S than reverse data immediately following it, implying that the postransitional field is more stable than the pretransitional field. One of the most prominent features of this record is an excursion of the field occurring roughly 4 kyr prior to the onset of the reversal. A record of the G/M transition from Chinese loess (R. Zhu et al., submitted manuscript, 1999) displays a similar event (also occurring roughly 4 kyr before the transition). This and the fact that the event is associated with anomalously low intensities suggest that the disturbance may be global in nature. The fact that comparable features are associated with other transitions [Hartl and Tauxe, 1996; Clement, 1992] intimates that the field may commonly show signs of early instability. This precursory event is actually one of a sequence of oscillations (in inclination and intensity) preceding the transition. That these fluctuations occur at

  14. Genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane rainforest inferred from a marine pollen record in southern Philippines during the glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical vegetation is the most outstanding and obvious feature of South-East Asia, and it is expected to provide valuable information for the palaeoclmatic conditions. Pollen records from the tropical West Pacific indicate that the tropical vegetation is much sensitive to the environment and climate change, and their good correspondence with palaeocliamte change in glacial/interglacial timescales. It is shown that the range of the tropical montane rainforest was affected by the temperature change during the glacial cycle. But, from some marine core, the genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane pollen record is also distinct during the glacial cycle. In this study, examination of the pollen content of marine core MD06-3075 taken from Davao Gulf in the Southern Philippines reveals a ~116,000 year record of tropical vegetation change as well as the influence of the environment and climate variability on the ecosystem of the tropical area. Chronology was determined by 16 AMS 14C dates and a detailed oxygen isotope record. A high representation of pollen from tropical upper montane rainforest (mainly Podocarpus) (40-60%) during the last glacial period indicates that this forest type extended to lower attitudes. And the genera variations of the tropical mid-upper montane rainforest exist between the Phyllocladus and Podocarpus with the environment and climate changing. The pollen content of Phyllocladus is much high in marine isotope stage (MIS) 5, but Podocarpus is much higher in the glacial period. During the onset of MIS 5a and 5c, the percentage of Phyllocladus pollen declines dramatically. Vegetation investigation in Mindanao, shows that Podocarpus exists in altitude ranging from 1,200-1,700 m, and Phyllocladus appear in altitude range from 1700-2100 m, but is more abundant above the 2,400 m. Thus, Phyllocladus might be more sensitive to the temperature change. Then, in this study, the pollen content of is much high during the interglacial period

  15. What Do Electronic Health Record Vendors Reveal About Their Products: An Analysis of Vendor Websites

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Natalie K; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2013-01-01

    Background Purchasing electronic health records (EHRs) typically follows a process in which potential adopters actively seek information, compare alternatives, and form attitudes towards the product. A potential source of information on EHRs that can be used in the process is vendor websites. It is unclear how much product information is presented on EHR vendor websites or the extent of its value during EHR purchasing decisions. Objective To explore what features of EHR systems are presented by vendors in Ontario, Canada, on their websites, and the persuasive means they use to market such systems; to compare the online information available about primary care EHR systems with that about hospital EHR systems, and with data compiled by OntarioMD, a regional certifying agency. Methods A list of EHR systems available in Ontario was created. The contents of vendor websites were analyzed. A template for data collection and organization was developed and used to collect and organize information on the vendor, website content, and EHR features. First, we mapped information on system features to categories based on a framework from the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Second, we used a grounded theory–like approach to explore information for building consumer confidence in the vendor and product, and the various persuasive strategies employed on vendor websites. All data were first coded by one researcher. A peer reviewer independently analyzed a randomly chosen subset of the websites (10 of 21; 48%) and provided feedback towards a unified coding scheme. All data were then re-coded and categorized into themes. Finally, we compared information from vendor websites and data gathered by OntarioMD. Results Vendors provided little specific product information on their websites. Only two of five acute care EHR websites (40%) and nine of 16 websites for primary care systems (56%) featured seven or all eight of the IOM components. Several vendor websites included system interface

  16. Data records of biophysical products in the Copernicus Global Land Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydekerke, L.; Smets, B.; Swinnen, E.; Lacaze, R. N.; Calvet, J. C.; Baret, F.; camacho De Coca, F.; Roujean, J. L.; Tansey, K.; Coelho, S.; Jann, A.; Paulik, C.; Verger, A.

    2014-12-01

    From 1stJanuary 2013, the Copernicus Global Land service provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing, over the whole globe, the vegetation dynamic, the energy budget at the continental surface and some components of the water cycle. These generic products serve numerous applications such as agriculture and food security monitoring, weather forecast, climate change impact studies, water, forest and natural resources management. The portfolio contains Essential Climate Variables like Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), surface albedo, Land Surface Temperature, soil moisture, burnt areas, areas of water bodies, and additional vegetation indices. They are generated daily on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data. Beside this timely production, the available historical archives, up to 16 years for SPOT-VEGETATION, have been processed using the same innovative algorithms. For a number of ECVs, the algorithms are adapted to work with NOAA-AVHRR as input to extend the time series up to 1982. The service continuity is provided in two parallel paths. On one hand, the existing retrieval methodologies are adapted to use the new PROBA-V sensor, fully consistent with SPOT-VEGETATION, and as such extends the time-series at 1km spatial resolution. On the other hand, the operation is moving to the finer resolution of PROBA-V (300m), while maintaining consistency with the 1km series. The data records are documented in terms of the physical methodologies, the technical properties, and the results of validation exercises. The service performs a continuous quality monitoring on three levels: technical, scientific and cross-cutting, following where possible the rules of CEOS/LPV and comparing with both in-situ and other datasets, e.g. MODIS. The service is improved through feedback from an independent expert team performing regular independent reviews and providing user feedback. All

  17. Field Testing of the Greenhouse Production Section of a Horticulture Laboratory Record Book for Pennsylvania. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Kenneth B.

    A study was conducted to develop and field test a greenhouse production record book and unit of instruction for growing potted chrysanthemums. Twenty high schools in Pennsylvania with horticulture departments formed the population for the study. The twenty schools were randomly assigned to four treatment levels: (1) five classes received the…

  18. 26 CFR 301.7456-1 - Administration of oaths and procurement of testimony; production of records of foreign...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administration of oaths and procurement of testimony; production of records of foreign corporations, foreign trusts or estates and nonresident alien individuals. 301.7456-1 Section 301.7456-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE...

  19. 49 CFR 1114.30 - Production of documents and records and entry upon land for inspection and other purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production of documents and records and entry upon land for inspection and other purposes. 1114.30 Section 1114.30 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES...

  20. 78 FR 39959 - Production of FHFA Records, Information, and Employee Testimony in Third-Party Legal Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ..., and Employee Testimony in Legal Proceedings for public comment in the Federal Register, 78 FR 9336..., December 29, 2009 (75 FR 707 (Jan. 5, 2010) (President's order on the classification of National Security... Oversight 12 CFR Part 1703 RIN 2590-AA51 Production of FHFA Records, Information, and Employee Testimony...

  1. Correcting the Record on the Analysis of IBEX and STEREO Data Regarding Variations in the Neutral Interstellar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Leonard, T.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Möbius, E.; Schwadron, N.; Sokół, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The journey of the Sun through space carries the solar system through a dynamic interstellar environment that is presently characterized by a Mach ~1 motion between the heliosphere and the surrounding warm partially ionized interstellar cloud. The interaction between the heliosphere and interstellar medium is an evolving process due to variable solar wind properties and the turbulent nature of the interstellar cloud that surrounds the heliosphere. Frisch et al. presented a meta-analysis of the historical data on the interstellar wind flowing through the heliosphere and concluded that temporal changes in the ecliptic longitude of the flow direction with time were statistically indicated by the data available in the refereed literature at the time of that writing. Lallement & Bertaux disagree with this result, and suggested, for instance, that a key instrumental response function of IBEX-Lo was incorrect and that the STEREO pickup ion data are unsuitable for diagnosing the flow of interstellar neutrals through the heliosphere. In this paper we first show that temporal variations in the interstellar wind through the heliosphere are consistent with our knowledge of the very local interstellar medium. The statistical analysis of the helium wind data is revisited, and a recent correction of a typographical error in the literature is incorporated into the new fits. With this correction, and including no newer IBEX results, these combined data still indicate that a change in the longitude of the interstellar neutral wind of λ = 5.°6 ± 2.°4 over the past forty years remains statistically likely, but an constant flow longitude is now statistically possible. Other scenarios for the selection of subsets of these data used in the fitting process produce similar conclusions. We show that the speculations made by Lallement & Bertin about the IBEX instrumental response function are incorrect, and that their other objections to the data used in the meta-analysis are either

  2. Marine palynological record for tropical climate variations since the late last glacial maximum in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lu; Weng, Chengyu

    2015-12-01

    The upper part (191-1439 cm) of the marine sediment core MD05-2906 from the northern South China Sea (SCS) was palynologically investigated. The chronology suggested that it covered the record since ~19 calendar kiloyears before present (cal ka BP) and revealed a detailed environmental change history since the late last glacial maximum (LGM). During the late LGM, due to the lowered sea level (~100 m lower) and the shortened distance from the shore to the study site, the pollen concentration was very high. The pollen assemblages were dominated by non-arboreal taxa, especially Artemisia pollen, before ~15 cal ka BP. Abundant subtropical and tropical pollen taxa were still important components and a south subtropical climate prevailed during the late LGM. The coexistent rich Artemisia pollen possibly was not derived from near shores, but was derived mainly from the northern exposed continental shelf in the East China Sea (ECS). After ~15 cal ka BP, with the rise in the sea level and enhanced distance from the pollen source areas to the core site, pollen concentrations started to decline gradually. However, during the late deglaciation and early Holocene, the higher concentrations of many pollen taxa reoccurred, which cannot be attributed to the sea level changes. Pinus pollen deposited in the core, which is considered to be mostly water-carried based on many modern pollen surveys, also started to dramatically increase at the same time. Therefore, the higher pollen concentration, with more Pinus and Typha (an aquatic plant) pollen indicated a notably enhanced terrestrial runoff and precipitation during the last deglaciation/Holocene transition (~11.3-9.4 cal ka BP). We inferred that a strong summer monsoon occurred at this time. During the late LGM/deglaciation transition period, the pollen assemblage reflected a gradually warming climate, and the climate fluctuations derived from the high-latitudes were not well-identified. This study suggests that solar insolation

  3. Spatial variation in phytoplankton dynamics in the Belgian coastal zone of the North Sea studied by microscopy, HPLC-CHEMTAX and underway fluorescence recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muylaert, Koenraad; Gonzales, Rhia; Franck, Melanie; Lionard, Marie; Van der Zee, Claar; Cattrijsse, André; Sabbe, Koen; Chou, Lei; Vyverman, Wim

    2006-05-01

    Spatial variation in the succession of phytoplankton in the Belgian Coastal Zone (BCZ) was investigated by monitoring phytoplankton biomass and community composition using microscopical cell counts, HPLC pigment analyses and in vivo fluorescence recordings. Monthly monitoring of phytoplankton community composition at five stations revealed a succession of three distinct diatom communities. The succession of these three communities was the same at each site, but the succession from the winter-spring to the summer community occurred one month earlier and the succession from the summer to the autumn community one month later at the SW than at the NE stations of the BCZ. Monthly monitoring of chlorophyll a at ten fixed sites and inspection of in vivo fluorescence recordings during various cruises of RV 'Zeeleeuw' indicated that the spring bloom started about one month earlier in the SW part of the BCZ than in the NE part. The spatial difference in the onset of the spring bloom was ascribed to the higher water column turbidity at the NE coast compared to the SW coast. Although a Phaeocystis bloom occurred at all monitoring stations, a clear spatial variation in the magnitude of such blooms was observed, with more intense blooms at the NE coast than at the SW coast. A close relation was observed between the intensity of the Phaeocystis bloom and the availability of inorganic nutrients (N and P) before the onset of the bloom. Comparison of microscopical cell counts and CHEMTAX analysis of accessory pigment data indicated that HPLC analysis may be a useful tool for monitoring Phaeocystis in the North Sea. The presence of chlorophyll c3 containing diatoms, however, probably resulted in the detection of small quantities of Phaeocystis by HPLC-CHEMTAX analysis when microscopical analyses showed that the species was absent.

  4. Changes in seasonality and productivity recorded at low latitudes in Tanzania during the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, A.; Nicholas, C. J.; Goodhue, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Tanzanian Drilling Project (TDP) has been active since 2002 in recovering Cretaceous and Paleogene marine sediments from along a 150km piece of coast in southern Tanzania. Late Cretaceous and Paleogene sediments along this stretch of coast are part of the Kilwa Group (Nicholas et al., 2006). The sediments largely comprise organic-rich marine clays and claystones, with occasional interbedded limestones and sporadic carbonate-rich beds. Calcareous microfossils are generally very well preserved, due to the impermeability of the clays and claystones, and do not show the recrystallised microstructure typical of deep-sea oozes and chalks (Pearson et al., 2001). van Dongen et al. (2006) have shown that the Kilwa Group sediments contain well preserved terrestrial biomarkers, indicating a shallow maximum burial depth. The sediments are interpreted as having been deposited in a bathyal outer shelf to upper slope setting at an estimated depth of 300-500m. TDP Site 14 recovered sediments from the very latest Paleocene and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. These well preserved, organic-rich clays were analysed using three separate techniques designed to complement the standard paleoclimatic analyses of planktonic and benthic foraminifera and nannofossils carried out by other workers. Nitrogen isotope chemostratigraphy is used in this work as a proxy for past productivity and associated nutrient supply. In order to identify any other potential contributors to, or dilution of the nitrogen isotope signal, sedimentary mineralogy and elemental geochemistry techniques were also employed. The results from mineralogy and elemental geochemistry analyses indicate that terrigenous run-off increased during the PETM at this locaton. Kaolinite abundances, meanwhile, show that this region did not experience any major changes in humidity. Mineralogical investigation also found a large reduction in calcium carbonate in these sediments during the PETM interval. Finally, nitrogen isotope

  5. 32 CFR 720.30 - Production of official records in response to court order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Only information, such as loyalty or security records. Records relating to compensation benefits administered by the Bureau of Employees' Compensation may not be disclosed except upon the written approval of that Bureau (20 CFR 1.21). In case of doubt, the matter should be handled in accordance with...

  6. Individual variation in parental workload and breeding productivity in female European starlings: is the effort worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Melinda A; Williams, Tony D

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed individual variation in work load (nest visit rate) during chick-rearing, and the consequences of this variation in terms of breeding productivity, in a highly synchronous breeder, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) focusing on female birds. There was marked (10- to 16-fold) variation in total, female and male nest visit rates, among individuals, but individual variation in female nest visit rate was independent of environment (rainfall, temperature) and metrics of individual quality (laying date, clutch size, amount of male provisioning help), and was only weakly associated with chick demand (i.e., day 6 brood size). Female nest visit rate was independent of date and experimentally delayed birds provisioned at the same rate as peak-nesting birds; supporting a lack of effect of date per se. Brood size at fledging was positively but weakly related to total nest visit rate (male + female), with >fivefold variation in nest visit rate for any given brood size, and in females brood size at fledging and chick mass at fledging were independent of female nest visit rate, that is, individual variation in workload was not associated with higher productivity. Nevertheless, nest visit rate in females was repeatable among consecutive days (6–8 posthatching), and between peak (first) and second broods, but not among years. Our data suggest that individual females behave as if committed to a certain level of parental care at the outset of their annual breeding attempt, but this varies among years, that is, behavior is not fixed throughout an individual's life but represents an annually variable decision. We suggest females are making predictable decisions about their workload during provisioning that maximizes their overall fitness based on an integration of information on their current environment (although these cues currently remain unidentified). PMID:26380688

  7. Individual variation in parental workload and breeding productivity in female European starlings: is the effort worth it?

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melinda A; Williams, Tony D

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed individual variation in work load (nest visit rate) during chick-rearing, and the consequences of this variation in terms of breeding productivity, in a highly synchronous breeder, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) focusing on female birds. There was marked (10- to 16-fold) variation in total, female and male nest visit rates, among individuals, but individual variation in female nest visit rate was independent of environment (rainfall, temperature) and metrics of individual quality (laying date, clutch size, amount of male provisioning help), and was only weakly associated with chick demand (i.e., day 6 brood size). Female nest visit rate was independent of date and experimentally delayed birds provisioned at the same rate as peak-nesting birds; supporting a lack of effect of date per se. Brood size at fledging was positively but weakly related to total nest visit rate (male + female), with >fivefold variation in nest visit rate for any given brood size, and in females brood size at fledging and chick mass at fledging were independent of female nest visit rate, that is, individual variation in workload was not associated with higher productivity. Nevertheless, nest visit rate in females was repeatable among consecutive days (6-8 posthatching), and between peak (first) and second broods, but not among years. Our data suggest that individual females behave as if committed to a certain level of parental care at the outset of their annual breeding attempt, but this varies among years, that is, behavior is not fixed throughout an individual's life but represents an annually variable decision. We suggest females are making predictable decisions about their workload during provisioning that maximizes their overall fitness based on an integration of information on their current environment (although these cues currently remain unidentified). PMID:26380688

  8. Recognition of wave-dominated, tide-influenced shoreline systems in the rock record: Variations from a microtidal shoreline model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelov, Boyan K.; Ainsworth, R. Bruce; MacEachern, James A.

    2012-11-01

    Existing wave-dominated facies models are based on microtidal coastlines and do not adequately address wave-dominated environments influenced by significant tidal ranges. Observations from modern environments show that such systems are abundant along tide-influenced shorelines facing wide shelves and large embayments, such as much of the northern Australia coast; yet equivalent deposits have been rarely recognized from the ancient record. Geomorphological literature shows that tidal influence on wave-dominated shorelines has the effect of shifting the shoaling, breaking, and swash wave zones up and down the beach profile; when the tidal range is appreciable, sedimentation is affected significantly. Many macrotidal, wave-dominated systems (tidal range > 4 m), for example, are non-barred and are characterized by poor development of dune-scale bedforms in the subtidal zone and along the beach profile. Other systems do develop cross stratification, but this occurs in the intertidal zone rather than the subtidal zone as is implied in existing wave-dominated facies models. The association of many wave-dominated, tide-influenced environments with shallow shelves also suggests that major storms may be capable of reworking sediment significant distances from the shoreline. We present an ancient example of a wave-dominated, tide-influenced, fluvial-affected system (Wtf) from the Campanian Bearpaw to Horseshoe Canyon Formation transition near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada, which has been described in closely spaced outcrop exposures and core. Wave domination in the coarsening-upward interval is unambiguous and is represented by abundance of micro-hummocky cross stratification and other storm beds in the mudstone-dominated portions, a well-defined swaley cross stratified sandstone interval, and an up to four meter thick, horizontal planar stratified interval interpreted to have been formed by swash waves. Tide influence is suggested by common double carbonaceous and mud drapes

  9. Testing theories on ENSO response to climate change: seasonal records of SST variation along the coast of Peru at key Holocene time periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpston, J.; Loubere, P.

    2008-12-01

    The El-Nino Southern Oscillation impacts environmental conditions across the tropical Pacific and, via teleconnection, feeds into climate across the globe. The degree to which ENSO is variable, and how this relates to global climate conditions, is a key issue for regional climate dynamics, marine biological resources and feedback analysis within the planetary climate system. The response of ENSO to global warming remains an open question. ENSO variability has been linked, in theoretical work, to both atmospheric dynamics and thermocline circulation in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Key factors are trade winds strength, temperatures of waters upwelling along the margin of South America, and depth of the thermocline. These feed into an annual cycle which provides the trigger for ENSO state switching. The sensitivity of this switching to tropical climate background state is in debate. Theories can be tested by examining SSTs and seasonal cycles from coastal Peru during times of different ENSO behavior and/or different global climate states. We provide this testing using oxygen isotope records of surf clams from selected Holocene time periods. These show significant variation in mean SST, and the seasonal cycle, that correspond to changes in ENSO behavior as recorded in Ecuadorian lake deposits. The data indicate that background state change has affected ENSO operation in the past.

  10. Holocene Sedimentary Record of Unusual Primary Productivity, Dalton Polynya, Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventer, A.; Armand, L.; Redovian, M.; Domack, E. W.; Shevenell, A.; Smith, C.; Lavoie, C.; Orsi, A. H.; Huber, B. A.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cruise NBP14-02 surveyed the previously unstudied Moscow University Ice Shelf region, East Antarctica, an area of concern due to recent changes in the glacial system. Using 3.5 kHz sub-bottom geophysical data, we targeted a mid-shelf site with an expanded Holocene sedimentary section, recovering ~ 10 meters of Holocene diatom-rich sediments characterized by an unusual floral assemblage that records the strong and consistent presence of open ocean diatoms. The sedimentary assemblage is dominated by ~50% Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, with a diagnostic contribution of Thalassiosira lentiginosa and Thalassiosira oliverana, species typical of the open Southern Ocean, suggesting southward inflow onto the shelf. A lesser contribution of Fragilariopsis curta indicates the influence of sea ice associated productivity within the polynya. Strong easterly winds and the blocking of sea ice transport into the region by the Dalton Iceberg Tongue to the east appear to be important factors in polynya development and maintenance; sea ice melt within the polynya likely contributes a diatom seed population. Chaetoceros is notably absent, likely due to the polynya opening later in the season (January) and the absence of a typical spring bloom. Unusual Thalassiothrix antarctica layers, up to 15 centimeters thick and comprised of tightly matted valves with a newspaper-like texture, are evident down core. This shade-adapted species can live at depth, maximizing access to nutrients, and is thought to be an under-recognized contributor to oceanic primary productivity due to the patchy subsurface nature of blooms. Thalassiothrix, and other species with a similar thread-like morphology, are often associated with oceanic frontal zones and may be responsible for episodic but significant carbon and silica flux to the sea floor. Temporal variability in the occurrence of Thalassiothrix layers in this Holocene sediment sequence may reflect past changes in the relative proximity and/or strength of

  11. Satellite Remote Sensing of Inundated Wetlands: Data Record Assembly and Cross-Product Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Chapman, B. D.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Moghaddam, M.; Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Schroeder, R.; Podest, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands cover less than 5% of Earth's ice-free land surface but exert major impacts on global biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biological diversity. Despite the importance of these environments in the global cycling of carbon and water, there is a scarcity of suitable regional-to-global remote-sensing data for characterizing their distribution and dynamics. We have been assembling a global-scale Earth System Data Record (ESDR) of natural Inundated Wetlands to facilitate investigations on their role in climate, biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biodiversity. The ESDR comprises (1) Fine-resolution (100 meter) maps, delineating wetland extent, vegetation type, and seasonal inundation dynamics for regional to continental-scale areas covering crucial wetland regions, and (2) global coarse-resolution (~25 km), multi-temporal mappings of inundated area fraction (Fw) across multiple years. The fine-scale ESDR component is constructed from L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The global maps of inundated area fraction are obtained by combining coarse-resolution (~25 km) remote sensing observations from passive and active microwave instruments. Surface water and inundated vegetation is classified at 100m resolution using ALOS PALSAR imagery. We combine multiple passive/active microwave data sets to quantify Fwat 25 km resolution producing a daily product with ~weekly temporal composites from 1992-2013. We compare information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution data sets relative to the SAR-based data sets. This ESDR will provide the first high-resolution, accurate, consistent and comprehensive global-scale data set of wetland inundation and vegetation. We present details of assembly of this ESDR, discussing aspects of remote sensing data collections, data processing and staging, algorithm application and adaptation to contemporary data streams, cross-product harmonization, and considerations for distribution with the user community. This work was carried out

  12. Seasonal variations of cave conditions and drip water stable isotopes from a monitoring study of Raccoon Mountain Caverns, Tennessee, and its implications in interpreting speleothem record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzclaw, C. L.; Gordon, R. D.; Feng, W.; Allard, J.

    2015-12-01

    A two-year monitoring study at Raccoon Mountain Caverns near Chattanooga, Tennessee was carried out in an attempt to establish quantitative relationships between climate signals and drip water stable isotopes for interpreting speleothem paleoclimate records from the cave. Eight field trips were made from Jan. 2014 to Jun. 2015, during which cave meteorological conditions (RH, temperature and cave air CO2 concentration) and drip rate were measured for 5 sites inside the cave. 63 cave drip and pool water samples were collected and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (δ18O and δD values). Cave air temperature varied throughout the study period, the temporal variations ranged at different sites from 2 to 8.4 °C (the greatest variation was observed at sites that are closer to the entrance or surface). These are significantly less than outside temperatures range of 24 °C, but more than observed in other monitored caves. Elevated cave-air CO2 concentration (3200 ppm) and slow drip rate during the summer indicated slowed or stalled growth of calcite. The overall range of δ18O values were -7.1‰ to -4.5‰. A δD vs δ18O diagram yields a slope of 6.1, which falls within the normal range of 6-8 for local Meteoric Water Line. The value is slightly above Global Meteoric Water Line, indicating lack of evaporative effect. Throughout the study period, the δ18O values varied from 0.6 ‰ at some sites to 1.9‰ at others. The largest changes were likely due to the close proximity of collection sites to the surface precipitation. Spatially, for samples collected at each cave trip, different sites displayed variations of δ18O values from 0‰ to 1.7‰. The difference could be attributed to different type of drip sites with varying types of flow paths rainwater takes to the drip sites. The significant seasonal shift of drip water δ18O values and growth conditions indicate importance of consideration of seasonality in interpreting speleothem δ18O record

  13. New European commission regulation on variations to the terms of marketing authorization for medicinal products and its impact on Croatian legislation.

    PubMed

    Martinac, Adrijana Ilić; Tomić, Sinisa; Simicić, Mirna

    2010-09-01

    Variations introduced to medicinal product documentation must not affect the quality, efficacy, and safety of the product. Croatian Medicinal Products Act and accompanying ordinances are largely aligned with the EU regulations. The EU has now tried to simplify the issue of variations with a new Regulation, creating differences in the definition of and approach to resolving certain types of variations between Croatia and the EU. These differences could hinder the approval procedure for variations in Croatia, particularly for medicines already approved in the EU. Amending the Croatian Ordinance on medicines already authorised in the EU would be one way of maintaining the efficiency of the Croatian regulatory system. PMID:20860972

  14. Characterization, Genetic Variation, and Combining Ability of Maize Traits Beneficial to the Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize stover has been identified as an important feedstock for the production of cellulosic ethanol. Our objectives were to measure hybrid effect and combining ability patterns of traits related to cellulosic ethanol production, determine if germplasm and mutations used for silage production would a...

  15. Discovery of Genetic Variation that Enhances Improvement of Dairy Production and Health in Cattle and Buffalos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis underlying this project is that genome-wide information on genetic variation will increase accuracy of predictions of genetic merit; will enhance heritability and reliability of these predictions through improved pedigree information; and will improve detection of most quantitative tr...

  16. Sociophonetic Variation in the Production and Perception of Obstruent Voicing in Buenos Aires Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohena-Madrazo, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents an instrumental study of variation in fricative voicing in Buenos Aires Spanish (BAS), particularly with respect to the devoicing change of the postalveolar fricative: /y/greater than/[function of]/. It proposes a novel way of determining the completion of this change by comparing the percentage voicing of the…

  17. Production of different phenotypes from the same genotype in the same environment by developmental variation.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter; Huber, Martin; Thiemann, Markus; van den Boogaart, Gerald; Schmitz, Oliver J; Schubart, Christoph D

    2008-02-01

    The phenotype of an organism is determined by the genes, the environment and stochastic developmental events. Although recognized as a basic biological principle influencing life history, susceptibility to diseases, and probably evolution, developmental variation (DV) has been only poorly investigated due to the lack of a suitable model organism. This obstacle could be overcome by using the recently detected, robust and highly fecund parthenogenetic marbled crayfish as an experimental animal. Batch-mates of this clonal crayfish, which were shown to be isogenic by analysis of nuclear microsatellite loci, exhibited surprisingly broad ranges of variation in coloration, growth, life-span, reproduction, behaviour and number of sense organs, even when reared under identical conditions. Maximal variation was observed for the marmorated coloration, the pattern of which was unique in each of the several hundred individuals examined. Variation among identically raised batch-mates was also found with respect to fluctuating asymmetry, a traditional indicator of the epigenetic part of the phenotype, and global DNA methylation, an overall molecular marker of an animal's epigenetic state. Developmental variation was produced in all life stages, probably by reaction-diffusion-like patterning mechanisms in early development and non-linear, self-reinforcing circuitries involving behaviour and metabolism in later stages. Our data indicate that, despite being raised in the same environment, individual genotypes can map to numerous phenotypes via DV, thus generating variability among clone-mates and individuality in a parthenogenetic species. Our results further show that DV, an apparently ubiquitous phenomenon in animals and plants, can introduce components of randomness into life histories, modifying individual fitness and population dynamics. Possible perspectives of DV for evolutionary biology are discussed. PMID:18245627

  18. Sulfur Isotope Trends in Archean Microbialite Facies Record Early Oxygen Production and Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A.; Meyer, N.; Izon, G.; Poulton, S.; Farquhar, J.; Claire, M.

    2014-12-01

    The major and minor sulfur isotope composition (δ34S and Δ33S) of pyrites preserved in ~2.65-2.5 billion-year-old (Ga) microbialites record localized oxygen production and consumption near the mat surface. These trends are preserved in two separate drill cores (GKF01 and BH1-Sacha) transecting the Campbellrand-Malmani carbonate platform (Ghaap Group, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa; Zerkle et al., 2012; Izon et al., in review). Microbialite pyrites possess positive Δ33S values, plotting parallel to typical Archean trends (with a Δ33S/δ34S slope of ~0.9) but enriched in 34S by ~3 to 7‰. We propose that these 34S-enriched pyrites were formed from a residual pool of sulfide that was partially oxidized via molecular oxygen produced by surface mat-dwelling cyanobacteria. Sulfide, carrying the range of Archean Δ33S values, could have been produced deeper within the microbial mat by the reduction of sulfate and elemental sulfur, then fractionated upon reaction with O2 produced by oxygenic photosynthesis. Preservation of this positive 34S offset requires that: 1) sulfide was only partially (50­­-80%) consumed by oxidation, meaning H2S was locally more abundant (or more rapidly produced) than O2, and 2) the majority of the sulfate produced via oxidation was not immediately reduced to sulfide, implying either that the sulfate pool was much larger than the sulfide pool, or that the sulfate formed near the mat surface was transported and reduced in another part of the system. Contrastingly, older microbialite facies (> 2.7 Ga; Thomazo et al., 2013) appear to lack these observed 34S enrichments. Consequently, the onset of 34S enrichments could mark a shift in mat ecology, from communities dominated by anoxygenic photosynthesizers to cyanobacteria. Here, we test these hypotheses with new spatially resolved mm-scale trends in sulfur isotope measurements from pyritized stromatolites of the Vryburg Formation, sampled in the lower part of the BH1-Sacha core. Millimeter

  19. A reconstruction of radiocarbon production and total solar irradiance from the Holocene 14C and CO2 records: implications of data and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Raphael; Joos, Fortunat

    2013-04-01

    Past atmospheric CO2 concentrations reconstructed from polar ice cores [Monnin et al., 2004] combined with its Δ14C signature as conserved in tree-rings [Reimer et al., 2009] provide important information both on the cycling of carbon as well as the production of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. As the 14C production rate (Q) is modulated by changes in the strength of the magnetic field enclosed in solar wind, it serves as a valuable proxy for past changes in solar activity. Using the Bern3D-LPX, a fully featured Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) with a 3D ocean and a dynamic vegetation model component, we perform transient carbon-cycle simulations spanning the past 21 kyr. By solving the atmospheric 14C budget, the radiocarbon production rate over the Holocene is reconstructed. Applying different deglacial forcings, as well as a control-simulation with constant climate, the sensitivity of Q to carbon-cycle changes is discussed. The error in the terrestrial 14C record is translated into an uncertainty in Q using a Monte-Carlo approach. In addition, uncertainties in the global carbon inventory, GPP and air-sea gas-exchange are taken into account. The estimated modern (1950-2005) production rate of 1.55±0.20 atoms/cm2/s is close to a recent theoretical calculations by Kovaltsov et al. (2012) yielding a modern production rate of 1.64 atoms/cm2/s but considerably lower than the estimated 2 atoms/cm2/s by Masarik and Beer (2009). The newly produced production rate record is then interpreted as a proxy for solar activity changes in the past 10 kyrs. To do so, we use published results from particle simulations [Masarik and Beer, 1999] together with the latest reconstruction of the geomagnetic dipole moment [Knudsen et al., 2008] to calculate the past history of the so-called solar modulation potential (Φ). The 14C based Φ is extended to 2005 A.D. with instrumental data [Usoskin et al., 2011]. In a subsequent step, Φ is translated into past

  20. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  1. Comment on "Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust".

    PubMed

    Goff, John A

    2015-09-01

    Crowley et al. (Reports, 13 March 2015, p. 1237) propose that abyssal hill topography can be generated by variations in volcanism at mid-ocean ridges modulated by Milankovitch cycle-driven changes in sea level. Published values for abyssal hill characteristic widths versus spreading rate do not generally support this hypothesis. I argue that abyssal hills are primarily fault-generated rather than volcanically generated features. PMID:26339022

  2. Comment on “Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.

    2015-09-01

    Crowley et al. (Reports, 13 March 2015, p. 1237) propose that abyssal hill topography can be generated by variations in volcanism at mid-ocean ridges modulated by Milankovitch cycle-driven changes in sea level. Published values for abyssal hill characteristic widths versus spreading rate do not generally support this hypothesis. I argue that abyssal hills are primarily fault-generated rather than volcanically generated features.

  3. Evidence for variations in magma production along oceanic spreading centers - A critical appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karson, J. A.; Elthon, D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the oceanic lithosphere near fracture zones have resulted in the proposal that the 'magma budget,' defined as the amount of magma delivered to magma chambers or conduits beneath a spreading center for a given amount of spreading, decreases as fracture zones are approached. Seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate that the crust becomes anomalously thin near fracture zones, but reference must be made to the boundary between residual upper mantle peridotites and overlying cumulate rocks in order to assess potential variations in the magma budget. The position of this interface, however, generally is not constrained by geophysical studies. Geochemical variations in basaltic glasses collected near fracture zones are consistent with a decrease in partial melting as fracture zones are approached, but they could also be produced by variations in open-system magmatic processes with no change in the extent of partial melting. Although a decrease in the magma budget as fracture zones are approached is consistent with these data, so are alternative models that incorporate a constant magma budget.

  4. 1 Tbit/in.2 Very-High-Density Recording in Mass-Productive Polycrystalline Ferroelectric Thin Film Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kenjiro; Kawano, Takahiro; Onoe, Atsushi; Tamura, Masahiro; Umeda, Masaru; Toda, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate very-high-density ferroelectric recording experiments of 1 Tbit/in.2 in polycrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin film for the first time. A high-quality polycrystalline PZT thin film was successfully deposited on a silicon substrate with a SrRuO3 (SRO) electrode by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The roughness of the PZT film was reduced to less than 1 nm by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The PZT film has very high controllability for domain inversion. Our fabrication process also enables high productivity. Therefore, our PZT film has potential to be a mass-productive ferroelectric recording medium for high-density storage systems.

  5. Sedimentary records of trace elements from large European lakes (Switzerland) document historic to recent freshwater pollution and climate-induced runoff variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenon, F.; Wirth, S. B.; Fujak, M.; Poté, J.; Thierry, A.; Chiaradia, M.; Girardclos, S.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous sedimentary records of anthropogenic and natural trace elements determined by ICPMS, from 5 large and deep perialpine lakes from Central Europe (Switzerland), evidence the environmental impacts of industrial fossil fuel pollution. In fact, the greatest increase in heavy metal pollution was registered at all the studied sites following the European industrial revolution of ca. AD 1800; with the highest values during the middle part of the 20th century. On a regional scale, anthropogenic heavy metal input subsequently stopped increasing thanks to remediation strategies such as the implementation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). On the other hand, the discharge of industrial treated wastewaters into Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva during the second part of the 20th century involved the sedimentation of highly contaminated sediments in the area surrounding the WWTP outlet pipe discharge; less than 4 km from the main supply of drinking water of Lausanne (127'000 hab.). Microbial analyses furthermore reveal i) high increase in bacterial densities following the lake eutrophication in the 1970s, and that ii) the related sediments can be considered as a reservoir of antibiotic resistant bacteria/genes (of human origin). We finally compare instrumental hydrological data over the last century with variations of lithogenic trace elements (e.g., titanium) as registered in three large lakes (Brienz, Thun and Bienne) connected by the River Aar. This task allows to better constraining the runoff variations on a regional scale over the last decades for the the River Aar, and its possible increase under warming climate conditions in the European Alps.

  6. On the Use of Biomineral Oxygen Isotope Data to Identify Human Migrants in the Archaeological Record: Intra-Sample Variation, Statistical Methods and Geographical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Emma; O’Connell, Tamsin C.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope analysis of archaeological skeletal remains is an increasingly popular tool to study past human migrations. It is based on the assumption that human body chemistry preserves the δ18O of precipitation in such a way as to be a useful technique for identifying migrants and, potentially, their homelands. In this study, the first such global survey, we draw on published human tooth enamel and bone bioapatite data to explore the validity of using oxygen isotope analyses to identify migrants in the archaeological record. We use human δ18O results to show that there are large variations in human oxygen isotope values within a population sample. This may relate to physiological factors influencing the preservation of the primary isotope signal, or due to human activities (such as brewing, boiling, stewing, differential access to water sources and so on) causing variation in ingested water and food isotope values. We compare the number of outliers identified using various statistical methods. We determine that the most appropriate method for identifying migrants is dependent on the data but is likely to be the IQR or median absolute deviation from the median under most archaeological circumstances. Finally, through a spatial assessment of the dataset, we show that the degree of overlap in human isotope values from different locations across Europe is such that identifying individuals’ homelands on the basis of oxygen isotope analysis alone is not possible for the regions analysed to date. Oxygen isotope analysis is a valid method for identifying first-generation migrants from an archaeological site when used appropriately, however it is difficult to identify migrants using statistical methods for a sample size of less than c. 25 individuals. In the absence of local previous analyses, each sample should be treated as an individual dataset and statistical techniques can be used to identify migrants, but in most cases pinpointing a specific homeland should

  7. Seasonal and Inter-annual Variation in Wood Production in Tropical Trees on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, is Related to Local Climate and Species Functional Traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, K.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; Kellner, J. R.; Wright, S. J.; Condit, R.; Detto, M.; Tribble, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest carbon budgets play a major role in global carbon dynamics, but the responses of tropical forests to current and future inter-annual climatic variation remains highly uncertain. Better predictions of future tropical forest carbon fluxes require an improved understanding of how different species of tropical trees respond to changes in climate at seasonal and inter-annual temporal scales. We installed dendrometer bands on a size-stratified sample of 2000 trees in old growth forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, a moist lowland forest that experiences an annual dry season of approximately four months. Tree diameters were measured at the beginning and end of the rainy season since 2008. Additionally, we recorded the canopy illumination level, canopy intactness, and liana coverage of all trees during each census. We used linear mixed-effects models to evaluate how tree growth was related to seasonal and interannual variation in local climate, tree condition, and species identity, and how species identity effects related to tree functional traits. Climatic variables considered included precipitation, solar radiation, soil moisture, and climatological water deficit, and were all calculated from high-quality on-site measurements. Functional traits considered included wood density, maximum adult stature, deciduousness, and drought tolerance. We found that annual wood production was positively related to water availability, with higher growth in wetter years. Species varied in their response to seasonal water availability, with some species showing more pronounced reduction of growth during the dry season when water availability is limited. Interspecific variation in seasonal and interannual growth patterns was related to life-history strategies and species functional traits. The finding of higher growth in wetter years is consistent with previous tree ring studies conducted on a small subset of species with reliable annual rings. Together with previous

  8. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile; Gregg, Watson

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton is responsible for over half of the net primary production on earth. The knowledge on the contribution of various phytoplankton groups to the total primary production is still poorly understood. Data from satellite observations suggest that for upwelling regions, photosynthetic rates by microplankton is higher than that of nanoplankton but that when the spatial extent is considered, the production by nanoplankton is comparable or even larger than microplankton. Here, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (approx. 50%) followed by coccolithophores and chlorophytes. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (>45 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nino Index, MEI) and 'regional' climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability. These results provide a modeling and data assimilation perspective to phytoplankton partitioning of primary production and contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of the carbon cycle in the oceans at a global scale.

  9. Irreversibility and entropy production in transport phenomena, IV: Symmetry, integrated intermediate processes and separated variational principles for multi-currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of entropy production in transport phenomena is discussed again by emphasizing the role of symmetry of non-equilibrium states and also by reformulating Einstein’s theory of Brownian motion to derive entropy production from it. This yields conceptual reviews of the previous papers [M. Suzuki, Physica A 390 (2011) 1904; 391 (2012) 1074; 392 (2013) 314]. Separated variational principles of steady states for multi external fields {Xi} and induced currents {Ji} are proposed by extending the principle of minimum integrated entropy production found by the present author for a single external field. The basic strategy of our theory on steady states is to take in all the intermediate processes from the equilibrium state to the final possible steady states in order to study the irreversible physics even in the steady states. As an application of this principle, Gransdorff-Prigogine’s evolution criterion inequality (or stability condition) dXP≡∫dr∑iJidXi≤0 is derived in the stronger form dQi≡∫drJidXi≤0 for individual force Xi and current Ji even in nonlinear responses which depend on all the external forces {Xk} nonlinearly. This is called “separated evolution criterion”. Some explicit demonstrations of the present general theory to simple electric circuits with multi external fields are given in order to clarify the physical essence of our new theory and to realize the condition of its validity concerning the existence of the solutions of the simultaneous equations obtained by the separated variational principles. It is also instructive to compare the two results obtained by the new variational theory and by the old scheme based on the instantaneous entropy production. This seems to be suggestive even to the energy problem in the world.

  10. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-Specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (50, the equivalent of 20 PgC y-1. Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed to 20 (7 PgC y-1 of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10 (4 PgC y(sub-1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (45) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4 (1-2 PgC y-1. We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nio Index, MEI) and regional climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p 0.05) between the MEI and the class-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatomscyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect on the class-specific primary production in the Southern Ocean. These results provide a modeling and

  11. High-resolution Late Pleistocene paleomagnetic secular variation record from Laguna Potrok Aike, Southern Patagonia (Argentina): preliminary results from the ICDP-PASADO drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisé-Pronovost, Agathe; St-Onge, Guillaume; Haberzettl, Torsten; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution paleomagnetic reconstructions from sedimentary sequences are scarce in the Southern Hemisphere. Therefore, the millennial- to centennial-scale variability of the geomagnetic field is under-represented in the Southern Hemisphere relative to the Northern Hemisphere and the possible global nature of that variability cannot be assessed. Here we present the first high-resolution Late Pleistocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) reconstruction from the continental archive Laguna Potrok Aike south of 42°S in South America. Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W) is a maar lake located in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field in southern Patagonia (Argentina). Previous studies revealed very high Holocene sedimentation rates (> 100 cm/ka) in the center of the lake. During the austral spring 2008, the multi-national Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject (PASADO) science team drilled two ~100 m holes under the framework of the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). A preliminary Holocene age model based on comparison of magnetic susceptibility data from the PASADO core with the well-dated (radiocarbon- and tephra-based chronology) core located nearby in the center of the lake (PTA03-12) indicates a continuous deposition of ~19 m of lacustrine sediments since the last 16 ka cal. BP. Hysteresis measurements using an alternating gradient force magnetometer indicate a magnetic assemblage dominated by magnetite grains in the pseudo-single domain range. Principal component analysis (PCA) inclination and declination profiles were constructed from the stepwise alternating field demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) measured on u-channels at 1 cm intervals using a 2G Enterprises cryogenic magnetometer. The PCA inclinations vary around the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) inclination for the latitude of the coring site and the maximum angular deviation (MAD) values are generally lower than 5°, indicating

  12. Titan-like exoplanets: Variations in geometric albedo and effective transit height with haze production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 μm). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 μm, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  13. Diagenetic variation in the Oregon Coast Range: Implications for rock strength, soil production, hillslope form, and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jill A.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2014-06-01

    The mechanisms by which lithology modulates geomorphic processes are poorly known. In the Oregon Coast Range (OCR), rhythmically bedded sandstones of the Eocene Tyee Formation underlie steep, soil-mantled hillslopes, with relatively uniform ridge-valley spacing. These characteristic landforms are perturbed where diagenetic variations manifest as resistant cliffs. Here we use petrology, rock mechanics, and lidar to characterize grain-scale variations in rock properties and their influence on rock strength, hillslope processes, and landscape morphology in two adjacent watersheds. Petrographic analyses suggest that a suite of diagenetic products in the "resistant" bedrock account for a 2.5 times increase in tensile strength relative to "typical" Tyee bedrock. Our reference catchment exhibits negligible resistant outcrops, and consistent hillslope gradients and longitudinal valley profiles. By contrast, the adjacent catchment teems with resistant, 1 to 10 m thick, noncontiguous sandstone beds that form hanging valleys with gentle upstream hillslopes and anomalously narrow valleys. Mechanical and topographic analyses suggest that the low fracture density characteristic of these resistant beds may render them relatively impervious to comminution by tree root activity, the dominant OCR soil production mechanism. Based on both hillslope gradient- and hilltop curvature-erosion models, we estimate that hillslopes perched above resistant beds erode at approximately half the pace of hillslopes unencumbered by downstream knickpoints. The diagenetic variations likely influence relief at the watershed scale. Depositional position and diagenetic processes appear to control the occurrence of resistant beds, providing a framework to quantify how seemingly subtle variations in rock properties can impose first-order controls on landscape form and evolution.

  14. Relative sea level variations recorded by coral microatolls over the last two centuries in Martinique and Guadeloupe: implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric, J.; Jennifer, W.; Feuillet, N.; Deschamps, P.; Guy, C.; Paul, T.; Galetzka, J. E.; Jean-Marie, S.; Bruno, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles arc is a region of high seismic hazard, which results from the convergence of the American and Caribbean plates at 2cm/yr. Several earthquakes of magnitude ≥ 7 have struck the islands in the past. The largest ones (M 8+) occurred four years apart on January 11 1839 and February 8, 1843, offshore Martinique and Guadeloupe respectively. The 1843 event destroyed the town of Pointe-à-Pitre and killed several thousand people. It was probably a megathrust event. To better constrain the seismic hazard induced by this poorly known subduction interface, we have quantified the surface deformations of Lesser Antilles arc recorded by coral skeletons in Martinique and Guadeloupe. Certain coral species form microatolls, whose upwards growth is limited by the yearly lowest tides (Highest Level of Survival- HLS). They act as tide gauges and provide powerful tools to quantify with a precision of few centimeters the sea-level variations induced by tectonic or climatic processes at annual scale over several centuries. We identified several places where microatolls are growing on Martinique, Guadeloupe, Antigua and Barbuda Islands. Several reefs were first surveyed with low altitude helicopter flights. High-resolution aerial photographs were acquired by a drone in some areas, which allowed identifying sites featuring abundant microatolls. Accurate total station mapping of several sites showed that microatolls within the same area recorded the HLS with a precision of about 4±1cm. Several heads were sampled with a hydraulic chain saw along the eastern coast of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Most are Siderastrea Siderea or Diploria strigosa. Using sclerochronology combined with chemical analysis and U/Th dating, we have determined annual growth rates of 5 mm/yr for the former and of ~10mm/year for the latter. During the last two centuries, all microatolls sampled in Martinique recorded a local relative sea level (RSL) rise of ≈ 2-3 mm/yr, interrupted by sudden

  15. 19 CFR 163.6 - Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... material omission of any information contained in the demanded record; or (ii) Disciplinary action taken... the liability of any person for duties, taxes and fees due or duties, taxes and fees which may be due, or determining the liability of any person for fines, penalties and forfeitures; or (ii)...

  16. 19 CFR 163.6 - Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... material omission of any information contained in the demanded record; or (ii) Disciplinary action taken... the liability of any person for duties, taxes and fees due or duties, taxes and fees which may be due, or determining the liability of any person for fines, penalties and forfeitures; or (ii)...

  17. 19 CFR 163.6 - Production and examination of entry and other records and witnesses; penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... material omission of any information contained in the demanded record; or (ii) Disciplinary action taken... the liability of any person for duties, taxes and fees due or duties, taxes and fees which may be due, or determining the liability of any person for fines, penalties and forfeitures; or (ii)...

  18. Strontium isotope record of seasonal scale variations in sediment sources and accumulation in low-energy, subtidal areas of the lower Hudson River estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Brabander, D.J.; Olsen, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr) profiles in sediment cores collected from two subtidal harbor slips in the lower Hudson River estuary in October 2001 exhibit regular patterns of variability with depth. Using additional evidence from sediment Ca/Sr ratios, 137Cs activity and Al, carbonate (CaCO3), and organic carbon (OCsed) concentration profiles, it can be shown that the observed variability reflects differences in the relative input and trapping of fine-grained sediment from seaward sources vs. landward sources linked to seasonal-scale changes in freshwater flow. During high flow conditions, the geochemical data indicate that most of the fine-grained sediments trapped in the estuary are newly eroded basin materials. During lower (base) flow conditions, a higher fraction of mature materials from seaward sources with higher carbonate content is trapped in the lower estuary. Results show that high-resolution, multi-geochemical tracer approaches utilizing strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) can distinguish sediment sources and constrain seasonal scale variations in sediment trapping and accumulation in dynamic estuarine environments. Low-energy, subtidal areas such as those in this study are important sinks for metastable, short-to-medium time scale sediment accumulation. These results also show that these same areas can serve as natural recorders of physical, chemical, and biological processes that affect particle and particle-associated material dynamics over seasonal-to-yearly time scales. ?? 2009.

  19. Pyrite framboid size distribution as a record for relative variations in sedimentation rate: An example on the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Southiberian Palaeomargin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Torres, David; Reolid, Matías; Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Martínez-Casado, Francisco Javier

    2015-12-01

    The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) represents one of the major alterations of the carbon cycle of the Mesozoic period. Despite being globally recognized, and particularly represented within the Tethys realm, its expression in the sedimentary record is highly variable depending on the studied section, which suggests local environmental factors exert a major control on the resulting lithological appearance of the event. We investigated the Fuente Vidriera section, in the eastern External Subbetic of the Betic Cordillera (Spain), where the Lower Jurassic is represented by alternate layers of marls and marly limestones, and the T-OAE is identified by a major δ13C excursion, micropalaeontological, ichnofacies and geochemical evidences. For this study, we analyzed pyrite framboid size distribution of the sedimentary sequence in Fuente Vidriera. The outcome, according to previous studies on pyrite framboid distribution, is contradictory when compared to all other evidences, suggesting oxygen depletion during the T-OAE. The results have been reinterpreted in the light of Crystal Size Distribution Theory and we conclude that not only growth time but also geochemical environment controls pyrite formation. Since growth time is directly related to burial rates, this approach allows us to reconstruct relative variations of sedimentation rates during the Early Jurassic in this location. Based on the obtained results, we provide new evidences for wide-spread transgression during the Early Toarcian in the South Iberian palaeomargin, which induced low sedimentation rate and lower energetic conditions, as well as favored oxygen impoverished bottom waters.

  20. A 15,400-year record of climate variation from a subalpine lacustrine sedimentary sequence in the western Nanling Mountains in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei; Cao, Jiayuan; Xue, Jibin; Ouyang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Multi-proxy records of a subalpine lacustrine sequence in Daping Swamp in the western Nanling Mountains provide evidence for exploring climate variability in the past 15,400 yr. Two dry and cool (15,400-14,500 and 13,000-11,000 cal yr BP) and one humid and warm interval (14,500-13,200 cal yr BP), which we correlate to Heinrich Event 1, the Younger Dryas and the Bølling-Allerød event respectively, are revealed. The early Holocene climate (11,000-8000 cal yr BP) was characterized by less humid and warm conditions, suggesting a weaker Asian summer monsoon (ASM) intensity. Our findings indicate that the Holocene optimum occurred between 8000 and 4500 cal yr BP, and the most intensified ASM appears from 8000 to 7000 cal yr BP. After 4500 cal yr BP, climate shifted to relatively cool and dry conditions. We speculate that five short dry and cool events centered at ~ 11,000, 9000, 8400, 6000, and 3500 cal yr BP were linked to the Holocene ice-rafting events detected in the North Atlantic. Migration of the ITCZ, and the oceanic-atmospheric circulations, particularly SST changes in the tropical Pacific may play a pivotal role in climate variation of the study region.

  1. SPATIAL VARIATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONCENTRATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MINIMIZING EXPOSURE MISCLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    PURPOSE: Many epidemiological studies of disinfection by-products (DBPs) rely on system average DBP concentrations as surrogates of personal exposures. Here we examine the potential effect of exposure misclassification from spatial variability on the association between mean bir...

  2. Seasonal variations, origin, and fate of settling diatoms in the Southern Ocean tracked by silicon isotope records in deep sediment traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closset, Ivia; Cardinal, Damien; Bray, Stephen G.; Thil, François; Djouraev, Irina; Rigual-Hernández, Andrés. S.; Trull, Thomas W.

    2015-09-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a pivotal role in the control of atmospheric CO2 levels, via both physical and biological sequestration processes. The biological carbon transfer to the ocean interior is tightly coupled to the availability of other elements, especially iron as a trace-limiting nutrient and dissolved silicon as the mineral substrate that allows diatoms to dominate primary production. Importantly, variations in the silicon cycling are large but not well understood. Here we use δ30Si measurements to track seasonal flows of silica to the deep sea, as captured by sediment trap time series, for the three major zones (Antarctic, AZ; Polar Frontal, PFZ; and Sub-Antarctic, SAZ) of the open Southern Ocean. Variations in the exported flux of biogenic silica (BSi) and its δ30Si composition reveal a range of insights, including that (i) the sinking rate of BSi exceeds 200 m d-1 in summer in the AZ yet decreases to very low values in winter that allow particles to remain in the water column through to the following spring, (ii) occasional vertical mixing events affect the δ30Si composition of exported BSi in both the SAZ and AZ, and (iii) the δ30Si signature of diatoms is well conserved through the water column despite strong BSi and particulate organic carbon (POC) attenuation at depth and is closely linked to the Si consumption in surface waters. With the strong coupling observed between BSi and POC fluxes in PFZ and AZ, these data provide new constraints for application to biogeochemical models of seasonal controls on production and export.

  3. Variation and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and net primary production of the Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-01-01

    The gradients of elevations and latitudes in the Appalachian Mountains provide a unique regional perspective on landscape variations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada. We reveal patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology, and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Global Production Efficiency Model datasets. We analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS), and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compare the results in different spatial contexts, including North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations, we analyze data and compare the results between the 30°-to-40°N and the 40°-to-50°N latitudes. The result reveal significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was a -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years from 1982 to 2006. The LOS was prolonged by 0.3 days per year-1 during the 25-year percent. The NPP increased by 2.68 g Cm-2 yr-2 from 1981 to 2000.

  4. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, John C; Vallazza, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the USA and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: (1) How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and (2) Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee river mouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee river mouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee river mouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content

  5. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  6. Recent geographic variations in terrestrial carbon cycle based on new production efficiency model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, T.; Ichii, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The terrestrial carbon budget must be understood more accurately for the prediction of future changes in climate and carbon cycle. The goal of this study is to estimate spatial and temporal patterns of the carbon fluxes more accurately using the newly developed terrestrial biosphere model and satellite data. Our model consists of terrestrial carbon cycle and hydrology submodels. An advantage is a new approach in the LUE (Light Use Efficiency) concept, which calculates temperature and water stress factor in LUE model from a photosynthetic model and stomatal conductance formulation. In carbon cycle model, GPP is calculated from the LUE concept and satellite-based fPAR dataset. The soil carbon cycle model is based on CENTURY model with optimized water and temperature factor. Hydrological submodel is based on BIOME3, calculating ET is used by Penman-Monteith method. The model was run for 18 years (1982-1999) on a global scale, and we simulated the geographic distributions of the terrestrial carbon fluxes. We have checked simulated vegetation growth limiting factor with stress factor of MODIS NPP algorithm. Large differences were found in the northern mid and high latitude forests because soil moisture stress is not incorporated into MODIS NPP algorithm. Although responses of stress factors in MODIS NPP algorithm are mostly similar to our theoretically based one, our model works well in the soil moisture limited regions. Global total NPP was estimated at 61.7GtC/yr, and total NEP variations are strongly related with ENSO. Validation using measured values from the GPPDI database showed that our NPP estimation was within a reasonable range. The temporal patterns of the terrestrial carbon flux showed that NPP increased in the northern middle/high latitudes, central Africa, and India. In contrast, NPP decreased in the south Amazon region, the middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere, a part of North America, and Southeast Asia. Sensitivity analysis indicated that NPP

  7. Alice's adventures in um-derland: Psycholinguistic sources of variation in disfluency production

    PubMed Central

    Fraundorf, Scott H.; Watson, Duane G.

    2013-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that three common types of disfluency (fillers, silent pauses, and repeated words) reflect variance in what strategies are available to the production system for responding to difficulty in language production. Participants' speech in a storytelling paradigm was coded for the three disfluency types. Repeats occurred most often when difficult material was already being produced and could be repeated, but fillers and silent pauses occurred most when difficult material was still being planned. Fillers were associated only with conceptual difficulties, consistent with the proposal that they reflect a communicative signal whereas silent pauses and repeats were also related to lexical and phonological difficulties. These differences are discussed in terms of different strategies available to the language production system. PMID:25339788

  8. Time-dependent Variation in Life Cycle Assessment of Microalgal Biorefinery Co-products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Mahdokht

    Microalgae can serve as a highly productive biological feedstock for fuels and chemicals. The lipid fraction of algal seeds has been the primary target of research for biofuel production. However, numerous assessments have found that valorization of co-products is essential to achieve economic and environmental goals. The relative proportion of co-products depends on the biomolecular composition of algae at the time of harvesting. In the present study the productivity of lipid, starch, and protein fractions were shown through growth experiments to vary widely with species, feeding regime, and harvesting time. Four algae species were cultivated under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions and analyzed at regular harvesting intervals. Dynamic growth results were then used for life cycle assessment using the U.S. Department of Energy's GREET model to determine optimal growth scenarios that minimize life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, eutrophication, and cumulative energy demand (CED), while aiming for an energy return on investment (EROI) greater than unity. Per kg of biodiesel produced, C. sorokiniana in N-replete conditions harvested at 12 days was most favorable for GHG emissions and CED, despite having a lipid content of <20%. N. oculata under the same conditions had the lowest life cycle eutrophication impacts, driven by efficient nutrient cycling and valorization of microalgal protein and anaerobic digester residue co-products. The results indicate that growth cycle times that maximize a single fraction do not necessarily result in the most favorable environmental performance on a life cycle basis, underscoring the importance of designing biorefinery systems that simultaneously optimize for lipid and non-lipid fractions.

  9. Development, Production and Validation of the NOAA Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), including source code and supporting documentation is now publicly available as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program. Daily and monthly averaged values of TSI and SSI, with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, are estimated from 1882 to the present with yearly averaged values since 1610, updated quarterly for the foreseeable future. The new Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions when bright faculae and dark sunspots are present on the solar disk. The magnitudes of the irradiance changes that these features produce are determined from linear regression of the proxy Mg II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements made by instruments on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft. We describe the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, operational implementation and validation approach. Future efforts to improve the uncertainty estimates of the Solar Irradiance CDR arising from model assumptions, and augmentation of the solar irradiance reconstructions with direct measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS: launch date, July 2017) are also discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Bovine chemerin (RARRES2) Gene Variation on Beef Cattle Production Traits1

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm-Perry, Amanda K.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Rempel, Lea A.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Cushman, Robert A.; McDaneld, Tara G.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Shackelford, Steven D.; King, David A.; Freetly, Harvey C.

    2012-01-01

    A previous study in cattle based on >48,000 markers identified markers on chromosome 4 near the chemerin gene associated with average daily feed intake (ADFI) in steers (P < 0.008). Chemerin is an adipokine associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome in humans, representing a strong candidate gene potentially underlying the observed association. To evaluate whether the bovine chemerin gene is involved in feed intake, 16 markers within and around the gene were tested for association in the same resource population. Eleven were nominally significant for ADFI (P < 0.05) and two were significant after Bonferroni correction. Two and five SNP in this region were nominally significant for the related traits of average daily gain (ADG) and residual feed intake (RFI), respectively. All markers were evaluated for effects on meat quality and carcass phenotypes. Many of the markers associated with ADFI were associated with hot carcass weight (HCW), adjusted fat thickness (AFT), and marbling (P < 0.05). Marker alleles that were associated with lower ADFI were also associated with lower HCW, AFT, and marbling. Markers associated with ADFI were genotyped in a validation population of steers representing 14 breeds to determine predictive merit across populations. No consistent relationships for ADFI were detected. To determine whether cattle feed intake or growth phenotypes might be related to chemerin transcript abundance, the expression of chemerin was evaluated in adipose of 114 heifers that were siblings of the steers in the discovery population. Relative chemerin transcript abundance was not correlated with ADFI, ADG, or RFI, but associations with body condition score and yearling weight were observed. We conclude that variation in the chemerin gene may underlie observed association in the resource population, but that additional research is required to determine if this variation is widespread among breeds and to develop robust markers with predictive merit

  11. 40 CFR 1054.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information to your written report so we can determine whether your new engines conform with the requirements... Clean Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part 1054. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for test engines in a...

  12. 40 CFR 1051.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... your written report, so we can determine whether your new vehicles conform with the requirements of... Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for test engines (or...

  13. Latitudinal variation of leaf stomatal traits from species to community level in forests: linkage with ecosystem productivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruili; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Zhiwei; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    To explore the latitudinal variation of stomatal traits from species to community level and their linkage with net primary productivity (NPP), we investigated leaf stomatal density (SDL) and stomatal length (SLL) across 760 species from nine forest ecosystems in eastern China, and calculated the community-level SD (SDC) and SL (SLC) through species-specific leaf area index (LAI). Our results showed that latitudinal variation in species-level SDL and SLL was minimal, but community-level SDC and SLC decreased clearly with increasing latitude. The relationship between SD and SL was negative across species and different plant functional types (PFTs), but positive at the community level. Furthermore, community-level SDC correlated positively with forest NPP, and explained 51% of the variation in NPP. These findings indicate that the trade-off by regulating SDL and SLL may be an important strategy for plant individuals to adapt to environmental changes, and temperature acts as the main factor influencing community-level stomatal traits through alteration of species composition. Importantly, our findings provide new insight into the relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function. PMID:26403303

  14. Latitudinal variation of leaf stomatal traits from species to community level in forests: linkage with ecosystem productivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruili; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Zhiwei; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    To explore the latitudinal variation of stomatal traits from species to community level and their linkage with net primary productivity (NPP), we investigated leaf stomatal density (SDL) and stomatal length (SLL) across 760 species from nine forest ecosystems in eastern China, and calculated the community-level SD (SDC) and SL (SLC) through species-specific leaf area index (LAI). Our results showed that latitudinal variation in species-level SDL and SLL was minimal, but community-level SDC and SLC decreased clearly with increasing latitude. The relationship between SD and SL was negative across species and different plant functional types (PFTs), but positive at the community level. Furthermore, community-level SDC correlated positively with forest NPP, and explained 51% of the variation in NPP. These findings indicate that the trade-off by regulating SDL and SLL may be an important strategy for plant individuals to adapt to environmental changes, and temperature acts as the main factor influencing community-level stomatal traits through alteration of species composition. Importantly, our findings provide new insight into the relationship between plant traits and ecosystem function. PMID:26403303

  15. Modelling the impact of variations in ice sheet runoff on fjord and coastal biological productivity over annual to decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sole, A. J.; Cowton, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Each summer, vast quantities of surface-derived ice sheet meltwater runs off from the Greenland Ice Sheet. Much of this runoff is injected into glaciated fjords at depth beneath marine-terminating glaciers. Due to its low relative density, the runoff rises as a buoyant plume up the glaciers' calving fronts, entraining deep fjord water as it does so. This deep, ambient water tends to be relatively rich in nutrients and so the runoff plumes act to fertilise the surface layers of the fjord, leading to an observed late season spike in biological productivity in the fjord's surface layers. Although surface melting and runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet are predicted to increase significantly in the coming years and decades, the potential effect of this on fjord and coastal biological productivity is yet to be quantified. Here we present simulations of fjord circulation and biological productivity using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), and a new coupled representation of buoyant runoff plumes which enables decadal time period experiments of large three dimensional fjords. We investigate the effect on biological productivity of varying ice sheet runoff, ocean properties, near-surface winds and fjord geometry and bathymetry. We find that variations in ice sheet runoff are particularly important for biological productivity because the rate of discharge controls the depth at which the plumes reach neutral buoyancy and therefore whether the nutrient-rich deep water is delivered to the photic zone.

  16. Analysis of genetic and pathogenic variation among Alternaria solani in a potato production region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year survey was conducted in a potato production region to investigate the genetic variability within naturally infecting populations of Alternaria solani, the cause of early blight in potato, and between species A. solani and A. dauci. Genetic diversity among 151 isolates was assessed using s...

  17. Genetic variations alter production and behavioral responses following heat stress in two strains of laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress is a problem for both egg production and hen well-being. Given a stressor, genetic differences alter the type and degree of hens’ responses and their adaptation. This study examined heat stress responses of two strains of White Leghorns: Dekalb XL (DXL), a commercial strain individually ...

  18. The Sensitivity of Land Surface Model Simulations to Differences in Diurnal Variations In Two Bias Corrected Reanalysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A. A.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Bias reduced forcing datasets were produced from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/ National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis. For each forcing product, an identical bias reduction scheme was applied whereby the reanalysis fields were adjusted to match monthly mean observations. The two products were then used as forcing for a land surface model. Despite the identical bias correction applied to each reanalysis, differences to the diurnal forcing are manifest in LSM model predictions of soil moisture status, evaporation, snow water equivalence, and runoff. Magnitudes of these differences and resultant effects on hydrological flux simulation are compared for 20 control watersheds distributed across the North American continent with a particular emphasis placed on which of the input variations (e.g. precipitation and radiation forcing) dominate the differences to model output, what role land surface characteristics play (e.g. soils, vegetation, topography), and how these vary over the continent.

  19. Variations in cercarial production and the level of in vitro activation of metacercariae of two different isolates of Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Norbury, Luke J; Wilkowski, Przemysław; Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Wedrychowicz, Halina

    2015-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica infections cause large economic losses and are a serious veterinary medicine problem in many regions of the world. Recent studies examining fascioliasis in the bison population from Bialowieza National Park have shown that the prevalence of infection with this parasite is up to 100%. Liver flukes isolated from bison from Bialowieza National Park in Poland were compared with a fluke strain originally obtained from the Central Veterinary Laboratory, Weybridge, UK, to determine variations in cercarial production and establish the ability of their metacercariae to activate in vitro. Some small differences in cercarial production between the two isolates are shown, while significant differences in the ability of their metacercariae to activate in vitro were observed. PMID:26204191

  20. Ethnic Variation in Consumption of Traditional Tobacco Products and Lung Cancer Risk in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, Greg A; Hashibe, Mia; Siwakoti, Bhola; Wei, Mei; Thakur, Binay Kumar; Pun, Chin Bahadur; Milrod, Charles; Adhikari, Subodh; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Sapkota, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading contributor to cancer deaths in the developing world. Within countries, significant variability exists in the prevalence of lung cancer risk, yet limited information is available whether some of the observed variability is associated with differences in the consumption pattern of local tobacco products with differing potency. We recruited 606 lung cancer cases and 606 controls from the B.P. Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital in Nepal from 2009-2012. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with different tobacco products, using unconditional logistic regression. Unfiltered cigarettes tended to be the most frequently used products across ethnic subgroup with about 53.7% of Brahmins, 60.1% of Chettris, and 52.3% of Rai/Limbu/Magar/others. In contrast, about 39.9% of Madishe/Tharu smokers reported using bidi compared with only 27.7% who smoked unfiltered cigarettes. Among those who only smoked one type of product, choor/kankat smokers had the highest lung cancer risk (OR 10.2; 95% CI 6.2-16.6), followed by bidi smokers (OR 5.6; 95% CI 3.6-8.7), unfiltered cigarettes (OR 4.9; 95% CI 3.4-7.2), and filtered cigarettes (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.2-5.3). A clear dose-response relationship was observed between increased frequency of smoking and lung cancer risk across all ethnic subgroups. These results highlight the important role of traditional tobacco products on lung cancer risk in the low income countries. PMID:26320442

  1. Spatial and temporal variation in tree-ring α-cellulose oxygen and hydrogen isotope values as a record of water availability in the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, E. J.; Dodd, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have documented that tree ring oxygen and hydrogen isotopes primarily reflect source water; however, biosynthetic fractionation processes modify this signal and can have a varied response to environmental conditions. The degree to which source water contributes to δ2H and δ18O values of plant α-cellulose is species-specific and modern calibration studies are necessary. Here we present a calibration data set of P. tamarugo α-cellulose δ2H and δ18O values from the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. P. tamarugo trees are endemic to the region and have adapted to the extremely arid environment where average annual precipitation is < 5mm/yr. This modern isotope chronology has been constructed from living P. tamarugo trees (n=12) from the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin in the northern Atacama. Generally, the tree-ring α-cellulose δ18O values are poorly correlated with meteorological data from coastal stations (i.e. Iquique); however, there is good agreement between regional groundwater depth and α-cellulose δ18O values. Most notably, average α-cellulose δ18O values increase by >2 ‰ over the past 20 years associated with a ~1.1 m lowering of the local groundwater table throughout the area. The correlation between a-cellulose isotope values and hydrologic conditions in modern times provides a baseline for interpretation of tree-ring isotope chronologies from the past 9.5 kya. A high-resolution Holocene (1.8-9.1 kya) age record of Prosopis sp. tree ring α-cellulose δ18O values provides a proxy for climatic and hydrologic conditions. During the early Holocene δ18O values range from 31 to 35‰ (2σ=0.58‰), while during the late Holocene values are much more variable (27.4 to 41‰; 2σ=2.64‰). Anthropogenic demand on local water sources is the most significant environmental factor affecting the variation in modern α-cellulose δ18O values; however, climate induced changes in regional water availability are the dominant driver of variability

  2. Photosynthetic production in the Central Arctic during the record sea-ice minimum in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Méndez, M.; Katlein, C.; Rabe, B.; Nicolaus, M.; Peeken, I.; Bakker, K.; Flores, H.; Boetius, A.

    2015-02-01

    The ice-covered Central Arctic Ocean is characterized by low primary productivity due to light and nutrient limitations. The recent reduction in ice cover has the potential to substantially increase phytoplankton primary production, but little is yet known about the fate of the ice-associated primary production and of the nutrient supply with increasing warming. This study presents results from the Central Arctic Ocean collected during summer 2012, when sea-ice reached a minimum extent since the onset of satellite observations. Net primary productivity (NPP) was measured in the water column, sea ice and melt ponds by 14CO2 uptake at different irradiances. Photosynthesis vs. irradiance (PI) curves were established in laboratory experiments and used to upscale measured NPP to the deep Eurasian Basin (north of 78° N) using the irradiance-based Central Arctic Ocean Primary Productivity (CAOPP) model. In addition, new annual production was calculated from the seasonal nutrient drawdown in the mixed layer since last winter. Results show that ice algae can contribute up to 60% to primary production in the Central Arctic at the end of the season. The ice-covered water column has lower NPP rates than open water due to light limitation. As indicated by the nutrient ratios in the euphotic zone, nitrate was limiting primary production in the deep Eurasian Basin close to the Laptev Sea area, while silicate was the main limiting nutrient at the ice margin near the Atlantic inflow. Although sea-ice cover was substantially reduced in 2012, total annual new production in the Eurasian Basin was 17 ± 7 Tg C yr-1, which is within the range of estimates of previous years. However, when adding the contribution by sub-ice algae, the annual production for the deep Eurasian Basin (north of 78° N) could double previous estimates for that area with a surplus of 16 Tg C yr-1. Our data suggest that sub-ice algae are an important component of the ice-covered Central Arctic productivity. It

  3. Primary production estimates from recordings of solar-stimulated fluorescence in the equatorial Pacific at 150 deg W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegmann, P. M.; Lewis, M. R.; Davis, C. O.; Cullen, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Biological, optical, and hydrographical data were collected on the WEC88 cruise along 150 deg W and during a 6-day time-series station on the equator during February/March 1988. This area was characterized by a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM), located at 50-70 m depth at the equator and descending down to 120-125 m at the north and south end of the transect. Highest primary production rates were near-surface and confined to the equatorial region and stations between 7 deg and 11 deg N. To determine the relationship between solar-stimulated fluorescence (centered at 683 nm wavelength) and primary production, a production-fluorescence model based on phytoplankton physiology and marine optics is described. Results of model calculations predict that there is a linear relation between production and fluorescence. A comparison between morning and midday measurements of the production-fluorescence relation showed that there was some difference between the two, whereas evening measurements, on the other hand, were distinctly different from the morning/midday ones. This seems to suggest that diurnal variations contribute significantly to variability in the quantum yield of photochemical processes. The ratio of the quantum yield of photosynthesis to the quantum yield of fluorescence ranged between 0.24 and 0.44 molC/Ein for all stations. The highest value for this ratio occurred at the equatorial stations, indicating that latitudinal variability could have an effect on the production-fluorescence relation.

  4. 40 CFR 1054.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Clean Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part... type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1054.315 and the sample-size...

  5. 40 CFR 1051.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051...) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1051.315 and the sample-size calculation required in §...

  6. 40 CFR 1048.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 1048. We have not changed production processes or quality-control..., regardless of the procedure or type of equipment. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1048.315...

  7. 40 CFR 1045.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 1045. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for..., regardless of the procedure or type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1045.315 and...

  8. 40 CFR 1045.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 1045. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for..., regardless of the procedure or type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1045.315 and...

  9. 40 CFR 1048.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 1048. We have not changed production processes or quality-control..., regardless of the procedure or type of equipment. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1048.315...

  10. 40 CFR 1045.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 1045. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for..., regardless of the procedure or type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1045.315 and...

  11. 40 CFR 1054.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Clean Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part... type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1054.315 and the sample-size...

  12. 40 CFR 1048.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 1048. We have not changed production processes or quality-control..., regardless of the procedure or type of equipment. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1048.315...

  13. 40 CFR 1051.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051...) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1051.315 and the sample-size calculation required in §...

  14. 40 CFR 1054.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Clean Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part... type of engine. (8) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1054.315 and the sample-size...

  15. 40 CFR 1051.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Act. Our production-line testing conformed completely with the requirements of 40 CFR part 1051...) Provide the CumSum analysis required in § 1051.315 and the sample-size calculation required in §...

  16. Experimental records of the effect of food patchiness and predation on egg production of Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Tiselius, P.; Verity, P.; Paffehofer, G.A. ); Jonsson, P.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of predation and spatial patchiness in food distribution on egg production of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa were investigated in the laboratory. A postexperiment egg production method was developed to override the decline in number of copepods due to predation. The copepods were able to remain in food patches about 41-47% of the time, and consequently egg production rates were higher than expected from the average food concentration. Predation by the calanoid copepod Labidocera aestiva tended to increase egg production rates of A. tonsa. The interaction of patchiness and predation resulted in relatively less time spent by A. tonsa in the food patches, probably as a consequence of conflict between hunger level and predation risk. 40 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. 40 CFR 1048.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 1048. We have not changed production processes or quality-control... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION...

  18. 40 CFR 1045.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR part 1045. We have not changed production processes or quality-control procedures for... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES...

  19. Variation of Spirulina maxima biomass production in different depths of urea-used culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Affan, Md-Abu; Lee, Dae-Won; Al-Harbi, Salim Marzoog; Kim, Han-Jun; Abdulwassi, Najah Ibrahim; Heo, Soo-Jin; Oh, Chulhong; Park, Heung-Sik; Ma, Chae Woo; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Fewer studies have assessed the outdoor cultivation of Spirulina maxima compared with S. platensis, although the protein content of S. maxima is higher than S. platensis. Spirulina growth medium requires an increased amount of NaHCO3, Na2CO3, and NaNO3, which increases the production cost. Therefore, the current study used a low-cost but high-efficiency biomass production medium (Medium M-19) after testing 33 different media. The medium depth of 25 cm (group A) was sub-divided into A1 (50% cover with a black curtain (PolyMax, 12 oz ultra-blackout), A2 (25% cover), and A3 (no cover). Similarly the medium depths of 30 and 35 cm were categorized as groups B (B1, B2, and B3) and C (C1, C2, and C3), respectively, and the effects of depth and surface light availability on growth and biomass production were assessed. The highest biomass production was 2.05 g L-1 in group A2, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in all other groups and sub-groups. Spirulina maxima died in B1 and C1 on the fifth day of culture. The biochemical composition of the biomass obtained from A2 cultures, including protein, carbohydrate, lipid, moisture, and ash, was 56.59%, 14.42%, 0.94%, 5.03%, and 23.02%, respectively. Therefore, S. maxima could be grown outdoors with the highest efficiency in urea-enriched medium at a 25-cm medium depth with 25% surface cover or uncovered. PMID:26691456

  20. Variation of Spirulina maxima biomass production in different depths of urea-used culture medium.

    PubMed

    Affan, Md-Abu; Lee, Dae-Won; Al-Harbi, Salim Marzoog; Kim, Han-Jun; Abdulwassi, Najah Ibrahim; Heo, Soo-Jin; Oh, Chulhong; Park, Heung-Sik; Ma, Chae Woo; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Fewer studies have assessed the outdoor cultivation of Spirulina maxima compared with S. platensis, although the protein content of S. maxima is higher than S. platensis. Spirulina growth medium requires an increased amount of NaHCO3, Na2CO3, and NaNO3, which increases the production cost. Therefore, the current study used a low-cost but high-efficiency biomass production medium (Medium M-19) after testing 33 different media. The medium depth of 25 cm (group A) was sub-divided into A1 (50% cover with a black curtain (PolyMax, 12 oz ultra-blackout), A2 (25% cover), and A3 (no cover). Similarly the medium depths of 30 and 35 cm were categorized as groups B (B1, B2, and B3) and C (C1, C2, and C3), respectively, and the effects of depth and surface light availability on growth and biomass production were assessed. The highest biomass production was 2.05 g L-1 in group A2, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in all other groups and sub-groups. Spirulina maxima died in B1 and C1 on the fifth day of culture. The biochemical composition of the biomass obtained from A2 cultures, including protein, carbohydrate, lipid, moisture, and ash, was 56.59%, 14.42%, 0.94%, 5.03%, and 23.02%, respectively. Therefore, S. maxima could be grown outdoors with the highest efficiency in urea-enriched medium at a 25-cm medium depth with 25% surface cover or uncovered. PMID:26691456

  1. Variations in DNA subtype, antifungal susceptibility, and slime production among clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Hollis, R J

    1995-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity, slime production, and antifungal susceptibility among 60 isolates of C. parapsilosis from 44 patients and 10 patient care providers from five different medical centers. Molecular typing was performed using macrorestriction digest profiles with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REAG) and by electrophoretic karyotyping (EK). Slime production was evaluated by growing the organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, and itraconazole was determined using National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards proposed standard methods. Overall 28 different DNA types were identified by REAG and EK methods. MIC90 values ranged from 0.12 microgram/ml for itraconazole to 1.0 microgram/ml for fluconazole and amphotericin B. Sixty-five percent of the isolates produced slime: 37% were moderately to strongly positive, 28% were weakly positive, and 35% were negative. Overall, 83% of blood and catheter isolates were slime positive versus 53% of isolates from all other sites (P < 0.05). These data underscore the genetic diversity and susceptibility of C. parapsilosis to antifungal agents. Slime production may be important in enabling C. parapsilosis to cause catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:7789100

  2. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  3. Millennial-Scale Fluctuations in Stable Isotope and Productivity Proxy Records in the N. South China Sea During the Last Glacial-Interglacial Cycle: Comparison Between the East Asian and South West Monsoons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, M. J.; Altabet, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    Several published records attest to the response of the mid- and low-latitudes to millennial-scale climatic variability. However, forcings, teleconnections and their relative leads/lags between the sub-tropics and polar latitudes are unclear. We focus on the biological response to fluctuations in East Asian Monsoon intensity on sub-millennial timescales in the South China Sea (SCS) and compare these records with those obtained from the NW Arabian Sea dominated by the SW Monsoon. We have analyzed very rapidly accumulating sediments (c. 50cm/Ka) from the northern SCS recovered during ODP Leg 184 (Site 1144) in a region of high surface productivity c. 400km SE of Hong Kong. The SCS is the largest semi-enclosed marginal basin of the W. Pacific and is especially sensitive to the influences of the West Pacific Warm Pool and East Asian Monsoon. Nutrient supply from localized upwelling during the winter NE monsoon is augmented by cyclonic advection of substantial areas of upwelled water with a high nutrient content both offshore NW Philippines and SW of Taiwan during prevailing NE winds. With temporal resolution <100 yr, our results exhibit millennial-scale variations in both stable isotopes (Nitrogen and Oxygen) and productivity proxies (chlorins, total N) with clear correlation to the oxygen isotopic record of D-O events from the GISP2 ice-core. Apparently rapid and abrupt increases in productivity record intensification of the winter monsoon during cold stades, whilst remote changes in W. Pacific source water outwith the SCS basin appear to control sedimentary isotopic composition. Comparison with similar records in the NW Arabian Sea under the influence of the SW summer monsoon facilitates analysis of the response of the monsoon system to changes in vegetation, albedo and pressure gradient over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau (HTP). Monsoon intensity is clearly tightly coupled to high latitude climate change. Variations in seasonal response on the HTP produce quite

  4. Nutrient variation in an urban lake chain and its consequences for phytoplankton production.

    PubMed

    Roach, W John; Grimm, Nancy B

    2009-01-01

    In the Central Arizona-Phoenix (CAP) ecosystem, managers divert mixed stream water and groundwater to maintain an artificial lake chain in Indian Bend Wash (IBW), a historically flashy, ephemeral, desert stream. Nutrient concentrations in the CAP ecosystem's groundwater, stream water, and floodwater differ: stream water has low concentrations of both inorganic N and P, while groundwater is low in inorganic P but rich in nitrate (NO(3)(-)). Consequently, groundwater contribution drives inorganic N concentrations in the lake chain. In contrast, floodwater typically has high P concentrations while remaining low in N. Thus we expected N and P concentrations in IBW lakes to vary with the mix of water flowing through them. Elevated NO(3)(-) and low inorganic P concentrations were predicted when groundwater pumping was pronounced and this prediction was supported. We hypothesized that these predictable changes in water chemistry would affect nutrient limitation of phytoplankton. Laboratory nutrient-addition bioassays demonstrated that phytoplankton growth was P-limited throughout the summer of 2003 when N/P was high. However, after a late-season flood drove N/P below 31:1, the expected threshold between N and P limitation, N limitation was observed. Our results indicate that effects of floods, the preeminent historic drivers of Sonoran Desert stream biogeochemistry, are mitigated in urban ecosystems by decisions about which spigots to turn. Consequently, nutrient limitation of urban streams is driven as much by management decisions as by natural hydrologic variation. PMID:19465718

  5. Production and characterization of hard films of ZrN with temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, H.; Molina, C. M.; Benavides, V.; Ospina, R.; Sánchez, L. A.; Giraldo, A. L.; Arias, D. F.; Arango, Y. C.; Restrepo, E.; Arango, P.; Devia, A.

    2005-08-01

    ZrN films were grown by the PAPVD method in the pulsed arc technique; bilayers were grown on stainless steel substrates by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc system. To produce the coatings, a target of Zr with a purity of 99.99% was used. The system is composed by a reaction chamber with two opposite electrodes placed inside it. The target is the cathode and the samples of stainless steel are the anode. A pulsed power supply is used to generate the discharge. The coatings were grown, varying the temperature of the substrate between 50 °C and 260 °C. The pressure into chamber was 3 mbar and the voltage of the discharge was 270 V. XRD technique was employed to study the coatings, observing changes on the lattice paramenter and intensity variations of the crystallographic planes, as a function of the substrate temperature. Morphological characteristics were analized by means of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), determining the thickness and the grain size.

  6. Grain-scale pressure variations recorded in orthopyroxene from the diamond grade ultra-high pressure Svartberget peridotite body, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.

    2014-05-01

    The ultra-high pressure (UHP) area in the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) in Norway is recognized as a giant UHP domain that resulted from the collision of Baltica and Laurentia during the Caledonian Orogeny. Recent geochronological data suggest the WGR resided at UHP for several tens of millions of years and slowly exhumed near- isothermally to amphibolite facies conditions. The Svartberget peridotite body is located in the north-westernmost part of the UHP area of the WGR. The rocks record diamond grade peak metamorphism at ~800 ° C in crosscutting pyroxenite veins as evidenced by micro-diamond inclusions in Caledonian metamorphic garnet. The peridotite body preserves primary spinel-garnet-peridotite assemblages stable at much lower pressure (~2.0 GPa at ~800 ° C). Orthopyroxene typically shows bowl-shaped aluminium (Al) zoning and conventional geothermobarometry using core compositions of garnet-opx mineral pairs yields P-T estimates of 5.5 GPa at ~800 ° C. Besides Al increasing toward the rims of orthopyroxene grains, concentrations also increase in cracks and veins crosscutting the mineral. Here, recently developed unconventional geobarometry and Gibbs minimization methods are used to derive the grain-scale pressure variations corresponding to the observed Al-zoning. The methods independently result in pressure variations from core to rim on the order of 2.0 GPa. Interestingly, low-Al cores correspond to low pressures whereas high-Al rims correspond to high pressures, opposite to conventional geothermobarometry results. However, the new estimates are in agreement with the consideration that at high pressure the high density phases become more stable. In a binary orthopyroxene in the MAS-system, the Mg-Tschermak endmember thought to be the dominant Al-species in the mineral has a higher density then the Al-free enstatite endmember. Therefore at higher pressure the Mg-Tschermak endmember in orthopyroxene is favoured over the enstatite endmember. This is similar

  7. The Terminator Time in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation as recorded by the Romanian VLF/LF radio monitoring system related to earthquake occurrence and volcano erruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, I. A.; Moldovan, A. S.; Biagi, P. F.; Ionescu, C.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Boudjada, M. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Romanian VLF/LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data is part of the European international network named INFREP. Information on electromagnetic fields' intensities created by transmitters at a receiving site are indicating the quality of the propagation along the paths between the receivers and transmitters. Studying the ionosphere's influences on the electromagnetic waves' propagation along a certain path is a method to put into evidence possible modifications of its lower structure and composition as earthquakes' precursors. The VLF/LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 and has already 3 years of testing, functioning and proving its utility in the forecast of some earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. Simultaneously we monitor, in the same site with the VLF/LF receiver, the vertical atmospheric electric field and different other meteorological parameters as: temperature, pressure or rainfall. The global magnetic conditions are emphasized with the help of Daily Geomagnetic Index Kp. At a basic level, the adopted analysis consists in a simple statistical evaluation of the signals by comparing the instantaneous values to the trend of the signal. In this paper we pay attention to the terminator times in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation, which are defined as the times of minimum in amplitude (or phase) around sunrise and sunset. These terminator times are found to shift significantly just around the earthquake. In the case of Kobe earthquake, there were found significant shifts in both morning and evening terminator times and these authors interpreted the shift in terminator time in terms of the lowering of lower ionosphere by using the full-wave mode theory. A LabVIEW application which accesses the VLF/LF receiver through internet was developed. This program opens the receiver's web-page and automatically retrieves the list of data

  8. Contrasting Metamorphic Record of Heat Production Anomalies in the Penokean Orogen of Northern Michigan.

    PubMed

    Attoh

    2000-05-01

    It is proposed that the contrasting metamorphic mineral assemblages of the isolated amphibolite facies metamorphic highs in the Penokean orogen of northern Michigan may be caused by different heat production rates in the Archean basement. This hypothesis is based on concentrations of K, U, and Th in the Archean basement gneisses and Paleoproterozoic metasediments that indicate significant contribution of radiogenic heating during Penokean metamorphism. Heat production was anomalously high ( approximately 10.6 µWm-3) where andalusite-bearing mineral assemblages indicate that high temperatures were attained at shallow crustal levels ( approximately 550 degrees -600 degrees C at approximately 3 kbar). In contrast, where exposed metamorphic rocks indicate peak temperatures of 600 degrees -650 degrees C at 6-7 kbar, heat production in the Archean basement was lower ( approximately 3.7 µWm-3). The effect of heat production rates on the metamorphic pressure-temperature paths was tested with numerical thermal models. The calculations show (1) that if the heat production rate, where andalusite-bearing assemblages formed, was significantly <6.0 µWm-3, the estimated pressure at peak temperatures (PTmax) would be much higher and lie in the sillimanite or kyanite stability fields; and (2) differences between PTmax estimates for the metamorphic highs based on thermobarometry can be reproduced if thermal history involved significant crustal thickening as well as moderate unroofing rates. PMID:10769161

  9. Changes in productivity and redox conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum as recorded in high-resolution geochemical records from Alfonso Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; Lyons, T. W.; Carriquiry, J. D.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Beaufort, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum represents the most recent major sea level low stand in Earth history. Such changes in eustatic sea level impacted the oxygenation of marine basins, yet the characteristics and mechanisms of those impacts remain poorly known. Specific basin conditions are needed to develop, record, and preserve those paleoredox changes through time most effectively, including rapid sedimentation rates and silled basin morphologies. The anoxic Alfonso Basin, partially separated from the Gulf of California by a bathymetric sill, is such a place. The basin is located in a dry semiarid region dominated by dust inputs and only occasional tropical cyclone-induced fluvial contributions. We present the first multi-proxy reconstruction of southern Gulf of California paleoredox that covers an uninterrupted timespan from the Late Pleistocene to the present, with an emphasis on the Last Glacial Maximum. In this research we contrast geochemical data from a 47-meter-long sediment core (collected with the giant CALYPSO corer aboard the R/V Marion Dufresne) with the solid phase and pore water chemical data from a shorter but very detailed box core (collected on the R/V El Puma), both from Alfonso Basin. Our results show that during the Late Pleistocene and throughout the Holocene several paleoredox shifts occurred, often accompanied by differences in lamination (laminated/massive alternations) and trace element (Mo, V, U) compositions; detailed Fe chemistry (FeHR/FeTand Fe/Al ratios); as well as carbon and sulfur concentrations and isotope ratios. For example, FeHR/FeT ratios indicate values of roughly 0.15 during the Last Glacial Maximum (lower than theoretic threshold of 0.2 between oxic and anoxic), suggesting more oxic conditions, in comparison to 0.25 and higher in the Holocene. Most of the variability seen in these proxies is related to global sea level change, while some variability is instead related to local variations in paleoproductivity, often connected to

  10. Effect of Tannin and Species Variation on In vitro Digestibility, Gas, and Methane Production of Tropical Browse Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gemeda, B. S.; Hassen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen tanniferous browse plants were collected from South Africa to investigate their digestibility, gas production (GP) characteristics and methane production. Fresh samples were collected, dried in forced oven, and ground and analyzed for nutrient composition. In vitro GP and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) were determined using rumen fluid collected, strained and anaerobically prepared. A semi- automated system was used to measure GP by incubating the sample in a shaking incubator at 39°C. There was significant (p<0.05) variation in chemical composition of studied browses. Crude protein (CP) content of the species ranged from 86.9 to 305.0 g/kg dry matter (DM). The neutral detergent fiber (NDF) ranged from 292.8 to 517.5 g/kg DM while acid detergent fiber (ADF) ranged from 273.3 to 495.1 g/kg DM. The ash, ether extract, non-fibrous carbohydrate, neutral detergent insoluble nitrogen, and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen and CP were negatively correlated with methane production. Methane production was positively correlated with NDF, ADF, cellulose and hemi-cellulose. Tannin decreased GP, IVOMD, total volatile fatty acid and methane production. The observed low methanogenic potential and substantial ammonia generation of some of the browses might be potentially useful as rumen manipulating agents. However, a systematic evaluation is needed to determine optimum levels of supplementation in a mixed diet in order to attain a maximal depressing effect on enteric CH4 production with a minimal detrimental effect on rumen fermentation of poor quality roughage based diet. PMID:25557814

  11. Variation in M protein production among Streptococcus pyogenes strains according to emm genotype.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakado; Suzuki, Masahiro; Hirose, Kaoru; Hiramatsu, Reiji; Minagawa, Hiroko; Minami, Masaaki; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okamoto, Akira; Ohta, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2011-06-01

    M protein is an important virulence determinant in Streptococcus pyogenes, but the amounts of M protein in various strains of the species remain to be elucidated. To assess the amount of M protein in strains of each emm genotype, dot blot analysis was performed on 141 clinically isolated strains. Among the cell membrane-associated proteins, M protein was present in greater quantities in the emm1, 3, and 6 strains than in the other emm strains. In addition three strains, one each of the emm1, 3, and 6 types, showed prolific M protein production (M protein-high producers). These three emm genotypes are frequently isolated in clinical practice. Sequencing of the csrRS gene, one of the two-component signal transduction systems implicated in virulence, was performed on 25 strains bearing different amounts of M protein. CsrS mutations, in contrast to CsrR protein, were detected in 11 strains. The M protein-high producer strain of emm1 type carried two amino acid substitutions, whereas the other three emm1 strains carried only one substitution each. The M protein-high producer expressed its emm gene more strongly than the corresponding M protein-low producer did according to TaqMan RT-PCR. These observations suggest that the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in CsrS protein may contribute, at least in part, to the large amount of M protein production seen in several emm genotypes. PMID:21371090

  12. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30°N-40°N and 40°N-50°N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  13. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health related research. Volume 4: Production and materials handling

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This is the fourth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume 4 is to describe record series pertaining to production and materials handling activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of production and materials handling practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to production and materials handling policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records.

  14. Paleo-ocean chemistry records in marine opal: Implications for fluxes of trace elements, cosmogenic nuclides ( 10Be and 26Al), and biological productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D.; Charles, C.; Vacher, L.; Goswami, J. N.; Jull, A. J. T.; McHargue, L.; Finkel, R. C.

    2006-07-01

    Here, we provide evidence suggesting that marine (diatom) opal contains not only a high fidelity record of dissolved oceanic concentrations of cosmic ray-produced radionuclides, 10Be and 26Al, but also a record of temporal variations in a large number of trace elements such as Ti, Fe, Zn and Mn. This finding is derived from measurements in purified biogenic opal that can be separated from detrital materials using a newly developed technique based on surface charge characteristics. Initial results from a sediment core taken near the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front (ODP Site 1093) show dramatic changes in the intrinsic concentrations of, Be, Al, Ti, Fe, Mn and Zn in the opal assemblages during the past ˜140 kyr BP. The results imply appreciable climatically controlled fluctuations in the level of bioreactive trace elements. The time series of total Be, Al, Ti, Fe and 10Be in the sediment core are all well correlated with each other and with dust records in the polar ice cores. The observations suggest that a significant flux of these trace metals to oceans is contributed by the aeolian dust, in this case, presumably from the Patagonia. This observation also allows determination of fluxes of dust-contributed 10Be to the Antarctica ice sheets. However, our data show that the relationships among the various metals are not perfectly linear. During periods of higher dissolved concentrations of trace elements (indicated by Fe and Ti) the relative concentrations of bioreactive elements, Be, Al, Mn and Zn are decreased. By contrast, the Fe/Zn and Fe/Mn ratios decrease significantly during each transition from cold to warm periods. The relative behavior could be consistent with any of the following processes: (i) enhanced biological productivity due to greater supply of the bioreactive elements (e.g. Zn) during cold periods (ii) increased biological and inorganic scavenging of particle active elements (e.g. Be and Al) during early interglacial periods (iii

  15. 40 CFR 1054.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....-directed production volume and number of tests for each engine family. (3) Describe how you randomly... procedure and schedule you used. (6) Provide the test number; the date, time and duration of testing; test..., modification, repair, preparation, maintenance, or test for the test engine if you did not report it...

  16. 40 CFR 1045.345 - What production-line testing records must I send to EPA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... total U.S.-directed production volume and number of tests for each engine family. (3) Describe how you... the procedure and schedule you used. (6) Provide the test number; the date, time and duration of... nonroutine adjustment, modification, repair, preparation, maintenance, or test for the test engine if you...

  17. Coexistence in tropical forests through asynchronous variation in annual seed production.

    PubMed

    Usinowicz, Jacob; Wright, S Joseph; Ives, Anthony R

    2012-09-01

    The storage effect is a mechanism that can facilitate the coexistence of competing species through temporal fluctuations in reproductive output. Numerous natural systems have the prerequisites for the storage effect, yet it has rarely been quantitatively assessed. Here, we investigate the possible importance of the storage effect in explaining the coexistence of tree species in the diverse tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. This tropical forest has been monitored for more than 20 years, and annual seed production is asynchronous among species, a primary requirement for the storage effect. We constructed a model of forest regeneration that includes species-specific recruitment through seed, sapling, and adult stages, and we parameterized the model using data for 28 species for which information is known about seedling germination and survival. Simulations of the model demonstrated that the storage effect alone can be a strong mechanism allowing long-term persistence of species. We also developed a metric to quantify the strength of the storage effect in a way comparable to classical resource partitioning. Applying this metric to seed production data from 108 species, the storage effect reduces the strength of pairwise interspecific competition to 11-43% of the strength of intraspecific competition, thereby demonstrating strong potential to facilitate coexistence. Finally, for a subset of 51 species whose phylogenetic relationships are known, we compared the strength of the storage effect between pairs of species to their phylogenetic similarity. The strength of the storage effect between closely related species was on average no different from distantly related species, implying that the storage effect can be important in promoting the coexistence of even closely related species. PMID:23094379

  18. Latitudinal variations in intermediate depth ventilation and biological production over northeastern Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zones during the last 60 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Bard, Edouard

    2012-10-01

    Mechanisms affecting past variability in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) are poorly known. We analyzed core MD02-2524, obtained from the Nicaragua Margin in the present ETNP OMZ for major and minor elements (titanium (Ti), brome (Br), silicon (Si), potassium (K), and calcium (Ca)) using an X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) core scanner, and redox-sensitive trace elements (uranium (U), molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni)) determined by ICP-MS. The U and Mo content was higher during the deglaciation than during the Holocene and the last glacial maximum, whereas enrichment was not observed for Ni, an element closely associated with organic matter. High-resolution XRF scanning indicated that the Ca-based carbonate content had millennial-scale variability inversely correlated with Br-based organic matter and Si/K-based opal content during the last glacial period. The available data suggest no clear regional trend in biological productivity during the last deglaciation, but significant local variability in the coastal eastern equatorial Pacific. The trace element enrichment and the lack of a concomitant increase in biogenic phases indicated that an enhanced ETNP OMZ, at least between 15°N and 12°N at a water depth of 500-900 m, was principally caused by a reduced oxygen supply driven by oceanic circulation to the Nicaragua Basin during the deglaciation. The observed patterns can be interpreted as the distinct changes in the oxygenation state of northern and southern water masses at intermediate depths. We also found evidence for a decoupling between local productivity and pore water oxygenation for several millennial-scale events during Marine Isotopic Stage 3, indicating that remote oxygen consumption and/or oceanic ventilation impacted OMZ intensity. Multi-millennial scale variations of the productivity at Papagayo upwelling cell displayed an opposite trend from productivity at the Costa Rica Dome, in relation with the latitudinal shift

  19. Variations in vegetation cover and topography control gully density and sediment production on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    The factors controlling topsoil erosion rates are relatively well understood. This explains why topsoil erosion rates on the Chinese loess plateau (CLP) can be relatively accurately estimated using a combination of empirical data and relatively simple models (Zhao et al., in press). This is, however, not the case for non-topsoil erosion (sediment production by gullying and landslides): while it is well known that these processes produce significant amounts of sediment, the factors controlling their intensity on the CLP are far less understood. In this study, the contribution of non-topsoil erosion to total sediment production on the CLP was investigated. We estimated non-topsoil erosion rates (ENT) by making the difference between measured total sediment yield and the estimated topsoil erosion in 46 gauged catchments on the CLP for the period 1950-1970, when soil conservation measures were mostly absent in the area. We tested an extensive set of environmental variables related to topography, climate and the impact of land use for correlation Our results showed that the average catchment erosion rate (E) and ENT between 1950 and 1970 were 68.29 tha‑1yr‑1 and 58.02 tha‑1yr‑1 respectively. The sediment contribution of non-topsoil erosion to total sediment production ranged between 0 and 97% with a mean of 70%. Both E and ENT were significantly related with river slope, land use, NDVI, and gully density. However, gully density was the only variable explaining a major part of the variance in both E (60%) and ENT (57%). Gully density itself was significantly related to topography and vegetation cover but not to precipitation. Importantly, gully density was not only related to overall slope steepness, but also the river gradients and the hypsometric integral, suggesting that not only land cover disturbance but also tectonic uplift may control gully density and erosion rates. The absence of a clear climate signal, both with respect to the variation in gully density

  20. Regional primary productivity differences off Morocco (NW-Africa) recorded by modern benthic foraminifera and their stable carbon isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberwein, A.; Mackensen, A.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of different primary productivity regimes on live (Rose Bengal stained) and dead benthic foraminiferal distribution, as well as on the stable carbon isotopic composition of foraminiferal tests, was investigated in sediment surface samples (0-1 cm) from the upwelling region off Morocco between Cape Ghir (31°N) and Cape Yubi (27°N). A combination of factor analysis, detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was applied to the benthic foraminiferal data sets. Five major assemblages for both the live and dead fauna were revealed by factor analysis. In the cape regions organic matter fluxes are enhanced by high chlorophyll- α concentrations in the overlying surface waters. Here, benthic foraminiferal faunas are characterized by identical live and dead assemblages, high standing stocks, and low species δ13C values, indicating constant year-round high productivity. Bulimina marginata dominates the unique fauna at the shallowest station off Cape Ghir indicating highest chlorophyll- a concentrations. Off both capes, the succession of the Bulimina aculeata/ Uvigerina mediterranea assemblage, the Sphaeroidina bulloides/ Gavelinopsis translucens assemblage, and the Hoeglundina elegans assemblage from the shelf to the deep sea reflects the decrease in chlorophyll- a concentrations, hence the export flux. In contrast, the area between the capes is characterized by differently composed live and dead assemblages, low standing stocks, and less depleted δ13C values, thus reflecting low primary productivity. High foraminiferal numbers of Epistominella exigua, Eponides pusillus, and Globocassidulina subglobosa in the dead fauna indicate a seasonally varying primary productivity signal. Significantly lower mean δ13C values were recorded in Bulimina mexicana, Cibicidoides kullenbergi, H. elegans, U. mediterranea and Uvigerina peregrina. Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi is a faithful recorder of bottom water δ13C in the Canary

  1. Sugarcane for water-limited environments. Variation in stomatal conductance and its genetic correlation with crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Basnayake, J; Jackson, P A; Inman-Bamber, N G; Lakshmanan, P

    2015-07-01

    Stomatal conductance (g(s)) and canopy temperature have been used to estimate plant water status in many crops. The behaviour of g(s) in sugarcane indicates that the internal leaf water status is controlled by regular opening and closing of stomata. A large number of g(s) measurements obtained across varying moisture regimes, locations, and crop cycles with a diverse sugarcane germplasm composed of introgression, and commercial clones indicated that there is a high genetic variation for g(s) that can be exploited in a breeding programme. Regardless of the environmental influences on the expression of this trait, moderate heritability was observed across 51 sets of individual measurements made on replicated trials over 3 years. The clone×water status interaction (G×E) variation was smaller than the clone (G) variation on many occasions. A wide range of genetic correlations (r(g)= -0.29 to 0.94) between g(s) and yield were observed across test environments in all three different production regions used. Canopy conductance (g(c)) based on g(s) and leaf area index (LAI) showed a stronger genetic correlation than the g(s) with cane yield (tonnes of cane per hectare; TCH) at 12 months (mature crop). The regression analysis of input weather data for the duration of measurements showed that the predicted values of r(g) correlated with the maximum temperature (r=0.47) during the measurements and less with other environmental variables. These results confirm that the g(c) could have potential as a criterion for early-stage selection of clones in sugarcane breeding programmes. PMID:25948709

  2. Temporal variation of oceanic spreading and crustal production rates during the last 180 My

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, Jean-Pascal; Humler, Eric

    2004-11-01

    oceanic crusts and seismic measurements [E. Humler, C.H. Langmuir, V. Daux, Depth versus age: new perspectives from the chemical compositions of ancient crust, Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 173 (1999) 7-23], the magmatic flux at young (0-80 Ma) oceanic ridges appears to be about 18.1±3.4 km 3 year -1 and was possibly 15% to 30% higher during the Mesozoic. We propose that mantle temperature variation provides an alternative mechanism to spreading rate for the Cretaceous highstand in sea-level and atmospheric CO 2 generation.

  3. Comparison of the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) fire product to ground-based fire records in Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuefei; Yu, Chao; Tian, Di; Ruminski, Mark; Robertson, Kevin; Waller, Lance A.; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-01

    Biomass burning has a significant and adverse impact on air quality, climate change, and various ecosystems. The Hazard Mapping System (HMS) detects fires using data from multiple satellite sensors in order to maximize its fire detection rate. However, to date, the detection rate of the HMS fire product for small fires has not been well studied, especially using ground-based fire records. This paper utilizes the 2011 fire information compiled from ground observations and burn authorizations in Georgia to assess the comprehensiveness of the HMS active fire product. The results show that detection rates of the hybrid HMS increase substantially by integrating multiple satellite instruments. The detection rate increases dramatically from 3% to 80% with an increase in fire size from less than 0.02 km2 to larger than 2 km2, resulting in detection of approximately 12% of all recorded fires which represent approximately 57% of the total area burned. The spatial pattern of detection rates reveals that grid cells with high detection rates are generally located in areas where large fires occur frequently. The seasonal analysis shows that overall detection rates in winter and spring (12% and 13%, respectively) are higher than those in summer and fall (3% and 6%, respectively), mainly because of higher percentages of large fires (>0.19 km2) that occurred in winter and spring. The land cover analysis shows that detection rates are 2-7 percentage points higher in land cover types that are prone to large fires such as forestland and shrub land.

  4. Regional Variation of CH4 and N2 Production Processes in the Deep Aquifers of an Accretionary Prism

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Makoto; Ishikawa, Shugo; Nagai, Kazushige; Hirata, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Kunio; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary prisms are mainly composed of ancient marine sediment scraped from the subducting oceanic plate at a convergent plate boundary. Large amounts of anaerobic groundwater and natural gas, mainly methane (CH4) and nitrogen gas (N2), are present in the deep aquifers associated with an accretionary prism; however, the origins of these gases are poorly understood. We herein revealed regional variations in CH4 and N2 production processes in deep aquifers in the accretionary prism in Southwest Japan, known as the Shimanto Belt. Stable carbon isotopic and microbiological analyses suggested that CH4 is produced through the non-biological thermal decomposition of organic matter in the deep aquifers in the coastal area near the convergent plate boundary, whereas a syntrophic consortium of hydrogen (H2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H2-utilizing methanogens contributes to the significant production of CH4 observed in deep aquifers in midland and mountainous areas associated with the accretionary prism. Our results also demonstrated that N2 production through the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by denitrifying bacteria is particularly prevalent in deep aquifers in mountainous areas in which groundwater is affected by rainfall. PMID:27592518

  5. High genetic variation in resting-stage production in a metapopulation: Is there evidence for local adaptation?

    PubMed

    Roulin, Anne C; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Hall, Matthew D; Walser, Jean-Claude; Haag, Christoph; Ebert, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Local adaptation is a key process for the maintenance of genetic diversity and population diversification. A better understanding of the mechanisms that allow (or prevent) local adaptation constitutes a key in apprehending how and at what spatial scale it occurs. The production of resting stages is found in many taxa and reflects an adaptation to outlast adverse environmental conditions. Daphnia magna (Crustacea) can alternate between asexual and sexual reproduction, the latter being linked to dormancy, as resting stages can only be produced sexually. In this species, on a continental scale, resting-stage production is locally adapted--that is, it is induced when the photoperiod indicates the imminence of habitat deterioration. Here, we aimed to explore whether selection is strong enough to maintain local adaptation at a scale of a few kilometers. We assessed life-history traits of 64 D. magna clones originating from 11 populations of a metapopulation with permanent and intermittent pool habitats. We found large within- and between-population variation for all dormancy-related traits, but no evidence for the hypothesized higher resting-stage production in animals from intermittent habitats. We discuss how gene flow, founder events, or other forms of selection might interfere with the process of local adaptation. PMID:26418426

  6. [Recording the lesions in slaughter animals for quality assurance in meat production].

    PubMed

    Blaha, T

    1994-07-01

    Pathologic-anatomic lesions of lungs, pleura, pericard and liver in slaughter pigs, which can be assigned to the farm of origin, are well suited as indicator for the herd health. The paper demonstrates a code for quantifying the lesions in single animals as well as a code for quantifying the health status of the herds the pigs come from. When used in the framework of integrated quality assurance systems (IQS) for the pork production, slaughter checks and their feed back to the farmer will lead to a gradual improvement of the health status of fattening herds, since it is expected that farmers who are informed about major lacks in their herd health will ask for veterinary consultation. In general, the implementation of IQS from "conception to consumption" will enlarge the importance of the veterinary profession within the production chain for food of animal origin. PMID:7924960

  7. The diurnal variation of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals: Implications for the heterogeneous production of HNO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Stimpfle, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals obtained through sunrise and sunset in the lower statosphere during SPADE are compared to results from a photochemical model constrained by observed concentrations of radical precursors and environmental conditions. Models allowing for heteogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols agree with measured concentrations of NO, NO2, and ClO throughout the day, but fail to account for high concentrations of OH and HO2 observed near sunrise and sunset. The morning burst of (OH) and (HO2) coincides with the rise of (NO) from photolysis of NO2, suggesting a new source of HO(x) that photolyzes in the near UV (350 to 400 nm) spectral region. A model that allow for the heterogeneous production of HNO2 results in an excellent simulation of the diurnal variations of (OH) and (HO2).

  8. The Diurnal Variation of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, and Chlorine Radicals: Implications for the Heterogeneous Production of HNO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Koplow, J. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Pfister, L.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Yue, G. K.; Prather, M. J.; Wilson, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals obtained through sunrise and sunset in the lower stratosphere during SPADE are compared to results from a photochemical model constrained by observed concentrations of radical precursors and environmental conditions. Models allowing for heterogeneous hydrolysis of N205 on sulfate aerosols agree with measured concentrations of NO, NO2, and ClO throughout the day, but fail to account for high concentrations of OH and H02 observed near sunrise and sunset. The morning burst of [OH] and [HO2] coincides with the rise of [NO] from photolysis of N02, suggesting a new source of HO, that photolyzes in the near UV (350 to 400 nm) spectral region. A model that allows for the heterogeneous production of HN02 results in an excellent simulation of the diurnal variations of [OH] and [HO2].

  9. Automation of Presentation Record Production Based on Rich-Media Technology Using SNT Petri Nets Theory

    PubMed Central

    Martiník, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Rich-media describes a broad range of digital interactive media that is increasingly used in the Internet and also in the support of education. Last year, a special pilot audiovisual lecture room was built as a part of the MERLINGO (MEdia-rich Repository of LearnING Objects) project solution. It contains all the elements of the modern lecture room determined for the implementation of presentation recordings based on the rich-media technologies and their publication online or on-demand featuring the access of all its elements in the automated mode including automatic editing. Property-preserving Petri net process algebras (PPPA) were designed for the specification and verification of the Petri net processes. PPPA does not need to verify the composition of the Petri net processes because all their algebraic operators preserve the specified set of the properties. These original PPPA are significantly generalized for the newly introduced class of the SNT Petri process and agent nets in this paper. The PLACE-SUBST and ASYNC-PROC algebraic operators are defined for this class of Petri nets and their chosen properties are proved. The SNT Petri process and agent nets theory were significantly applied at the design, verification, and implementation of the programming system ensuring the pilot audiovisual lecture room functionality. PMID:26258164

  10. Variations in Atlantic surface ocean paleoceanography, 50°-80° N: A time-slice record of the last 30,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, Michael; Jansen, Eystein; Weinelt, Mara; Arnold, Maurice; Duplessy, Jean Claude; Erlenkeuser, Helmut; FlatøY, Astrid; Johannessen, Gro; Johannessen, Truls; Jung, Simon; Koc, Nalan; Labeyrie, Laurent; Maslin, Mark; Pflaumann, Uwe; Schulz, Hartmut

    1995-12-01

    accelerating buildup of the great European ice sheets; in the early deglacial, meltwater probably induced a southward flow of cold water along Norway, which led to the Oldest Dryas cold spell. An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on a diskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN to AGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUEST as the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APEND. Type LS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file to get it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system.) (Paper 95PA01453, Variations in Atlantic surface ocean paleoceanography, 50°-80°N: A time-slice record of the last 30,000 years, M. Sarnthein et al.) Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order.

  11. Temporal Variations of Water Productivity in Irrigated Corn: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Yield and Water Use across Central Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Tony; Yang, Haishun; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Water Productivity (WP) of a crop defines the relationship between the economic or physical yield of the crop and its water use. With this concept it is possible to identify disproportionate water use or water-limited yield gaps and thereby support improvements in agricultural water management. However, too often important qualitative and quantitative environmental factors are not part of a WP analysis and therefore neglect the aspect of maintaining a sustainable agricultural system. In this study, we examine both the physical and economic WP in perspective with temporally changing environmental conditions. The physical WP analysis was performed by comparing simulated maximum attainable corn yields per unit of water using the crop model Hybrid-Maize with observed data from 2005 through 2013 from 108 farm plots in the Central Platte and the Tri Basin Natural Resource Districts of Nebraska. In order to expand the WP analysis on external factors influencing yields, a second model, Maize-N, was used to estimate optimal nitrogen (N)–fertilizer rate for specific fields in the study area. Finally, a vadose zone flow and transport model, HYDRUS-1D for simulating vertical nutrient transport in the soil, was used to estimate locations of nitrogen pulses in the soil profile. The comparison of simulated and observed data revealed that WP was not on an optimal level, mainly due to large amounts of irrigation used in the study area. The further analysis illustrated year-to-year variations of WP during the nine consecutive years, as well as the need to improve fertilizer management to favor WP and environmental quality. In addition, we addressed the negative influence of groundwater depletion on the economic WP through increasing pumping costs. In summary, this study demonstrated that involving temporal variations of WP as well as associated environmental and economic issues can represent a bigger picture of WP that can help to create incentives to sustainably improve

  12. Temporal Variations of Water Productivity in Irrigated Corn: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Yield and Water Use across Central Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tony; Yang, Haishun; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Water Productivity (WP) of a crop defines the relationship between the economic or physical yield of the crop and its water use. With this concept it is possible to identify disproportionate water use or water-limited yield gaps and thereby support improvements in agricultural water management. However, too often important qualitative and quantitative environmental factors are not part of a WP analysis and therefore neglect the aspect of maintaining a sustainable agricultural system. In this study, we examine both the physical and economic WP in perspective with temporally changing environmental conditions. The physical WP analysis was performed by comparing simulated maximum attainable corn yields per unit of water using the crop model Hybrid-Maize with observed data from 2005 through 2013 from 108 farm plots in the Central Platte and the Tri Basin Natural Resource Districts of Nebraska. In order to expand the WP analysis on external factors influencing yields, a second model, Maize-N, was used to estimate optimal nitrogen (N)-fertilizer rate for specific fields in the study area. Finally, a vadose zone flow and transport model, HYDRUS-1D for simulating vertical nutrient transport in the soil, was used to estimate locations of nitrogen pulses in the soil profile. The comparison of simulated and observed data revealed that WP was not on an optimal level, mainly due to large amounts of irrigation used in the study area. The further analysis illustrated year-to-year variations of WP during the nine consecutive years, as well as the need to improve fertilizer management to favor WP and environmental quality. In addition, we addressed the negative influence of groundwater depletion on the economic WP through increasing pumping costs. In summary, this study demonstrated that involving temporal variations of WP as well as associated environmental and economic issues can represent a bigger picture of WP that can help to create incentives to sustainably improve

  13. Chilean and Southeast Pacific paleoclimate variations during the last glacial cycle: directly correlated pollen and δ18O records from ODP Site 1234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, Linda; Heusser, Cal; Mix, Alan; McManus, Jerry

    2006-12-01

    Joint pollen and oxygen isotope data from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1234 in the southeast Pacific provide the first, continuous record of temperate South American vegetation and climate from the last 140 ka. Located at ˜36°S, ˜65 km offshore of Concepcion, Chile, Site 1234 monitors the climatic transition zone between northern semi-arid, summer dry-winter wet climate and southern year-round, rainy, cool temperate climate. Dominance of onshore winds suggests that pollen preserved here reflects transport to the ocean via rivers that drain the region and integrate conditions from the coastal mountains to the Andean foothills. Down-hole changes in diagnostic pollen assemblages from xeric lowland deciduous forest (characterized by grasses, herbs, ferns, and trees such as deciduous beech, Nothofagus obliqua), mesic Valdivian Evergreen Forest (including conifers such as the endangered Prumnopitys andina), and Subantarctic Evergreen Rainforest (comprised primarily of southern beech, N. dombeyi) reveal large rapid shifts that likely reflect latitudinal movements in atmospheric circulation and storm tracks associated with the southern westerly winds. During glacial intervals (MIS 2-4, and 6), rainforests and parkland dominated by Nothofagus moved northward into the region. At the MIS 6/5e transition, coeval with the rapid shift to lower isotopic values, rainforest vegetation was rapidly replaced by xeric plant communities associated with Mediterranean-type climate. An increased prominence of halophytic vegetation suggests that MIS 5e was more arid and possibly warmer than MIS 1. Although rainforest pollen rises again at the end of MIS 5e, lowland deciduous forest pollen persists through MIS 5d and 5c, into MIS 5b. Substantial millennial-scale variations occur in both interglacial and glacial regimes, attesting to the sensitivity of the southern westerly belt to climate change. Comparison of the cool, mesic N. dombeyi rainforest assemblage from Site 1234 with δ18O in

  14. The Cr Redox Record of fO2 Variation in Angrites. Evidence for Redox Conditions of Angrite Petrogenesis and Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, Charles K.; Bell, Aaron S.; Burger, Paul V.; Papike, James J.; Jones, John; Le, Loan

    2016-01-01

    Angrites represent some of the earliest stages of planetesimal differentiation. Not surprisingly, there is no simple petrogenetic model for their origin. Petrogenesis has been linked to both magmatic and impact processes. Studies demonstrated that melting of chondritic material (e.g. CM, CV) at redox conditions where pure iron metal is unstable (e.g., IW+1 to IW+2) produced angrite-like melts. Alternatively, angrites were produced at more reducing conditions (variation of DEu/DGd with fO2, between plagioclase and fassaitic pyroxene in equilibrium with an angrite melt composition. They used their observations to estimate the fO2 of crystallization to be approximately IW+0.6 for angrite LEW 86010. This estimate is only a "snapshot" of fO2 conditions during co-crystallization of plagioclase and pyroxene. Preliminary XANES analyses of V redox state in pyroxenes from D'Orbigny reported changes in fO2 from IW-0.7 during early pyroxene crystallization to IW+0.5 during latter episodes of pyroxene crystallization [15]. As this was a preliminary report, it presented limited information concerning the effects of pyroxene orientation and composition on the V valence measurements, and the effect of melt composition on valence and

  15. Holocene dinoflagellate cyst record of climate and marine primary productivity change in the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelova, Vera; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Hendy, Ingrid, L.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records of dinoflagellate cysts and other marine palynomorphs from the Santa Barbara Basin (Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A) demonstrate large variability of primary productivity during the Holocene, as the California Current System responded to climate change. Throughout the sequence, dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are characterized by the dominance of cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, and particularly by Brigantedinium, accompanied by other upwelling-related taxa such as Echinidinium and cysts of Protoperidinium americanum. During the early Holocene (~12-7 ka), the species richness is relatively low (16 taxa) and genius Brigantedinium reaches the highest relative abundance, thus indicating nutrient-rich and highly productive waters. The middle Holocene (~7-3.5 ka) is characterized by relatively constant cyst concentrations, and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are indicative of a slight decrease in sea-surface temperature. A noticeable increase and greater range of fluctuations in the cyst concentrations during the late Holocene (~3.5-1 ka) indicate enhanced marine primary productivity and increased climatic variability, most likely related to the intensification of El Niño-like conditions. Keywords: dinoflagellate cysts, Holocene, North Pacific, climate, primary productivity.

  16. Holocene temperature variations at a high-altitude site in the Eastern Alps: a chironomid record from Schwarzsee ob Sölden, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Ilyashuk, Elena A.; Koinig, Karin A.; Heiri, Oliver; Ilyashuk, Boris P.; Psenner, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Few well-dated, quantitative Holocene temperature reconstructions exist from high-altitude sites in the Central Eastern Alps. Here, we present a chironomid-based quantitative reconstruction of mean July air temperatures (TJuly) throughout the Holocene for a remote high-mountain lake, Schwarzsee ob Sölden, situated above the treeline at 2796 m a.s.l. in the Austrian Alps. Applying a chironomid-temperature inference model developed from lakes of the Alpine region to a high-resolution chironomid record from the lake provides evidence for early Holocene (ca 10000–8600 cal yr BP) TJuly of up to 8.5 °C, i.e. >4 °C above the modern (1977–2006) mean July temperature. The reconstruction reveals the so-called ‘8.2-ka cold event’ centered at ca 8250–8000 cal yr BP with temperatures ca 3 °C below the early-Holocene thermal maximum. Rather warm (ca 6 °C) and productive conditions prevailed during ca 7900–4500 cal yr BP. The chironomid record suggests a climate transition between ca 5200 and 4500 cal yr BP to cooler TJuly. A distinct cooling trend is evident from ca 4500 until ca 2500 cal yr BP. Thereafter, the study site experienced its coldest conditions (around 4 °C or less) throughout the rest of the Holocene, with the exception of the warming trend during the late 20th century. Beside other factors, the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation seems to be the major driving force for the long-term trends in TJuly at high altitudes in the Eastern Alps. Due to the extreme location of the lake and the limited temperature range represented by the applied calibration data set, the chironomid-based temperature reconstruction fails to track phases of the late-Holocene climatic history with TJuly cooler than 4 °C. Further chironomid-based palaeoclimate model and down-core studies are required to address this problem, provide more realistic TJuly estimates from undisturbed high-altitude lakes in the Alps, and extract a reliable regional

  17. Evapotranspiration partitioning and variation of sap flow in female and male parents of maize for hybrid seed production in arid region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the variation of sap flow in female and male parents of maize for hybrid seed production and evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning is useful in accurately determining water use of the female and male parents and improving irrigation management of maize for hybrid seed production. Sap fl...

  18. Time-lagged variation in pond density and primary productivity affects duck nest survival in the Prairie Pothole Region.

    PubMed

    Walker, Johann; Rotella, Jay J; Stephens, Scott E; Lindberg, Mark S; Ringelman, James K; Hunter, Christine; Smith, Aaron J

    2013-07-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is the primary breeding region for most species of North American dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). Conservation of these species is guided in part by knowledge of relationships between nest survival probability and habitat features. Positive relationships between duck nest survival and amount and configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation have been observed in previous studies, but these 2- to 4-year studies might not have adequately characterized the temporal effect of wet-dry episodes on nest survival. Over an eight-year period, we studied nest survival of five species of ducks in the PPR relative to spatial and temporal variation in pond density, primary productivity, and hydrologic status of wetlands, soil, and vegetation on 52 study sites selected to span a gradient of spatial variation in proportion of herbaceous perennial vegetation and in number of wetland basins. We observed the fate of 12 754 nests. Consistent with past studies, 90% of nests that failed to hatch were destroyed by predators. Nest survival probability was positively related to current-year pond density and primary productivity, negatively related to pond density and primary productivity during the previous two years, and positively related to the number of wetland basins on the study site. Predicted relationships between nest survival and proportion or configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation in the surrounding landscape were not supported. For mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), median estimated nest survival probability ranged from 0.02 (SE = 0.01) to 0.22 (SE = 0.02). Estimated nest survival was greatest on sites with numerous wetland basins that had transitioned from dry, unproductive conditions to wet, productive conditions in the previous 1-2 years. Our results were consistent with time-lagged responses of food webs to resource pulses in a broad array of ecosystems. Our study highlighted the importance of wetland basins and wet-dry episodes to duck

  19. Algal pigments record shifts in dominant primary productivity through the Holocene in an arctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C.; Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The character and magnitude of primary productivity in arctic lakes is largely controlled by climate. Organic compounds derived from pigments and preserved in lake sediments allow reconstruction of past abundances of algae that do not leave silicious microfossils. Fossil algal pigments are abundant in lake sediment and can be accurately quantified using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several groups of algae produce unique pigments that can be used to reconstruct their past abundance. In Qivitu Highlands Lake, eastern central Baffin Island, the ratio of pigments diatoxantin and lutein exhibits coherent changes through the Holocene. Diatoxanthin is produced by diatoms and chrysophytes, whereas lutein is produced by green algae and higher plants. Because these pigments are the dominant carotenoids in the sediment, they serve as proxies for the dominant group of primary producers. During the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the past century, lutein is much more abundant than diatoxanthin. During Neoglacial cooling and into the Little Ice Age, diatoxanthin becomes the dominant carotenoid. This shift reveals that there was a change in not only the magnitude of algal production, but also the most abundant type. The adaptation of aquatic algal assemblages to changing climate suggests that gross changes in primary productivity may not be suitable to track the abundance of one type of algal microfossil (such as diatoms) without considering the other algal groups. Higher plants also produce lutein, and its abundance is additionally influenced by the presence of terrestrial organic matter as well as aquatic macrophyte plants. We hypothesize that the prevalence of lutein during warm summers is due to a longer ice-free season, allowing the development of a greater biomass of green algae and macrophyte plants as well as possible increases of terrestrial higher plant communities. This is part of a larger study where the lutein to diatoxanthin ratio is compared to organic

  20. Latitudinal variation in ambient UV-B radiation is an important determinant of Lolium perenne forage production, quality, and digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Comont, David; Winters, Ana; Gomez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    Few studies to date have considered the responses of agriculturally important forage grasses to UV-B radiation. Yet grasses such as Lolium perenne have a wide current distribution, representing exposure to a significant variation in ambient UV-B. The current study investigated the responses of L. perenne (cv. AberDart) to a simulated latitudinal gradient of UV-B exposure, representing biologically effective UV-B doses at simulated 70, 60, 50, 40, and 30° N latitudes. Aspects of growth, soluble compounds, and digestibility were assessed, and results are discussed in relation to UV-B effects on forage properties and the implications for livestock and bio-ethanol production. Aboveground biomass production was reduced by approximately 12.67% with every 1 kJ m–2 day–1 increase in biologically weighted UV-B. As a result, plants grown in the highest UV-B treatment had a total biomass of just 13.7% of controls. Total flavonoids were increased by approximately 76% by all UV-B treatments, while hydroxycinnamic acids increased in proportion to the UV-B dose. Conversely, the digestibility of the aboveground biomass and concentrations of soluble fructans were reduced by UV-B exposure, although soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations were unaffected. These results highlight the capacity for UV-B to directly affect forage productivity and chemistry, with negative consequences for digestibility and bioethanol production. Results emphasize the need for future development and distribution of L. perenne varieties to take UV-B irradiance into consideration. PMID:23580749

  1. Latitudinal variation in ambient UV-B radiation is an important determinant of Lolium perenne forage production, quality, and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Comont, David; Winters, Ana; Gomez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2013-05-01

    Few studies to date have considered the responses of agriculturally important forage grasses to UV-B radiation. Yet grasses such as Lolium perenne have a wide current distribution, representing exposure to a significant variation in ambient UV-B. The current study investigated the responses of L. perenne (cv. AberDart) to a simulated latitudinal gradient of UV-B exposure, representing biologically effective UV-B doses at simulated 70, 60, 50, 40, and 30° N latitudes. Aspects of growth, soluble compounds, and digestibility were assessed, and results are discussed in relation to UV-B effects on forage properties and the implications for livestock and bio-ethanol production. Aboveground biomass production was reduced by approximately 12.67% with every 1 kJ m(-2) day(-1) increase in biologically weighted UV-B. As a result, plants grown in the highest UV-B treatment had a total biomass of just 13.7% of controls. Total flavonoids were increased by approximately 76% by all UV-B treatments, while hydroxycinnamic acids increased in proportion to the UV-B dose. Conversely, the digestibility of the aboveground biomass and concentrations of soluble fructans were reduced by UV-B exposure, although soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations were unaffected. These results highlight the capacity for UV-B to directly affect forage productivity and chemistry, with negative consequences for digestibility and bioethanol production. Results emphasize the need for future development and distribution of L. perenne varieties to take UV-B irradiance into consideration. PMID:23580749

  2. Age Offsets of the Matuyama-Brunhes Polarity Transition in Records From the Atlantic: Lock-in Depth Variations or Site Dependent Field Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, B. M.; Acton, G.; Lund, S.; Okada, M.; Williams, T.

    2004-12-01

    A number of high -resolution Matuyama-Brunhes transitions have recently been obtained from deep-sea sediments in the Atlantic Ocean. Three of these transition records were obtained from sites on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge and the Bermuda Rise as part of depth transect drilled during ODP Leg 172. The polarity transition records from these sites are remarkably similar, both during the reversal and in excursions that occurred prior to the reversal. Previous work has shown that in this region initial magnetic susceptibility records provide a useful proxy for marine isotopic stages. However, using the shipboard susceptibility records as a correlation tool, it becomes apparent that while the transition records exhibit very similar features, these features are offset relative to the susceptibility records at ODP Sites 1060, 1061 and 1063. The distance between Sites 1060 and 1061 is insignificant on a geomagnetic scale, implying that the differences are not likely due to time transgressive field behavior. Instead, the offset of the magnetization record relative to the susceptibility record may result from a difference in the lock-in depths at these sites. A possible explanation is that the different water depths at the sites affect the amount of organic matter that is oxidized before reaching the sea-floor. This in turn would lead to different depths of the redox boundaries within the sediment column. If the remanence lock-in zone is related to processes associated with the redox boundary, the difference in water depths may explain the offsets. To test this hypothesis, we compare the other Matuyama-Brunhes records from the Atlantic with the positions of the reversal relative to the marine isotopic stages, including the record from Site 1083, which was recorded in anoxic sediments.

  3. Variations of net ecosystem production due to seasonal precipitation differences in a tropical dry forest of northwest Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduzco, Vivian S.; Garatuza-Payán, Jaime; Yépez, Enrico A.; Watts, Christopher J.; Rodríguez, Julio C.; Robles-Morua, Agustin; Vivoni, Enrique R.

    2015-10-01

    Due to their large extent and high primary productivity, tropical dry forests (TDF) are important contributors to atmospheric carbon exchanges in subtropical and tropical regions. In northwest Mexico, a bimodal precipitation regime that includes winter precipitation derived from Pacific storms and summer precipitation from the North American monsoon (NAM) couples water availability with ecosystem processes. We investigated the net ecosystem production of a TDF ecosystem using a 4.5 year record of water and carbon fluxes obtained from the eddy covariance method complemented with remotely sensed data. We identified a large CO2 efflux at the start of the summer season that is strongly related to the preceding winter precipitation and greenness. Since this CO2 efflux occurs prior to vegetation green-up, we infer that respiration is mainly due to decomposition of soil organic matter accumulated from the prior growing season. Overall, ecosystem respiration has an important effect on the net ecosystem production but can be overwhelmed by the strength of the primary productivity during the NAM. Precipitation characteristics during NAM have significant controls on sustaining carbon fixation in the TDF into the fall season. We identified that a threshold of ~350 to 400 mm of monsoon precipitation leads to a switch in the annual carbon balance in the TDF ecosystem from a net source (+102 g C/m2/yr) to a net sink (-249 g C/m2/yr). This monsoonal precipitation threshold is typically exceeded one out of every 2 years. The close coupling of winter and summer periods with respect to carbon fluxes suggests that the annual carbon balance is dependent on precipitation amounts in both seasons in TDF ecosystems.

  4. Earthflow sediment production and Holocene sediment record in a large Apennine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Alessandro; Ponza, Alessio; Picotti, Vincenzo; Berti, Matteo; Dinelli, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    Landscape evolution in active mountain chains can be dominated by gravitational slope movements. This is observed in a large portion of the Reno river catchment, Apennines, Italy, where weak rocks, such as clayshales, are subject to earthflows that control hillslope morphology and supply sediments to the channel network. In this paper, we evaluate the sediment flux generated by earthflows and compare it with Holocene-averaged deposition rates to assess the contribution of mass movements to landscape evolution. Present-day hillslope sediment flux is estimated by combining measured displacement rates (72 inclinometers) and spatial attributes of earthflows and historical frequency of reactivations. Averaged sediment yield (~ 1.6 x 103 t/km2/yr) compares well with similar studies on earthflow-dominated landscapes, despite notable differences in methodology. In the study area, the connectivity between hillslopes and the stream network is well developed and no significant sediment sinks influence the sediment transport processes. We document best estimates of regional sediment fluxes and related uncertainties, based on available data. Coarse limestone fragments, present in the clayshales, are used as a natural sediment tracer to allow a comparison with sedimentation rates taking place at the mouth of the intramontane catchment. Here, available borehole logs, 14C datings and stratigraphic correlations of the alluvial fan are used to obtain an estimate of the deposition that took place during Holocene times. Taking also into account the role of solute transport, sedimentation rates are compared to earthflow sediment production rates. Results show a good agreement and demonstrate that earthflows are the primary mass wasting process in these weak rock lithologies. We document best estimates of regional sediment fluxes and related uncertainties. Present earthflow sediment production outpaces Holocene-averaged sedimentation rates by a factor of two. The gap between sediment

  5. The sensitivity of wood production to seasonal and interannual variations in climate in a lowland Amazonian rainforest.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Lucy; Malhi, Y; Silva-Espejo, J E; Farfán-Amézquita, F; Halladay, K; Doughty, C E; Meir, P; Phillips, O L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding climatic controls on tropical forest productivity is key to developing more reliable models for predicting how tropical biomes may respond to climate change. Currently there is no consensus on which factors control seasonal changes in tropical forest tree growth. This study reports the first comprehensive plot-level description of the seasonality of growth in a Peruvian tropical forest. We test whether seasonal and interannual variations in climate are correlated with changes in biomass increment, and whether such relationships differ among trees with different functional traits. We found that biomass increments, measured every 3 months on the two plots, were reduced by between 40 and 55% in the peak dry season (July-September) relative to peak wet season (January-March). The seasonal patterns of biomass accumulation are significantly (p < 0.01) associated with seasonal patterns of rainfall and soil water content; however, this may reflect a synchrony of seasonal cycles rather than direct physiological controls on tree growth rates. The strength of the growth seasonality response among trees is significantly correlated to functional traits: consistent with a hypothesised trade-off between maximum potential growth rate and hydraulic safety, tall and fast-growing trees with broad stems had the most strongly seasonal biomass accumulation, suggesting that they are more productive in the wet season, but more vulnerable to water limitation in the dry season. PMID:24026500

  6. Biomineralization: linking the fossil record to the production of high value functional materials.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J R; Pearce, C I; Coker, V S; Pattrick, R A D; van der Laan, G; Cutting, R; Vaughan, D J; Paterson-Beedle, M; Mikheenko, I P; Yong, P; Macaskie, L E

    2008-06-01

    The microbial cell offers a highly efficient template for the formation of nanoparticles with interesting properties including high catalytic, magnetic and light-emitting activities. Thus biomineralization products are not only important in global biogeochemical cycles, but they also have considerable commercial potential, offering new methods for material synthesis that eliminate toxic organic solvents and minimize expensive high-temperature and pressure processing steps. In this review we describe a range of bacterial processes that can be harnessed to make precious metal catalysts from waste streams, ferrite spinels for biomedicine and catalysis, metal phosphates for environmental remediation and biomedical applications, and biogenic selenides for a range of optical devices. Recent molecular-scale studies have shown that the structure and properties of bionanominerals can be fine-tuned by subtle manipulations to the starting materials and to the genetic makeup of the cell. This review is dedicated to the late Terry Beveridge who contributed much to the field of biomineralization, and provided early models to rationalize the mechanisms of biomineral synthesis, including those of geological and commercial potential. PMID:18462384

  7. Examining Variation in Recombination Levels in the Human Female: A Test of the Production-Line Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Rowsey, Ross; Gruhn, Jennifer; Broman, Karl W.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Hassold, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The most important risk factor for human aneuploidy is increasing maternal age, but the basis of this association remains unknown. Indeed, one of the earliest models of the maternal-age effect—the “production-line model” proposed by Henderson and Edwards in 1968—remains one of the most-cited explanations. The model has two key components: (1) that the first oocytes to enter meiosis are the first ovulated and (2) that the first to enter meiosis have more recombination events (crossovers) than those that enter meiosis later in fetal life. Studies in rodents have demonstrated that the first oocytes to enter meiosis are indeed the first to be ovulated, but the association between the timing of meiotic entry and recombination levels has not been tested. We recently initiated molecular cytogenetic studies of second-trimester human fetal ovaries, allowing us to directly examine the number and distribution of crossover-associated proteins in prophase-stage oocytes. Our observations on over 8,000 oocytes from 191 ovarian samples demonstrate extraordinary variation in recombination within and among individuals but provide no evidence of a difference in recombination levels between oocytes entering meiosis early in fetal life and those entering late in fetal life. Thus, our data provide a direct test of the second tenet of the production-line model and suggest that it does not provide a plausible explanation for the human maternal-age effect, meaning that—45 years after its introduction—we can finally conclude that the production-line model is not the basis for the maternal-age effect on trisomy. PMID:24995869

  8. Interindividual variation of sensitivity to frequency modulation: its relation with click-evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Sho; Furukawa, Shigeto; Yamagishi, Shimpei; Hirota, Koich; Kashino, Makio

    2014-04-01

    The frequency modulation detection limen (FMDL) with a low modulation rate has been used as a measure of the listener's sensitivity to the temporal fine structure of a stimulus, which is represented by the pattern of neural phase locking at the auditory periphery. An alternative to the phase locking cue, the excitation pattern cue, has been suggested to contribute to frequency modulation (FM) detection. If the excitation pattern cue has a significant contribution to low-rate FM detection, the functionality of cochlear mechanics underlying the excitation pattern should be reflected in low-rate FMDLs. This study explored the relationship between cochlear mechanics and low-rate FMDLs by evaluating physiological measures of cochlear functions, namely distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs). DPOAEs and CEOAEs reflect nonlinear cochlear gain. CEOAEs have been considered also to reflect the degree of irregularity, such as spatial variations in number or geometry of outer hair cells, on the basilar membrane. The irregularity profile could affect the reliability of the phase locking cue, thereby influencing the FMDLs. The features extracted from DPOAEs and CEOAEs, when combined, could account for more than 30 % of the inter-listener variation of low-rate FMDLs. This implies that both cochlear gain and irregularity on the basilar membrane have some influence on sensitivity to low-rate FM: the loss of cochlear gain or broader tuning might influence the excitation pattern cue, and the irregularity on the basilar membrane might disturb the ability to use the phase locking cue. PMID:24504749

  9. An Evaluation of Coulomb Stress Changes from Earthquake Productivity Variations in the Western Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptokaropoulos, K. M.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Orlecka-Sikora, B.; Karakostas, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field in the seismically active and well-monitored area of the western Gulf of Corinth, Greece, is investigated. The highly accurate and vast regional catalogues were used for inverting seismicity rate changes into stress variation using a rate/state-dependent friction model. After explicitly determining the physical quantities incorporated in the model (characteristic relaxation time, fault constitutive parameters, and reference seismicity rates), we looked for stress changes across space and over time and their possible association with earthquake clustering and fault interactions. We focused our attention on the Efpalio doublet of January 2010 ( M = 5.5 and M = 5.4), with a high aftershock productivity, and attempted to reproduce and interpret stress changes prior to and after the initiation of this seismicity burst. The spatial distribution of stress changes was evaluated after smoothing the seismological data by means of a probability density function (PDF). The inverted stress calculations were compared with the calculations derived from an independent approach (elastic dislocation model) and this comparison was quantified. The results of the two methods are in good agreement (up to 80 %) in the far field, with the inversion technique providing more robust results in the near field, where they are more sensitive to the uncertainties of coseismic slip distribution. It is worth mentioning that the stress inversion model proved to be a very sensitive stress meter, able to detect even small stress changes correlated with spatio-temporal earthquake clustering. Data analysis was attempted from 1975 onwards to simulate the stress changes associated with stronger earthquakes over a longer time span. This approach revealed that only M > 5.5 events induce considerable stress variations, although in some cases there was no evidence for such stress changes even after an M > 5.5 earthquake.

  10. Composition of settling particles in the Southern Ocean and processes controlling seasonal variations of deep export production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinal, Damien; Ameur, Khedidja; Closset, Ivia; Bray, Stephen; Trull, Thomas W.

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes controlling the biological carbon pump and the efficiency of export production, we need time series in contrasted oceanic regions that fully describe seasonality. Due to strong logistic constraints, especially in the Southern Ocean, such data can only be obtained from above (satellite) or from below (sediment traps). In this study, settling particles of Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), Polar Front Zone (PFZ) and Antarctic Zone (AZ) along the CLIVAR-SR3 transect (140°E, south to Tasmania) have been collected in sediment traps deployed at 1000, 2000 and 3800m (SAZ), 800 and 1500 m (PFZ) and 200 and 3700 m (AZ). In addition to the measurements of Particulate Organic Carbon, Particulate Inorganic Carbon, Biogenic silica we have measured particulate composition of some trace and major elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Ti, Ba, Sr, Mn, U, light Rare Earth Elements) by ICP-MS. When looking at correlations between elemental fluxes we show that there are generally different modes of variations. Surprisingly, those are not necessarily site-specific, i.e. different periods of SAZ and AZ traps can behave in a similar way, while they can be strongly decoupled at other periods. This is the case not only for biogenic elements (e.g. Ba, Ca, Sr) but also for elements usually representative of lithogenic particles (e.g., Al, Fe, Ti). More particularly Al vs. Fe fluxes appear to be strongly bimodal: Al fluxes are generally higher in northern traps while Fe fluxes are higher in AZ and PFZ traps; moreover single data points of both traps are distributed over two clear correlation lines, each one displaying little scattering. This suggests that the types of Fe- and/or Al- bearing particles vary more seasonally than spatially. In contrast, Ba fluxes, which are used in paleo-oceanography as a proxy of export production, are very similar to Ca fluxes, whatever the location. This suggests that carbonate productivity is more prone to deep carbon export compared to opal

  11. Carbon footprint and land requirement for dairy herd rations: impacts of feed production practices and regional climate variations.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, M; Cederberg, C; Swensson, C

    2014-08-01

    Feed production is a significant source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dairy production and demands large arable and pasture acreage. This study analysed how regional conditions influence GHG emissions of dairy feed rations in a life cycle perspective, that is the carbon footprint (CF) and the land area required. Factors assessed included regional climate variations, grass/clover silage nutrient quality, feedstuff availability, crop yield and feed losses. Using the Nordic feed evaluation model NorFor, rations were optimised for different phases of lactation, dry and growing periods for older cows, first calvers and heifers by regional feed advisors and combined to annual herd rations. Feed production data at farm level were based on national statistics and studies. CF estimates followed standards for life cycle assessment and used emissions factors provided by IPCC. The functional unit was 'feed consumption to produce 1 kg energy corrected milk (ECM) from a cow with annual milk yield of 9 900 kg ECM including replacement animals and feed losses'. Feed ration CF varied from 417 to 531 g CO2 e/kg ECM. Grass/clover silage contributed more than 50% of total GHG emissions. Use of higher quality silage increased ration CF by up to 5% as a result of an additional cut and increased rates of synthetic N-fertiliser. Domestically produced horse bean (Vicia faba), by-products from the sugar industry and maize silage were included in the rations with the lowest CF, but horse bean significantly increased ration land requirement. Rations required between 1.4 to 2 m2 cropland and 0.1 to 0.2 m2/kg semi-natural grassland per kg ECM and year. Higher yield levels reduced ration total CF. Inclusion of GHG emissions from land use change associated with Brazilian soya feed significantly increased ration CF. Ration CF and land use depended on ration composition, which was highly influenced by the regional availability and production of feedstuffs. The impact of individual

  12. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping LER and defect density on production wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabtay, Saar; Blumberg, Yuval; Levi, Shimon; Greenberg, Gadi; Harel, Daniel; Conley, Amiad; Meshulach, Doron; Kan, Kobi; Dolev, Ido; Kumar, Surender; Mendel, Kalia; Goto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Naoaki; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shinichi; Nagaoka, Shirou; Sekito, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) constitute a higher percentage of the line-width and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include: scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, lithography stack thickness and composition variations, exposure variations, etc. These process variations in advanced VLSI manufacturing processes, specifically in memory devices where CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations, are well known to significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or Optical Critical Dimension (OCD) metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time and cover only a small fraction of the wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials® and Nikon Corporation®, on the implementation of a complementary method to the CD-SEM and OCD tools, to monitor post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM), is based on measuring variations in the light reflected from periodic structures, under optimized illumination and collection conditions, and is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV brightfield (BF) wafer inspection tool. It will be shown that full polarization control in illumination and collection paths of the wafer inspection tool is critical to enable to set an optimized Process Variation Monitoring recipe.

  13. Implications for Welfare, Productivity and Sustainability of the Variation in Reported Levels of Mortality for Laying Hen Flocks Kept in Different Housing Systems: A Meta-Analysis of Ten Studies

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Claire A.; Lambton, Sarah L.; Williams, Adrian G.

    2016-01-01

    Data from ten sources comprising 3,851 flocks were modelled to identify variation in levels of mortality in laying hens. The predicted increase with age was curvilinear with significant variation between the seven breed categories. Mortality was higher in loose housing systems than in cages and variable within system, confirming previous reports. Cumulative mortality (CM) was higher in flocks with intact beaks (χ2 = 6.03; df 1; p = 0.014) than in those with trimmed beaks. Most data were available for free-range systems (2,823 flocks), where producer recorded CM at 60–80 weeks of age averaged 10% but with a range from 0% to 69.3%. Life cycle assessment showed that the main effect of increased levels of hen mortality is to increase the relative contribution of breeding overheads, so increasing environmental burdens per unit of production. Reducing CM to levels currently achieved by the 1st quartile could reduce flock greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 25%. Concurrently this would enhance hen welfare and better meet the expectation of egg consumers. More research to understand the genetic x environment interaction and detailed records of the causes of mortality is required so that improved genotypes can be developed for different systems and different breeds can be better managed within systems. PMID:26734933

  14. Implications for Welfare, Productivity and Sustainability of the Variation in Reported Levels of Mortality for Laying Hen Flocks Kept in Different Housing Systems: A Meta-Analysis of Ten Studies.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Claire A; Lambton, Sarah L; Williams, Adrian G

    2016-01-01

    Data from ten sources comprising 3,851 flocks were modelled to identify variation in levels of mortality in laying hens. The predicted increase with age was curvilinear with significant variation between the seven breed categories. Mortality was higher in loose housing systems than in cages and variable within system, confirming previous reports. Cumulative mortality (CM) was higher in flocks with intact beaks (χ2 = 6.03; df 1; p = 0.014) than in those with trimmed beaks. Most data were available for free-range systems (2,823 flocks), where producer recorded CM at 60-80 weeks of age averaged 10% but with a range from 0% to 69.3%. Life cycle assessment showed that the main effect of increased levels of hen mortality is to increase the relative contribution of breeding overheads, so increasing environmental burdens per unit of production. Reducing CM to levels currently achieved by the 1st quartile could reduce flock greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 25%. Concurrently this would enhance hen welfare and better meet the expectation of egg consumers. More research to understand the genetic x environment interaction and detailed records of the causes of mortality is required so that improved genotypes can be developed for different systems and different breeds can be better managed within systems. PMID:26734933

  15. Coupled high-resolution marine and terrestrial records of carbon and hydrologic cycles variations during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, Brett J.; Pagani, Mark; Krishnan, Srinath; Dirghangi, Sitindra S.; Galeotti, Simone; Agnini, Claudia; Giusberti, Luca; Rio, Domenico

    2011-11-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum is characterized by a massive perturbation of the global carbon cycle reflected in a large, negative carbon isotope excursion associated with rapid global warming and changes in the hydrologic system. The magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion from terrestrial carbonates and organic carbon is generally larger relative to marine carbonates. However, high-resolution marine and terrestrial isotopic records from the same locality for direct comparison are limited. Here we present coupled carbon isotope records from terrestrial biomarkers (δ 13C n-alkane ), marine bulk carbonates (δ 13C carbonate), and bulk organic carbon (δ 13C organic) from the continuous sedimentary record of the Forada section in northern Italy in order to evaluate the magnitude and phase relationships between terrestrial and marine environments. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the carbon isotope excursion established from δ 13C n-alkane values is more negative than those established from δ 13C carbonate and δ 13C organic values. In contrast to the majority of PETM records, all Forada δ 13C records show a sharp 13C-enrichment immediately following the onset of the carbon isotope excursion. Further, the terrestrial δ 13C n-alkane record lags δ 13C carbonate/δ 13C organic trends by ~ 4-5 kyr—offsets that reflect the long residence time of soil organic carbon. Hydrogen isotope records from higher-plant leaf waxes (δD n-alkane ) and sea-surface temperatures (TEX 86) were established to assess hydrologic and ocean temperature trends. We find δD n-alkane values trend more positive, associated with higher temperatures prior to the onset of the carbon isotope excursion, and conclude that regional changes in the hydrologic cycle likely occurred before the onset of the carbon isotope anomaly.

  16. Seasonal variation in the occurrence and removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in different biological wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qian; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Gang

    2011-04-15

    The occurrence of 12 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in two wastewater treatment plants in Beijing was studied monthly over the course of one year. The removal of PPCPs by three biological treatment processes including conventional activated sludge (CAS), biological nutrient removal (BNR), and membrane bioreactor (MBR) was compared during different seasons. Seasonal variations of PPCPs in the wastewater influent were discrepant, while in the wastewater effluent, most PPCPs had lower concentrations in the summer than in the winter. For the easily biodegradable PPCPs, the performance of MBR was demonstrated to be more stable than CAS or BNR especially during winter months. Diclofenac, trimethoprim, metoprolol, and gemfibrozil could be moderately removed by MBR, while their removal by CAS and BNR was much lower or even negligible. Nevertheless, no removal was achieved regardless of the season or the treatment processes for the recalcitrant PPCPs. Studies on the contribution of each tank of the MBR process to the total removal of four biodegradable PPCPs indicated the oxic tank was the most important unit, whereas membrane filtration made a negligible contribution to their elimination. PMID:21428396

  17. Consequences of intraspecific variation in female body size in Stagmomantis limbata (Mantodea: Mantidae): feeding ecology, male attraction, and egg production.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Michael R; Frinchaboy, Caylin

    2014-02-01

    Body size is an important feature of organisms, influencing many components of life history and fitness, such as feeding success and reproductive output. Body size is considered especially salient for solitary predators, whose food intake hinges on individual predation success, which in turn is often driven by the relative sizes of predator and prey. The current study examined intraspecific variation in adult female length and its fitness consequences in a solitary predator, the praying mantid Stagmomantis limbata Hahn. Through a 5-yr integration of observational and experimental work in the field and captivity, we investigated the relationship between female pronotum length and prey size, diet breadth, male attraction, and measures of egg production (fecundity and ootheca mass). We found that longer females ate longer prey in the field and showed greater breadth of prey size than shorter females. Longer females did not necessarily feed at higher rates in the field, as measured by the rate of abdominal expansion. Female length failed to show significant effects on male attraction or on the incidence of cannibalism. Longer females had higher fecundity (mature eggs in body at death) and laid heavier oothecae than shorter females. In nature, longer females consistently emerged as adults earlier in the season than shorter females. Shorter female adults emerged when feeding rates were higher in the field, suggesting an incidental ecological benefit of shorter adult size. PMID:24341955

  18. [Production and law of variation of the pleural cavity intrinsic pressure and the pressure of alveolar wall during respiratory process].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenghua; Qin, Renjia

    2012-04-01

    All physiologic textbooks deal with pleural cavity pressure, alveolar wall pressure and pressure inside the lung, but they have not stated these ideas clearly. The present study reveals production and Law of variation of the intrinsic pressure of pleural cavity, the pressure of alveolar wall and the intrinsic pressure in the alveoli. Pleural cavity intrinsic pressure is produced by the pressure from pleura expanding or compressing force of the lungs. When the lungs calmly inhale, the thorax expands, pleural cavity negative pressure increase. When the lungs calmly exhale, thorax reduces, but thorax and lungs are still in the extended state, pleural cavity is still in negative pressure. With thorax reducing, negative pressure decreases. When the lungs are at the forced expiration, the lung pleura and wall pleura extrude pleural cavity, only to produce positive pressure. The pressure of alveolar wall is the algebraic sum of the intrinsic pressure of pleural cavity, the intrinsic pressure of pulmonary tissue and the additional pressure of alveolar wall. We did the calculation of additional pressure on the alveolar wall by using Laplace formula of spherical elastic membrane. The intrinsic pressure of alveoli depends on the moving speed or slowness of expansion or compression of alveolar wall and the size of trachea resistance. PMID:22616171

  19. Acidity variations across the cloud drop size spectrum and their influence on rates of atmospheric sulfate production

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J.L. Jr.; Bator, A.; Rao, Xin; Demoz, B.

    1994-11-01

    Measurements of pH variations within natural cloud drop populations reveal that small drops are often more acidic than large drops. Cloud samples collected from coastal stratus clouds, frontal clouds, and radiation fogs, from heavily polluted and pristine locations, had pH values ranging from below three to more than seven. Differences between small and large cloud drop acidities as large as two pH units were observed, although differences were generally below one pH unit. This chemical heterogenity can significantly enhance oxidation of sulfur dioxide to sulfate within clouds, relative to oxidation rates predicted from the average cloudwater composition. One-third of the sampled clouds were estimated to experience an increase of at least 20% in the rate of sulfur oxidation by ozone (8% of the clouds had increases exceeding 100%) as a result of acidity differences between large and small cloud drops. These findings suggest that sulfate production within clouds, a critical component of the global sulfur cycle, may be more rapid than previously though. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Seasonal variation and physical properties of the cloud system over southeastern China derived from CloudSat products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhun; Zhou, Tianjun

    2015-05-01

    Based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) data and CloudSat products, the seasonal variations of the cloud properties, vertical occurrence frequency, and ice water content of clouds over southeastern China were investigated in this study. In the CloudSat data, a significant alternation in high or low cloud patterns was observed from winter to summer over southeastern China. It was found that the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) circulation and its transport of moisture leads to a conditional instability, which benefits the local upward motion in summer, and thereby results in an increased amount of high cloud. The deep convective cloud centers were found to coincide well with the northward march of the EASM, while cirrus lagged slightly behind the convection center and coincided well with the outflow and meridional wind divergence of the EASM. Analysis of the radiative heating rates revealed that both the plentiful summer moisture and higher clouds are effective in destabilizing the atmosphere. Moreover, clouds heat the mid-troposphere and the cloud radiative heating is balanced by adiabatic cooling through upward motion, which causes meridional wind by the Sverdrup balance. The cloud heating-forced circulation was observed to coincide well with the EASM circulation, serving as a positive effect on EASM circulation.

  1. Application of spectrum shifting methodology to restore NaI(Tl)-recorded gamma spectra, shifted due to temperature variations in the environment.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Roy, Arup Singha; Verma, Amit K; Pant, Amar D; Prakasha, M S; Anilkumar, S; Kumar, A Vinod

    2016-01-01

    A method has been standardized for restoring a shifted differential pulse height spectrum from a scintillator based gamma ray spectrometer recorded at measurement temperature, to the position of a desired spectrum, recorded at a reference temperature. The method is based on the assumption that the spectrum obtained at measurement temperature represents the same statistical distribution as that at reference temperature but with different energy scales. A computer program has been developed for calculation of the transformation between the energy scales and for the restoration of the shifted spectrum. The method developed has been successfully applied for the restoration of gamma spectra measured at different temperatures. PMID:26492324

  2. Biological production and spatial variation of dimethylated sulfur compounds and their relation with plankton in the North Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Xuan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Wang, Bao-Dong

    2015-07-01

    The concentrations of dimethylated sulfur compounds and chlorophyll a, as well as biological production and consumption rates of dimethylsulfide (DMS), were measured in the surface water of the North Yellow Sea (NYS, 37-40°N to 121-124°E) in winter 2007. Surface DMS, dissolved and particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPd and DMSPp) concentrations in the study area increased significantly from offshore to inshore sites, with the average values of 2.00, 4.52 and 7.21 nM, respectively. The biological production and consumption rates of DMS were estimated, with the average values of 5.41 and 3.84 nM d-1, respectively. The spatial variation of chlorophyll a was consistent with that of DMS and DMSP, as well as with that of DMS biological production, suggesting that phytoplankton biomass might play an important role in controlling the distribution of DMS and DMSP in the study area. According to the collective data of dimethylated sulfur compounds and DMS biological conversion in China Seas, the dimethylated sulfur compounds concentrations in the NYS during winter were a factor of 2 and 1.3 higher than those in the East China Sea and South China Sea, respectively. Less DMS (DMSP) in NYS was released in winter than that in spring and summer, which could be attributed to the shift in phytoplankton community composition dominated by diatoms to non-diatoms from winter to summer. Quantitative comparison analysis pointed to DMSPp rather than DMSPd as an important precursor of DMS in the surface water. The estimated sea-to-air fluxes of DMS using Liss and Merlivat (LM86), Wanninkhof (W92) and Nightingale (N2000) formulae were 2.72, 5.12 and 4.28 μmol m-2 d-1, respectively. In the surface water, the biological turnover time of DMS varied from 0.21 to 1.73 d with an average of 0.83 d, which was about 5.43-fold faster than the mean DMS sea-air turnover time (3.12 d), implying that microbial consumption was a main sink of DMS in the surface water.

  3. Variation et heterogeneite de recits en francais de jeunes eleves tunisiens (Variation and Heterogeneity of the French Narrative Productions of Young Tunisian Students).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anane, Chiraz

    2001-01-01

    This study analyzes narrative productions in the French of 10 Tunisian pupils selected from 2 schools (1 in an urban area, 1 in a rural area) in Tunisia (Tunis). The purpose of the study was to observe the development of the French language in native Tunisian Arabic speakers. Particular attention is focused on the narrative structure and time…

  4. Production of grooming-associated sounds by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Ngogo: variation, social learning, and possible functions.

    PubMed

    Watts, David P

    2016-01-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) use some communicative signals flexibly and voluntarily, with use influenced by learning. These signals include some vocalizations and also sounds made using the lips, oral cavity, and/or teeth, but not the vocal tract, such as "attention-getting" sounds directed at humans by captive chimpanzees and lip smacking during social grooming. Chimpanzees at Ngogo, in Kibale National Park, Uganda, make four distinct sounds while grooming others. Here, I present data on two of these ("splutters" and "teeth chomps") and consider whether social learning contributes to variation in their production and whether they serve social functions. Higher congruence in the use of these two sounds between dyads of maternal relatives than dyads of non-relatives implies that social learning occurs and mostly involves vertical transmission, but the results are not conclusive and it is unclear which learning mechanisms may be involved. In grooming between adult males, tooth chomps and splutters were more likely in long than in short bouts; in bouts that were bidirectional rather than unidirectional; in grooming directed toward high-ranking males than toward low-ranking males; and in bouts between allies than in those between non-allies. Males were also more likely to make these sounds while they were grooming other males than while they were grooming females. These results are expected if the sounds promote social bonds and induce tolerance of proximity and of grooming by high-ranking males. However, the alternative hypothesis that the sounds are merely associated with motivation to groom, with no additional social function, cannot be ruled out. Limited data showing that bouts accompanied by teeth chomping or spluttering at their initiation were longer than bouts for which this was not the case point toward a social function, but more data are needed for a definitive test. Comparison to other research sites shows that the possible existence of grooming

  5. Palaeomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of travertine: Its potential as a recorder of geomagnetic palaeosecular variation, environmental change and earthquake activity in the Sıcak Çermik geothermal field, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, John D. A.; Mesci, Levent B.; Gürsoy, Halil; Tatar, Orhan; Davies, Ceri J.

    2007-04-01

    Travertine, the product of incremental growth of inorganic carbonate, is potentially a high-resolution recorder of geomagnetic palaeosecular variation (PSV) when it incorporates small amounts of ferromagnetic material. It grows most regularly in regions of neotectonic activity where geothermal waters feed into extensional fissures and deposit successive layers of carbonate as fissure travertine. The same waters spill out onto the surface to deposit bedded travertine which may incorporate wind blown dust including ferromagnetic particles. Tectonic travertine deposits are linked to earthquake activity because the geothermal reservoirs are reset and activated by earthquake fracturing but tend to become sealed up by carbonate deposition between events. This study investigates whether sequential deposition can identify cycles of PSV and provide a means of estimating rates of travertine growth and earthquake frequency. The palaeomagnetic record in three travertine fissures from the Sıcak Çermik geothermal field in Central Anatolia and nearby bedded travertines dated up to 360,000 years in age (U-Th) are investigated to evaluate magnetic properties and relate the geomagnetic signature to earthquake-induced layering. Sequential sampling of bedded travertine from the margins (earliest deposition) to centres of fissures (last deposition) identifies directional migrations reminiscent of PSV. Thermal demagnetisation shows that goethite pigment is not a significant remanence carrier; instead hematite, and more rarely magnetite, is the carrier. Magnetic susceptibility of fissure travertine is proportional to the calcite:aragonite ratio. Two-frequency susceptibility analysis identifies a ferromagnetic content in bedded travertine dominated by fine superparamagnetic grain sizes whereas the fissure travertine has mostly single and multidomain grain sizes, a difference interpreted to reflect contrasting energies of the two environments plus atmospheric input in the bedded

  6. Postpartum variations of plasma IGF and IGFBPs, oocyte production and quality in dairy cows: relationships with parity and subsequent fertility.

    PubMed

    Grimard, B; Marquant-Leguienne, B; Remy, D; Richard, C; Nuttinck, F; Humblot, P; Ponter, A A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether postpartum variations of plasma IGF-1 and IGFBP concentrations, oocyte production and quality were related to parity and subsequent conception rate in Holstein dairy cows. Holstein dairy cows [10 primiparous (PP) and 22 multiparous (MP)] were allotted in six batches and sampled once weekly between calving and oestrous synchronization treatment started at 71.2 ± 2.0 days postpartum. During the 3 weeks before treatment, ovum pick-up (OPU) was performed twice weekly. Oocytes were scored on a 4-point scale, and oocytes from OPU1, 3 and 5 were fertilized in vitro. Seventeen cows became pregnant after first and second AI and were considered as fertile (F), while the others were considered to be subfertile (SF). Logistic regression was carried out to investigate the relationships between repeated measurements and fertility including parity and batch effects in the models. Likelihood of fertility significantly increased when plasma urea and IGFBP-3 concentrations decreased and was higher in PP compared with MP cows. There was a trend for fertility to increase when plasma IGF-1 concentrations increased (p = 0.07). In vitro cleavage and development rates were similar between SF and F cows (46.4% and 28.3% in SF vs 55.0% and 22.1% in F). Parity had an effect on plasma IGF-1 concentrations (PP: 61.65 ± 2.67 vs MP: 41.63 ± 5.81 ng/ml, p < 0.001), mean number of follicles aspirated per session (PP: 5.7 ± 1.3 vs MP: 9.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.05) and fertility (PP: 8/10 = 80% vs MP: 9/22 = 41%, p < 0.05) but not on the number of oocytes recovered per session nor their quality. In conclusion, postpartum plasma urea and IGFBP-3 concentrations, but not oocyte production and quality before breeding, were related to subsequent conception rate in our experimental design. Parity had a significant effect on energy status, follicular growth and fertility and needs to be considered when investigating relationships between nutrition and reproduction

  7. Simultaneous recording of stimulus-frequency and distortion-product otoacoustic emission input-output functions in human ears.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Kim S; Keefe, Douglas H

    2005-02-01

    Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) input-output (I/O) functions were elicited in normal-hearing adults using unequal-frequency primaries in equal-level and fixed-suppressor level (Ls) conditions. Responses were repeatable and similar across a range of primary frequency ratios in the fixed-Ls condition. In comparison to equal-frequency primary conditions [Schairer, Fitzpatrick, and Keefe, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 944-966 (2003)], the unequal-frequency, fixed-Ls condition appears to be more useful for characterizing SFOAE response growth and relating it to basilar-membrane response growth, and for testing the ability to predict audiometric thresholds. Simultaneously recorded distortion-product OAE (DPOAE) I/O functions had higher thresholds than SFOAE I/O functions, and they identified the onset of the nonlinear-distortion mechanism in SFOAEs. DPOAE threshold often corresponded to nonmonotonicities in SFOAE I/O functions. This suggests that the level-dependent nonmonotonicities and associated phase shifts in SFOAE I/O functions were due to varying degrees of cancellation of two sources of SFOAE, such as coherent reflection and distortion mechanisms. Level-dependent noise was observed on-band (at the frequencies of the stimuli) but not off-band, or in the DPOAEs. The variability was observed in ears with normal hearing and ears with cochlear implants. In general, these results indicate the source of the variability is biological, possibly from within the middle ear. PMID:15759702

  8. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on 26Al Production in Massive Stars: A Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate variations on 26Al production in massive stars. The dominant production sites in such events were recently investigated by using stellar model calculations: explosive neon-carbon burning, convective shell carbon burning, and convective core hydrogen burning. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for each of these sites by adopting temperature-density-time profiles from recent stellar evolution models. For each profile, we individually multiplied the rates of all relevant reactions by factors of 10, 2, 0.5, and 0.1, and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 26Al. In total, we performed ≈900 nuclear reaction network calculations. Our simulations are based on a next-generation nuclear physics library, called STARLIB, which contains a recent evaluation of Monte Carlo reaction rates. Particular attention is paid to quantifying the rate uncertainties of those reactions that most sensitively influence 26Al production. For stellar modelers our results indicate to what degree predictions of 26Al nucleosynthesis depend on currently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for nuclear experimentalists our results represent a guide for future measurements. We also investigate equilibration effects of 26Al. In all previous massive star investigations, either a single species or two species of 26Al were taken into account, depending on whether thermal equilibrium was achieved or not. These are two extreme assumptions, and in a hot stellar plasma the ground and isomeric states may communicate via γ-ray transitions involving higher-lying 26Al levels. We tabulate the results of our reaction rate sensitivity study for each of the three distinct massive star sites referred to above. It is found that several current reaction rate uncertainties influence the production of 26Al. Particularly important reactions are 26Al(n,p)26Mg, 25Mg(α,n)28Si, 24Mg(n,γ)25Mg, and 23Na(α,p)26Mg. These reactions

  9. Interoceanic variation in the rare earth, major, and trace element depositional chemistry of chert: Perspectives gained from the DSDP and ODP record

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.W.; Jones, D.L. ); Buchholtz Ten Brink, M.R.; Gerlach, D.C.; Russ, G.P. III )

    1992-05-01

    Rare earth element (REE), major, and trace element abundances and relative fractionations in forty nodular cherts sampled by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) indicate that the REE composition of chert records the interplay between terrigenous sources and scavenging from the local seawater. Chert from the large Pacific Ocean, where deposition occurs relatively removed from significant terrigenous input, records a depositional REE signal dominated by adsorption of dissolved REEs from sea water. Chert from the Atlantic basin, a moderately sized ocean basin lined by passive margins and with more terrigenous input than the Pacific, records a mix of adsorptive and terrigenous REE signals, with moderately negative Ce anomalies and La{sub n}/YB{sub n} ratios intermediate to those of the Pacific and those of terrigenous input. Chert from the southern high latitude region is dominated by the large terrigenous input on the Antarctic passive margin, with inherited Ce/Ce{sup *} {approximately} 1 and inherited La{sub n}/Yb{sub n} values of {approximately} 1.2-1.4. This and previous studies of the large-scale controlling parameters of sedimentary REEs across ocean basins collectively indicate that REE indices of depositional regime (e.g., Ce/Ce{sup *}, La{sub n}/Yb{sub n}, La{sub ex}) are reproducible in a variety of sediment and rock lithologies, ages, and ocean basins, and present a coherent tool for paleoceanographic and tectonic basin reconstructions.

  10. Seasonal sea ice cover as principal driver of spatial and temporal variation in depth extension and annual production of kelp in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Marbà, Núria; Olesen, Birgit; Sejr, Mikael K; Christensen, Peter Bondo; Rodrigues, João; Renaud, Paul E; Balsby, Thorsten JS; Rysgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    We studied the depth distribution and production of kelp along the Greenland coast spanning Arctic to sub-Arctic conditions from 78 °N to 64 °N. This covers a wide range of sea ice conditions and water temperatures, with those presently realized in the south likely to move northwards in a warmer future. Kelp forests occurred along the entire latitudinal range, and their depth extension and production increased southwards presumably in response to longer annual ice-free periods and higher water temperature. The depth limit of 10% kelp cover was 9–14 m at the northernmost sites (77–78 °N) with only 94–133 ice-free days per year, but extended to depths of 21–33 m further south (73 °N–64 °N) where >160 days per year were ice-free, and annual production of Saccharina longicruris and S. latissima, measured as the size of the annual blade, ranged up to sevenfold among sites. The duration of the open-water period, which integrates light and temperature conditions on an annual basis, was the best predictor (relative to summer water temperature) of kelp production along the latitude gradient, explaining up to 92% of the variation in depth extension and 80% of the variation in kelp production. In a decadal time series from a high Arctic site (74 °N), inter-annual variation in sea ice cover also explained a major part (up to 47%) of the variation in kelp production. Both spatial and temporal data sets thereby support the prediction that northern kelps will play a larger role in the coastal marine ecosystem in a warmer future as the length of the open-water period increases. As kelps increase carbon-flow and habitat diversity, an expansion of kelp forests may exert cascading effects on the coastal Arctic ecosystem.

  11. 39 CFR 230.17 - If an attempt is made to compel production of reports and records during the employee's testimony...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Act and shall be handled pursuant to 39 CFR 230.5. ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If an attempt is made to compel production of reports and records during the employee's testimony, what is an Office of Inspector General...

  12. Secular variation of the middle and late Miocene geomagnetic field recorded by the Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon, Idaho and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Ada R.; Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-06-01

    This study of 118 discrete volcanic flows from the Columbia River Basalt Group is aimed to determine their distribution of geomagnetic field directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and to compare the inherent secular variation parameters with those from other studies. The magnetic signature of these rocks is uniformly carried by primary titanomagnetite, indicating that magnetic changes are due to variations in the magnetic field. Although most flows are flat lying, those that are tilted pass the Tauxe and Watson tilt test. Sequential flows with statistically similar site means were grouped, and directions that were considered outliers were evaluated and removed using the Vandamme cut-off method. Three normal-polarity (N-polarity) and three reversed-polarity (R-polarity) intervals are revealed by the stratigraphically ordered flows and have mean directions of N polarity (dec/inc = 6.6°/+61.2°, k = 29.3, α95 = 4.2°), and R polarity (dec/inc = 178.2°/-59.2°, k = 16, α95 = 5.5°). Regression analysis indicates that the secular variation analysis has not been affected by regional rotation, and that apparent polar wander is negligible. The VGP distribution is almost perfectly circular and supports the preference of VGP positions for the dispersion analysis. Dispersion parameters with corrections for within-site scatter (Sb) show a range of 14.3°-25.5°, including error limits, and were consistently higher for R-polarity results than for those of N polarity. Published dispersion parameters for extrusives <5 Ma show Sb values slightly lower than ours, yielding values of 16°-19°, although the difference is not statistically significant. In contrast, published dispersion parameters from high quality data from the Cretaceous Normal Superchron are lower than those for the Neogene, which suggests that the noisiness of the magnetic field correlates with the frequency of reversals. Our new results allow us to extend the Plio-Pleistocene palaeosecular variation

  13. Climatic Variation in the Western Part of Subtropical North America during Late Last Glacial and Deglaciation: Some New Records and a Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. D.; Quiroz-Jiménez, J. D.; Chávez Lara, C. M.; Sánchez Zavala, J. L.; Lozano-Santacruz, R.; Lopez-Balbiaux, N.

    2014-12-01

    Late Quaternary climate of western subtropical North America is related to the dynamics of summer as well as winter precipitation. During the last glacial maximum, it was hypothesized that the frequent winter storms provided more precipitation (COHMAP members, 1988) as the southern branch of the jet streams carried more moisture into the region (Kutzbach and Wright, 1985). However, the new global climate simulations do not provide indication of the jet stream split and some even suggest that the southern branch of the jet was weaker (Kim et al., 2008; Toracinta et al., 2004). In the last few years, the proxy records from the region have provided new information and suggested new hypothesis (Barron et al., 2012; Lyle et al., 2012; Roy et al., 2013). We present some new records of paleohydrological changes occurred over the late last glacial and deglaciation from the northwestern México. A compilation of all the important records from the region provides information about the geographic coverage of summer and winter precipitation. Minimal influence of summer as well as winter precipitation caused drier conditions over a large part of northern and northwestern Mexico (i.e. 29°-31°N) during the late last glacial (27-18 cal ka BP). Summer precipitation was restricted to the southern part of subtropical North America during >18 cal ka BP and it expanded to higher latitudes and covered different regions over the deglaciation (18-10 cal ka BP). We relate the different geographical coverage of summer precipitation to moisture flow sourced from the tropical and subtropical Pacific and Gulf of California during different intervals.

  14. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  15. Calendar-dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Nicolussi, Kurt; Deline, Philip; Astrade, Laurent; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Miramont, Cécile; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Holocene glacier records from the western European Alps are still sparse, although a number of sites are well suited to constraining pre- and early- Little Ice Age (LIA) glacier advances. The present study provides the first dendrochronologically-based and calendar-dated Neoglacial glacier chronology for the Mont Blanc massif, French Alps. It is based on the analysis of over 240 glacially buried Pinus cembra subfossil logs and wood remains found either embedded-in-till or as detrital material in the Mer de Glace right lateral moraine. Only a few of the samples were found to be 'formally in situ' but we show that some logs were 'virtually in situ' (not rooted but showing little or no evidence of reworking) and could be used to accurately reconstruct past glacier margin behavior in space and time. Uncertainties regarding the other samples may relate to original growth location and/or to outer wood decay. The resulting dates (followed by a '+') were therefore considered maximum-limiting ages for glacier advances. The main burial events - interpreted as glacier advances - occurred between ca 1655+ and 1544+ BC, between ca 1230+ and 1105+ BC, between ca 1013+ and 962+/937+ BC, at ca 802-777 BC, after 608+ BC, between 312 and 337 AD, between ca 485+ AD and 606+ AD, between 1120 and 1178 AD, between ca 1248 and 1278+/1296 AD, and after 1352+ AD. These advances predate the late LIA maxima known from historical sources. The magnitude of the advances gradually increased to culminate in three near-Neoglacial maxima during the 7th, 12th and 13th centuries AD, followed by a first LIA/Neoglacial maximum in the second half of the 14th century AD. The pattern of Neoglacial events described here is coherent with Central and Eastern Alpine glacier chronologies. This indicates marked synchronicity of late Holocene glacier variability and forcing at a regional scale, although occasional differences could be detected between 'Western' and 'Eastern' records. The Mer de Glace record also

  16. Temporal Variation in Honey Production by the Stingless Bee Melipona subnitida (Hymenoptera: Apidae): Long-Term Management Reveals its Potential as a Commercial Species in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Koffler, Sheina; Menezes, Cristiano; Menezes, Paulo Roberto; Kleinert, Astrid de Matos Peixoto; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera Lucia; Pope, Nathaniel; Jaffé, Rodolfo

    2015-06-01

    Even though stingless beekeeping has a great potential as a sustainable development tool, the activity remains essentially informal, technical knowledge is scarce, and management practices lack the sophistication and standardization found in apiculture. Here, we contributed to the further development of stingless beekeeping by investigating the long-term impact of management and climate on honey production and colony survival in the stingless bee Melipona subnitida Ducke (1910). We analyzed a 10-yr record of 155 M. subnitida colonies kept by a commercial honey producer of northeastern Brazil. This constitutes the longest and most accurate record available for a stingless bee. We modeled honey production in relation to time (years), age, management practices (colony division and food supplementation), and climatic factors (temperature and precipitation), and used a model selection approach to identify which factors best explained honey production. We also modeled colony mortality in relation to climatic factors. Although the amount of honey produced by each colony decreased over time, we found that the probability of producing honey increased over the years. Colony divisions decreased honey production, but did not affect honey presence, while supplementary feeding positively affected honey production. In warmer years, the probability of producing honey decreased and the amount of honey produced was lower. In years with lower precipitation, fewer colonies produced honey. In contrast, colony mortality was not affected by climatic factors, and some colonies lived up to nine years, enduring extreme climatic conditions. Our findings provide useful guidelines to improve management and honey production in stingless bees. PMID:26470204

  17. Decadal variations in trace metal concentrations on a coral reef: Evidence from a 159 year record of Mn, Cu, and V in a Porites coral from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Deng, Wenfeng; Liu, Ying; Sun, Yali; Zeng, Ti; Xie, Luhua

    2015-01-01

    cycles of trace metals are important influences on the composition and function of the marine ecosystem. Although spatial distributions of most trace metals have now been determined in at least some parts of the oceans, temporal variations have barely been studied on account of data limitations. In this paper, we report on a 159 year record of trace metal concentrations from a Porites coral from the northern South China Sea (SCS), and discuss how oceanic and climatic processes control variations in Mn, Cu, and V concentrations in this region. Our results show that trace metal concentrations in the coral skeleton demonstrate decadal to interdecadal fluctuations, and that their variations are controlled by different mechanisms. The input of Mn to reef water is partly controlled by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), which controls precipitation and river runoff. Surface water concentrations of the nutrient-like element Cu are controlled by summer upwelling to the east of Hainan Island. The concentrations of V show complex interrelationships, and are linked to riverine input prior to the 1990 and to upwelling after the 1990. Our results imply that in the northern SCS, ocean-atmosphere climate fluctuations, such as the PDO and the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM), are important factors that influence long-term variability of Mn, Cu, and V concentrations in seawater, by controlling precipitation-related river runoff and the strength of upwelling systems.

  18. Multi-proxy sedimentary record from Lake Ghirla (N-Italy) reveals hydro-climatic variations and periods of anthropogenic activities during the past 13 kyrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Stefanie B.; Gilli, Adrian; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-04-01

    Lake Ghirla is a small lake that lies in the southern foothills of the Central Alps near the Swiss-Italian border. Climatically, the region is influenced by North Atlantic and Mediterranean weather systems and is frequently affected by severe storm tracks causing heavy precipitation. The catchment with Permian granites and gneisses contains Pb in amounts significant for mining as well as less important concentrations of Cu, As and U. This sensitive setting makes Lake Ghirla a promising site to reconstruct hydro-climatic variations and to track human activity by means of elevated heavy metal concentrations in the lake sediments. The recovered sediment core comprises the entire Younger Dryas-Holocene time period and was analyzed for (i) sedimentological changes to identify flood deposits, for (ii) the hydrogen isotopic composition of terrestrial plant waxes (plant-wax D/H) to constrain hydro-climatic changes, and for (iii) variations of the elemental composition (XRF core scanning, ICP-MS) to understand anthropogenic impacts. During the past 13 kyrs, we observe a high variability of floods with peak periods appearing at ~11, 10.6-8.2, 6-4.9, 2.8-2.7, 2.6-2.4, 1.2-1 and 0.4-0.1 (LIA) cal kyr BP. From a hydro-climatic perspective, the most remarkable result from the plant-wax D/H data is that the Younger Dryas is characterized by no significant change and that the 2.8-2.7 kyr BP and LIA intervals show an increase of plant-wax D/H values. Hence, during these three cool climatic periods temperature effects cannot be solely responsible for plant-wax D/H variation. The southward migration of the westerly storm tracks above the North Atlantic due to climate cooling must have led to a more southern and thus isotopically enriched moisture source for the southern Alps. This moisture-source change likely counter-balanced or even over-rode the temperature-driven isotope effect. Increased sedimentary Cu concentrations at 3.8-3.3 kyr BP are the first evidence for the presence of

  19. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  20. Critical Climate-Sensitive and Important Grain-Producing Regions: Grain Production/Yield Variations Due to Climate Fluctuations. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Ideally, the Crop Country Inventory, CCI, is a methodology for the pre-harvest prediction of large variations in a country s crop production. This is accomplished by monitoring the historical climatic fluctuations, especially during the crop calendar period, in a climate sensitive large crop production region or sub-country, rather than the entire country. The argument can be made that the climatic fluctuations in the climatic sensitive region are responsible for the major annual crop country variations and that the remainder of the country, without major climatic fluctuations for a given year, can be assumed to be a steady-state crop producer. The principal data set that has been used is the Global Climate Mode (GCM) data from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), taken over the last half century. As a test of its accuracy, GCM data can and has been correlated with the actual meteorological station data at the station site.