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Sample records for professional responsibility model

  1. Whistleblowing & Professional Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the moral dilemmas encountered daily by professionals and how the teaching of ethics may help resolve the conflicts individuals face with respect to whistleblowing. Included are consideration of responsibilities, role of ethics codes, and courses on professional ethics. (CS)

  2. The Professional Will: An Ethical Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret; Kabell, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is directed to the ethical responsibility for the counselor to develop a professional will. Essentially the professional will is a roadmap for what the counselor directs to happen in the event that the counselor becomes incapacitated due to sudden death or illness. A model of a professional will is provided.

  3. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  4. Continuing Professional Education: Responsibilities and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Margaret; Bauer, Martha

    1998-01-01

    Presents a philosophical analysis of professionalism to clarify professional responsibilities for continuing education; illustrates professional organizations' responses, using occupational therapy as an example. Provides a framework for planning continuing professional-education activities based on a systems approach. (SK)

  5. Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Sissela

    1980-01-01

    Individuals who would blow the whistle by making public disclosure of impropriety in their own organizations face choices of public v private good. These dilemmas, along with institutional and professional standards that might ease the way of whistleblowers, are explored. (Author)

  6. Responses to professional identity threat.

    PubMed

    van Os, Annemiek; de Gilder, Dick; van Dyck, Cathy; Groenewegen, Peter

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore sensemaking of incidents by health care professionals through an analysis of the role of professional identity in narratives of incidents. Using insights from social identity theory, the authors argue that incidents may create a threat of professional identity, and that professionals make use of identity management strategies in response to this identity threat. Design/methodology/approach - The paper draws on a qualitative analysis of incident narratives in 14 semi-structured interviews with physicians, nurses, and residents at a Dutch specialist hospital. The authors used an existing framework of identity management strategies to categorize the narratives. Findings - The analysis yielded two main results. First, nurses and residents employed multiple types of identity management strategies simultaneously, which points to the possible benefit of combining different strategies. Second, physicians used the strategy of patronization of other professional groups, a specific form of downward comparison. Research limitations/implications - The authors discuss the implications of the findings in terms of the impact of identity management strategies on the perpetuation of hierarchical differences in health care. Practical implications - The authors argue that efforts to manage incident handling may profit from considering social identity processes in sensemaking of incidents. Originality/value - This is the first study that systematically explores how health care professionals use identity management strategies to maintain a positive professional identity in the face of incidents. This study contributes to research on interdisciplinary cooperation in health care. PMID:26556165

  7. Leadership Responsibilities of Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitstifer, Dorothy I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a leadership development model that raises the question "Leadership for what?" Leadership is about going somewhere-personally and in concert with others-in an organization. Although leadership, especially position (elected or appointed) leadership, often is discussed in terms of leader qualities and skills, the…

  8. Determining Possible Professionals and Respective Roles and Responsibilities for a Model Comprehensive Elder Abuse Intervention: A Delphi Consensus Survey

    PubMed Central

    Du Mont, Janice; Kosa, Daisy; Macdonald, Sheila; Elliot, Shannon; Yaffe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have undertaken a multi-phase, multi-method program of research to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive hospital-based nurse examiner elder abuse intervention that addresses the complex functional, social, forensic, and medical needs of older women and men. In this study, we determined the importance of possible participating professionals and respective roles and responsibilities within the intervention. Methods Using a modified Delphi methodology, recommended professionals and their associated roles and responsibilities were generated from a systematic scoping review of relevant scholarly and grey literatures. These items were reviewed, new items added for review, and rated/re-rated for their importance to the intervention on a 5-point Likert scale by an expert panel during a one day in-person meeting. Items that did not achieve consensus were subsequently re-rated in an online survey. Analysis Those items that achieved a mean Likert rating of 4+ (rated important to very important), and an interquartile range<1 in the first or second round, and/or for which 80% of ratings were 4+ in the second round were retained for the model elder abuse intervention. Results Twenty-two of 31 recommended professionals and 192 of 229 recommended roles and responsibilities rated were retained for our model elder abuse intervention. Retained professionals were: public guardian and trustee (mean rating = 4.88), geriatrician (4.87), police officer (4.87), GEM (geriatric emergency management) nurse (4.80), GEM social worker (4.78), community health worker (4.76), social worker/counsellor (4.74), family physician in community (4.71), paramedic (4.65), financial worker (4.59), lawyer (4.59), pharmacist (4.59), emergency physician (4.57), geriatric psychiatrist (4.33), occupational therapist (4.29), family physician in hospital (4.28), Crown prosecutor (4.24), neuropsychologist (4.24), bioethicist (4.18), caregiver advocate (4.18), victim support worker (4.18), and respite care worker (4.12). Conclusion A large and diverse group of multidisciplinary, intersectoral collaborators was deemed necessary to address the complex needs of abused older adults, each having important roles and responsibilities to fulfill within a model comprehensive elder abuse intervention. PMID:26630030

  9. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients. PMID:21366145

  10. Toward a New Model of Professionalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savard, Rejean

    1986-01-01

    Public librarians in Quebec were surveyed to compare their orientation toward a field-specific model of professionalism with their orientation toward a traditional model based on traits derived from other professions. Results indicate that they had a stronger orientation toward the field-specific model to measure the level of professionalism in…

  11. Professional Responsibility--An Issue for Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Karseth, Berit

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on some aspects of professional responsibility by investigating students' visions of future work and notions of professional responsibility. The data is based on interviews with samples of freshmen in three educational programmes at the University of Oslo in Norway. The data has been analysed in relation to…

  12. From the Teachers Professional Ethics to the Personal Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seghedin, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Following the idea of civic responsibility of all adults for the new generation, we have tried, in different previous studies, to demonstrate that teaching is involving a lot of moral principles and values. Our present article aim is to present a part of our research about the teaching ethics under the idea of being a stable dimension of teaching…

  13. The Professional Context as a Predictor for Response Distortion in the Adaption-Innovation Inventory--An Investigation Using Mixture Distribution Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Sebastian; Freund, Philipp Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Adaption-Innovation Inventory (AII), originally developed by Kirton (1976), is a widely used self-report instrument for measuring problem-solving styles at work. The present study investigates how scores on the AII are affected by different response styles. Data are collected from a combined sample (N = 738) of students, employees, and…

  14. Professional Learning Communities: A Middle School Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, David N.

    2010-01-01

    This research project explored the transition from a traditional model to a Professional Learning Community model in a NJ Middle School. The administration overcame obstacles during the transition such as scheduling conflicts, teacher apathy, and resistance. This action research study gathered data to determine how to best structure the…

  15. Relationship Violence: A Model for Family Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Clifton P.

    1987-01-01

    Asserts that courtship and marital violence represents forms of the same phenomenon and should be examined as relationship violence. Presents a model of relationship violence based on three premises concerning courtship and marital violence. Discusses advantages and implications of a model of relationship violence for family professionals.…

  16. Team-Based Professional Development: A New Model for Professional Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Steven A.; Witmer, Judith T.

    This study investigated the perceptions of teachers regarding their own professional development along five distinct constructs (teaming, time, organizational support, communication, and professional responsibility). It also compared the perceptions of teachers utilizing a team-based approach to professional development with the perceptions of…

  17. Teacher Change in Response to a Professional Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Andrea; Clarkson, Philip; Scott, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on change in teachers' perceptions of important elements of their role as teachers of mathematics at the conclusion of a two-year professional learning project. Analyses of written responses to survey items indicated shifts in four categories describing important elements of their role: teaching skills, knowledge, concepts;…

  18. Environmental geology: Our professional public responsibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhard, L.C.; Brady, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    Conflicts between different interest groups for use of natural resources is one area where state geological surveys can provide assistance. A state geological survey working within the scientific constraints of specific issues can remain objective in its presentations and maintain the faith of both the conflicting interest groups and the public. One cannot vary from the objective view or you will quickly be criticized. Criticism can still occur from one side of a natural resource issue as your data might counter their views. However, the final decisions are almost always made in some legislators, or regulators, area of responsibility. The responsibility of the state geological survey is to provide the important data that will assist in making correct decisions. Should one party in the conflict become extreme in their demands, a potential compromise that is beneficial to both sides can be lost. In Kansas, the classical natural resource problem of resource/recreation in a populated area is presented as a case study. The state geological survey presented data on sand resources in the Kansas River and its valley in northeast Kansas. That information was important to both recreation and dredging interests where the political problem is a conflict of sand use as a construction material resource versus use of the alluvial river as an important recreation area, especially for canoeing. However, when a reasonable compromise was near completion in the Kansas Legislature one side, in a bold move to develop an advantage, ruined that potential for compromise.Conflicts between different interest groups for use of natural resources is one area where state geological surveys can provide assistance. A state geological survey working within the scientific constraints of specific issues can remain objective in its presentations and maintain the faith of both the conflicting interest groups and the public. In Kansas, the classical natural resource problem of resource/recreation in a populated area is presented as a case study. The state geological survey presented data on sand resources in the Kansas River and its valley in northeast Kansas. That information was important to both recreation and dredging interests.

  19. Impact of Professional Development on Preschool Teachers' Conversational Responsivity and Children's Linguistic Productivity and Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Wiggins, Alice K.; Turnbull, Khara Pence; Curenton, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of professional development (PD) on preschool teachers' conversational responsivity in the classroom, defined as teachers' use of strategies to promote children's participation in extended conversational exchanges (communication-facilitating strategies) and exposure to advanced linguistic models

  20. Developing a Professional Development Program Model Based on Teachers' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hea-Jin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a teacher needs-based (TNB) professional development program. The TNB model formed the foundation of three externally funded professional development programs. The objectives of this model are to maximize the effects of a professional development program, and to help participants sustain their learning over the long…

  1. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. PMID:26432465

  2. Enhancing Professional Practice through WebCT: A Model for Preparing Reading Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akanbi, Linda B.

    The University System of Georgia and the Georgia Professional Standards Commission formed the University System of Georgia Reading Consortium in response to Georgia's need to improve the preparation of teachers to teach reading. It emphasized the professional development of classroom teachers. Institutions seeking to offer a Reading Endorsement…

  3. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  4. Exploring Professional Identity in Response to Curriculum Reform and Professional Development: The Teaching Life Stories of Chemistry Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Gayle D.

    This study contributes to the existing literature in teacher education on teacher professional identity (Beijaard, Meijer & Verloop, 2004; Lamote & Engels, 2010; Rots, 2007), particularly in response to curriculum change and professional development. It proposes to offer a much better understanding of how chemistry teachers’ professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and the tensions they experience associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their actual practice. Specifically, this study aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following the introduction of the latest chemistry curricula in Manitoba. These latest chemistry curricula advocate for a more learner focused 'tetrahedral orientation' (Mahaffy, 2004) teaching practice that supports chemistry learning through the use of Johnstone's (1991) three modes of representation - the symbolic, macroscopic and molecular levels - as well as a human element dimension. This study also aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following their participation in long-term professional development offered by teacher educators at the University of Manitoba. Additionally, this study aims to determine whether teachers feel they have experienced tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices as a result of sustained professional development. Finally, this study aims to determine whether the curriculum changes and associated professional development have led teachers to think about and reflect more on their teaching practice and whether this has led to a change in their beliefs about teaching and learning and their teaching practice. Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1979) Model of the Ecology of Human Development was used as a theoretical framework for this study. This study was informed by semi-structured interviews involving 32 teachers of chemistry that were conducted during the fourth phase of a five-year research and development project supported by the University of Manitoba's Centres for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and Learning (CRYSTAL). These interviews suggested that teachers have experienced some tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices. The study further elicited data from eight of these 32 teachers via a qualitative narrative inquiry study employing narrative interviews to reveal teachers' perceptions of their evolving professional identities and chemistry teaching practices. Teaching life stories constructed from the narrative interview data revealed that these teachers feel that their professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and that a change in curricula followed by supportive professional development has caused these teachers to reflect more on their teaching practices. Furthermore, though these teachers indicated that they have experienced tensions associated with how they want to teach and their actual teaching practices, they feel they have experienced a shift in their beliefs about teaching and learning such that they feel their teaching practices have improved through their more consistent use of the four modes of representation in chemistry learning. The qualitative data show, however, that these teachers still feel that they have a long way to go to achieve a truly learner focused classroom practice where these four modes of chemistry learning are being used the majority of the time. The study closes by recommending that a much broader study be undertaken to include more teachers of chemistry in Manitoba to verify and add to the findings of this study, among other suggestions.

  5. Our Professional Responsibilities Relative to Human-Animal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bustad, L. K.; Hines, L.

    1984-01-01

    An interesting area with great potential for benefiting and enriching the lives and conditions of people and animals is opening to us in research, service and teaching. By working with colleagues in other disciplines, we can develop new and creative ways to realize the great promise inherent in people-animal interactions properly studied and utilized. Veterinarians who understand that a strong human-companion animal bond can augment people's mental and physical states will help develop sound and effective companion animal programs for individuals who are lonely or handicapped and for persons in the school systems of the community, as well as its hospices, nursing and convalescent homes, prisons and other institutions. Children experiencing the deep satisfaction of interacting with animals while young will more likely become responsible pet owners and advocates as adults. The image of the profession is enhanced when children and adults see veterinarians as concerned teachers and compassionate health professionals. We as professionals will be required not only to update our knowledge and skills, but to acquire new knowledge in fields of animal and human behavior, psychology and sociology. We are needed on interdisciplinary research teams to study human-animal interactions. We will also be asked to commit time and personal energies in community programs, sometimes with no remuneration. But if skilled health professionals like veterinarians do not take the lead in establishing sound, long-term companion animal programs in their own communities, everyone will suffer including the animals. How we, as individual professionals, respond will be an important reflection of our compassion and our humanity. PMID:17422458

  6. Harmonizing professional, personal, and social responsibilities: Indian women dentists' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nagda, Suhasini Jayantilal

    2015-05-01

    Women in Indian culture have a paradoxical status: on the one hand, goddesses are worshipped for power and prosperity; on the other hand, working women face challenges due to age-old beliefs and sociocultural norms. With 60% of the students enrolled in undergraduate dental education currently being women, there is a need to study the challenges these women are facing and how they tackle them. The aim of this survey study was to assess the barriers women dentists face in career advancement and how successfully they balance the personal, professional, and social aspects of their lives. Questionnaires, consisting of four qualitative and 24 quantitative items, were distributed to 500 women dentists: postgraduate residents and faculty members in dental colleges of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, as well as private dental practitioners. Of the 500 women, 210 returned the survey, for an overall response rate of 42%. The results showed that 95% of the respondents believed they successfully balance the various spheres of their lives, but the most common challenges they faced continued to be traditional gender bias, dual professional and home responsibilities, and preconceived ideas about women. PMID:25941237

  7. Enhancing the Dental Professional’s Responsiveness Towards Domestic Violence; A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kashinath, Korpathi R; Raju, Ananda S; Suresh, K V; Bharateesh, Jayanna V

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists may be the first health care professionals to treat patients who have experienced Oro-facial trauma resulting from Domestic violence (DV). Hence, as a national health concern, it challenges the social responsibility of a dentist in bringing down its prevalence. Objective To assess the knowledge of Domestic violence among dentists of Karnataka. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among dentists of Karnataka to know their knowledge, its relation to dentistry and measures they practice to bring down the prevalence of DV victims. Results Overall knowledge about DV was very less among the dentists & out of 64% who said the dentist has a role in bringing down the prevalence, 28% reported the need for training. Conclusion Based on analysis of the data, dentists were interested and would benefit from additional education opportunities concerning recognizing, referring and managing patients who may be the victim of domestic violence in order to enhance their role. PMID:26266218

  8. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  9. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE....80 Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System—limited access. (a) The following system...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index...

  10. An Embedded Professional Paired Placement Model: "I Know I Am Not an Expert, but I Am at a Point Now Where I Could Step into the Classroom and Be Responsible for the Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine; Neal, Deborah; Karvouni, Maria; Chandler, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    We present a sustainable and innovative model for pre-service teacher paired professional placements called the Teaching School model. The Teaching School model was piloted initially in partnership with a Metropolitan University and a P-12 College located in Melbourne's northern suburbs in 2013. It was expanded in 2014 to capitalise on an existing…

  11. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  12. Outcome F. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Course Performance indicators

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Outcome F. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Course Rubric Outcome F "Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility." Poor. addressed and assessed & discussed PI3 Grade distribution 1 (F) 2 (D) 3 (C) 4 (B) 5 (A) Performance

  13. Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos V M

    2012-08-01

    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract. PMID:22002433

  14. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: Professional Development for Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Kathryn Berry

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) offered yearlong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professional development to teachers in rural Alaska. Teacher training focused on introducing youth to workforce technologies used in Arctic research. Due to challenges in making professional development accessible to rural teachers, ACMP…

  15. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Basol, Roberta; Hilleren-Listerud, Amy; Chmielewski, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how The Compass, a professional practice model (PPM), was developed through clinical nurse involvement, review of literature, expert opinion, and an innovative schematic. Implementation was supported through a dynamic video account of a patient story, interwoven with The Compass. Postproject evaluation of PPM integration demonstrates opportunities for professional nursing development and future planning. PMID:25479174

  16. Modeling Teacher Professional Development Through a Telescope Making Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, J. T.; Schleigh, S. P.; Lee, T. D.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) provides a springboard to develop innovative enduring educational programming directed toward astronomy education. We examine current professional development models focusing on astronomy and discuss the need for improvement. We propose a professional development design that follows the medical field philosophy using a low cost telescope making workshop as a vehicle to test and modify the model. The workshop promotes teacher content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and develops skills and confidence in an inquiry, integrative lesson. This model can be shared with professional development leaders, coordinators and teachers in any topic or level of education. Professional development designs such as the proposed promote excitement and interest in astronomy and makes it possible for underserved and economically depressed regions to have opportunities to promote the values of scientific investigation, STEM education, and public awareness of astronomy.

  17. Discerning Professional Identity and Becoming Bold, Socially Responsible Teacher-Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collay, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This essay reviews the powerful influence of professional identity in shaping how school leaders perceive their work. I review factors that mold teacher professional identity, implications for educational leadership pedagogy, and supports and barriers for teacher leaders to consider in their quest to more fully enact bold, socially responsible

  18. Outcome F. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Course Performance indicators

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Outcome F. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Course majors. #12;Outcome and Performance Indictor Performance Indicator Rubric Outcome F "Graduates will have distribution 1 (F) 2 (D) 3 (C) 4 (B) 5 (A) Performance Indicator 1. (PI1). "Awareness of professional

  19. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  20. Modeling Instruction: The Impact of Professional Development on Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Angela T.; Frick, Tasha M.; Barker, Heather L.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling Instruction holds the potential for transforming science instruction and improving student achievement. Key to the success of Modeling Instruction, however, is the fidelity of implementation of its curriculum. This qualitative study examined the impact of Modeling Instruction professional development on participating teachers'…

  1. Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

  2. A call for responsibility in ethical issues for IS professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of persons in the business world. Public abhorrence of questionable behavior of politicians, the savings and loan scandal and insider trading violations are just a few examples of many problems in business and professional life. A 1992 study by the Josephson Institute of Ethics involving 9,000 young people and adults revealed alarmingly low ethical characteristics in American institutions. Ferrell and Fraedrick have concluded that {open_quotes}business ethics is one of the most important concerns in today`s business world.{close_quote} A few professional organizations have tried to comprehend the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of their constituents. Vittrell has studied the frequency of ethical behavior for management information specialists. Martin and Peterson have examined the ethical issues of insider trading. Fimbel and Burstein have investigated the ethical values of technology professionals. Thornburg made use of a survey concerning the ethical beliefs and practices of human resources professionals. On a preliminary basis, these studies indicate the various ethical issues and uncertainties which are problematic for members of the various professions. Most business people are ethical segregationists, that is they tend to segregate their ethical values into one type of behavior for business and another type of behavior away from business. Managers accused of unethical behavior respond with, III am not that type of person. I am active in my church, in community affairs, a good family man, and so on.

  3. Professional Education in Expert Search: A Content Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine L.; Roseberry, Martha I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive model of the subject matter taught in courses on expert search in ALA-accredited programs, answering the question: What is taught in formal professional education on search expertise? The model emerged from a grounded content analysis of 44 course descriptions and 16 syllabi, and was validated via a review of…

  4. The Professional Development School Model: Unpacking Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Lisa J.

    2004-01-01

    In response to Cochran-Smith and Lytle's (1998) call for Other ways of researching and thinking about educational research and the recent call by the US Secretary of Education to reform "teacher-training" programs (Schoicet 2002), this article presents a research study focusing on a reform effort in teacher education. The study moved beyond the…

  5. tsunami_response_case2.doc 1 GIS Professional Ethics Project gisprofessionalethics.org

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    to Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi (summer 2005), the aftermath of severe storms and flooding in Missouri 16 June 2008 from www.giscorps.org. Staff (2005). GISCorps aids hurricane response, ArcUser Onlinetsunami_response_case2.doc 1 GIS Professional Ethics Project gisprofessionalethics.org Case study

  6. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  7. Developing a Model for Continuous Professional Development by Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Susan; Rainford, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the work of two teacher educators with an in-service science teacher. This case study forms one cycle of a larger action research study that will eventually lead to a model of how the third-space concept for teacher professional development can be realized in natural school settings. The case study took place in…

  8. Professional Learning: A Fuzzy Logic-Based Modelling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravani, M. N.; Hadjileontiadou, S. J.; Nikolaidou, G. N.; Hadjileontiadis, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have suggested that professional learning is influenced by two key parameters, i.e., climate and planning, and their associated variables (mutual respect, collaboration, mutual trust, supportiveness, openness). In this paper, we applied analysis of the relationships between the proposed quantitative, fuzzy logic-based model and a series of…

  9. Professional Development Schools: A Model for Preparing School Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Michael; Steen, Sam; Williams, Franklyn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a training model, based on The Education Trust, The American School Counselor Association, and The Holmes Partnership, consisting of school counselor trainees completing their clinical experiences in a Professional Development School. A case study demonstrating the role of the school counselor is presented along with…

  10. Professionalism, scientific freedom and dissent: individual and institutional roles and responsibilities in geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Debate and dissent are at the heart of scientific endeavour. A diversity of perspectives, alternative interpretations of evidence and the robust defence of competing theories and models drive the advancement of scientific knowledge. Just as importantly, legitimate dissent and diversity of views should not be covered up when offering scientific advice to policy-makers and providing evidence to inform public debate - indeed, they should be valued. We should offer what Andy Stirling has termed 'plural and conditional' scientific advice, not just for the sake of democratic legitimacy, but because it supports better informed and more effective policy-making. 'Monocultures' of scientific advice may have a superficial appeal to policy-makers, but they devalue the contribution of scientists, undermine the resilience of regulatory structures, are often misleading, and can lead to catastrophic policy failure. Furthermore, many of the great societal challenges now facing us require interdisciplinary approaches, across the natural sciences and more widely still, which bring to the fore the need for humility, recognition that we do not have all the answers, and mutual respect for the views of others. In contentious areas such as climate change, extraction of shale gas and radioactive waste disposal, however, such open dialogue may make researchers and practitioners vulnerable to advocates and campaigners who cherry-pick the evidence, misinterpret it, or seek to present scientific uncertainty and debate as mere ignorance. Nor are scientists themselves always above such unethical tactics. The apparent authority conferred on unscrupulous 'campaigning scientists' by their academic and professional credentials may make it all but impossible to distinguish them from those who legitimately make the case for a minority scientific view (and may be marginalised by the mainstream of their discipline in doing so). There is a risk that real scientific debate may be thwarted. Individual geoscientists have a responsibility to behave ethically in such contested areas of science - both with regards to their own work and its dissemination, and in examining the claims of others. But learned and professional scientific bodies also have an important role to play. Increasingly, they are expected to establish and police the ethical 'rules of engagement' of scientific practice and discourse, whether through codes of conduct or developing non-mandatory guidelines and cultures of best practice. This presentation will examine how professional standards can be developed and promulgated, so as to foster a diversity of scientific views and permit dissenting voices to be heard, while also allowing scientifically and professionally illegitimate behaviours to be identified and addressed.

  11. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  12. Item Response Theory Modeling

    Cancer.gov

    Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling is a statistical technique that is applied after data have been collected. IRT represents the field of psychometrics -- that is, evaluation of the degree of precision and breadth of scales that are used to measure latent constructs, or underlying traits of concepts that are not directly observable and must therefore be measured indirectly.

  13. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies. This work is supported by the NOTE Project (FP6-36465).

  14. Using Blogs to Promote Literary Response during Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie; Hutchison, Amy; Reinking, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that studied 15 preservice teachers' perceptions of and reactions to responding to children's and young adult literature using a Ning blog. These perceptions and reactions provided insight into various practical aspects of using a social networking blog to facilitate literature response in a teacher education…

  15. A model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy.

    PubMed

    Wade, Gail Holland

    2004-03-01

    This model-testing correlational study was designed to predict a causal model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy in female baccalaureate nursing students by testing three carative factors embedded in Watson's Theory of Transpersonal Caring. Proportional quota and convenience sampling were used to collect data from 317 senior nursing students enrolled in 20 National League for Nursing-accredited baccalaureate nursing programs. Path analysis revealed that the hypothesized model was not testable. With removal of nonsignificant paths, 19.1% of the variance in perceived clinical competence was explained by self-esteem and perceptions of instructor caring behaviors. Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem, and perceived clinical competence contributed 11.1% to the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. These findings provide a baseline for understanding the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. A large percentage of the variance in the model was unexplained, suggesting the need for further study of other contributing variables. PMID:15072338

  16. Pacific CRYSTAL Teacher Professional Development Models: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Flier-Keller, E.; Yore, L.

    2010-12-01

    From 2005 to 2010 Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) has been engaged in community-based research fostering teacher leadership in innovative science education through a variety of approaches to teacher professional development. Pacific CRYSTAL is a University of Victoria based, NSERC funded project founded on a collaborative research model involving scentists, science educators and community members including schools, teachers, community groups and government. Pacific CRYSTAL professional development approaches embrace both in-service teachers and pre-service teachers, and include Lighthouse schools, workshops (ongoing as well as one-time), community-based partnerships in Pacific CRYSTAL research projects, teachers as researchers, and university science courses and workshops for pre-education and education students. A number of common themes, identified through these approaches, should be considered in the development and implementation of future science professional development initiatives. They include; teacher turnover, expanding and adding schools and participating teachers, teacher apprehension, building leadership capacity, further engagement of 'tourist' teachers, continuing professional support for teachers, as well as on-going mentoring.

  17. Using a model to evaluate nursing education and professional practise.

    PubMed

    Kapborg, Inez; Fischbein, Siv

    2002-01-01

    The concept of evaluation is becoming increasingly ambiguous and a lot of processes may be called evaluation without any clear definitions. A theoretical frame of reference may function as a compass in an evaluation context when collecting, analysing and interpreting data as well as drawing conclusions. The purpose of the present study was to present and discuss the applicability of an educational interaction model for the evaluation of nursing education programs and the professional competence of nurses. The model combines different dimensions in the educational process, using both a student and an educational perspective. It is not uncommon for evaluations to concentrate on one dimension only, which tends to give an insufficient picture of the process of interaction. Examples are provided from nurse students/nurses education and professional practise to show that the relationship between students' abilities and educational factors, in the form of intentional goals and educational frameworks, have an influence on educational outcome. PMID:12084019

  18. Learning Agreements and Socially Responsible Approaches to Professional and Human Resource Development in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon original qualitative data to present an initial assessment of the significance of learning agreements for the development of socially responsible approaches to professional and human resource development within the workplace. The article suggests that the adoption of a partnership-based approach to learning is more…

  19. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities. 120.113 Section 120.113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  20. Interventions to Improve Responses of Helping Professionals to Intimate Partner Violence: A Quick Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Y. Joon; An, Soonok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the response of various helping professionals who come into contact with female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Methods: Several databases were searched, and N = 38 studies met the inclusion criteria…

  1. Transplant ethics under scrutiny – responsibilities of all medical professionals

    PubMed Central

    Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L.; Lavee, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices. PMID:23444249

  2. A Hybrid Evaluation Model for Evaluating Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie; Zygouris-Coe, Vicky; Fiedler, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Online professional development is multidimensional. It encompasses: a) an online, web-based format; b) professional development; and most likely c) specific objectives tailored to and created for the respective online professional development course. Evaluating online professional development is therefore also multidimensional and as such both…

  3. [Planned non-hospital births in industrialized countries: bureaucratic dream vs. professional responsibility].

    PubMed

    Arabin, B; Chervenak, F A; McCullough, L B

    2013-02-01

    This article addresses in how far planned non-hospital births should be an alternative to planned hospital births. Advocates of planned non-hospital deliveries have emphasised patient safety, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and respect for women's rights. We provide a critical evaluation of each of these claims and have doubts that the information available for the pregnant women and the public is in accord with professional responsibility. We understand that the increasing rates of interventions and operative deliveries in hospital births demand an answer, but we doubt that planned home birth is the appropriate professional solution. Complications during non-hospital births inevitably demand a transport of mother and child to a perinatal centre. The time delay by itself is an unnecessary risk for both and this cannot be abolished by bureaucratic quality criteria as introduced for non-hospital births in Germany. Evidence-based studies have shown that modern knowledge of the course of delivery including ultrasound as well as intensive care during the delivery all reduce the rate of operative deliveries. Unfortunately, this is not well-known and only rarely considered during any delivery. All these facts, however, are the best arguments to find a cooperative model within perinatal centres to combine the art of midwifery with modern science, reduction of pain and perinatal care of the pregnant women before, during and after birth. We therefore call on obstetricians, midwifes and health-care providers as well as health politicians to carefully analyse the studies from Western countries showing increasing risks if the model of intention-to-treat is considered and accoordingly not to support planned non-hospital births nor to include these models into prospective trials. Alternatively, we recommend the introduction of a home-like climate within hospitals and perinatal centres, to avoid unnecessary invasive measures and to really care for the pregnant mother before, during and after delivery within a cooperative model without the lack of patient safety for both mother and child in case of impending or acute emergencies. PMID:23440656

  4. A Practice-Based Theory of Professional Education: Teach For America's Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, Ball and Cohen proposed a practice-based theory of professional education, which would end inadequate professional development efforts with a more comprehensive approach. Their work has been referenced over the past decade, yet there have been limited attempts to actualize their ideals and research their implications. In this article, I…

  5. The transformational model for professional practice: a system integration focus.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail A; Hayden, Margaret; Bradle, Judith A

    2004-04-01

    Healthcare organizations face the increasingly difficult challenge of providing services that are of high quality, reasonable cost, and easy accessibility for their constituents. Mergers and acquisitions are one strategy for accomplishing this, but in doing so it is critical to have a "road map" to create an integrated system, rather than merely a consortium of hospitals. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has successfully created an integrated healthcare system of 19 hospitals. The authors describe the professional practice model used as a framework for success in integrating patient care. PMID:15097213

  6. A Futures-Oriented Systems Model of Professional Development in Complex Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clevenger, Charles

    The professional development process can be organized as a continuous, multifaceted, proactive, and integrated system that is futures-oriented and focused on adaptation as an essential organizational function. A systems model employing a university professional school as an example is presented. It focuses on professional schools because they lend…

  7. The PKRC's Value as a Professional Development Model Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Dale

    2013-01-01

    After a brief review of the 4-H professional development standards, a new model for determining the value of continuing professional development is introduced and applied to the 4-H standards. The validity of the 4-H standards is affirmed. 4-H Extension professionals are encouraged to celebrate the strength of their standards and to engage the…

  8. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  9. Teacher Characteristics Associated with Responsiveness and Exposure to Consultation and On-line Professional Development Resources

    PubMed Central

    Downer, Jason T.; Locasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural follow-up to intent-to-treat findings indicating that the MyTeachingPartner Consultancy, inclusive of on-line video resources and web-mediated consultation, improved the quality of pre-k teachers’ interactions with children. This study takes a close look at implementation fidelity within the effective MTP Consultancy condition over both years of implementation, in order to learn more about the ingredients of professional development that may have contributed to the success of the intervention. Variation in teachers’ responsiveness (e.g., ratings of Consultancy worth) and exposure to the intervention (e.g., number of consultation cycles completed) are examined, with particular interest in the identification of teacher factors that may serve as supports or barriers to successfully implementing consultation supports and on-line professional development resources. PMID:25419081

  10. Toward Continuous Program Improvement: Using a Logic Model for Professional Development School Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ye; Rohr, Jean; Miller, Samuel D.; Levin, Barbara B.; Mercier, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for evaluating a professional development school program to enact an evidence-based model for a continuous cycle of program improvement. Guided by the logic model for program evaluation, we developed three survey instruments based on the professional development school standards of the National…

  11. Applying a Cognitive-Affective Model of Conceptual Change to Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Ellen K.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated Gregoire’s (2003) Cognitive-Affective Conceptual Change model (CAMCC) for predicting and assessing conceptual change in science teachers engaged in a long-term professional development project set in a large school district in the southwestern United States. A multiple case study method with data from three teacher participants was used to understand the process of integrating and applying a reform message of inquiry based science teaching. Data sources included: responses to example teaching scenarios, reflective essays, lesson plans, classroom observations, and action research projects. Findings show that the CAMCC functioned well in predicting how these teachers made decisions that impacted how they processed the reform message. When the reform message was communicated in such a way as to initiate stress appraisal, conceptual change occurred, producing changes in classroom practice. If the reform message did not initiate stress appraisal, teachers rejected the professional development message and developed heuristic responses. In order to further research and improve practice, propositions for assessments related to the CAMCC are provided.

  12. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  13. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  14. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  15. Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in Science Education Faculty, and Future and Current Science Teachers: Providing Professional Learning, Instructional Materials, and a Model for Locally-Relevant and Culturally-Responsive Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halversen, C.; Apple, J. K.; McDonnell, J. D.; Weiss, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for 5th grade students to "obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth's resources and environment". Achieving this, and other objectives in NGSS, will require changes in the educational system for both students and teachers. Teachers need access to high quality instructional materials and continuous professional learning opportunities starting in pre-service education. Students need highly engaging and authentic learning experiences focused on content that is strategically interwoven with science practices. Pre-service and early career teachers, even at the secondary level, often have relatively weak understandings of the complex Earth systems science required for understanding climate change and hold alternative ideas and naïve beliefs about the nature of science. These naïve understandings cause difficulties in portraying and teaching science, especially considering what is being called for in NGSS. The ACLIPSE program focuses on middle school pre-service science teachers and education faculty because: (1) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the disciplinary core ideas and practices in NGSS for middle grades; and (2) middle school is a critical time for capturing students interest in science as student engagement by eighth grade is the most effective predictor of student pursuit of science in high school and college. Capturing student attention at this age is critical for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. THE ACLIPSE program uses cutting edge research and technology in ocean observing systems to provide educators with new tools to engage students that will lead to deeper understanding of the interactions between the ocean and climate systems. Establishing authentic, meaningful connections between indigenous and place-based, and technological climate observations will help generate a more holistic perspective on climate change and demonstrate that observing systems can enhance understanding. ACLIPSE materials strive to translate research about climate change effectively into understandable narratives of real world phenomena using ocean data, creating meaningful pathways into ocean-climate science for students in ALL communities.

  16. A Qualitative Study of the Perceptions and Beliefs of Elementary Teachers' Value of and Responses to Their Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlan-Price, Regina A.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge that professional development coordinators and instructional leaders face is designing and implementing professional development that is the most effective for improving teaching and learning in their school. To determine what is the perceptions and beliefs of elementary teachers' value of and responses to their professional

  17. Beyond climate focus and disciplinary myopia. The roles and responsibilities of hospitals and healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Ulhøi, John P; Ulhøi, Benedicte P

    2009-03-01

    This paper calls for the need to address climate change within the concept of sustainable development, in recognition of the interrelationships between environmental, economic and social systems. So far, health- providing organizations such as hospitals have paid surprisingly little attention to the relationships between environmental change (e.g. climate change) and human health, or between hospitals (as professional organizations) and their impact on sustainable development. Although it is usually such industries as the chemical, extractive and metal industries, etc., that are associated with environmentally harmful activities, there is also an urgent need to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and their embeddedness in a wider ecological, economic and social context. The key objective here is to discuss the relevance of sustainability and environmental management issues in a sector that until now has conveniently ignored its roles and responsibilities in relation to sustainability issues. The paper concludes that arguments based on systems theory, environment, medicine, economics and innovation strongly urge hospitals to reconsider their present roles and environmental responsibilities. PMID:19440441

  18. Beyond Climate Focus and Disciplinary Myopia. The Roles and Responsibilities of Hospitals and Healthcare Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Ulhøi, John P.; Ulhøi, Benedicte P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper calls for the need to address climate change within the concept of sustainable development, in recognition of the interrelationships between environmental, economic and social systems. So far, health- providing organizations such as hospitals have paid surprisingly little attention to the relationships between environmental change (e.g. climate change) and human health, or between hospitals (as professional organizations) and their impact on sustainable development. Although it is usually such industries as the chemical, extractive and metal industries, etc., that are associated with environmentally harmful activities, there is also an urgent need to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and their embeddedness in a wider ecological, economic and social context. The key objective here is to discuss the relevance of sustainability and environmental management issues in a sector that until now has conveniently ignored its roles and responsibilities in relation to sustainability issues. The paper concludes that arguments based on systems theory, environment, medicine, economics and innovation strongly urge hospitals to reconsider their present roles and environmental responsibilities. PMID:19440441

  19. A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

  20. EFL Teachers' Professional Development: A Concept, a Model, and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serdiukov, Peter; Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    The main purpose of this article is to propose the Distance Professional Development and Support System (DPDS), an approach specifically designed to help non-native speakers of English teach English-as-a-Foreign Language (EFL) in a non-English-speaking setting. English has become the primary language of international communication, and there is a…

  1. Putting the Research To Work: Professional Development Models from Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Ellen; Thompson, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Describes statewide professional development programs in Michigan that were developed to train teachers in technology use. Discusses Teach for Tomorrow, which combines online learning with local facilitators and peer support networks; and the Great Lakes Education Network Best Practices project, which combines lesson plans from the Web with…

  2. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  3. The Identification of Effective Models for Developing Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy Herard, Berretta

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive study was to determine whether significant differences existed in the perceptions of elementary school teachers regarding the presence of the 5 dimensions of professional learning communities (PLCs) in Title I schools scoring above versus Title I schools scoring below the 55th percentile on state…

  4. A Comparison of Models of Role Orientations of Professionals in a Research-Oriented University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Grimes, Andrew J.

    1981-01-01

    Challenging three common presuppositions concerning role orientations (the values, attitudes, and expectations associated with professional and organizational roles), a research study explores the dimensions of role orientations in five models and suggests three mechanisms generating associations among these dimensions. (WD)

  5. The Attending Nurse Caring Model: integrating theory, evidence and advanced caring-healing therapeutics for transforming professional practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jean; Foster, Roxie

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a proposed model: The Attending Nursing Caring Model (ANCM) as an exemplar for advancing and transforming nursing practice within a reflective, theoretical and evidence-based context. Watson's theory of human caring is used as a guide for integrating theory, evidence and advanced therapeutics in the area of children's pain. The ANCM is offered as a programme for renewing the profession and its professional practices of caring-healing arts and science, during an era of decline, shortages, and crises in care, safety, and hospital and health reform. The ANCM elevates contemporary nursing's caring values, relationships, therapeutics and responsibilities to a higher/deeper order of caring science and professionalism, intersecting with other professions, while sustaining the finest of its heritage and traditions of healing. PMID:12709110

  6. The Relationship among Professional Learning Communities, a Response to Intervention Framework and Mathematics Scores in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiller, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between professional learning community (PLC) factors, components of an implementation of response to intervention (RTI) and student learning in mathematics at the middle and high school level. This study was designed to answer three questions: Is there a correlation between PLC…

  7. Outcome EE.f. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Course Performance indicators

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    program outcome each course outcome maps into. ** For example "exam 1, problem 1" *** For Grade giveOutcome EE.f. Graduates will have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility the loop: This outcome is subject to review every year based on performance criteria and metrics

  8. Outcome 8. Graduates will understand their professional and ethical responsibilities. This outcome maps to ABET Criterion 3 f, j

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Outcome 8. Graduates will understand their professional and ethical responsibilities. This outcome maps to ABET Criterion 3 f, j Course Performance indicators ChE 455, 456 Graduates will be familiar the loop: This outcome is subject to review every year based on performance criteria and metrics

  9. Promoting the development of professional identity of gerontologists: an academic/experiential learning model.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tracey L; Myers, Barbara J; Pelco, Lynn E; Welleford, E Ayn

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in gerontology has an essential role in providing the foundational knowledge required to work with a diverse aging population. It can also play an essential role in promoting best-practice approaches for the development of professional identity as a gerontologist. The primary goal of this study was to determine what factors predict the professional identity and career path of gerontologists. In addition, the study explored how experiential learning influenced professional identity for newcomers to the field and for those experienced in an aging-related field ("professional incumbents"). Graduates (N = 146) of Association for Gerontology in Higher Education-affiliated graduate programs participated. Professional identity as a gerontologist was predicted by length of time in the field, age, satisfaction with coworkers, and satisfaction with opportunities for advancement. Experiential learning contributed to professional identity in important but different ways for newcomers to the field and for professional incumbents. The inclusion of an academic/experiential learning model within graduate gerontology programs promotes the development of professional identity and career path for all graduate students. PMID:23383630

  10. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  11. How Professionally Relevant Can Language Tests Be?: A Response to Wette (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, John; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The recently published article "English Proficiency Tests and Communication Skills Training for Overseas-Qualified Health Professionals in Australia and New Zealand" (Wette, 2011) aims to address perceived problems and misconceptions associated with the testing of English language skills and professional communicative competence of…

  12. Lifespan based indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2012-02-01

    In the field of hematology, several mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models have been developed to understand the dynamics of several blood cell populations under different clinical conditions while accounting for the essential underlying principles of pharmacology, physiology and pathology. In general, a population of blood cells is basically controlled by two processes: the cell production and cell loss. The assumption that each cell exits the population when its lifespan expires implies that the cell loss rate is equal to the cell production rate delayed by the lifespan and justifies the use of delayed differential equations for compartmental modeling. This review is focused on lifespan models based on delayed differential equations and presents the structure and properties of the basic lifespan indirect response (LIDR) models for drugs affecting cell production or cell lifespan distribution. The LIDR models for drugs affecting the precursor cell production or decreasing the precursor cell population are also presented and their properties are discussed. The interpretation of transit compartment models as LIDR models is reviewed as the basis for introducing a new LIDR for drugs affecting the cell lifespan distribution. Finally, the applications and limitations of the LIDR models are discussed. PMID:22212685

  13. Lifespan based indirect response models

    PubMed Central

    Ruixo, Juan Jose Perez

    2012-01-01

    In the field of hematology, several mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models have been developed to understand the dynamics of several blood cell populations under different clinical conditions while accounting for the essential underlying principles of pharmacology, physiology and pathology. In general, a population of blood cells is basically controlled by two processes: the cell production and cell loss. The assumption that each cell exits the population when its lifespan expires implies that the cell loss rate is equal to the cell production rate delayed by the lifespan and justifies the use of delayed differential equations for compartmental modeling. This review is focused on lifespan models based on delayed differential equations and presents the structure and properties of the basic lifespan indirect response (LIDR) models for drugs affecting cell production or cell lifespan distribution. The LIDR models for drugs affecting the precursor cell production or decreasing the precursor cell population are also presented and their properties are discussed. The interpretation of transit compartment models as LIDR models is reviewed as the basis for introducing a new LIDR for drugs affecting the cell lifespan distribution. Finally, the applications and limitations of the LIDR models are discussed. PMID:22212685

  14. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. PMID:25301826

  15. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model

  16. Collaborative Partnerships: A Model for Science Teacher Education and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Mellita M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a collaborative partnership between practicing and pre-service teachers as a model for implementing science teacher education and professional development. This model provides a structure within which partnerships will work collaboratively to plan, implement and reflect on a series of Science lessons in cycles of…

  17. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school…

  18. Level Models of Continuing Professional Development Evaluation: A Grounded Review and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldwell, Mike; Simkins, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) evaluation in education has been heavily influenced by "level models", deriving from the work of Kirkpatrick and Guskey in particular, which attempt to trace the processes through which CPD interventions achieve outcomes. This paper considers the strengths and limitations of such models, and in particular…

  19. A Professional Development Model: Building Word Knowledge for Middle Level Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kathryn L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a professional development model to support the implementation of word study in the middle school grades. The first section provides a rationale and considerations for the model. The following section discusses the theory and instructional methods of word study focusing on word sorting and word hunts. To confirm the…

  20. The Effect of a Professional Development Classroom Management Model on At-Risk Elementary Students' Misbehaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglin, Gary; Akpo-Sanni, Joretta; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2012-01-01

    The problem in the study was that at-risk elementary school students had too many classroom disruptive behaviors. The purpose was to investigate the effect a Professional Development Classroom Management Model would have on reducing these students' misbehaviors. The study implemented a classroom management model to improve the classroom management…

  1. Conceptual Issues in Response-Time Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    Two different traditions of response-time (RT) modeling are reviewed: the tradition of distinct models for RTs and responses, and the tradition of model integration in which RTs are incorporated in response models or the other way around. Several conceptual issues underlying both traditions are made explicit and analyzed for their consequences. We…

  2. A model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education.

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two year project to design a model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education. The core of the curriculum are sixteen modules which cover the broad range of medical informatics and which are closely related to the profiles of the professions involved (nursing, physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietetics). The curriculum emphasizes the need of using structured data and information to perform tasks in health care delivery and management, for which modern information technology is indispensable. The model curriculum will enable faculty to redesign existing undergraduate programs and to select the contents they see appropriate. In this way we hope that the model curriculum will contribute to an innovative attitude of future graduating health care professionals. A new three year project just has started to develop learning materials using professional health care software based on the sixteen modules of the curriculum. PMID:8563329

  3. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40...result or refusal to submit to a test. (2) During the SAP interview required for a verified positive test...

  4. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40...result or refusal to submit to a test. (2) During the SAP interview required for a verified positive test...

  5. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40...result or refusal to submit to a test. (2) During the SAP interview required for a verified positive test...

  6. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40...result or refusal to submit to a test. (2) During the SAP interview required for a verified positive test...

  7. Supporting mental health in South African HIV-affected communities: primary health care professionals' understandings and responses.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rochelle Ann

    2015-09-01

    How do practitioners respond to the mental distress of HIV-affected women and communities? And do their understandings of patients' distress matter? The World Health Organization (WHO) along with advocates from the Movement for Global Mental Health (MGMH) champion a primary mental health care model to address burgeoning mental health needs in resource-poor HIV-affected settings. Whilst a minority of studies have begun to explore interventions to target this group of women, there is a dearth of studies that explore the broader contexts that will likely shape service outcomes, such as health sector dynamics and competing definitions of mental ill-health. This study reports on an in-depth case study of primary mental health services in a rural HIV-affected community in Northern KwaZulu-Natal. Health professionals identified as the frontline staff working within the primary mental health care model (n = 14) were interviewed. Grounded thematic analysis of interview data highlighted that practitioners employed a critical and socially anchored framework for understanding their patients' needs. Poverty, gender and family relationships were identified as intersecting factors driving HIV-affected patients' mental distress. In a divergence from existing evidence, practitioner efforts to act on their understandings of patient needs prioritized social responses over biomedical ones. To achieve this whilst working within a primary mental health care model, practitioners employed a series of modifications to services to increase their ability to target the sociostructural realities facing HIV-affected women with mental health issues. This article suggests that beyond attention to the crucial issues of funding and human resources that face primary mental health care, attention must also be paid to promoting the development of policies that provide practitioners with increased and more consistent opportunities to address the complex social realities that frame the mental distress of HIV-affected women. PMID:25161270

  8. The Brazilian Football Association (CBF) model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Runco, Jose Luiz; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to establish a national methodological model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries and to describe the numerous relevant studies previously published on this topic. INTRODUCTION: The risk of injury in professional soccer is high. However, previous studies of injury risk in Brazil and other countries have been characterized by large variations in study design and data collection methods as well as definitions of injury, standardized diagnostic criteria, and recovery times. METHODS: A system developed by the Union of European Football for epidemiological studies on professional soccer players is being used as a starting point to create a methodological model for the Brazilian Football Association. To describe the existing studies on professional soccer player injuries, we developed a search strategy to identify relevant epidemiological studies. We included the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and Medline databases in our study. RESULTS: We considered 60 studies from Medline and 16 studies from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences in the final analysis. Twelve studies were selected for final inclusion in this review: seven from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and five from Medline. We identified a lack of uniformity in the study design, data collection methods, injury definitions, standardized diagnostic criteria, and the definition of recovery time. Based on the information contained within these articles, we developed a model for epidemiological studies for the Brazilian Football Association. CONCLUSIONS: There is no uniform model for epidemiological studies of professional soccer injuries. Here, we propose a novel model to be applied for epidemiological studies of professional soccer player injuries in Brazil and throughout the world. PMID:22012041

  9. Teachers' Knowledge Base for Implementing Response-to-Intervention Models in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear-Swerling, Louise; Cheesman, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the knowledge base of 142 elementary-level educators for implementing response-to-intervention (RTI) models in reading. A questionnaire assessed participants' professional background for teaching reading, as well as their familiarity with specific assessments, research-based instructional models, and interventions potentially…

  10. Displaying and Regulating Different Social Response Patterns: a Computational Agent Model1

    E-print Network

    Treur, Jan

    : social response, ASD, regulation, computational agent model 1 Introduction Human social interaction often biologically plausible computational models that offer a wide human-like social interaction repertoire. Here a physician and a patient. To monitor such social interactions of professionals, and, when desired, to improve

  11. An Evaluation of Professional Development on Using Student Response Systems and Interactive Whiteboards for Formative Assessment in the Middle Schools of a Southeastern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Julia Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The purchase of 21st-century technologies for each middle school teacher in my school system coinciding with a historic lack of significant professional development in technology integration provided the impetus for the study. To address the problem, professional development focused on helping teachers use student response systems and mobile…

  12. Measuring the Impact of Student Interaction with Student Affairs Professionals on Socially Responsible Leadership Development in the First Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Georgianna L.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study on Liberal Arts Education, this research explored the impact of students' interactions with student affairs professionals on socially responsible leadership development during the first year of college. Overall, students' interactions with student affairs professionals were…

  13. Teachers Helping Teachers: A Professional Development Model That Promotes Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study reports on the outcomes of a professional development model (PDM) developed by a K-12 private school in Beirut, Lebanon, after 3 years of its employment. Specifically, an evaluation of this PDM is provided with special emphasis on its potential of developing teacher leaders at school. The PDM embraces a constructivist…

  14. Embedded Teacher Leadership: Support for a Site-Based Model of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Deborah S.; Vogel, Robert; Liang, Ling L.

    2009-01-01

    Project Achieve is a professional development (PD) project that utilizes teacher leaders (TLs), former teachers who have been reassigned to provide school-based mentoring, instruction, lesson plan assistance and modelling of lessons for urban middle school teachers. A primary goal of Project Achieve is to evaluate the extent to which TLs were able…

  15. Science Teaching Reform through Professional Development: Teachers' Use of a Scientific Classroom Discourse Community Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Baker, Dale R.; Helding, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines a 2-year investigation into how secondary science teachers used professional development (PD) to build scientific classroom discourse communities (SCDCs). Observation data, teacher, student, and school demographic information were used to build a hierarchical linear model. The length of time that teachers received PD was the…

  16. Professional Development for Secondary School Mathematics Teachers: A Peer Mentoring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Professional development is important for all teachers, and in low socio-economic schools where the challenges of teaching are greater this need is crucial. A model involving a combination of one-on-one peer mentoring integrated with group peer mentoring was piloted with experienced mathematics teachers of senior students in low socio-economic…

  17. Creating Internet-based Curriculum Projects: A Model for Teacher Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Mercedes; McGrath, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Presents the professional development model at the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE), Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken, NJ) in which teachers develop their own Internet-based science and mathematics projects to use in their classrooms. Discusses school-year workshops, the summer institute, follow-up, and factors…

  18. An Analysis of Academic Research Libraries Assessment Data: A Look at Professional Models and Benchmarking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Heather S.; Passonneau, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    This research provides the first review of publicly available assessment information found on Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members' websites. After providing an overarching review of benchmarking assessment data, and of professionally recommended assessment models, this paper examines if libraries contextualized their assessment…

  19. The SIOP Model: A Professional Development Framework for a Comprehensive School-Wide Intervention. CREATE Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echevarría, Jana; Short, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief first describes individual interventions that CREATE researchers tested in middle school science, social studies, and language arts classrooms with English language learners over the course of the 2005-2009 school years. The brief then explains how the SIOP Model was used as a professional development framework to unite the separate…

  20. An Integrated Model of Professional Expertise and Its Implications for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yielder, Jill

    2004-01-01

    The nature of professional expertise has been widely debated in the literature. However it has been examined primarily from a dichotomy of perspectives--either from an experiential or a cognitive focus, without the attempt to integrate these, and other aspects of expertise into an integrated and coherent model. This article presents the…

  1. National Models for Continuing Professional Development: The Challenges of Twenty-First-Century Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Marilyn; Younie, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    If teacher quality is the most critical factor in improving educational outcomes, then why is so little attention drawn to the knowledge and evidence base available to support teachers in improving the quality of their professional knowledge? This paper draws together findings from a range of sources to propose national models for continuing…

  2. A Collaborative Model for Continuing Learning in Computers for Professional Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duszynski, Timothy J.

    This report presents a collaborative model for continuing education in computers for professional educators. The National Computer Training Institute, a private consortium founded in 1984, has as its goal the development and delivery of high quality training materials and activities for teachers, students, and community members. Eighty-six…

  3. Integrating Professional and Folk Models of HIV Risk: YMSM's Perceptions of High-Risk Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubicek, Katrina; Carpineto, Julie; McDavitt, Bryce; Weiss, George; Iverson, Ellen F.; Au, Chi-Wai; Kerrone, Dustin; Martinez, Miguel; Kipke, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Risks associated with HIV are well documented in research literature. Although a great deal has been written about high-risk sex, little research has been conducted to examine how young men who have sex with men (YMSM) perceive and define high-risk sexual behavior. In this study, we compare the "professional" and "folk" models of HIV risk based on…

  4. All That You Can't Leave Behind: Professionalism as the Focus of Mentoring and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Roja S; Wood, Jeyhan S; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2015-11-01

    Mentoring serves a critical and necessary role not only in the advancement of plastic surgery, but also in maintaining the health of our specialty. In addition to providing a driving force for innovation-which remains the core competency of plastic surgery-mentoring is a powerful, educational tool that helps us teach the critical skills of communication and model the tenets of professionalism. Our identity as innovators, healers, and providers of hope is dependent on conferring what it means to be a professional, from those who are just beginning their journey as surgeons, to those who are still on that odyssey. PMID:26594964

  5. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes. PMID:18358441

  6. Using the Communication in Science Inquiry Project Professional Development Model to Facilitate Learning Middle School Genetics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.; Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Uysal, Sibel; Purzer, Senay; Lang, Michael; Baker, Perry

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of embedding content in the Communication in Inquiry Science Project professional development model for science and language arts teachers. The model uses four components of successful professional development (content focus, active learning, extended duration, participation by teams of teachers from the same school…

  7. Factors Affecting the Professional Characteristics of Teacher Educators in Israel and in the USA: A Comparison of Two Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shagrir, Leah

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research study was to identify the factors affecting the professional characteristics of teacher educators by comparing two models of teacher education. The research findings revealed four major focal points that have an impact on professional characteristics: the operational model adopted by the institution where teacher…

  8. Skilling for the Workforce: A Tertiary Education Response to Enrich Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Gerald A.; Calway, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Tertiary educators are being directed by government policy: to develop a learning environment where participants become more than passive receivers of knowledge and to skill the workforce through technical skills and competency-based education. Professional development is needed for compliance, and to develop and maintain generic, productivity,…

  9. Up, Close and Personal: Teachers' Responses to an Individualised Professional Learning Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Tracey; Beswick, Kim; Williamson, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an account of professional learning in action through documenting the experiences of three upper primary teachers as they engaged in reflection-on-action with the assistance of an academic mentor. Video-stimulated recall was used as a mechanism to encourage productive reflective practice, using video footage of each teacher's…

  10. Racism's Impact on Counselors' Professional and Personal Lives: A Response to the Personal Narratives on Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Madonna G.

    1999-01-01

    Common themes among the personal narratives pertaining to racism in this issue include racial socialization, "passing," biracial identity issues, awareness of racism, counselors as social change agents, racism in counselor training programs and counseling practice, and striving for nonracist identity. Implications for counselors' professional and…

  11. Social Work Values and Pacifism: Opposition to War as a Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, if social workers behave professionally according to their prescribed values and ethics, it will follow that they are working from an active pacifist perspective. Presents definition of pacifism and examines pacifism and social work values (importance of individual, respect for differences, commitment to social justice, persistence…

  12. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  13. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  14. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  15. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  16. Tensions across Federalism, Localism, and Professional Autonomy: Social Media and Stakeholder Response to Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kimberly Scriven; Herrington, Carolyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing upon research on federalism, localism, and professional autonomy, this article explores how educational stakeholders used social media to discuss and organize against the implementation of Differentiated Accountability in a large Florida school district. The results showed that the stakeholders used social media to engage in sense making…

  17. Model for predicting the acrosswind response of

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    to compute the modal response. The model provides flexibility in the selection of appropriate inputModel for predicting the acrosswind response of buildings A. Kareem Department of Civil for predicting the acrosswind response of isolated square cross-section buildings to typical atmospheric boundary

  18. The scope for the involvement of patients in their consultations with health professionals: rights, responsibilities and preferences of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Buetow, S

    1998-01-01

    The degree and nature of patient involvement in consultations with health professionals influences problem and needs recognition and management, and public accountability. This paper suggests a framework for understanding the scope for patient involvement in such consultations. Patients are defined as co-producers of formal health services, whose potential for involvement in consultations depends on their personal rights, responsibilities and preferences. Patients' rights in consultations are poorly defined and, in the National Health Service (NHS), not legally enforceable. The responsibilities of patients are also undefined. I suggest that these are not to deny, of their own volition, the rights of others, which in consultations necessitate mutuality of involvement through information-exchange and shared decision-making. Preferences should be met insofar as they do not militate against responsibilities and rights. PMID:9752626

  19. Exploring Climate Science with WV Educators: A Regional Model for Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberg, L. F.; Calinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Literacy reports that children reared in rural agricultural communities, who experience regular interactions with plants and animals, develop more sophisticated understanding of ecology and biological systems than do urban and suburban children of the same age. West Virginia (WV) is a rural state. The majority of its residents live in communities of fewer than 2,500 people. Based on the features of the population being served and their unique strengths, this presentation focuses on a regional model for teacher professional development that addresses agricultural and energy vulnerabilities and adaptations to climate change in WV. The professional development model outlined shows how to guide teachers to use a problem-based learning approach to introduce climate data and analysis techniques within a scenario context that is locally meaningful. This strategy engages student interest by focusing on regional and community concerns. Climate science standards are emphasized in the Next Generation Science Standards, but WV has not provided its teachers with appropriate instructional resources to meet those standards. The authors addressed this need by offering a series of climate science education workshops followed by online webinars offered to WV science educators free of charge with funding by the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium. The authors report on findings from this series of professional development workshops conducted in partnership with the West Virginia Science Teachers Association. The goal was to enhance grades 5-12 teaching and learning about climate change through problem-based learning. Prior to offering the climate workshops, all WV science educators were asked to complete a short questionnaire. As Figure 1 shows, over 40% of the teacher respondents reported being confident in teaching climate science content. For comparison post workshops surveys measure teacher confidence in climate science instruction after the professional development sessions. In summary, this report describes how this professional approach can serve as a regional model to address the need for climate science literacy throughout Appalachia.

  20. Compensating the transplant professional: time for a model change.

    PubMed

    Abouljoud, M; Whitehouse, S; Langnas, A; Brown, K

    2015-03-01

    Compensation models for physicians are currently based primarily on the work relative value unit (wRVU) that rewards productivity by work volume. The value-based payment structure soon to be ushered in by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rewards clinical quality and outcomes. This has prompted changes in wRVU value for certain services that will result in reduced payment for specialty procedures such as transplantation. To maintain a stable and competent workforce and achieve alignment between clinical activity, growth imperatives, and cost effectiveness, compensation of transplant physicians must evolve toward a matrix of measures beyond the procedure-based activity. This personal viewpoint proposes a redesign of transplant physician compensation plans to include the "virtual RVU" to recognize and reward meaningful clinical integration defined as hospital-physician commitment to specified and measurable metrics for current non-RVU-producing activities. Transplantation has been a leader in public outcomes reporting and is well suited to meet the challenges ahead that can only be overcome with a tight collaboration and alignment between surgeons, other physicians, support staff, and their respective institution and leadership. PMID:25693472

  1. Developing a Tiered Response Model for Social-Emotional Learning through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maras, Melissa A.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Lewis, Christie; Thornburg, Kathy; Hawks, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    A tiered response model for social-emotional learning (SEL) is needed to address the significant mental health needs of young people in this country. In collaboration with other school mental health professionals, school psychologists have a unique expertise that situates them to be systems change agents in this work. This article describes a…

  2. Professionally designed information materials and telephone reminders improved consent response rates: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Andy; Tilling, Kate; Cornish, Rosie; Davies, Amy; Humphries, Kerry; Macleod, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether different study-to-participant communication methods increase response, increase response from hard-to-engage individuals, and influence participants' consent decisions. Study Design and Setting A randomized controlled trial within the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Cohort members were invited to re-enroll at age 18 and consent to linkage to their health and administrative records. Participants were randomized to receive one of eight combinations of three interventions: a prior-notification postcard or no contact, a standard or professionally designed consent pack, and a phone or postal reminder. The primary outcome was return of the consent form (“response”), with consent decision being the secondary outcome. Results Of 1,950 participants, 806 (41%) responded. Response rates were 2.7% higher (95% confidence interval: ?0.06, 5.5%; P = 0.06) among those receiving designed packs than among those receiving standard packs and 6.4% higher (2.3, 10.6%; P = 0.002) among those receiving phone reminders (compared with postal reminders). The prior-notification postcard did not influence response rates [difference = 0% (?2.8, 2.8%; P = 1.0)], and we found no evidence that the communication method influenced consent decision. Conclusion This trial provides evidence that communication material design can influence response rates and that phone reminders have superior cost/benefit returns over designed materials. Experimental evaluation of communications strategies and dissemination of findings may benefit cohort studies. PMID:25920944

  3. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  4. From Learning to Research: Developing a Hybrid Teacher Professional Development Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J. S.; Odell, M. R.; Hoadley, C.; Sumner, T.; Maull, K.; Dibie, O.; Sundberg, C.; Kennedy, T.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Wegner, K.

    2012-12-01

    In conjunction with The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign, the From Learning to Research (L2R) project seeks to develop a successful model for student-teacher-scientist interaction and collaboration using 21st century technologies. The culminating event for each year of the project is the GLOBE Virtual Student Conference, which is held in May. At the conference, students present their locally relevant climate projects. To get to this final event, teachers participate in hybrid professional development including a weeklong summer professional development institute followed by twice monthly webinars. The weeklong professional development institute focused on project-based learning, Next Generation Science Standards, climate and climate change education, dealing with climate change misconceptions and controversies, and 21st century skills. Webinars included career talks by professionals in a variety of STEM careers, teacher updates on the climate projects, and science, technology, or education information. Now over halfway into the second year of the project, this presentation will highlight strategies and successes in developing this professional development model. 75 GLOBE-trained teachers (30 the first year, 45 the second year) from 22 US states and Puerto Rico have participated in the From Learning to Research project. The teachers represent a wide diversity of populations, including schools ranging from extremely rural to inner city and low-income public schools to Ivy League prep private schools. Regardless of the location, students and teachers were able to collaborate with other schools and scientists to study their local climates. The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) is an international K-12 science and education program, engaging teachers and their students in an exploration of the environment. Using scientific protocols, students collect environmental data in their community, asking questions, developing scientific projects, and ultimately gaining a better understanding of their world. GLOBE has been implemented at over 25,000 schools in over 110 countries since 1995.

  5. Analysis of the Professional Choice Self-Efficacy Scale Using the Rasch-Andrich Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambiel, Rodolfo A. M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; de Francisco Carvalho, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the psychometrics properties of the professional choice self-efficacy scale (PCSES), using the Rasch-Andrich rating scale model. The PCSES assesses four factors: self-appraisal, gathering occupational information, practical professional information search and future planning. Participants were 883 Brazilian…

  6. Structural-Functional Model of Designing Individual Educational Path of Teacher's Professional Development in Conditions of Information Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharifzyanova, Kadriya Sh.; Shtreter, Juliya N.; Nauryzbayeva, Rahat N.

    2015-01-01

    Actuality of studied problem is due to constant modernization of teacher's professional development which depends on many factors and conditions aimed at identifying the reserve possibilities of professional qualified and competitive specialist. In this context, this article aims to develop structure the content of structural-functional model of…

  7. A Multi-Year Study of the Impact of the Rice Model Teacher Professional Development on Elementary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaconu, Dana Viorica; Radigan, Judy; Suskavcevic, Milijana; Nichol, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    A teacher professional development program for in-service elementary school science teachers, the Rice Elementary Model Science Lab (REMSL), was developed for urban school districts serving predominately high-poverty, high-minority students. Teachers with diverse skills and science capacities came together in Professional Learning Communities, one…

  8. Peer Coaching as a Model for Professional Development in the Elementary Mathematics Context: Challenges, Needs and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jao, Limin

    2013-01-01

    As our knowledge about education continues to change, educators must refine and redefine their beliefs and teaching practices through professional development. In the peer coaching model of professional development, both participants have a chance to reflect on what they observe and on their own teaching practices. This reciprocal gain is one of…

  9. Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners in Inclusive Pre-Kindergartens: An Evaluation of a Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Lower, Joanna K.; Smallwood, Gretchen Robinson; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Li, Linlin; Jordan, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the "Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners" (TFC) project was to implement and evaluate a sustainable model of high-quality professional development focused on improving inclusive pre-kindergarten services for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families. The professional development program…

  10. Core Temperature and Sweat Responses in Professional Women's Tennis Players During Tournament Play in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Tippet, Melissa L.; Stofan, John R.; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. Objective: To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Women's Tennis Association Tour–sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Patients or Other Participants: Seven professional tennis players. Main Outcome Measure(s): Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Results: Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of ?0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P ?=? .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Conclusions: Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight. PMID:21214351

  11. Analysis of the Response Speed of Musculature of the Knee in Professional Male and Female Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, D.; Diez-Vega, I.; Rodríguez-Matoso, D.; Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Sagastume, R.; Molina, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the normalized response speed (Vrn) of the knee musculature (flexor and extensor) in high competitive level volleyball players using tensiomyography (TMG) and to analyze the muscular response of the vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) in accordance with the specific position they play in their teams. One hundred and sixty-six players (83 women and 83 men) were evaluated. They belonged to eight teams in the Spanish women's superleague and eight in the Spanish men's superleague. The use of Vrn allows avoiding possible sample imbalances due to anatomical and functional differences and demands. We found differences between Vrn in each of the muscles responsible for extension (VM, RF, and VL) and flexion (BF) regardless of the sex. Normalized response speed differences seem to be larger in setters, liberos and outside players compared to middle blockers and larger in males when compared to females. These results of Vrn might respond to the differences in the physical and technical demands of each specific position, showing an improved balance response of the knee extensor and flexor musculature in male professional volleyball players. PMID:25003109

  12. Air Quality Response Modeling for Decision Support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality management relies on photochemical models to predict the responses of pollutant concentrations to changes in emissions. Such modeling is especially important for secondary pollutants such as ozone and fine particulate matter which vary nonlinearly with changes in emis...

  13. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  14. On Compensation in Multidimensional Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of compensation in multidimensional response modeling is addressed. We show that multidimensional response models are compensatory in their ability parameters if and only if they are monotone. In addition, a minimal set of assumptions is presented under which the MLEs of the ability parameters are also compensatory. In a recent series of…

  15. Bayesian Estimation and Model Choice in Item Response Models

    E-print Network

    Sahu, Sujit K

    educational and psychological tests. Such models are used to quantify the probability of correct response response data are often found in educational and psychological testing. Typically a set of binary responses power of the questions in the test. Some of these models also incorporate a threshold parameter

  16. Strategies for Teaching Regional Climate Modeling: Online Professional Development for Scientists and Decision Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, P.; Yarker, M. B.; Mesquita, M. D. S.; Otto, F. E. L.

    2014-12-01

    There is a clear role for climate science in supporting decision making at a range of scales and in a range of contexts: from Global to local, from Policy to Industry. However, clear a role climate science can play, there is also a clear discrepancy in the understanding of how to use the science and associated tools (such as climate models). Despite there being a large body of literature on the science there is clearly a need to provide greater support in how to apply appropriately. However, access to high quality professional development courses can be problematic, due to geographic, financial and time constraints. In attempt to address this gap we independently developed two online professional courses that focused on helping participants use and apply two regional climate models, WRF and PRECIS. Both courses were designed to support participants' learning through tutor led programs that covered the basic climate scientific principles of regional climate modeling and how to apply model outputs. The fundamental differences between the two courses are: 1) the WRF modeling course expected participants to design their own research question that was then run on a version of the model, whereas 2) the PRECIS course concentrated on the principles of regional modeling and how the climate science informed the modeling process. The two courses were developed to utilise the cost and time management benefits associated with eLearning, with the recognition that this mode of teaching can also be accessed internationally, providing professional development courses in countries that may not be able to provide their own. The development teams saw it as critical that the courses reflected sound educational theory, to ensure that participants had the maximum opportunity to learn successfully. In particular, the role of reflection is central to both course structures to help participants make sense of the science in relation to their own situation. This paper details the different structures of both courses, evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of each, along with the educational approaches used. We conclude by proposing a framework for the develop of educationally robust online professional development programs that actively supports decision makers in understanding, developing and applying regional climate models.

  17. Use Of Pre-operative Testing And Physicians’ Response To Professional Society Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sigmund, Alana E.; Stevens, Elizabeth R.; Blitz, Jeanna; Ladapo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The value of routine pre-operative testing prior to most surgical procedures is widely considered to be low. To improve the quality of pre-operative care and reduce waste, two professional societies released guidance in 2002, but researchers and policymakers remain concerned about the health and cost burden of low-value care in the pre-operative setting. Objective To examine the long-term, national impact of 2002 professional guidance from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), on physicians’ use of routine pre-operative testing. Design, Setting, Participants U.S. adults evaluated in pre-operative visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) between 1997-2010. A quasi-experimental, differences-in-differences (DID) approach evaluated whether professional guidance in 2002 was associated with changes in pre-operative testing patterns, while adjusting for temporal trends in routine testing, as captured by testing patterns in general medical exams. Main Measures Physician orders for outpatient plain radiography, hematocrit, urinalysis, electrocardiogram (ECG), and cardiac stress testing. Results Over the 14-year period, the average annual number of pre-operative visits in the US increased from 6.8 million in 1997-1999, to 9.8 million in 2002-2004, to 14.3 million in 2008-2010. After accounting for temporal trends in routine testing, we found no statistically significant overall changes in the use of plain radiography (11.3% in 1997-2002 to 9.9% in 2003-2010, DID=?1.0-per-100-visits 95% CI-4.1,2.2), hematocrit (9.4% in 1997-2002 to 4.1% in 2003-2010, DID=+1.2-per-100-visits 95% CI-2.2,4.7), urinalysis (12.2% in 1997-2002 to 8.9% in 2003-2010, DID=+2.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-1.7,7.1), or cardiac stress testing (1.0% in 1997-2002 to 2.0% in 2003-2010, DID=+0.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-0.1,1.5) after release of professional guidance. However, the rate of ECG testing fell (19.4% in 1997-2002 to 14.3% in 2003-2010, DID=?6.7-per-100-visits, 95%CI-10.6,?2.7%) in the period after these guidelines. Conclusions and Relevance The release of 2002 guidance reduced the incidence of routine ECG but not of plain radiography, hematocrit, urinalysis, or cardiac stress testing. Because routine pre-operative testing is generally considered to provide low incremental value, more concerted efforts to understand physician behavior and remove barriers to guideline adherence may improve quality and reduce healthcare costs. PMID:26053956

  18. COBRA ATD multispectral camera response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, V. Todd; Kenton, Arthur C.; Hilton, Russell J.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H., Jr.

    2000-08-01

    A new multispectral camera response model has been developed in support of the US Marine Corps (USMC) Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis (COBRA) Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) Program. This analytical model accurately estimates response form five Xybion intensified IMC 201 multispectral cameras used for COBRA ATD airborne minefield detection. The camera model design is based on a series of camera response curves which were generated through optical laboratory test performed by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division, Coastal Systems Station (CSS). Data fitting techniques were applied to these measured response curves to obtain nonlinear expressions which estimates digitized camera output as a function of irradiance, intensifier gain, and exposure. This COBRA Camera Response Model was proven to be very accurate, stable over a wide range of parameters, analytically invertible, and relatively simple. This practical camera model was subsequently incorporated into the COBRA sensor performance evaluation and computational tools for research analysis modeling toolbox in order to enhance COBRA modeling and simulation capabilities. Details of the camera model design and comparisons of modeled response to measured experimental data are presented.

  19. An investigation of a professional development model in science education: A systems approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Glenda Love

    The Mathematics and Science Cooperative (MSEC), a four year longevity model of professional development education for in-service teachers, is closely aligned with the spirit and tenets of science for all. This partnership of a university, a school district, and a higher education coordinating board, seeks to promote and improve science and mathematics achievement for underserved and underrepresented populations. This study sought to explore how this model affects elementary in-service teachers' feelings of self-efficacy toward science and science teaching. Interactive Qualitative Research (IQR), a systems approach of natural inquiry, was used for this study. Theory is grounded in the data collected and analyzed through group processes. A core group of teachers, key teachers representing grades one through six and lead teachers the campus contact representatives, received professional development education from university professors in semi-monthly after school workshops and in a three week summer science institute held on-site. In this study, (N = 18) key and lead teachers participated in a focus group, a picture board exercise (a projective type exercise), interviews, and classroom observations. Within the system of the MSEC professional development model, cause and effect relationships among eleven phenomena were identified which had the greatest impact on the teachers' feelings of self-efficacy and science teaching practices. Changed teaching practices were indicated by inquiry-based science lessons with students as active learners. Five principles of self-efficacy: (1) efficacy; (2) goals setting; (3) values; (4) expectancy; and, (5) control beliefs were used to evaluate efficacy beliefs. Findings from the data collection and analysis identified two phenomena, the university instructional leadership role and teacher time commitments and time constraints, both internally and externally imposed, which seemed to have the greatest impact on elementary teachers' efficacy and science teaching practices. Provision of science materials and equipment and college level science content, process skills, and pedagogical skills knowledge facilitated by the university and the amount of time teachers chose to commit to professional development education work sessions and to the preparation and implementation of inquiry-based instruction in contrast to other professional and personal commitments were significant factors.

  20. Effect of the science teaching advancement through modeling physical science professional development workshop on teachers' attitudes, beliefs and content knowledge and students' content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Laura

    The Science Teaching Advancement through Modeling Physical Science (STAMPS) professional development workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in improving teachers' and students' content knowledge. Previous research has shown modeling to be an effective method of instruction for improving student and teacher content knowledge, evidenced by assessment scores. Data includes teacher scores on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI; Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhamer, 1992) and the Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI; Jenkins, Birk, Bauer, Krause, & Pavelich, 2004), as well as student scores on a physics and chemistry assessment. Quantitative data is supported by teacher responses to a post workshop survey and classroom observations. Evaluation of the data shows that the STAMPS professional development workshop was successful in improving both student and teacher content knowledge. Conclusions and suggestions for future study are also included.

  1. Taking Professional Learning to Isolated Schools: Perceptions of Providers and Principals, and Lessons for Effective Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Kim; Jones, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and outcomes, as perceived by the professional learning providers and school principals, of a professional learning (PL) model devised in response to recognition that models of PL that are effective in urban settings are not effective in rural and remote areas. Rather than expecting the teachers to travel…

  2. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for the Bering Strait School District, a geographically isolated area with low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poverty. Scientists from around the globe have converged in this region and other areas of the Arctic to observe and measure changes in climate that are significant, accelerating, and unlike any in recorded history. Climate literacy (the ability to understand Earth system science and to make scientifically informed decisions about climate changes) has become essential for this population. Program resources were designed in collaboration with scientists to mimic the processes used to study Arctic climate. Because the Bering Strait School District serves a 98 percent Alaska Native student population, ACMP focused on best practices shown to increase the success of minority students. Significant research indicates that Alaska Native students succeed academically at higher rates when instruction addresses topics of local interest, links education to the students’ physical and cultural environment, uses local knowledge and culture in the curriculum, and incorporates hands-on, inquiry-based lessons in the classroom. A seven-partner consortium of research institutes and Alaska Native corporations created ACMP to help teachers understand their role in nurturing STM talent and motivating students to explore geoscience careers. Research underscores the importance of increasing school emphasis in content areas, such as climate, that facilitate global awareness and civic responsibility, and that foster critical thinking and other 21st century learning skills. Climate studies offer insight into a broad cross-section of STM careers, and provide a natural forum for helping students develop problem-solving skills inherent in STM research. Climate research involves sophisticated technology, a complex set of 21st century skills, and the ability to collaborate with an international community. Professional development that trains teachers in these skills is essential considering that recent research shows 90 percent of U.S. secondary students are taught Earth and physical science by a teacher lacking STM certification. ACMP summative evaluation posed three questions: 1) Did ACMP training meet teachers’ needs? 2) Did ACMP involvement result in more effective teachers and teaching? 3) Did participation in ACMP result in higher Bering Strait School District student achievement? Teachers and students were evaluated using a mixed method design incorporating descriptive components with a before/after design to measure what teachers and students learned. Community members, 165 teachers, and 1,738 individual students participated in the program, which was successful in its goals overall.

  3. The experience and responses of Swedish health professionals to patients requesting virginity restoration (hymen repair).

    PubMed

    Essén, Birgitta; Blomkvist, Anna; Helström, Lotti; Johnsdotter, Sara

    2010-05-01

    An important determinant of family honour in many cultures is the chastity of women, with much importance attributed to virginity until marriage. The traditional proof of virginity is bleeding from the ruptured hymen, which has led some women to request genital surgery to "restore" virginity, or hymen repair. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Swedish health care providers have had experience of patients requesting this surgery. Questionnaires were sent to 1,086 gynaecologists, midwives, youth welfare and social officers, and school nurses and doctors in four Swedish cities. Of the 507 who returned the questionnaire, 271 had seen patients seeking virginity-related care. Of these, 14 had turned the patients away; 221 had made 429 referrals, mostly to a welfare officer or a gynaecologist; and 26 had referred patients to a plastic surgeon. Nine gynaecologists had carried out such surgery themselves. Swedish authorities have to date focused on this issue primarily from a social and legal perspective. No guidelines exist on how health professionals should deal with requests for surgery to restore virginity. Further research is needed on how best to meet the needs of this group of patients in a multi-ethnic society and how to address requests for hymen repair. Without this, medical practitioners and counsellors will remain uncertain and ambivalent, and a variety of approaches will persist. PMID:20541082

  4. Personal Beliefs and Professional Responsibilities: Ethiopian Midwives' Attitudes toward Providing Abortion Services after Legal Reform.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Sarah Jane; Berhe, Aster; Cherie, Amsale

    2015-03-01

    In 2005, Ethiopia liberalized its abortion law and subsequently authorized midwives to offer abortion services. Using a 2013 survey of 188 midwives and 12 interviews with third-year midwifery students, this cross-sectional research examines midwives' attitudes toward abortion to understand their decisions about service provision. Most midwives were willing to provide abortion services. This willingness was positively and significantly related to clinical experience with abortion, but negatively and significantly related to religiosity, belief that providers have the right to refuse to provide services, and care of patients from periurban as opposed to rural areas. No significant relationship was found with perceptions of abortion stigma, years of work as a midwife, or knowledge of the law. Interview data suggest complex dynamics underlying midwives' willingness to offer services, including conflicts between professional norms and religious beliefs. Findings can inform Ethiopia's efforts to reduce maternal mortality through task-shifting to midwives and can aid other countries that are confronting provider shortages and high levels of maternal mortality and morbidity, particularly due to unsafe abortion. PMID:25753060

  5. Modelling event-related skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Flandin, Guillaume; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic tools for psychophysiological signals often make implicit assumptions that are unspecified. In developing a mathematical framework for analysis of skin conductance responses [SCRs], we formalise our assumptions by positing that SCRs can be regarded as the output of a linear time-invariant filter. Here, we provide an empirical test of these assumptions. Our findings indicate that a large component of the variance in SCRs can be explained by one response function per individual. We note that baseline variance (i.e. variance in the absence of evoked responses) is higher than variance that could not be explained by a linear time-invariant model of evoked responses. Furthermore, there was no evidence for nonlinear interactions among evoked responses that depended on their temporal overlap. We develop a canonical response function and show that it can be used for signals from different recording sites. We discuss the implications of these observations for model-based analysis of SCRs. PMID:20093150

  6. Neglected ethical dimensions of the professional liability crisis.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2004-05-01

    In response to the professional liability crisis, self-interest can become dominant and displace fiduciary professionalism from its central place in the moral lives of physicians and physician leaders. We provide preventive ethics tools to address this neglected ethical dimension of the professional liability crisis. We develop these tools on the basis of the concept of the physician as fiduciary of the patient, which was introduced in the English-language literature of medical ethics by Dr John Gregory (1714-1773). These tools are designed to preserve and strengthen 4 professional virtues: integrity, compassion, self-effacement, and self-sacrifice. Acceptable and unacceptable responses to the professional liability crisis are identified with the use of these 4 virtues. These virtues should be supported by an organizational culture of fiduciary professionalism. An organizational culture that is shaped by these 4 professional virtues should be used by physicians and physician leaders to create ethical best-practice models. PMID:15167818

  7. Professional Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jean M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews "Investigating Mathematics with Young Children" (Althouse); "Homecoming for Babies after the Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery: A Guide for Parents," with companion guide for professionals (Hanson and VandenBerg); "HIV/AIDS: A Challenge to Us All," with companion video (Pediatric AIDS Foundation); and "Modeling Healthy Behavior: Actions and…

  8. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This specific…

  9. Addressing the Gap between Case Law and Professional Practice: A Response to Zirkel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this article, authors Carl Smith, Antonis Katsiyannis, and Joseph Ryan respond to Zirkel's most recent article, "The Law in the Special Education Literature: A Brief Legal Critique," published in this issue of "Behavioral Disorders." Smith, Katsiyannis, and Ryan begin their response by saying that "The Law in the…

  10. Can instruction in engineering ethics change students' feelings about professional responsibility?

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Golnaz; Loui, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student's feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of two short cases that posed moral problems. For each case, the role of the engineer was successively changed and the student was asked how each change altered his or her decisions about the case. Students who had completed the ethics course considered more options before making a decision, and they responded consistently despite changes in the cases. For both cases, even when they were not directly involved, they were more likely to feel responsible and take corrective action. Students who were less successful in the ethics course gave answers similar to students who had not taken the course. This latter group of students seemed to have weaker feelings of responsibility: they would say that a problem was "not my business." It appears that instruction in ethics can increase awareness of responsibility, knowledge about how to handle a difficult situation, and confidence in taking action. PMID:20146104

  11. Response to Comments: Practical Wisdom in the Service of Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Lee S.

    2007-01-01

    In a response to comments by Rodney Evans on an earlier "Educational Researcher" (ER) article that the author cowrote with three colleagues at The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the author shows that Evans' critique is based largely on a misreading or misrepresentation of their argument, its rationale, and associated…

  12. MODELLING COMMUNITY RESPONSE AND PERCEPTION TO NATURAL

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    . Keywords: Natural hazards, management & planning, vulnerability, disasters, small states. 1 1. IntroductionMODELLING COMMUNITY RESPONSE AND PERCEPTION TO NATURAL HAZARDS: LESSONS LEARNT FROM HURRICANE LENNY RESPONSE AND PERCEPTION TO NATURAL HAZARDS: LESSONS LEARNT FROM HURRICANE LENNY 1999 by Valma R. Jessamy1

  13. Assesssing herbal medical practitioners in professional qualifying examination in Ghana, a model.

    PubMed

    Adusi-Poku, Yaw; Okine, Laud K-N; Hlortsi-Akakpo, F K; Fleischer, Theophilus C; Mensah, M L K; Arhin, Peter; Agyemfra, George; Dabra, Togbega; Mensah, E N

    2010-01-01

    About 70% of Ghanaians depend on Alternative health practice for their primary health care needs. Hence, there is the need to streamline and regulate these practices. Graduates from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (K.N.U.S.T), Kumasi-Ghana were assessed by the Professional Qualifying Examination Board of the Traditional Medicine Practice Council (TMPC), Ghana, after two years of internship training. A model of assessment took into consideration, the scope of the university training, internship and the primary health care needs of the society. PMID:21304617

  14. International Trade Professional Curriculum System Innovation and Personnel Training Model Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang

    With the rapid development of China's foreign trade, now many universities have set up the International Trade major one after another; The University must be based on our own resources superiority to have the scientific orientation of personnel training objectives, which can make trained students meet needs of society and enterprises better. This paper based on the characteristics of International Trade major in University proposes to take the personnel training model combining with "Work, Certificate and Learning" as the objective, proceeding the orientation of professional personnel and settings of certificate testing module and teaching module, to construct the curriculum system from the innovation of theoretical and practical teaching.

  15. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  16. Professional responsibilities versus familial responsibilities: an examination of role conflict among first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Adams, Terri; Turner, Mila

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a human-caused or natural disaster, the police are essential front-line first responders. The ability of police departments to provide adequate services is contingent upon critical response personnel working and functioning in an efficient manner. Currently, it is assumed that first responders will continue to work in the event of a disaster, even if they are personally impacted by the disaster to which they are expected to respond. This study examines role conflict among police officers who served as first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. PMID:24691915

  17. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  18. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further. PMID:23802650

  19. Evaluating the Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education Professional Development Program at the Elementary School Level in the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    The overall effectiveness of the culturally relevant and responsive education (CRRE) professional development program in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) was evaluated. Recruitment procedures included general and special educators and school administrators as participants. The "CRRE Observation Coding Scheme" and reflective field…

  20. Transformation of a nursing culture through actualization of a nursing professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sandra G; Rich, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    Leading and effecting meaningful change in a nursing division culture, such as the type required to achieve Magnet designation, entails senior nurse executives to be well-acquainted not only with the facts and figures of their business but also with the nuances, myths, and cultures that either enable or block a change from occurring. Expert nurse leaders embrace the story being told by data on dashboards and the quality outcomes achieved and look beyond those points of information out to the edges of their division. These nurse executives also seek to understand the pivotal, perhaps seemingly inconsequential things (notions, beliefs, cultural beliefs, and stories) that will block or tip a culture to change and achieve success. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), a Magnet-designated organization, the road to Magnet was not straightforward. Instead, the path was a winding, learning journey. Through authentic leadership and the conception and actualization of a professional practice model, the HUP Nursing Excellence in Professional Practice (HUP NEPP) model, Magnet designation was achieved and a nursing culture was transformed. PMID:20023559

  1. An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Georgi Anne

    The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in the implementation of curriculum. Data on student learning outcomes implied that both content knowledge and inquiry skills were critical bases for curriculum in terms of teacher efficacy and student achievement. Teachers needed to examine student work as a professional development strategy to also promote reflection on teaching and learning. Further research and professional development in the area of science assessment, in terms of scientific content and processes, was suggested.

  2. The Professionalization of International Disaster Response: It Is Time for Midwives to Get Ready.

    PubMed

    Hays, Karen E; Prepas, Robbie

    2015-01-01

    Disasters and humanitarian emergencies due to natural or human origins result in severe and often prolonged suffering of the affected population. Midwives have a role to play in providing assistance because women and their infants experiencing such crises have unique vulnerabilities and needs. This article introduces midwives and other women's health care practitioners to international humanitarian emergency response efforts and describes preparation and training activities they can undertake to get ready to volunteer with an international health aid agency. Various clinical realities and challenges are discussed, including recommended priorities for providing reproductive health care in disaster zones. Common ethical dilemmas in crisis health care settings are also reviewed. By arriving in the field well prepared to participate and collaborate, midwives can make substantial contributions to the safety, health, and comfort of women and their families who have experienced a natural disaster, armed conflict, or disease epidemic. PMID:26197704

  3. The Multilayered Peer Coaching Model and the In-Service Professional Development of Tertiary EFL Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Junyi; Tajaroensuk, Songphorn; Seepho, Sirinthorn

    2013-01-01

    The increasing need to learn English worldwide leads to the rapid development in the field of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Teachers in this profession are required to reach a much higher level of professionalism now, and their in-service professional development can be an effective approach to updating their professional learning…

  4. Development and evaluation of an innovative model of inter-professional education focused on asthma medication use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inter-professional learning has been promoted as the solution to many clinical management issues. One such issue is the correct use of asthma inhaler devices. Up to 80% of people with asthma use their inhaler device incorrectly. The implications of this are poor asthma control and quality of life. Correct inhaler technique can be taught, however these educational instructions need to be repeated if correct technique is to be maintained. It is important to maximise the opportunities to deliver this education in primary care. In light of this, it is important to explore how health care providers, in particular pharmacists and general medical practitioners, can work together in delivering inhaler technique education to patients, over time. Therefore, there is a need to develop and evaluate effective inter-professional education, which will address the need to educate patients in the correct use of their inhalers as well as equip health care professionals with skills to engage in collaborative relationships with each other. Methods This mixed methods study involves the development and evaluation of three modules of continuing education, Model 1, Model 2 and Model 3. A fourth group, Model 4, acting as a control. Model 1 consists of face-to-face continuing professional education on asthma inhaler technique, aimed at pharmacists, general medical practitioners and their practice nurses. Model 2 is an electronic online continuing education module based on Model 1 principles. Model 3 is also based on asthma inhaler technique education but employs a learning intervention targeting health care professional relationships and is based on sociocultural theory. This study took the form of a parallel group, repeated measure design. Following the completion of continuing professional education, health care professionals recruited people with asthma and followed them up for 6 months. During this period, inhaler device technique training was delivered and data on patient inhaler technique, clinical and humanistic outcomes were collected. Outcomes related to professional collaborative relationships were also measured. Discussion Challenges presented included the requirement of significant financial resources for development of study materials and limited availability of validated tools to measure health care professional collaboration over time. PMID:24708800

  5. Weight-Related Attitudes and Experiences of Nutrition Professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Learners will describe the attitudes and experiences of nutrition professionals regarding professional responsibility to model an appropriate weight status and the role of personal weight-related issues in nutrition counseling interactions. The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes an...

  6. Stiffening response of a cellular tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    Wendling, S; Oddou, C; Isabey, D

    1999-02-01

    Living cells exhibit, as most biological tissues, a stiffening (strain-hardening) response which reflects the nonlinearity of the stress-strain relationship. Tensegrity structures have been proposed as a comprehensive model of such a cell's mechanical response. Based on a theoretical model of a 30-element tensegrity structure, we propose a quantitative analysis of its nonlinear mechanical behavior under static conditions and large deformations. This study provides theoretical foundation to the passage from large-scale tensegrity models to microscale living cells, as well as the comparison between results obtained in biological specimens of different sizes. We found two non-dimensional parameters (L*-normalized element length and T*-normalized elastic tension) which govern the mechanical response of the structure for three types of loading tested (extension, compression and shear). The linear strain-hardening is uniquely observed for extension but differed for the two other types of loading tested. The stiffening response of the theoretical model was compared and discussed with the living cells stiffening response observed by different methods (shear flow experiments, micromanipulation and magnetocytometry). PMID:10049624

  7. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  8. Log-Multiplicative Association Models as Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Yu, Hsiu-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Log-multiplicative association (LMA) models, which are special cases of log-linear models, have interpretations in terms of latent continuous variables. Two theoretical derivations of LMA models based on item response theory (IRT) arguments are presented. First, we show that Anderson and colleagues (Anderson & Vermunt, 2000; Anderson & Bockenholt,…

  9. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  10. Program evaluation of a model to integrate internationally educated health professionals into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for health professionals continues to increase, partially due to the aging population and the high proportion of practitioners nearing retirement. The University of British Columbia (UBC) has developed a program to address this demand, by providing support for internationally trained Physiotherapists in their preparation for taking the National Physiotherapy competency examinations. The aim was to create a program comprised of the educational tools and infrastructure to support internationally educated physiotherapists (IEPs) in their preparation for entry to practice in Canada and, to improve their pass rate on the national competency examination. Methods The program was developed using a logic model and evaluated using program evaluation methodology. Program tools and resources included educational modules and curricular packages which were developed and refined based on feedback from clinical experts, IEPs and clinical physical therapy mentors. An examination bank was created and used to include test-enhanced education. Clinical mentors were recruited and trained to provide clinical and cultural support for participants. Results The IEP program has recruited 124 IEPs, with 69 now integrated into the Canadian physiotherapy workforce, and more IEPs continuing to apply to the program. International graduates who participated in the program had an improved pass rate on the national Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE); participation in the program resulted in them having a 28% (95% CI, 2% to 59%) greater possibility of passing the written section than their counterparts who did not take the program. In 2010, 81% of all IEP candidates who completed the UBC program passed the written component, and 82% passed the clinical component. Conclusion The program has proven to be successful and sustainable. This program model could be replicated to support the successful integration of other international health professionals into the workforce. PMID:24119470

  11. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  12. Perceptions and Attitudes of Health Professionals in Kenya on National Health Care Resource Allocation Mechanisms: A Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Chern, Jin-Yuan; Chiu, Chiung-Hsuan Megan; Wang, Bill; Huang, Kuo-Cherh; Muga, Miriam Adoyo

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care resource allocation is key towards attaining equity in the health system. However, health professionals’ perceived impact and attitude towards health care resource allocation in Sub-Saharan Africa is unknown; furthermore, they occupy a position which makes them notice the impact of different policies in their health system. This study explored perceptions and attitudes of health professionals in Kenya on health care resource allocation mechanism. Method We conducted a survey of a representative sample of 341 health professionals in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital from February to April 2012, consisting of over 3000 employees. We assessed health professionals’ perceived impact and attitudes on health care resource allocation mechanism in Kenya. We used structural equation modeling and applied a Confirmatory Factor Analysis using Robust Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure to test the hypothesized model. Results We found that the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their perceived positive impact (-1.04, p < .001), health professionals’ satisfaction (-0.24, p < .01), and professionals’ attitudes (-1.55, p < .001) while it was positively associated with perceived negative impact (1.14, p < .001). Perceived positive impact of the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their overall satisfaction (-0.08) and attitude (-0.98) at p < .001, respectively. Furthermore, overall satisfaction was negatively associated with attitude (-1.10, p <.001). On the other hand, perceived negative impact of the allocation was positively associated with overall satisfaction (0.29, p <.001) but was not associated with attitude. Conclusion The result suggests that health care resource allocation mechanism has a negative effect towards perceptions, attitudes and overall satisfaction of health professionals who are at the frontline in health care. These findings can serve as a crucial reference for policymakers as the Kenyan health system move towards devolving the system of governance. PMID:26039053

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Robert D.

    the spectrum of DNA damages formed by ionizing radiation. Radiat Res. 161(4), 451-457 (2004) · R.D. Stewart, WMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality

  14. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  15. Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers. PMID:23101486

  16. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  17. 1 Professional Psychology PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Professional Psychology PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Offered through the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences' social and behavioral sciences discipline, the professional psychology program teaches students that combines extensive practical experience with classes on scientific foundations of psychology taught

  18. Modelling the superparamagnetic response of AEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattel, Daniel; Mutton, Oaul

    2015-09-01

    Several lines of VTEM data flown at different system elevations across a known sulphide body and surface cover with elevated superparamagnetic (SPM) properties were analysed with MAXWELL, layered-earth inversions (LEI), LEROIAIR and LEROI. The SPM material was modelled with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibilities at shallow depth. Due to their slow late-time decay, SPM responses can be confused with responses of deep conductors and vice versa. Depending on the parameter weighting used, 1D inversions model all late-time responses as deep conductive material or as surficial SPM material. However, the joint 1D inversion of data acquired at different system elevations manages to recover a deep conductor from the sulphide anomaly and elevated SPM values at the location of the SPM response. For the modelled parameters, the VTEM datasets from two elevations (at 70 and 80 m) require a vertical separation of ~10 m to allow for the discrimination between the SPM and sulphide responses. For lower system elevations, less sensor separation is necessary due to the strong gradient of the SPM response. Following the determination of SPM parameters from VTEM survey data, these values were used to hypothesise the SPM response for a range of system geometries, showing that larger transmitter loops and larger offsets between transmitter and receiver loops reduce SPM effects. We suggest that two vertically separated receivers could be used to measure the airborne electromagnetic (AEM) gradient and depending on the flying height of the transmitter, the vertical offset of the receivers should be between 2 and 40 m. If gradient data are not collected, then EM responses measured during the transmitter on-time and x-component data, if available, might offer some model discrimination. Whereas synthetic data of the examined helicopter TEM systems VTEM, AEROTEM and HELITEM indicate a fairly high sensitivity to SPM effects, fixed-wing MEGATEM data are much less affected, due to the higher transmitter elevation and large transmitter loop - receiver separation. SPM effects on data of frequency-domain systems such as the RESOLVE system are also small.

  19. The influence of personal and environmental factors on professionalism in medical education

    PubMed Central

    West, Colin P; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2007-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a critical quality for physicians to possess. Physician professionalism has received increased attention in recent years, with many authorities suggesting that professionalism is in decline. An understanding of the factors contributing to professionalism may allow the development of more effective approaches to promoting this quality in medical education. Discussion We propose a model of personal and environmental factors that contribute to physician professionalism. Personal factors include distress/well-being, individual characteristics, and interpersonal qualities. Environmental factors include institutional culture, formal and informal curricula, and practice characteristics. Promotion of professionalism requires efforts directed at each of these elements. Summary One responsibility of medical education is to foster the development of professionalism among its learners. Both personal and environmental factors play a role in physician professionalism. Accordingly, institutions should consider these factors as efforts to promote physician professionalism evolve. PMID:17760986

  20. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum likelihood framework. They are explicitly formulated…

  1. A Medical-Model Professional Development School: Effects of Training Experience on the First Year of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Trisha Gerrish

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in teacher efficacy for classroom management, instructional strategies, and student engagement between teachers who trained in a full-time, yearlong, medical-model professional development school (PDS) and their experience as a first year teacher in comparison to teachers who participated…

  2. Toward an Innovative, Basic Program Model for the Improvement of Professional Instruction in Dental Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the massive amount of literature pertaining to the improvement of professional instruction in dental education resulted in the formation of a comprehensive model of 10 categories, including Delphi technique; systems approach; agencies; workshops; multi-media, self-instruction; evaluation paradigms, measurement, courses, and…

  3. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.O.; Lapham, E.V.

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  4. Distinguishing Models of Professional Development: The Case of an Adaptive Model's Impact on Teachers' Knowledge, Instruction, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koellner, Karen; Jacobs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We posit that professional development (PD) models fall on a continuum from highly adaptive to highly specified, and that these constructs provide a productive way to characterize and distinguish among models. The study reported here examines the impact of an adaptive mathematics PD model on teachers' knowledge and instructional practices as…

  5. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations to determine performance coefficients. These coefficients represent the decrease in time required for various basic motions in emergency situations and were used to model an emergency response. This approach will make hazardous operations requiring operator response, alarm management, and evacuation processes easier to design and predict. An application of this methodology is included in the article. The time required for an emergency response was roughly a one-third faster than for a normal response time. PMID:25530564

  6. Instructional Rounds as a Professional Learning Model for Systemic Implementation of Assessment for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; Klinger, Don; Pyper, Jamie; Woods, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the implementation of a professional learning project aimed at building educators' knowledge and skills in assessment for learning (AfL) within two school districts in Ontario, Canada. Specifically, the research examined the value of a two-tier "Instructional Rounds" (IR) professional

  7. Sport Education for Teachers: Professional Development when Introducing a Novel Curriculum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a description of an on-site professional development program for Russian teachers as they learned to teach Sport Education. A concurrent objective was to investigate the effectiveness of this professional development opportunity. Participants were two physical education teachers (one with 27 and one with 3…

  8. Modeling and Measuring the Structure of Professional Vision in Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Tina; Stürmer, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Professional vision has been identified as an important element of teacher expertise that can be developed in teacher education. It describes the use of knowledge to notice and interpret significant features of classroom situations. Three aspects of professional vision have been described by qualitative research: describe, explain, and predict…

  9. Pre-Professional Training for Serving Children with ASD: An Apprenticeship Model of Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with varied skill profiles and levels of severity making development and implementation of specialized school services challenging. Research indicates that school professionals require and desire additional ASD-specific professional development, both at the pre-and in-service levels.…

  10. Development of student professionalism.

    PubMed

    Roth, Mary T; Zlatic, Thomas D

    2009-06-01

    In late 2007, the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) charged their National StuNet Advisory Committee to formulate tenets of professionalism, with the primary goal of introducing students to essential attitudes and behaviors of professionalism. The committee's list of tenets served as a working document for the development of this White Paper. This collaborative effort of the ACCP Board of Regents and the National StuNet Advisory Committee sought to complement other published documents addressing student professionalism. The purpose of this White Paper is to enhance student understanding of professionalism, emphasizing the importance of the covenantal or "fiducial" relationship between the patient and the pharmacist. This fiducial relationship is the essence of professionalism and is a relationship between the patient and the pharmacist built on trust. This White Paper also outlines the traits of professionalism, which were developed after an extensive review of the literature on professionalism in medicine and pharmacy. The traits of professionalism identified here are responsibility, commitment to excellence, respect for others, honesty and integrity, and care and compassion. It is from these traits that student actions and behaviors should emanate. Students, pharmacy practitioners, and faculty have a responsibility to each other, to society as a whole, and to individual patients whom they serve to ensure that their words and actions uphold the highest standards of professional behavior. PMID:19476426

  11. One Size Doesn't Fit All: Customizing Educational Technology Professional Development. Part Three--Combining Goals & Models to Fit Teachers' Characteristics & Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Judi

    2008-01-01

    Educational technology-related professional development (ETPD) can be designed in many different ways. It varies by general purposes and goals, specific learning objectives, curriculum content, the student grade levels for which the strategies and tools presented are appropriate, professional development model(s) used, how it is matched to…

  12. The Research Dynamic: A Professional Development Model for Secondary School Science Teachers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This essay summarizes the author's 10 years of experience at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation mentoring secondary school science teachers during 8-wk Summer Research Institutes. The summary is presented as a learning model, which we call the research dynamic. This model consists of three interlocked components: specified ignorance, peer interactions, and gateway experiments. Specified ignorance is based on the work of the sociologist Robert K. Merton. It is essentially the art of highlighting what is not known about a phenomenon but must become known for further progress. In practice, specified ignorance is framed as a hypothesis, a prediction, or a question. It is commonly the outcome of peer interactions, which are the second essential component of the research dynamic. Peer interactions are the inevitable outcome of having teachers work together in the same laboratory on related research topics. These topics are introduced as gateway experiments, the third component. The most important attribute of gateway experiments is their authenticity. These experiments, when first carried out, opened new scientific vistas. They are also technically, conceptually, and logically simple. We illustrate the research dynamic with a line of seminal experiments in biochemical genetics. We provide evidence that the research dynamic produced significantly positive effects on teachers' confidence in their professional preparedness. PMID:19487501

  13. Population-expression models of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Antia, Rustom; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    The immune response to a pathogen has two basic features. The first is the expansion of a few pathogen-specific cells to form a population large enough to control the pathogen. The second is the process of differentiation of cells from an initial naive phenotype to an effector phenotype which controls the pathogen, and subsequently to a memory phenotype that is maintained and responsible for long-term protection. The expansion and the differentiation have been considered largely independently. Changes in cell populations are typically described using ecologically based ordinary differential equation models. In contrast, differentiation of single cells is studied within systems biology and is frequently modeled by considering changes in gene and protein expression in individual cells. Recent advances in experimental systems biology make available for the first time data to allow the coupling of population and high dimensional expression data of immune cells during infections. Here we describe and develop population-expression models which integrate these two processes into systems biology on the multicellular level. When translated into mathematical equations, these models result in non-conservative, non-local advection-diffusion equations. We describe situations where the population-expression approach can make correct inference from data while previous modeling approaches based on common simplifying assumptions would fail. We also explore how model reduction techniques can be used to build population-expression models, minimizing the complexity of the model while keeping the essential features of the system. While we consider problems in immunology in this paper, we expect population-expression models to be more broadly applicable.

  14. Professional Education PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AWARD FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Graduate & Professional Education PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AWARD FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS to their field of study. Conference travel is essential to the academic growth and development of graduate and Professional Education is charged with the responsibility of administering competitive funds for this purpose

  15. Impact of feeling responsible for adverse events on doctors' personal and professional lives: the importance of being open to criticism from colleagues

    PubMed Central

    Aasland, O; Forde, R

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of adverse events that had caused patient injury and for which the doctor felt responsible, and the experience of acceptance of criticism among colleagues. Design: Self-reports based on postal questionnaires to 1616 doctors. Setting: Norway. Participants: A representative sample of 1318 active doctors. Results: 368/1294 (28%) reported that they had experienced at least one adverse event with serious patient injury. Being male and working within a surgical discipline (including anaesthesiology, obstetrics and gynaecology) significantly increased the probability of such reports. 38% of the events had been reported to official authorities and, for 17% of doctors, the incident had a negative impact on their private life; 6% had needed professional help. 50% and 54%, respectively, found it difficult to criticise colleagues for their ethically or professionally unacceptable conduct. Doctors who found it easy to criticise colleagues also reported having received more support from their colleagues after a serious patient injury. Conclusion: Male surgeons report the highest prevalence of adverse events. Criticism for professionally and ethically unacceptable conduct is difficult to express among doctors. More acceptance of criticism of professional conduct may not only prevent patient harm, but may also give more support to colleagues who have experienced serious patient injury. PMID:15691998

  16. The Earth2Class Model for Professional Development to Implement the Next Generation Science Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Assumpcao, C. M.; Baggio, F. D.; Hemming, S. R.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Brenner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Professional development for teachers involved in the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) will require a multifaceted approach combining curriculum development, understanding the nature of science, applications of engineering and technology, integrating reading and writing, and other pedagogical components. The Earth2Class Workshops (E2C) at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (LDEO) provides one model for creating effective training to meet the NGSS challenges. E2C has provided more than 135 workshops since 1998 that have brought together LDEO research scientists with classroom teachers and students from the New York metropolitan area and elsewhere. Each session provides teachers with the chance to learn first-hand about the wide range of investigations conducted at LDEO. This approach aligns strongly with the NGSS goals: mastery of the disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices, understanding the nature of science, and cross-cutting relationships. During workshops, participating teachers interact with scientists to gain understanding of what stimulated research questions, how scientists put together all the components of investigations, and ways in which results are disseminated. Networking among teachers often leads to developing lesson plans based on the science, as well as support for professional growth not always possible within the school setting. Through the E2C website www.earth2class.org, teachers and students not able to attend the live workshops can access archival versions of the sessions. The website also provides a wide variety of educational resources. These have proved to be valuable on a national basis, as evidenced by an average of more than 300,000 hits per month from thousands of site visitors. Participating researchers have found E2C to be an effective approach to provide broader outreach of their results. During the next couple of years, the E2C program will expand to provide more resources useful for educators seeking to introduce NGSS-based programs in their districts. The E2C model can be applied in other settings, with appropriate modifications.

  17. Validating a conceptual model for an inter-professional approach to shared decision making: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Stacey, Dawn; Gagnon, Susie; Dunn, Sandy; Pluye, Pierre; Frosch, Dominick; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Elwyn, Glyn; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Graham, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Following increased interest in having inter-professional (IP) health care teams engage patients in decision making, we developed a conceptual model for an IP approach to shared decision making (SDM) in primary care. We assessed the validity of the model with stakeholders in Canada. Methods In 15 individual interviews and 7 group interviews with 79 stakeholders, we asked them to: (1) propose changes to the IP-SDM model; (2) identify barriers and facilitators to the model's implementation in clinical practice; and (3) assess the model using a theory appraisal questionnaire. We performed a thematic analysis of the transcripts and a descriptive analysis of the questionnaires. Results Stakeholders suggested placing the patient at its centre; extending the concept of family to include significant others; clarifying outcomes; highlighting the concept of time; merging the micro, meso and macro levels in one figure; and recognizing the influence of the environment and emotions. The most common barriers identified were time constraints, insufficient resources and an imbalance of power among health professionals. The most common facilitators were education and training in inter-professionalism and SDM, motivation to achieve an IP approach to SDM, and mutual knowledge and understanding of disciplinary roles. Most stakeholders considered that the concepts and relationships between the concepts were clear and rated the model as logical, testable, having clear schematic representation, and being relevant to inter-professional collaboration, SDM and primary care. Conclusions Stakeholders validated the new IP-SDM model for primary care settings and proposed few modifications. Future research should assess if the model helps implement SDM in IP clinical practice. PMID:20695950

  18. RRAWFLOW: Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (v1.15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    The Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (RRAWFLOW) is a lumped-parameter model that simulates streamflow, spring flow, groundwater level, or solute transport for a measurement point in response to a system input of precipitation, recharge, or solute injection. I introduce the first version of RRAWFLOW available for download and public use and describe additional options. The open-source code is written in the R language and is available at http://sd.water.usgs.gov/projects/RRAWFLOW/RRAWFLOW.html along with an example model of streamflow. RRAWFLOW includes a time-series process to estimate recharge from precipitation and simulates the response to recharge by convolution, i.e., the unit-hydrograph approach. Gamma functions are used for estimation of parametric impulse-response functions (IRFs); a combination of two gamma functions results in a double-peaked IRF. A spline fit to a set of control points is introduced as a new method for estimation of nonparametric IRFs. Several options are included to simulate time-variant systems. For many applications, lumped models simulate the system response with equal accuracy to that of distributed models, but moreover, the ease of model construction and calibration of lumped models makes them a good choice for many applications (e.g., estimating missing periods in a hydrologic record). RRAWFLOW provides professional hydrologists and students with an accessible and versatile tool for lumped-parameter modeling.

  19. Constructing a Flexible Model of Integrated Professional Practice: Part 3--The Model in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhydderch, Gillian; Gameson, John

    2010-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers exploring the Constructionist Model of Informed Reasoned Action (COMOIRA). The first two papers articulated the theoretical and conceptual issues underpinning the model and explored some important process and practice issues associated with it. Initially, this paper discusses two important concepts that…

  20. A national survey of healthcare professionals' views on models of follow-up, holistic needs assessment and survivorship care for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wells, M; Semple, C J; Lane, C

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of follow-up and survivorship care are changing in response to growing numbers of cancer survivors and an increasing recognition that traditional models are unsustainable and result in unmet needs. Clinicians have shown reluctance in changing conventional follow-up practices for patients with head and neck cancer. This study aimed to explore nurses' and allied health professionals' views and practices in relation to follow-up, holistic needs assessment and survivorship care in this patient group. An online survey of members of the British Association of Head and Neck Oncology Nurses was undertaken. The response rate was 43% (74 of 174). Findings revealed a range of existing models of follow-up, rehabilitation and support for people with head and neck cancer across the UK. Specialist staff were open to new models of care and to more responsibility, with adequate training and supervision. There were some gaps in the provision of comprehensive survivorship care and some specific areas of practice in which nurses lacked confidence, knowledge and skills, such as managing medications and complex symptoms. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate effective models of follow-up and support for a growing population of head and neck cancer survivors who have diverse and complex needs. PMID:25615418

  1. Assessing the Effectiveness of Selected Biomarkers in the Acute and Cumulative Physiological Stress Response in Professional Rugby Union through Non-invasive Assessment.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, A; Lewis, J G; Scarrott, C; Gill, N; Gieseg, S P; Draper, N

    2015-06-01

    Rugby union is a sport involving high force and frequency impacts making the likelihood of injury a significant risk. The aim of this study was to measure and report the individual and group acute and cumulative physiological stress response during 3 professional rugby games through non-invasive sampling. 24 professional rugby players volunteered for the study. Urine and saliva samples were collected pre and post 3 matches. Myoglobin, salivary immunoglobulin A, cortisol, neopterin and total neopterin (neopterin+7,8-dihydroneopterin) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography or enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Significant increases in cortisol, myoglobin, neopterin and total neopterin when urine volume was corrected with specific gravity were observed (p<0.05). Significant decreases in salivary immunoglobulin A concentration were observed for games 1 and 2 while secretion rate decreased after games 2 and 3. Significant decreases were seen with the percent of 7,8-dihydroneopterin being converted to neopterin following games 2 and 3. The intensity of 3 professional rugby games was sufficient to elicit significant changes in the physiological markers selected for our study. Furthermore, results suggest the selected markers not only provide a means for analysing the stress encountered during a single game of rugby but also highlight the unique pattern of response for each individual player. PMID:25760150

  2. The Graded Unfolding Model: A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Graded Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to attitude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes analyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent investigations suggest that unfolding models are more appropriate (J. S. Roberts, 1995; W. H. Van Schuur and H. A. L. Kiers, 1994). Advances in…

  3. Demystifying reflective practice: Using the DATA model to enhance evaluators' professional activities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tiffany L; Barlow, Patrick B; Peters, John M; Skolits, Gary J

    2015-10-01

    Reflective practice (RP), one of six essential competency domains in evaluation identified by Stevahn, King, Ghere, and Minnema (2005), refers to thinking critically about one's evaluation practice, alone or with other people, and using critical insights to improve one's practice. Currently, evaluators have minimal guidance in navigating this essential professional competency, professed to be a necessary part of their practice. This article focuses on how RP can serve as a tool for evaluators through the use of the "DATA" integrated RP framework, developed by Peters (1991, 2009). DATA is an acronym with each letter standing for a different step in the process of reflective practice. The "D" step of the acronym focuses on (D)escribing what is or has been happening in practice. The "A" step refers to (A)nalyzing the current state of practice-why is this happening the way it is? The "T" concentrates on a practice-oriented form of (T)heorizing, which comes from analysis and serves as a basis for the resulting (A)ct. The last "A" focuses on the specifics of an action plan to change one's evaluation practice in light of the practical theory developed through theorizing. This paper describes the DATA model and introduces the application of the framework in a practice context. PMID:26051793

  4. Ballistic Response of Fabrics: Model and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Walker Anderson, James D., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Walker (1999)developed an analytical model for the dynamic response of fabrics to ballistic impact. From this model the force, F, applied to the projectile by the fabric is derived to be F = 8/9 (ET*)h^3/R^2, where E is the Young's modulus of the fabric, T* is the "effective thickness" of the fabric and equal to the ratio of the areal density of the fabric to the fiber density, h is the displacement of the fabric on the axis of impact and R is the radius of the fabric deformation or "bulge". Ballistic tests against Zylon^TM fabric have been performed to measure h and R as a function of time. The results of these experiments are presented and analyzed in the context of the Walker model. Walker (1999), Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Ballistics, pp. 1231.

  5. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response

  6. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  7. Complex Childhood Trauma and School Responses: A Case Study of the Impact of Professional Development in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderWegen, Terrie A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine one public elementary school in Spokane, Washington that has received significant complex trauma professional development training provided by Washington State University Area Health Education Center (WSU-AHEC). The study explored teachers', specialists', and the principal's perceptions of…

  8. Who Is the "Professional" in a Professional Learning Community? An Exploration of Teacher Professionalism in Collaborative Professional Development Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servage, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This study is a survey and interpretation of professional development literature related to professional learning communities (PLCs) in schools. Current K 12 trade publications focusing on PLCs were analyzed against four different theoretical models of professionalism. Each model encourages and legitimates a different understanding of the…

  9. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based…

  10. Perspective: Organizational professionalism: relevant competencies and behaviors.

    PubMed

    Egener, Barry; McDonald, Walter; Rosof, Bernard; Gullen, David

    2012-05-01

    The professionalism behaviors of physicians have been extensively discussed and defined; however, the professionalism behaviors of health care organizations have not been systemically categorized or described. Defining organizational professionalism is important because the behaviors of a health care organization may substantially impact the behaviors of physicians and others within the organization as well as other institutions and the larger community. In this article, the authors discuss the following competencies of organizational professionalism, derived from ethical values: service, respect, fairness, integrity, accountability, mindfulness, and self-motivation. How nonprofit health care organizations can translate these competencies into behaviors is described. For example, incorporating metrics of population health into assessments of corporate success may increase collaboration among regional health care organizations while also benefiting the community. The unique responsibilities of leadership to model these competencies, promote them in the community, and develop relevant organizational strategies are clarified. These obligations elevate the importance of the executive leadership's capacity for self-reflection and the governing boards' responsibility for mapping operational activities to organizational mission. Lastly, the authors consider how medical organizations are currently addressing professionalism challenges. In an environment made turbulent by regulatory change and financial constraints, achieving proficiency in professionalism competencies can assist nonprofit health care organizations to promote population health and the well-being of their workforces. PMID:22450182

  11. Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

    1984-11-25

    Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  12. BridgeGreen : bridging the disconnect between design professionals and resources fro environmentally, socially, and economically responsive architecture

    E-print Network

    Elbaum, Meredith Sue, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Sustainable design, whether referred to as green, high performing, responsible, or environmentally, socially, and economically responsive architecture, is influencing the global building industry. Most major firms of ...

  13. Modeling of Cardiovascular Response to Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. Keith

    1999-01-01

    It was the hypothesis of this Project that the Simple lack of hydrostatic pressure in microgravity generates several purely physical reactions that underlie and may explain, in part, the cardiovascular response to weightlessness. For instance, hydrostatic pressure within the ventricles of the heart may improve cardiac performance by promoting expansion of ventricular volume during diastole. The lack of hydrostatic pressure in microgravity might, therefore, reduce diastolic filling and cardiac performance. The change in transmural pressure is possible due to the difference in hydrostatic pressure gradients between the blood inside the ventricle and the lung tissue surrounding the ventricle due to their different densities. On the other hand, hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature may reduce cardiac inlet pressures because of the typical location of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level (the level at which pressure remains constant throughout changes in gravity). Additional physical responses of the body to changing gravitational conditions may influence cardiovascular performance. For instance, fluid shifts from the lower body to the thorax in microgravity may serve to increase central venous pressure (CVP) and boost cardiac output (CO). The concurrent release of gravitational force on the rib cage may tend to increase chest girth and decrease pedcardial pressure, augmenting ventricular filling. The lack of gravity on pulmonary tissue may allow an upward shifting of lung mass, causing a further decrease in pericardial pressure and increased CO. Additional effects include diuresis early in the flight, interstitial fluid shifts, gradual spinal extension and movement of abdominal mass, and redistribution of circulatory impedance because of venous distention in the upper body and the collapse of veins in the lower body. In this project, the cardiovascular responses to changes in intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, in intravascular hydrostatic pressure and, to a limited extent, in extravascular and pedcardial hydrostatic pressure were investigated. A complete hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system was built and flown aboard the NASA KC-135 and a computer model was developed and tested in simulated microgravity. Results obtained with these models have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume. When combined with the acute increase in ventricular pressure associated with the elimination of hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature and the resultant cephalad fluid shift with the models in the upright position, however, stroke volume increased in the models. Imposition of a decreased pedcardial pressure in the computer model and in a simplified hydraulic model increased stroke volume. Physiologic regional fluid shifting was also demonstrated by the models. The unifying parameter characterizing of cardiac response was diastolic ventricular transmural pressure (DVDELTAP) The elimination of intraventricular hydrostatic pressure in O-G decreased DVDELTAP stroke volume, while the elimination of intravascular hydrostatic pressure increased DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the upright posture, but reduced DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the launch posture. The release of gravity on the chest wall and its associated influence on intrathoracic pressure, simulated by a drop in extraventricular pressure4, increased DVDELTAP ans stroke volume.

  14. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  15. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  16. [Professionalism in healthcare organizations--a unique model in the Assuta Medical Centers Network].

    PubMed

    Shemer, Joshua; Abadi-Korek, Ifat

    2015-04-01

    "Medical professionalism signifies a set of values, behaviors, and relationships that underpin the trust the public has in doctors". Healthcare organizations and medical schools are expected to ensure that their employees and graduates possess these values, behaviors and skills. The importance of maintaining professionalization within the organization led the Assuta Medical Centers Network to establish a School of Professionalism in January 2014. All of the employees within Assuta are scheduled to participate in a training program focused on Professionalism in Healthcare. Training includes a unique, interactive teaching initiative facilitated by leaders chosen from among Assuta employees. Each training class comprises heterogeneous sets of employees from all divisions within the organization (medical, administrative, support employees etc.). Until February 2015, a total of 1,225 workers participated in this program. This novel intervention initiative is being evaluated and assessed in order to understand how the trainees perceive professionalism before and after the interventions; to observe changes in their attitudes, behaviors and skills following the training; and to assess short and long-term outcomes as this program progresses over the years. PMID:26065223

  17. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    PubMed

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency. PMID:26698757

  18. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in contrast possessed no adhesion to the pure component C11EG6OH SAM at both temperatures examined, 25 and 40°C. The protein adhesion data to the mixed SAM also supports the hypothesis that the mixed SAM displays a non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it displays a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. Advancing contact angles obtained through tensiometry were used to find the surface free energy of the mixed SAM before and after the thermal response using the van Oss-Good-Chaudhury method. The surface tension values obtained, 42 and 38 mN/m for 22 and 40°C, respectively, are not dissimilar enough with regard to error to make conclusions. In a similar manner, the surface free energy of another mixed SAM composed of alkyl and trimethylamine thiolates was also calculated. PNIPAAm brushes grown on a silicon substrate by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were imaged by AFM and characterized by XPS. The height of the resulting brushes could be controlled from ˜5 to 55 nm by reaction time. A thermal response was observed for polymer brushes with a length greater than 20 nm. For polymer brush lengths greater than 20 nm, the static contact angle at 22°C was 35° and varied from 60 to 80° at 40°C. The thermal response was also observed using the captive bubble method. Force-distance curves of the PNIPAAm brushes were taken with an unmodified silicon nitride AFM cantilever at incremental temperature steps. At room temperature the force-distance data was fit to the Alexander-de Gennes model resulting in a hydrated polymer length of 235 nm. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Hertz model and changed from ˜80 MPa at 26°C to ˜350 MPa at 40°C. The solvent condition of the Alexander-de Gennes model was set to the case of good solvent and showed close match to the force-distance data at 26°C. The match was not as close when the solvent condition was set to theta solvent condition and compared to the force-distance data at 40°C. Finally, the effective diffusion coefficients of a dye were obtained for the uptake, encapsulation, a

  19. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors Toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-02-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based curricula was employed to determine how science teacher's attitudes and efficacy where impacted while designing science-based video games. The study's mixed-method design ascertained teacher efficacy on five factors (General computer use, Science Learning, Inquiry Teaching and Learning, Synchronous chat/text, and Playing Video Games) related to technology and gaming using a web-based survey). Qualitative data in the form of online blog posts was gathered during the project to assist in the triangulation and assessment of teacher efficacy. Data analyses consisted of an Analysis of Variance and serial coding of teacher reflective responses. Results indicated participants who used computers daily have higher efficacy while using inquiry-based teaching methods and science teaching and learning. Additional emergent findings revealed possible motivating factors for efficacy. This professional development project was focused on inquiry as a pedagogical strategy, standard-based science learning as means to develop content knowledge, and creating video games as technological knowledge. The project was consistent with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework where overlapping circles of the three components indicates development of an integrated understanding of the suggested relationships. Findings provide suggestions for development of standards-based science education software, its integration into the curriculum and, strategies for implementing technology into teaching practices.

  20. Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Reanyansky, Anatoly D; Bourne, Neil K; Millett, Jeremy C F

    2009-01-01

    The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

  1. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  2. Modeling controlled release from responsive microgel capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Masoud, Hassan

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a coarse-grained computational method that explicitly captures the release of nanoparticles and macromolecules from responsive microgel capsules. The model is based on the dissipative particle dynamics. Our simulations reveal that not only swelling, but also deswelling of hollow microcapsules can be harnessed for controlled release. We show that the release from swollen capsules is diffusion driven, whereas the release from deswelling gel capsules occurs due to the flow of encapsulated solvent that is expelled from the shrinking capsule interior. The latter hydrodynamic release is burst-like and continues only during capsule deswelling. We find that deformable polymer chains that can easily penetrate thorough membrane pores are released in larger amounts from deswelling capsules, than nanoparticles that are filtered out by shrinking membrane pores. Our simulations further demonstrate that the inclusion of rigid microrods inside deswelling capsules mitigates the membrane pore closing, and, in this fashion, provides an effective method for regulating the rate of hydrodynamic release of nanoparticles.

  3. Chemistry Teachers' Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers' beliefs and practice. The data indicated that the teachers developed more complete conceptions of classroom inquiry, valued a "phenomena first" approach to scientific investigations, and viewed inquiry approaches as helpful for facilitating improved student thinking. Analysis of classroom observations with the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol indicated that features of the PD were observed in the teachers' practice during the academic year follow-up. Implications for effective science teacher professional development models are discussed.

  4. A Year-Round Professional Development Model for World Language Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Tracy M.; Peterson, Margaret D.; Silva, Duarte M.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2009-01-01

    The Bay Area Foreign Language Program (BAFLP), one of nine regional sites of the California Foreign Language Project, offers ongoing, year-round professional development programs for world language educators. In addition, its leadership program prepares selected educators to assume leadership positions at their school sites, building capacity for…

  5. Navigating Past and Present Accountability Measures in Search of an Effective Principal Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the perceived experiences encountered by principals in the state of Illinois regarding professional development sessions offered through the Illinois Administrator Academy. The fundamental value of the Illinois Administrator Academy was designed as one of 169 specific initiatives in association with the…

  6. Promoting the Development of Professional Identity of Gerontologists: An Academic/Experiential Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendron, Tracey L.; Myers, Barbara J.; Pelco, Lynn E.; Welleford, E. Ayn

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in gerontology has an essential role in providing the foundational knowledge required to work with a diverse aging population. It can also play an essential role in promoting best-practice approaches for the development of professional identity as a gerontologist. The primary goal of this study was to determine what factors…

  7. A Co-Teaching Model: Committed Professionals, High Expectations, and the Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Karen Wise; Magiera, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article relates the story of a first grade teacher and a child who was the only deaf student in the entire school. Because he had no one who could communicate with him--not teachers, not students, no one, this situation tugged at the hearts of a committed team of professionals. A teacher of the deaf, a first grade general education teacher, a…

  8. Undergraduates' Intentions to Take Examinations for Professional Certification: Examinations of Four Competing Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Hsu, Ping-Kun; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on professional certification has primarily focused on graduate certificates in intensive care nursing, writing certificates for practitioners, maintenance of certification in radiation oncology, and the certification of teachers and surgeons. Research on certification in the domain of business and management from an…

  9. Teachers' Perception of a Professional Learning Community Model and Its Impact on Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    This study of a suburban school district in south central Pennsylvania employed a mixed method design to explore teachers' perceptions of their professional learning community (PLC) and the impact of such on teaching effectiveness and student learning. Perceptual data was collected through the Learning Community Culture Indicator (LCCI) teacher…

  10. Toward Conceptual Clarity: A Multidimensional, Multilevel Model of Professional Learning Communities in Dutch Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleegers, Peter; den Brok, Perry; Verbiest, Eric; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Daly, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of professional learning communities (PLCs) among researchers, practitioners, and educational policy makers, studies on PLCs differ significantly on the dimensions and capacities used to conceptualize them. Further, the interrelatedness of different dimensions and capacities within PLCs is not often well conceived nor…

  11. "Drama for Schools": Teacher Change in an Applied Theatre Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kathryn; Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Baker, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Applied theatre often draws upon critical pedagogy and constructivist methodology as a way to bring participants into direct engagement with their own learning experiences. As learners, adults bring a wealth of perspectives that further affect how they interact with an applied theatre experience. "Drama for Schools" (DFS) is a professional

  12. Educational Change and Reform. An Integrated Model for the Professional Development of Teacher Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Richard D.; Bas-Isaac, Eugenia

    This paper presents a detailed example of teachers' professional development as a part of a district's career ladder pilot-test program in Arizona. A case study describes a secondary school teacher who has been a leader in a major national and state teachers' organization. A description is given of how teachers develop intellectually and…

  13. English Teachers' Cultural Models about Technology: A Microethnographic Perspective on Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2014-01-01

    Prompted by calls for research on technology-focused professional development, this ethnographic case study investigates how teachers' participation in learning communities may influence technology integration within the secondary English curriculum. In this article, I draw on educational psychology, cognitive anthropology, and…

  14. Fostering Family-Professional Collaboration through Person-Centered IEP Meetings: The "True Directions" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Cynthia; Childre, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Family-professional partnerships have been recognized through research and supported through legislation as critical components contributing to the positive development of children with disabilities, yet current practices and services need significant improvement. In practice, families and service providers often experience difficulty in…

  15. Discrete Latent Markov Models for Normally Distributed Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittmann, Verena D.; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Van de Pol and Langeheine (1990) presented a general framework for Markov modeling of repeatedly measured discrete data. We discuss analogical single indicator models for normally distributed responses. In contrast to discrete models, which have been studied extensively, analogical continuous response models have hardly been considered. These…

  16. Response Plots for Linear Models David J. Olive

    E-print Network

    Olive, David

    Response Plots for Linear Models David J. Olive Southern Illinois University June 9, 2010 Abstract For linear models, the response and residual plots can be used to check the model for goodness and lack of fit. The plots can also be used to visualize the linear model in the background of the data, to check

  17. Assessment of basic indirect pharmacodynamic response models with physiological limits.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenling; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Jusko, William J

    2006-04-01

    Many physiological factors are regulated by homeostatic mechanisms to maintain normal body function. Empirical lower Rl (Model I and IV) or upper Rh limits (Model II and III) were included in current basic indirect response (IDR) models to account for the additional role of physiological limits (IDRPL). Various characteristics of these models were evaluated with simulations and explicit equations. The simulations reveal that the expanded models exhibit most properties of basic indirect response models, such as slow response initiation, lag time between the kinetic and dynamic peaks, a large dose plateau, and shift in Tmax with dose. The proposed models always produce lesser net responses than predicted by basic IDR models. Simulations demonstrate that addition of a parameter limit which is close to the baseline has a great influence on the overall and maximum responses and fitted model parameters. Only stimulatory IDRPL Models III and IV allow resolution of all model parameters in the absence of clear indications or predetermined values of the lower or upper limits. However, all four models are able to resolve model parameters when subgroups with different baselines are simultaneously fitted. These models create new interpretations of the determinants of baseline conditions which can be important in assessing inter-subject variability in responses. The applicability of IDRPL models is demonstrated using several examples from the published literature. Indirect response models with physiological limits will be useful in characterizing drug responses for turnover systems which are maintained within a certain range. PMID:16547797

  18. Modeling Information Accumulation in Psychological Tests Using Item Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a latent trait model is proposed for the response times in psychological tests. The latent trait model is based on the linear transformation model and subsumes popular models from survival analysis, like the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model. Core of the model is the assumption that an unspecified monotone…

  19. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  20. Organization-based self-development prescriptive model for the promotion of professional development of Iranian clinical nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rahimaghaee, Flora; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Mohammadi, Eesa; Salavati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professional development is reiterated in the new definition of modern organizations as a serious undertaking of organizations. This article aims to present and describe a prescriptive model to increase the quality of professional development of Iranian nurses within an organization-based framework. Materials and Methods: This article is an outcome of the results of a study based on grounded theory describing how Iranian nurses develop. The present study adopted purposive sampling and the initial participants were experienced clinical nurses. Then, the study continued by theoretical sampling. The present study involved 21 participants. Data were mainly collected through interviews. Analysis began with open coding and continued with axial coding and selective coding. Trustworthiness was ensured by applying Lincoln and Guba criteria such as credibility, dependability, and conformability. Based on the data gathered in the study and a thorough review of related literature, a prescriptive model has been designed by use of the methodology of Walker and Avant (2005). Results: In this model, the first main component is a three-part structure: Reformation to establish a value-assigning structure, a position for human resource management, and a job redesigning. The second component is certain of opportunities for organization-oriented development. These strategies are as follows: Raising the sensitivity of the organization toward development, goal setting and planning the development of human resources, and improving management practices. Conclusions: Through this model, clinical nurses’ professional development can transform the profession from an individual, randomized activity into more planned and systematized services. This model can lead to a better quality of care. PMID:26457100

  1. TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2009-12-20

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.

  2. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: III. STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of dose-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. Recently, statistical models appropriate for developmental toxicity testing have been developed and applied (Rai...

  3. Teachers' personal didactical models and obstacles to professional development: Case-studies with secondary experimental science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamba Aguado, Ana Maria

    The aim of this thesis has been to elaborate criteria which characterise how teachers teach, as a curriculum component of their professional knowledge and to infer the obstacles which hinder their desired professional development, in such a way that they are considered in the design of proposals for teacher training in secondary education. In addition to this, a further objective was to elaborate and validate data analysis instruments. Case studies were carried out on three natural science secondary teachers with more than ten years' experience, enabling the characterisation of the teachers' science and science teaching conceptions as well as the description of classroom practice. Finally, with the help of these data together with the material used by the teachers, the inference of the teachers' personal didactical models and the obstacles to their professional development were made possible. Instruments for data collection used a questionnaire to facilitate the realisation of a semi-structured interview, video recordings of the classroom intervention of each teacher which correspond to a teaching unit taught over a two-week period and all the written material produced for the unit was collected. For the data analysis a taxonomy of classroom intervention patterns and a progression hypothesis towards desirable professional knowledge were elaborated, from the perspective of a research in the classroom model and according to a system of categories and subcategories which refer to their concepts about scientific knowledge, school knowledge, how to teach and evaluation. With the interview and the questionnaire a profile of exposed conceptions was obtained. The intervention profile was obtained using the classroom recordings; according to the patterns identified and their sequencing, both of which determine the characteristic structures and routines of these teachers. An outcome of these results was the validation of the previously mentioned taxonomy as an instrument of classroom practice analysis. From these profiles and taking the progression hypothesis as a reference, the teachers' personal didactic models and the obstacles to professional development were inferred, following the system of categories and subcategories selected.

  4. Process-Response Modeling and the Scientific Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichter, Lynn S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the process-response model (PRM) in its theoretical and practical forms. Describes how geologists attempt to reconstruct the process from the response (the geologic phenomenon) being studied. (TW)

  5. EXPLANATORY MODELS FOR ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is often spatial patterns in environmental and ecological variables that arouse interest and demand explanation. or environmental response variables, the causal influences of interacting environmental factors produce the patterns of interest. cological response variables by de...

  6. Relative age and birthplace effect in Japanese professional sports: a quantitative evaluation using a Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Relative age effect (RAE) in sports has been well documented. Recent studies investigate the effect of birthplace in addition to the RAE. The first objective of this study was to show the magnitude of the RAE in two major professional sports in Japan, baseball and soccer. Second, we examined the birthplace effect and compared its magnitude with that of the RAE. The effect sizes were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model with the number of players as dependent variable. The RAEs were 9.0% and 7.7% per month for soccer and baseball, respectively. These estimates imply that children born in the first month of a school year have about three times greater chance of becoming a professional player than those born in the last month of the year. Over half of the difference in likelihoods of becoming a professional player between birthplaces was accounted for by weather conditions, with the likelihood decreasing by 1% per snow day. An effect of population size was not detected in the data. By investigating different samples, we demonstrated that using quarterly data leads to underestimation and that the age range of sampled athletes should be set carefully. PMID:25917193

  7. Use of a risk communication model to evaluate dietetics professionals' viewpoints on genetically engineered foods and crops.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kathy S; Struble, Marie Boyle; McCullum-Gomez, Christine; Wilkins, Jennifer L

    2006-05-01

    The complex issues surrounding the application of genetic engineering to food and agriculture have generated a contentious debate among diverse interest groups. One pervasive dimension in the resultant discourse is the varying perceptions of the risks and benefits of genetically engineered foods and crops. In the risk communication model, technical information is evaluated within the context of an individual's values and perceptions. The purpose of this study was to explore how dietetics professionals respond to a complex set of interrelated issues associated with genetically engineered foods and crops and to identify what varying viewpoints may exist. Participants were asked to sort a total of 48 statements distributed across eight issue areas according to level of agreement and disagreement. Using Q methodology, a total of 256 sortings were analyzed using the centroid method and varimax rotation in factor analysis. Three distinct viewpoints emerged: Precautionary (R(2)=43%), Discerning Supporter (R(2)=11%), and Promoting (R(2)=5%). Across all viewpoints, respondents agreed that dietetics professionals should employ critical thinking skills to communicate the social, economic, environmental, ethical, and technical aspects of genetically engineered foods and crops. The findings have implications for how dietetics professionals can foster an open interchange of information among diverse groups. PMID:16647331

  8. Modeling mechanical response of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Siladitya

    Heterogeneous materials are ubiquitous in nature and as synthetic materials. These materials provide unique combination of desirable mechanical properties emerging from its heterogeneities at different length scales. Future structural and technological applications will require the development of advanced light weight materials with superior strength and toughness. Cost effective design of the advanced high performance synthetic materials by tailoring their microstructure is the challenge facing the materials design community. Prior knowledge of structure-property relationships for these materials is imperative for optimal design. Thus, understanding such relationships for heterogeneous materials is of primary interest. Furthermore, computational burden is becoming critical concern in several areas of heterogeneous materials design. Therefore, computationally efficient and accurate predictive tools are highly essential. In the present study, we mainly focus on mechanical behavior of soft cellular materials and tough biological material such as mussel byssus thread. Cellular materials exhibit microstructural heterogeneity by interconnected network of same material phase. However, mussel byssus thread comprises of two distinct material phases. A robust numerical framework is developed to investigate the micromechanisms behind the macroscopic response of both of these materials. Using this framework, effect of microstuctural parameters has been addressed on the stress state of cellular specimens during split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A voronoi tessellation based algorithm has been developed to simulate the cellular microstructure. Micromechanisms (microinertia, microbuckling and microbending) governing macroscopic behavior of cellular solids are investigated thoroughly with respect to various microstructural and loading parameters. To understand the origin of high toughness of mussel byssus thread, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based optimization framework has been developed. It is found that two different material phases (collagens) of mussel byssus thread are optimally distributed along the thread. These applications demonstrate that the presence of heterogeneity in the system demands high computational resources for simulation and modeling. Thus, Higher Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) based surrogate modeling concept has been proposed to reduce computational complexity. The applicability of such methodology has been demonstrated in failure envelope construction and in multiscale finite element techniques. It is observed that surrogate based model can capture the behavior of complex material systems with sufficient accuracy. The computational algorithms presented in this thesis will further pave the way for accurate prediction of macroscopic deformation behavior of various class of advanced materials from their measurable microstructural features at a reasonable computational cost.

  9. Hierarchical Diffusion Models for Two-Choice Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandekerckhove, Joachim; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Lee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-choice response times are a common type of data, and much research has been devoted to the development of process models for such data. However, the practical application of these models is notoriously complicated, and flexible methods are largely nonexistent. We combine a popular model for choice response times--the Wiener diffusion…

  10. Modeling the cytotoxic T cell response Dennis Lai Chao

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Modeling the cytotoxic T cell response by Dennis Lai Chao B.S.E., Princeton University, 1994-99-1-0417) and the Defense Ad- vanced Research Projects Agency (AGR F30602-00-2-0584). iv #12;Modeling the cytotoxic T cell December 2004 #12;Modeling the cytotoxic T cell response by Dennis Lai Chao B.S.E., Princeton University

  11. The Gradual Increase of Responsibility Model: Coaching for Teacher Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collet, Vicki S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the gradual increase of responsibility (GIR) model for teacher coaching (Collet, 2008), an adaptation of Pearson and Gallagher's (1983) Gradual Release of Responsibility model. In GIR, instructional coaches model, make recommendations, ask probing questions, affirm teachers' appropriate decisions, and praise in order to provide…

  12. Multidimensional Vector Model of Stimulus-Response Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Proctor, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposes and examines the multidimensional vector (MDV) model framework as a modeling schema for choice response times. MDV extends the Thurstonian model, as well as signal detection theory, to classification tasks by taking into account the influence of response properties on stimulus discrimination. It is capable of accounting…

  13. Professional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of primary and secondary sources identifies five basic properties of professional ethics codes. The author's own theory, which is related directly to intra- and extraprofessional statuses, is added to the two traditional theories (functional and monopoly) which explain these properties. Professional ethics in America since 1900 are…

  14. Women's Endorsement of Models of Sexual Response: Correlates and Predictors.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Beata; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated endorsement of female sexual response models, and no single model has been accepted as a normative description of women's sexual response. The aim of the study was to establish how women from a population-based sample endorse current theoretical models of the female sexual response-the linear models and circular model (partial and composite Basson models)-as well as predictors of endorsement. Accordingly, 174 heterosexual women aged 18-55 years were included in a cross-sectional study: 74 women diagnosed with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) based on DSM-5 criteria and 100 non-dysfunctional women. The description of sexual response models was used to divide subjects into four subgroups: linear (Masters-Johnson and Kaplan models), circular (partial Basson model), mixed (linear and circular models in similar proportions, reflective of the composite Basson model), and a different model. Women were asked to choose which of the models best described their pattern of sexual response and how frequently they engaged in each model. Results showed that 28.7 % of women endorsed the linear models, 19.5 % the partial Basson model, 40.8 % the composite Basson model, and 10.9 % a different model. Women with FSD endorsed the partial Basson model and a different model more frequently than did non-dysfunctional controls. Individuals who were dissatisfied with a partner as a lover were more likely to endorse a different model. Based on the results, we concluded that the majority of women endorsed a mixed model combining the circular response with the possibility of an innate desire triggering a linear response. Further, relationship difficulties, not FSD, predicted model endorsement. PMID:26601676

  15. Emotional response modeling in financial markets : Boston Stock Exchange data analysis

    E-print Network

    McCaney, Patrick Michael, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, physiological data is analyzed in the context of financial risk processing, specifically investigating the effects of financial trading decisions and situations on the physiological responses of professional ...

  16. Modelling climate change responses in tropical forests: similar productivity estimates across five models, but different mechanisms and responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, L.; Harper, A.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Galbraith, D. R.; Imbuzeiro, H. M. A.; Powell, T. L.; Doughty, C.; Levine, N. M.; Malhi, Y.; Saleska, S. R.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Meir, P.; Williams, M.

    2014-11-01

    Accurately predicting the response of Amazonia to climate change is important for predicting changes across the globe. However, changes in multiple climatic factors simultaneously may result in complex non-linear responses, which are difficult to predict using vegetation models. Using leaf and canopy scale observations, this study evaluated the capability of five vegetation models (CLM3.5, ED2, JULES, SiB3, and SPA) to simulate the responses of canopy and leaf scale productivity to changes in temperature and drought in an Amazonian forest. The models did not agree as to whether gross primary productivity (GPP) was more sensitive to changes in temperature or precipitation. There was greater model-data consistency in the response of net ecosystem exchange to changes in temperature, than in the response to temperature of leaf area index (LAI), net photosynthesis (An) and stomatal conductance (gs). Modelled canopy scale fluxes are calculated by scaling leaf scale fluxes to LAI, and therefore in this study similarities in modelled ecosystem scale responses to drought and temperature were the result of inconsistent leaf scale and LAI responses among models. Across the models, the response of An to temperature was more closely linked to stomatal behaviour than biochemical processes. Consequently all the models predicted that GPP would be higher if tropical forests were 5 °C colder, closer to the model optima for gs. There was however no model consistency in the response of the An-gs relationship when temperature changes and drought were introduced simultaneously. The inconsistencies in the An-gs relationships amongst models were caused by to non-linear model responses induced by simultaneous drought and temperature change. To improve the reliability of simulations of the response of Amazonian rainforest to climate change the mechanistic underpinnings of vegetation models need more complete validation to improve accuracy and consistency in the scaling of processes from leaf to canopy.

  17. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  18. A New Mathematical Model for the Heat Shock Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Ion; Mizera, Andrzej; Hyder, Claire L.; Mikhailov, Andrey; Eriksson, John E.; Sistonen, Lea; Back, Ralph-Johan

    We present in this paper a novel molecular model for the gene regulatory network responsible for the eukaryotic heat shock response. Our model includes the temperature-induced protein misfolding, the chaperone activity of the heat shock proteins, and the backregulation of their gene transcription. We then build a mathematical model for it, based on ordinary differential equations. Finally, we discuss the parameter fit and the implications of the sensitivity analysis for our model.

  19. Model of Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Kuwahara, Takashi

    The model of transient response of semiconductor gas sensor under modulation heating has been constructed successfully. The model consists of the heat conduction process from heater to the sensor surface, the reaction process on the sensor surface and diffusion process near the sensor surface to supply the inflammable gas. The calculated sensor response agreed well with experimental result under step power supplying to the heater. We can predict the sensor transient response so that the model will be useful to distinguish gases and smells by using transient response of semiconductor gas sensors.

  20. Response Transformations for Models with Additive David J. Olive

    E-print Network

    Olive, David

    Response Transformations for Models with Additive Errors David J. Olive Southern Illinois, Nonlinear Regression, Nonparametric Regression, Single Index Models. David J. Olive is Associate Professor: ch. 18), and Olive and Hawkins (2005). A second type of response plot is a plot of ^Yi = ^m

  1. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  2. Projective Item Response Model for Test-Independent Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward Hak-Sing; Chen, Shyh-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The problem of fitting unidimensional item-response models to potentially multidimensional data has been extensively studied. The focus of this article is on response data that contains a major dimension of interest but that may also contain minor nuisance dimensions. Because fitting a unidimensional model to multidimensional data results in…

  3. Parallel Finite Element Modeling of Earthquake Ground Response and Liquefaction

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    1 Parallel Finite Element Modeling of Earthquake Ground Response and Liquefaction Jinchi Lu1 , Jun. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for earthquake ground response and liquefaction using the salient characteristics of sand liquefaction and associated accumulation of shear deformations. Key

  4. Crop response to climate: ecophysical models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecophysiological models were the dominant tools used to estimate the potential impact of climate change in agroecosystems in the Third and Fourth Assessment Reports of the IPCC and are widely used elsewhere in climate change research. These models, also known as “crop models” or “simulation models”,...

  5. Target Practice: Reader Response Theory and Teachers' Interpretations of Students' SAT 10 Scores in Data-Based Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Becky M.

    2012-01-01

    The study reported in this article examines how teachers read and respond to their students' Stanford Achievement Test 10 (SAT 10) scores with the goal of investigating the assumption that data-based teaching practice is more "objective" and less susceptible to divergent teacher interpretation. The study uses reader response theory to frame…

  6. Toward Pride and Professionalism: Increasing Personal Responsibility. Thirty-Six Hour Substance Abuse Curriculum. Facilitator Guide. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Barbara Reed

    This document presents a 36-hour curriculum of the Navy Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program designed to reduce drug and alcohol related problems in the Navy by increasing resistance to addiction. The responsibility each person holds for his or her own health and well-being as a member of the United States Navy is emphasized throughout the…

  7. Professional Development for Culturally Responsive and Relationship-Based Pedagogy. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented here is a large-scale evaluation of a theory-driven school reform project in New Zealand, which focuses on improving the educational achievement of Maori students in public secondary schools. The project's conceptual underpinnings are based on Kaupapa Maori research, culturally responsive teaching, student voice, and…

  8. Examining the Relationship between Teachers' Attitudes and Motivation toward Web-Based Professional Development: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Hui-Min; Kao, Chia-Pin; Yeh, I-Jan; Lin, Kuen-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate elementary school teachers' attitudes and motivation toward web-based professional development. The relationship between teachers' attitudes and motivation was explored using the AWPD (Attitudes toward Web-based Professional Development) and MWPD (Motivation toward Web-based Professional Development)…

  9. Formation of medical student professional identity: categorizing lapses of professionalism, and the learning environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquiring the values of medical professionalism has become a critical issue in medical education. The purpose of this study was to identify lapses in professionalism witnessed by medical students during their four year MD curriculum, and to categorize, from the students’ perspective, who was responsible and the settings in which these occurred. Methods An electronic survey, developed by faculty and medical students, was sent to all students with two email reminders. It included quantitative responses and some open-ended opportunities for comments. All analyses were performed with SAS version 9.1. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the medical school curriculum. Thirty six percent of students had witnessed or been part of an exemplary demonstration of professionalism; 64% responded that they had witnessed a lapse of professionalism. At the pre-clerkship level, the most frequent lapses involved students: arrogance (42.2%), impairment (24.2%), followed by cultural or religious insensitivity (20.5%). At the clerkship level of training, where students are exposed to real clinical situations, the lapses involved primarily faculty (including preceptor and clinician) or other staff; these included arrogance (55.3%), breach of confidentiality (28.3%), and cultural or religious insensitivity (26.6%); impairment involved mostly students (25.5%). These findings are analyzed from the perspective of role modeling by faculty and in the context of the learning environment. Conclusions Medical students witnessed a lapse of professionalism involving both fellow students as well as faculty and administrative staff, in several domains. Results from this study emphasize the importance of role modeling and the need for faculty development, to improve the learning environment. This study adds to the limited emerging literature on the forces that influence medical student professional identity formation. PMID:25004924

  10. FGSR Professional Development Professional Practice

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    for FGSR Professional Development Week Nov. 18, 2009 Candy Sloboda, Faculty of Nursing, University, feedback and evaluation. Candy was asked to offer advice on how to give feedback to a colleague, perhaps

  11. Integrative Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions under a Multi-response Partially Linear Varying Coefficient Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cen; Cui, Yuehua; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Consider the integrative analysis of genetic data with multiple correlated response variables. The goal is to identify important gene-environment (G×E) interactions along with main gene and environment effects that are associated with the responses. The homogeneity and heterogeneity models can be adopted to describe the genetic basis of multiple responses. To accommodate possible nonlinear effects of some environment effects, a multi-response partially linear varying coefficient (MPLVC) model is assumed. Penalization is adopted for marker selection. The proposed penalization method can select genetic variants with G×E interactions, no G×E interactions, and no main effects simultaneously. It adopts different penalties to accommodate the homogeneity and heterogeneity models. The proposed method can be effectively computed using a coordinate descent algorithm. Simulation study and the analysis of Health Professional’s Follow-up Study (HPFS), which has two correlated continuous traits, SNP measurements, and multiple environment effects, show superior performance of the proposed method over its competitors. PMID:25146388

  12. Agriculture 398 Professional Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Agriculture 398 Professional Practice Manual Internship in Agriculture ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CAMPUS BOX 5020 NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61790 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COORDINATOR RESPONSIBILITIES.................. 8 AGRICULTURAL ACADEMIC ADVISOR

  13. Multicategorical Spline Model for Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamowicz, Michal; Ramsay, James O.

    1992-01-01

    A nonparametric multicategorical model for multiple-choice data is proposed as an extension of the binary spline model of J. O. Ramsay and M. Abrahamowicz (1989). Results of two Monte Carlo studies illustrate the model, which approximates probability functions by rational splines. (SLD)

  14. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  15. EvalPartners: Facilitating the Development of a New Model of Voluntary Organization for Professional Evaluation to Support the Development of National Evaluation Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosheleva, Natalia; Segone, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In many less developed democracies Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluation (VOPEs) face the challenges of low demand for evaluation and the resulting low economic capacity of national evaluation communities. The VOPE model that evolved in well-developed democracies is not directly applicable under these circumstances, so a new model

  16. Collective Commitment and Collective Efficacy: A Theoretical Model for Understanding the Motivational Dynamics of Dilemma Resolution in Inter-Professional Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jo; Norwich, Brahm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model which conceptualizes inter-professional and multi-agency collaborative working, at the level of the individual within a group. This arises from a review of the literature around joint working, and is based on social psychological theories which refer to shared goals. The model assumes that collective…

  17. Response to Intervention and the Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lise; Carta, Judith; Strain, Phillip S.; Dunlap, Glen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2010-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is a systematic decision-making process that has gained widespread popularity as a problem-solving framework for organizing hierarchies of evidence-based interventions in the context of ongoing progress monitoring. Initially applied to literacy instruction, RtI is being incorporated into an expanding breadth of…

  18. Models of dielectric response in disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Franta, Daniel; Necas, David; Zajícková, Lenka

    2007-11-26

    Two dispersion models of disordered solids, one parameterizing density of states (PDOS) and the other parameterizing joint density of states (PJDOS), are presented. Using these models, not only the complex dielectric function of the materials, but also some information about their electronic structure can be obtained. The numerical integration is necessary in the PDOS model. If analytical expressions are required the presented PJDOS model is, for some materials, a suitable option still providing information about the electronic structure of the material. It is demonstrated that the PDOS model can be successfully applied to a wide variety of materials. In this paper, its application to diamond-like carbon (DLC), a-Si and SiO2-like materials are discussed in detail. Unlike the PDOS model, the presented PJDOS model represents a special case of parameterization that can be applied to limited types of materials, for example DLC, ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and SiO2-like. PMID:19550911

  19. Communities of practice as a professional and organizational development strategy in local public health organizations in Quebec, Canada: an evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Richard, Lucie; Chiocchio, François; Essiembre, Hélène; Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Lamy, Geneviève; Champagne, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-02-01

    Communities of practice (CoPs) are among the professional development strategies most widely used in such fields as management and education. Though the approach has elicited keen interest, knowledge pertaining to its conceptual underpinnings is still limited, thus hindering proper assessment of CoPs' effects and the processes generating the latter. To address this shortcoming, this paper presents a conceptual model that was developed to evaluate an initiative based on a CoP strategy: Health Promotion Laboratories are a professional development intervention that was implemented in local public health organizations in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). The model is based on latest theories on work-group effectiveness and organizational learning and can be usefully adopted by evaluators who are increasingly called upon to illuminate decision-making about CoPs. Ultimately, validation of this conceptual model will help advance knowledge and practice pertaining to CoPs as well as professional and organizational development strategies in public health. PMID:24726072

  20. Communities of Practice as a Professional and Organizational Development Strategy in Local Public Health Organizations in Quebec, Canada: An Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Lucie; Chiocchio, François; Essiembre, Hélène; Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Lamy, Geneviève; Champagne, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Communities of practice (CoPs) are among the professional development strategies most widely used in such fields as management and education. Though the approach has elicited keen interest, knowledge pertaining to its conceptual underpinnings is still limited, thus hindering proper assessment of CoPs' effects and the processes generating the latter. To address this shortcoming, this paper presents a conceptual model that was developed to evaluate an initiative based on a CoP strategy: Health Promotion Laboratories are a professional development intervention that was implemented in local public health organizations in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). The model is based on latest theories on work-group effectiveness and organizational learning and can be usefully adopted by evaluators who are increasingly called upon to illuminate decision-making about CoPs. Ultimately, validation of this conceptual model will help advance knowledge and practice pertaining to CoPs as well as professional and organizational development strategies in public health. PMID:24726072

  1. Public High School Assistant Principals' Reports of Self-Efficacy in Performing Their Professional Job Responsibilities in Accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe public high school assistant principals' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) in performing their professional job responsibilities in accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's (ELCC) Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership (National Policy Board…

  2. Fostering Professionalism in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Shrank, William H; Reed, Virginia A; Jernstedt, G Christian

    2004-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on developing professionalism in medical school graduates. Unfortunately, the culture of academic medical centers and the behaviors that faculty model are often incongruent with our image of professionalism. The need for improved role modeling, better assessment of student behavior, and focused faculty development is reviewed. We propose that the incentive structure be adjusted to reward professional behavior in both students and faculty. The third-year medicine clerkship provides an ideal opportunity for clinician-educators to play a leading role in evaluating, rewarding, and ultimately fostering professionalism in medical school graduates. PMID:15242476

  3. Improving Student Professionalism During Experiential Learning

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to serve as a tool for preceptors to aid in pharmacy students' development of professionalism. Specifically, the article defines professionalism, describes it in the context of contemporary pharmacy practice, discusses the professional socialization process of students, and suggests strategies for preceptors to facilitate improvement in professionalism among students during experiential training. While numerous suggestions are presented, positive role modeling is considered the most important means of improving professionalism among students. PMID:17136180

  4. Human teeth model using photoacoustic frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a novel photo-acoustic technique modality utilizing a frequency- modulated Q-switch Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and coherent frequency domain signal processing is introduced for impulse and frequency responses of biological tissues. We present a photoacoustic technique to monitor the temporal behavior of temperature and pressure in an excised sample of human teeth after either a single laser pulse or during multiple laser pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. Knowledge of the dynamic characteristics of structural elements often means the difference between normal and abnormal tissue. The determination of the resonance characteristics of structures is termed "modal analysis." The results of our study suggest that it is possible to identify the impulse, frequency response and resonance modes of simplified human teeth. This data provided a powerful tool to differentiate between normal and decay teeth.

  5. Hierarchical Item Response Models for Cognitive Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Mark Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive diagnosis models (see, e.g., Rupp, Templin, & Henson, 2010) have received increasing attention within educational and psychological measurement. The popularity of these models may be largely due to their perceived ability to provide useful information concerning both examinees (classifying them according to their attribute profiles)…

  6. Latent Growth Modeling for Logistic Response Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jaehwa; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the social and behavioral sciences, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) has become an important tool for understanding individuals' longitudinal change. Although nonlinear variations of latent growth models appear in the methodological and applied literature, a notable exclusion is the treatment of growth following…

  7. A Study of Bayesian Estimation and Comparison of Response Time Models in Item Response Theory

    E-print Network

    Suh, Hongwook

    2010-04-26

    showed better results as follows: (1) better recoveries in item and examinee parameter, (2) reasonable explanations in delineating relationships between response time and other related parameters in the model. There were no clear relationships among speed...

  8. Modeling human response errors in synthetic flight simulator domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a control theoretic approach to modeling human response errors (HRE) in the flight simulation domain. The human pilot is modeled as a supervisor of a highly automated system. The synthesis uses the theory of optimal control pilot modeling for integrating the pilot's observation error and the error due to the simulation model (experimental error). Methods for solving the HRE problem are suggested. Experimental verification of the models will be tested in a flight quality handling simulation.

  9. Family-Professional Partnerships: Practice that Matches Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    File, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses current models of family-professional partnerships and barriers to true collaboration, including turf issues, the nature of trust, expertise differences, and differences in scope of responsibility. Offers recommendations for practice, including questions for self-evaluation. Asserts that as educators change their practice and ways of…

  10. Music Teacher Practice and Identity in Professional Development Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conkling, Susan Wharton

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the author has been the university music educator responsible to a professional development partnership. Over an 8-year span, she has collected narratives of experience from approximately 100 pre-service music teachers, following, to some extent, the research model of Connelly and Clandinin. In developing their notion of "personal…

  11. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Henfield, Malik S.; Booker, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model, which is designed to help school counselors integrate students' academic and personal-social development into their group work. We first describe this group model in detail and then offer one case example of a middle school counselor using the ASE model to…

  12. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  13. A Bayesian Semiparametric Latent Variable Model for Mixed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrmeir, Ludwig; Raach, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a latent variable model (LVM) for mixed ordinal and continuous responses, where covariate effects on the continuous latent variables are modelled through a flexible semiparametric Gaussian regression model. We extend existing LVMs with the usual linear covariate effects by including nonparametric components for nonlinear…

  14. Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting

    E-print Network

    Hartke, Stephen

    38 Chapter 3 Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting 3 are occurring. This is particularly relevant in disease spread processes, where vaccinations and quarantines then on. The response allowed is only a limited number of vaccinations of non­infected vertices

  15. DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING FOR HAZARD CHARACTERIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation outlines the 1)Components of Risk Assessment/Management, 2)Data, 3)Approaches to Characterizing Dose-Response. It also discusses Dose-Response Modeling, Creative Tensions-conceptual differences between NOAELs and BMDs, and Risk-benefit analyses

  16. Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting

    E-print Network

    Hartke, Stephen

    38 Chapter 3 Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting 3 are occurring. This is particularly relevant in disease spread processes, where vaccinations and quarantines. The response allowed is only a limited number of vaccinations of non-infected vertices. Specifically, let G

  17. Modeling crop responses to environmental change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Potential biophysical responses of crops to climate change are studied focusing on the primary environmental variables which define the limits to agricultural crop growth and production, and the principal methods for predicting climate change impacts on crop geography and production. It is concluded that the principal uncertainties in the prediction of the impacts of climate change on agriculture reside in the contribution of the direct effects of increasing CO2, in potential changes inclimate variability, and the effects of adjustments mechanisms in the context of climatic changes.

  18. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  19. Estimation of a four-parameter item response theory model.

    PubMed

    Loken, Eric; Rulison, Kelly L

    2010-11-01

    We explore the justification and formulation of a four-parameter item response theory model (4PM) and employ a Bayesian approach to recover successfully parameter estimates for items and respondents. For data generated using a 4PM item response model, overall fit is improved when using the 4PM rather than the 3PM or the 2PM. Furthermore, although estimated trait scores under the various models correlate almost perfectly, inferences at the high and low ends of the trait continuum are compromised, with poorer coverage of the confidence intervals when the wrong model is used. We also show in an empirical example that the 4PM can yield new insights into the properties of a widely used delinquency scale. We discuss the implications for building appropriate measurement models in education and psychology to model more accurately the underlying response process. PMID:20030965

  20. Dynamic causal modelling of anticipatory skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Anticipatory skin conductance responses [SCRs] are a widely used measure of aversive conditioning in humans. Here, we describe a dynamic causal model [DCM] of how anticipatory, evoked, and spontaneous skin conductance changes are generated by sudomotor nerve activity. Inversion of this model, using variational Bayes, provides a means of inferring the most likely sympathetic nerve activity, given observed skin conductance responses. In two fear conditioning experiments, we demonstrate the predictive validity of the DCM by showing it has greater sensitivity to the effects of conditioning, relative to alternative (conventional) response estimates. Furthermore, we establish face validity by showing that trial-by-trial estimates of anticipatory sudomotor activity are better predicted by formal learning models, relative to response estimates from peak-scoring approaches. The model furnishes a potentially powerful approach to characterising SCR that exploits knowledge about how these signals are generated. PMID:20599582

  1. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID:22438929

  2. Model identification and order response prediction for bladed wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, X.

    2009-06-01

    A method is proposed in this paper for model identification and order response prediction for bladed wheels. This method makes use of measured blade tip-to-blade tip frequency response functions of a mistuned wheel and assumes responses of the wheel subject to order excitations to be a weighted sum of a number, which is equal to the number of the blades, of modes of the corresponding tuned wheel. The model for the mistuned wheel is identified in terms of the scale-reduced mass and stiffness matrices from which an expression for order responses is derived. The method is validated by comparing order responses calculated using this method with those from the original equation for two wheel models, a lumped parameter model and a finite element paddle wheel model. It can be concluded that, using this method, resonance responses of a mistuned wheel to order excitations at and around the natural frequencies of the first family can be accurately predicted, even mistuning is large. From the order responses the strain levels in the blades can be evaluated and the suitability for the wheel to be released for field use can be assessed.

  3. Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentell, Helen

    1994-01-01

    The central dilemma of staff development--training to perform a task versus professional learning and growth--must be addressed by distance education managers. Distance education organizations need to be learning organizations, fostering a culture of learning among students and staff. (SK)

  4. Maintenance Professional

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Understanding how costs flow in an Enterprise System Budgeting/Forecasting Cost analysis for managementTRAINING THAT WORKS TRAINING THAT WORKS Maintenance Management Professional (MMP) Connect, Learn, ContributeConnect, ContributeLearn, Equip your Maintenance Managers with the tools they need to succeed. Our

  5. Kimono Professionals

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-12-20

    is offering a test of kimono knowledge. About 7,000 people of all ages have signed up to take the test and receive certification as trained kimono professionals. Don't move! I'm licensed to tie. #ceas #hacker #japan #tsutsui...

  6. A model of plant canopy polarization response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    Sensors to remotely measure the linear polarization of ground scenes have been proposed for the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS), a satellite sensor system proposed to complement the Thematic Mapper. At present justification for a sensor on MRS to measure scene polarization is limited. This paper discusses a model for the amount of linearly polarized light reflected by the shiny leaves of such crops as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The theory demonstrates that, potentially, measurements of the linearly polarized light from a crop canopy may be used as an additional feature to discriminate between crops. Examination of the model suggests that, potentially, satellite polarization measurements may be used to monitor crop development stage, leaf water content, leaf area index, hail damage, and certain plant diseases. The model adds to the understanding of the potential information content of scene polarization measurements acquired by future satellite sensor systems such as MRS.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  8. Relationships between match activities and peak power output and Creatine Kinase responses to professional reserve team soccer match-play.

    PubMed

    Russell, M; Sparkes, W; Northeast, J; Cook, C J; Bracken, R M; Kilduff, L P

    2016-02-01

    The specific movement demands of soccer that are linked to post-match recovery and readiness to train are unclear. Therefore, we examined the relationship between Global Positioning System (GPS) variables and the change (?; from baseline) in Creatine Kinase (CK) concentrations and peak power output (PPO; during the countermovement jump) at 24h and 48h post-match. Fifteen English Premier League reserve team players were examined over 1-4 matches. Measurements of CK and PPO were taken before (24h prior to match-play) and after (+24h and +48h) each game during which movement demands were quantified using 10Hz GPS data. High intensity distance covered (r=0.386, p=0.029; r=-0.349; p=0.050), high intensity distance covered?min(-1) (r=0.365, p=0.040; r=-0.364, p=0.040), high speed running distance (r=0.363, p=0.041; r=-0.360, p=0.043) and the number of sprints?min(-1) (r=0.410, p=0.020; r=-0.368, p=0.038) were significantly related to ?CK and ?PPO at +24h post-match, respectively. No relationships were observed between any match variables and ?CK and ?PPO after +48h of recovery. These findings highlight that high intensity match activities are related to ?CK and ?PPO in the 24h, but not 48h, following soccer match-play. Such information is likely of interest to those responsible for the design of soccer player's training schedules in the days following a match. PMID:26615476

  9. Modeling Clinical Radiation Responses in the IMRT Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Murray, D.; Stewart, R. D.; Phillips, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  10. Job and Professional Leaving Among Newly Licensed RNs: A Structural Equation Model.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Chisolm, Latarsha

    2016-01-01

    With more than 50% of the nursing workforce close to retirement, it is especially important to keep younger nurses in nursing jobs and careers. This study empirically tests a structural equation model of registered nurse (RN) intent to leave the job and profession using data from a survey of newly licensed RNs (NLRNs). Job demands, difficulties and control, intent to leave the job, and intent to leave the profession were latent variables. A number of direct, indirect, and mediating relationships were modeled. Measurement models for all latent variables and the structural model had good fit. The final model showed a path from job demands, difficulties, and control to job satisfaction to intent to leave the job to intent to leave the profession. The results suggest that the process of an NLRN intending to leave the job and profession involves a number of mediators between the work environment and this intent. PMID:25433000

  11. Modeling the T cell immune response: a fascinating challenge

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Penelope A; Faeder, James R; Hawse, William F; Miskov-Zivanov, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is designed to protect the organism from infection and to repair damaged tissue. An effective response requires recognition of the threat, the appropriate effector mechanism to clear the pathogen and a return to homeostasis with minimal damage to self-tissues. T cells play a central role in orchestrating the immune response at all stages of the response and have been the subject of intense study by both experimental immunologists and modelers. This review examines some of the more critical questions in T cell biology and describes the latest attempts to address those questions using approaches that combine mathematical modeling and experiments. PMID:25155903

  12. Bayes Modal Estimation in Item Response Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    Simultaneous estimation of many parameters can often be improved, sometimes dramatically so, if it is reasonable to consider one or more subsets of parameters as exchangeable members of corresponding populations. While each observation may provide limited information about the parameters it is modeled directly in terms of, it also contributes…

  13. Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

  14. Bridging Scientific Model Outputs with Emergency Response Needs in Catastrophic Earthquake Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannes, Tay W.

    2010-01-01

    In emergency management, scientific models are widely used for running hazard simulations and estimating losses often in support of planning and mitigation efforts. This work expands utility of the scientific model into the response phase of emergency management. The focus is on the common operating picture as it gives context to emergency…

  15. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  16. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of ‘‘apparent redox potentials’’ and ‘‘apparent pKa’’results from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure and type of morphological aggregates that can form on the surface.Again, these structures result from the optimization of chemical redox equilibrium, conformational entropy, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, changes in domains structure can manifest themselves in the capacitance-potential curves and then provide a link between macroscopic measurements and the formation of nanoscopic domains. It is clear that chemical engineers are in a unique position to use these switchable surfaces in the molecular design of sensors, biosensors, separation devices, microfluidic devices with on-off environmental switches and drug delivery systems among many others. Finally, we want to stress that the application of molecular theories, where the coupling between chemical equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are explicitly included provide with quantitative predictions of the layers properties, as compared with experimental observations, and enable the fundamental understanding of the observed behavior. Moreover, the theory provides with a detailed microscopic picture and should be used as an integral part in the design of functional and responsive surfaces. It is important to emphasize that the molecular approaches are not exact, and, therefore, there is a need to continue their development and the incorporation of improved approximations to further broaden their applicability.

  17. Modelling the propagation of social response during a disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Fast, Shannon M; González, Marta C; Wilson, James M; Markuzon, Natasha

    2015-03-01

    Epidemic trajectories and associated social responses vary widely between populations, with severe reactions sometimes observed. When confronted with fatal or novel pathogens, people exhibit a variety of behaviours from anxiety to hoarding of medical supplies, overwhelming medical infrastructure and rioting. We developed a coupled network approach to understanding and predicting social response. We couple the disease spread and panic spread processes and model them through local interactions between agents. The social contagion process depends on the prevalence of the disease, its perceived risk and a global media signal. We verify the model by analysing the spread of disease and social response during the 2009 H1N1 outbreak in Mexico City and 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome and 2009 H1N1 outbreaks in Hong Kong, accurately predicting population-level behaviour. This kind of empirically validated model is critical to exploring strategies for public health intervention, increasing our ability to anticipate the response to infectious disease outbreaks. PMID:25589575

  18. Modelling and validation of magnetorheological brake responses using parametric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, Zainordin A.; A, Abdullah M.; K, Hudha

    2013-12-01

    Magnetorheological brake (MR Brake) is one x-by-wire systems which performs better than conventional brake systems. MR brake consists of a rotating disc that is immersed with Magnetorheological Fluid (MR Fluid) in an enclosure of an electromagnetic coil. The applied magnetic field will increase the yield strength of the MR fluid where this fluid was used to decrease the speed of the rotating shaft. The purpose of this paper is to develop a mathematical model to represent MR brake with a test rig. The MR brake model is developed based on actual torque characteristic which is coupled with motion of a test rig. Next, the experimental are performed using MR brake test rig and obtained three output responses known as angular velocity response, torque response and load displacement response. Furthermore, the MR brake was subjected to various current. Finally, the simulation results of MR brake model are then verified with experimental results.

  19. Assessment of Professional Development for Teachers in the Vocational Education and Training Sector: An Examination of the Concerns Based Adoption Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Concerns Based Adoption Model (Hall & Hord, 2006) as a conceptual lens and practical methodology for professional development program assessment in the vocational education and training (VET) sector. In this sequential mixed-methods study, findings from the first two phases (two of five) of…

  20. Is Authentic Cross-Cultural Collaboration Possible between Universities and Public Schools within a Professional Development School Model? Perceptions from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Debra D.; Muir Welsh, Kate

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, a state in the Rocky Mountain region combined the concept of partner schools (Goodlad, 1993) and the model of a professional development school (Holmes Group, 1986, 1995) to develop four university public school partnerships. This study asked two guiding questions: Is authentic cross-cultural collaboration possible between a university…

  1. Adding heat to the live-high train-low altitude model: a practical insight from professional football

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, M; Racinais, S; Bilsborough, J; Hocking, J; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Bourdon, P C; Voss, S; Livingston, S; Christian, R; Périard, J; Cordy, J; Coutts, A J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine with a parallel group study design the performance and physiological responses to a 14-day off-season ‘live high-train low in the heat’ training camp in elite football players. Methods Seventeen professional Australian Rules Football players participated in outdoor football-specific skills (32±1°C, 11.5?h) and indoor strength (23±1°C, 9.3?h) sessions and slept (12 nights) and cycled indoors (4.3?h) in either normal air (NORM, n=8) or normobaric hypoxia (14±1?h/day, FiO2 15.2–14.3%, corresponding to a simulated altitude of 2500–3000?m, hypoxic (HYP), n=9). They completed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 2 (Yo-YoIR2) in temperate conditions (23±1°C, normal air) precamp (Pre) and postcamp (Post). Plasma volume (PV) and haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured at similar times and 4?weeks postcamp (4WPost). Sweat sodium concentration ((Na+)sweat) was measured Pre and Post during a heat-response test (44°C). Results Both groups showed very large improvements in Yo-YoIR2 at Post (+44%; 90% CL 38, 50), with no between-group differences in the changes (?1%; ?9, 9). Postcamp, large changes in PV (+5.6%; ?1.8, 5.6) and (Na+)sweat (?29%; ?37, ?19) were observed in both groups, while Hbmass only moderately increased in HYP (+2.6%; 0.5, 4.5). At 4WPost, there was a likely slightly greater increase in Hbmass (+4.6%; 0.0, 9.3) and PV (+6%; ?5, 18, unclear) in HYP than in NORM. Conclusions The combination of heat and hypoxic exposure during sleep/training might offer a promising ‘conditioning cocktail’ in team sports. PMID:24282209

  2. Enhancing Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Knowledge and Practices: A Professional Development Model for Technology Teachers in Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikasanda, Vanwyk Khobidi Mbubzi; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Williams, John; Jones, Alister

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a professional development that was designed and implemented in an attempt to broaden teachers' knowledge of the nature of technology and also enhance their technological pedagogical practices. The professional development was organised in four phases with each phase providing themes for reflection and teacher learning…

  3. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  4. Predicting aquifer response time for application in catchment modeling.

    PubMed

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. PMID:24842053

  5. Separability of Item and Person Parameters in Response Time Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses two forms of separability of item and person parameters in the context of response time models. The first is "separate sufficiency," and the second is "ranking independence." For each form a theorem stating sufficient conditions is proved. The two forms are shown to include several cases of models from psychometric and biometric…

  6. Equity Access Plans: A Regulatory and Educational State Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLisle, James

    1984-01-01

    Introduces the basic notion of equity access plans as property-based solutions to the cash flow needs of elderly homeowners and then proposes a normative response model that states can adopt to help manage the risk exposures. The recommended model incorporates regulatory, information dissemination, and educational elements. (BH)

  7. The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

  8. Updated model for dielectric response function of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A modified and updated version of the model of the dielectric response function of liquid water as currently implemented in the PARTRAC code is presented. The updated version takes advantage of the newer experimental information from the Sendai group and implements some improvements in modeling and usability. PMID:23415106

  9. CANCER DOSE-RESPONSE MODELS INCORPORATING CLONAL EXPANSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the assumption that a malignant tumor develops through a sequence of steps (normal cells - initiated cells/foci - nodules - tumors) two classes of mathematical models of carcinogenesis that have a potential to be used for cancer dose-response modeling are discussed. The two...

  10. Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data

    E-print Network

    Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data H. T. Banksa,1 , M. Davidiana,2 equations is formulated to describe the pathogenesis of HIV infection, wherein certain important features, and stimulation by antigens other than HIV. A stability analysis illustrates the capability of this model

  11. Minimax D-Optimal Designs for Item Response Theory Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Martjin P. F.; King, C. Y. Joy; Wong, Weng Kee

    2000-01-01

    Proposed minimax designs for item response theory (IRT) models to overcome the problem of local optimality. Compared minimax designs to sequentially constructed designs for the two parameter logistic model. Results show that minimax designs can be nearly as efficient as sequentially constructed designs. (Author/SLD)

  12. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY III. STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of do@e-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. he benchmark dose (BMD) approach has been proposed for use with developmental (as well as other noncancer) endpo...

  13. A Speeded Item Response Model with Gradual Process Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goegebeur, Yuri; De Boeck, Paul; Wollack, James A.; Cohen, Allan S.

    2008-01-01

    An item response theory model for dealing with test speededness is proposed. The model consists of two random processes, a problem solving process and a random guessing process, with the random guessing gradually taking over from the problem solving process. The involved change point and change rate are considered random parameters in order to…

  14. Modeling the host response to inhalation anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Day, Judy; Friedman, Avner; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax, an often fatal infection, is initiated by endospores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis that are introduced into the lung. To better understand the pathogenesis of an inhalation anthrax infection, we propose a two compartment mathematical model which takes into account the documented early events of such an infection. Anthrax spores, once inhaled, are readily taken up by alveolar phagocytes which then migrate rather quickly out of the lung and into the thoracic/mediastinal lymph nodes. En route, these spores germinate to become vegetative bacteria. In the lymph nodes, the bacteria kill the host cells and are released into the extracellular environment where they can be disseminated into the blood stream and grow to a very high level, often resulting in death of the infected person. Using this framework as the basis of our model, we explore the probability of survival of an infected individual. This is dependent on several factors, such as the rate of migration and germination events and treatment with antibiotics. PMID:21295589

  15. STELLOPT Modeling of the 3D Diagnostic Response in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel A

    2013-05-07

    The ITER three dimensional diagnostic response to an n=3 resonant magnetic perturbation is modeled using the STELLOPT code. The in-vessel coils apply a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fi eld which generates a 4 cm edge displacement from axisymmetry as modeled by the VMEC 3D equilibrium code. Forward modeling of flux loop and magnetic probe response with the DIAGNO code indicates up to 20 % changes in measured plasma signals. Simulated LIDAR measurements of electron temperature indicate 2 cm shifts on the low field side of the plasma. This suggests that the ITER diagnostic will be able to diagnose the 3D structure of the equilibria.

  16. A model for predicting lung cancer response to therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Rebecca M. . E-mail: rseiber1@utk.edu; Ramsey, Chester R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Volumetric computed tomography (CT) images acquired by image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) systems can be used to measure tumor response over the course of treatment. Predictive adaptive therapy is a novel treatment technique that uses volumetric IGRT data to actively predict the future tumor response to therapy during the first few weeks of IGRT treatment. The goal of this study was to develop and test a model for predicting lung tumor response during IGRT treatment using serial megavoltage CT (MVCT). Methods and Materials: Tumor responses were measured for 20 lung cancer lesions in 17 patients that were imaged and treated with helical tomotherapy with doses ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 Gy per fraction. Five patients were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, and 1 patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Tumor response to treatment was retrospectively measured by contouring 480 serial MVCT images acquired before treatment. A nonparametric, memory-based locally weight regression (LWR) model was developed for predicting tumor response using the retrospective tumor response data. This model predicts future tumor volumes and the associated confidence intervals based on limited observations during the first 2 weeks of treatment. The predictive accuracy of the model was tested using a leave-one-out cross-validation technique with the measured tumor responses. Results: The predictive algorithm was used to compare predicted verse-measured tumor volume response for all 20 lesions. The average error for the predictions of the final tumor volume was 12%, with the true volumes always bounded by the 95% confidence interval. The greatest model uncertainty occurred near the middle of the course of treatment, in which the tumor response relationships were more complex, the model has less information, and the predictors were more varied. The optimal days for measuring the tumor response on the MVCT images were on elapsed Days 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 12, 17, and 18 during treatment. Conclusions: The LWR model accurately predicted final tumor volume for all 20 lung cancer lesions. These predictions were made using only 8 days' worth of observations from early in the treatment. Because the predictions are accurate with quantified uncertainty, they could eventually be used to optimize treatment.

  17. Theoretical and Empirical Comparisons between Two Models for Continuous Item Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzed the relations between two continuous response models intended for typical response items: the linear congeneric model and Samejima's continuous response model (CRM). Illustrated the relations described using an empirical example and assessed the relations through a simulation study. (SLD)

  18. Simplified Analysis Model for Predicting Pyroshock Responses on Composite Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Takashi; Shi, Qinzhong

    A simplified analysis model based on the frequency response analysis and the wave propagation analysis was established for predicting Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) on the composite panel subjected to pyroshock loadings. The complex composite panel was modeled as an isotropic single layer panel defined in NASA Lewis Method. Through the conductance of an impact excitation test on a composite panel with no equipment mounted on, it was presented that the simplified analysis model could estimate the SRS as well as the acceleration peak values in both near and far field in an accurate way. In addition, through the simulation for actual pyroshock tests on an actual satellite system, the simplified analysis model was proved to be applicable in predicting the actual pyroshock responses, while bringing forth several technical issues to estimate the pyroshock test specifications in early design stages.

  19. Models of subjective response to in-flight motion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudrapatna, A. N.; Jacobson, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Mathematical relationships between subjective comfort and environmental variables in an air transportation system are investigated. As a first step in model building, only the motion variables are incorporated and sensitivities are obtained using stepwise multiple regression analysis. The data for these models have been collected from commercial passenger flights. Two models are considered. In the first, subjective comfort is assumed to depend on rms values of the six-degrees-of-freedom accelerations. The second assumes a Rustenburg type human response function in obtaining frequency weighted rms accelerations, which are used in a linear model. The form of the human response function is examined and the results yield a human response weighting function for different degrees of freedom.

  20. Trust, Accountability, Autonomy: Building a Teacher-Driven Professional Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jebson, Hugh; DiNota, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Faculty evaluation--arguably no other topic in independent education evokes as much passionate discourse--mostly negative, or at least freighted with anxiety. But, in the authors' experience, it does not have to be this way. At their school, Berkeley Preparatory School (Florida), they have recently developed a teacher evaluation model that is…

  1. Applications of the Functional Writing Model in Technical and Professional Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostoff, Anita

    The functional writing model is a method by which students learn to devise and organize a written argument. Salient features of functional writing include the organizing idea (a component that logically unifies a paragraph or sequence of paragraphs), the reader's frame of reference, forecasting (prediction of the sequence by which the organizing…

  2. Explore Elementary Teachers' Professional Knowledge of Guiding Science Fair Product by Using Different Instruction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This research is about using two different instruction models, "theory course combined with sample introduction" and "theory course combined with case method teaching", to instruct elementary teachers on how to guide the science fair product in two courses (16 and 12 teachers in each class) and observe their guiding tactics after the instructed…

  3. Satisfaction with Components of the Therapeutic Model: Perspectives of Consumers and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazicki, Tammy A.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Roberts, Michael C.; Benson, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    We provide information about consumer and provider perceptions using a mixed-model pilot study within the Intensive Mental Health Project (IMHP), a school-based treatment service for children with SED and their families. Caregiver, youth, and provider questionnaires developed for this project elicited quantitative and qualitative information on…

  4. Emerging E-Trends and Models in Teacher Education and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laferriere, Therese; Lamon, Mary; Chan, Carol K. K.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the knowledge era, teacher education needs to prepare teachers to face the changing technological contexts and to model pedagogies and tools for better forms of learning. Despite much enthusiasm about the roles of technology in education, its role in transforming teacher learning, in ways aligned with advances in the learning…

  5. Rehabilitation Services Program - Red Deer College (A Training Model for Para-Professionals).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McColl, Diana

    The paper describes a 2-year college program designed to meet the need for front-line workers, who have been trained within the developmental model, to work with people exhibiting a broad variety of handicaps. The program is explained to adhere to a philosophy of normalization/integration for the handicapped. The orientation is noted to be…

  6. Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

    2006-01-01

    Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a "reverse science fair" in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study…

  7. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  8. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  9. Traffic model by braking capability and response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jeenu; Kim, Youngho; Lee, Choong-Ki

    2015-06-01

    We propose a microscopic traffic model where the update velocity is determined by the deceleration capacity and response time. It is found that there is a class of collisions that cannot be distinguished by simply comparing the stop positions. The model generates the safe, comfortable, and efficient traffic flow in numerical simulations with a reasonable values of the parameters, and this is analytically supported. Our approach provides a new perspective in modeling traffic-flow safety and worrying situations like lane changing.

  10. Robustness of the network models of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Chakrabarti, B. K.

    1990-09-01

    We introduce a quantitative measure of the robustness of the network models of immune response against damage of inter-cellular interactions. As an illustrative example, we compute the robustness of a model which is equivalent to the one proposed recently by Chowdhury and Stauffer (J. Stat. Phys. 59 (1990) 1019). We also study the basins of attraction of the fixed points of this model with damaged inter-cellular interactions.

  11. Modelling climate change responses in tropical forests: similar productivity estimates across five models, but different mechanisms and responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, L.; Harper, A.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Galbraith, D. R.; Imbuzeiro, H. M. A.; Powell, T. L.; Doughty, C.; Levine, N. M.; Malhi, Y.; Saleska, S. R.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Meir, P.; Williams, M.

    2015-04-01

    Accurately predicting the response of Amazonia to climate change is important for predicting climate change across the globe. Changes in multiple climatic factors simultaneously result in complex non-linear ecosystem responses, which are difficult to predict using vegetation models. Using leaf- and canopy-scale observations, this study evaluated the capability of five vegetation models (Community Land Model version 3.5 coupled to the Dynamic Global Vegetation model - CLM3.5-DGVM; Ecosystem Demography model version 2 - ED2; the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator version 2.1 - JULES; Simple Biosphere model version 3 - SiB3; and the soil-plant-atmosphere model - SPA) to simulate the responses of leaf- and canopy-scale productivity to changes in temperature and drought in an Amazonian forest. The models did not agree as to whether gross primary productivity (GPP) was more sensitive to changes in temperature or precipitation, but all the models were consistent with the prediction that GPP would be higher if tropical forests were 5 °C cooler than current ambient temperatures. There was greater model-data consistency in the response of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to changes in temperature than in the response to temperature by net photosynthesis (An), stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf area index (LAI). Modelled canopy-scale fluxes are calculated by scaling leaf-scale fluxes using LAI. At the leaf-scale, the models did not agree on the temperature or magnitude of the optimum points of An, Vcmax or gs, and model variation in these parameters was compensated for by variations in the absolute magnitude of simulated LAI and how it altered with temperature. Across the models, there was, however, consistency in two leaf-scale responses: (1) change in An with temperature was more closely linked to stomatal behaviour than biochemical processes; and (2) intrinsic water use efficiency (IWUE) increased with temperature, especially when combined with drought. These results suggest that even up to fairly extreme temperature increases from ambient levels (+6 °C), simulated photosynthesis becomes increasingly sensitive to gs and remains less sensitive to biochemical changes. To improve the reliability of simulations of the response of Amazonian rainforest to climate change, the mechanistic underpinnings of vegetation models need to be validated at both leaf- and canopy-scales to improve accuracy and consistency in the quantification of processes within and across an ecosystem.

  12. Modelling tropical forests response to logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzolla Gatti, Roberto; Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems by large-scale fragmentation due to human activity such as heavy logging and agricultural clearance. Although, they provide crucial ecosystem goods and services, such as sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity. In several countries forest resource extraction has experienced a shift from clearcutting to selective logging to maintain a significant forest cover and understock of living biomass. However the knowledge on the short and long-term effects of removing selected species in tropical rainforest are scarce and need to be further investigated. One of the main effects of selective logging on forest dynamics seems to be the local disturbance which involve the invasion of open space by weed, vines and climbers at the expense of the late-successional state cenosis. We present a simple deterministic model that describes the dynamics of tropical rainforest subject to selective logging to understand how and why weeds displace native species. We argue that the selective removal of tallest tropical trees carries out gaps of light that allow weeds, vines and climbers to prevail on native species, inhibiting the possibility of recovery of the original vegetation. Our results show that different regime shifts may occur depending on the type of forest management adopted. This hypothesis is supported by a dataset of trees height and weed/vines cover that we collected from 9 plots located in Central and West Africa both in untouched and managed areas.

  13. Urban dispersion : challenges for fast response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    There is renewed interest in urban dispersion modeling due to the need for tools that can be used for responding to, planning for, and assessing the consequences of an airborne release of toxic materials. Although not an everyday phenomenon, releases of hazardous gases and aerosols have occurred in populated urban environments and are potentially threatening to human life. These releases may stem from on-site accidents as in the case of industrial chemical releases, may result during transport of hazardous chemicals as in tanker truck or railroad spills, or may be premeditated as in a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) agent terrorist attack. Transport and dispersion in urban environments is extremely complicated. Buildings alter the flow fields and deflect the wind, causing updrafts and downdrafts, channeling between buildings, areas of calm winds adjacent to strong winds, and horizontally and vertically rotating-eddies between buildings, at street corners, and other places within the urban canopy (see review by Hosker, 1984). Trees, moving vehicles, and exhaust vents among other things further complicate matters. The distance over which chemical, biological, or radiological releases can be harmful varies from tens of meters to many kilometers depending on the amount released, the toxicity of the agent, and the atmospheric conditions. As we will show later, accounting for the impacts of buildings on the transport and dispersion is crucial in estimating the travel direction, the areal extent, and the toxicity levels of the contaminant plume, and ultimately for calculating exposures to the population.

  14. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-05-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box-Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  15. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  16. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Analysing the Professional Development of Teaching and Learning from a Political Ethics of Care Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozalek, Vivienne Grace; McMillan, Wendy; Marshall, Delia E.; November, Melvyn; Daniels, Andre; Sylvester, Toni

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses Tronto's political ethics of care as a normative framework to evaluate a model of teaching and learning professional development. This framework identifies five integrated moral elements of care -- attentiveness, responsibility, competence, responsiveness and trust. This paper explicates on each of these elements to evaluate…

  18. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitán

    2008-08-01

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  19. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitan

    2008-08-11

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  20. The Relationship between Counselors and Their State Professional Association: Exploring Counselor Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darcy, Monica G.; Abed-Faghri, Nahid M.

    2013-01-01

    A state's counseling association conducted a study to explore characteristics of its licensed mental health counselors. Responses were collected regarding employment, priorities for the state professional association, competence in professional activities, and sources of professional support. The majority of respondents indicated high job…

  1. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. PMID:12507317

  2. Structural characteristic responses for finite element model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linren; Wang, Lei; Ou, Jinping

    2014-04-01

    The field measurements of structures are very important to the structural finite element (FE) model updating because the errors and uncertainties of a FE model are corrected directly through closing the discrepancies between the analytical responses from FE model and the measurements from field testing of a structure. Usually, the accurate and reliable field measurements are very limited. Therefore, it is very important to make full use of the limited and valuable field measurements in structural model updating to achieve a best result with the lowest cost. In this paper, structural FE model updating is investigated in the point of view of solving a mathematical problem, and different amount and category of structural dynamic responses and static responses are considered as constraints to explore their effects on the updated results of different degree and types of structural damages. The numerical studies are carried out on a space truss. Accounting for the numerical results, some inherent phenomena and connections taking account of the updating parameters, output responses and the updated results are revealed and discussed. Some useful and practicable suggestions about using the field measurements for FE model updating are provided to achieve efficient and reliable results.

  3. Autonomic responses to modeled distress in prison psychopaths.

    PubMed

    House, T H; Milligan, W L

    1976-10-01

    The present experiment was designed to study the physiological basis of the proposition that psychopaths are indifferent to the feelings of others. Young male subjects from a prison population were divided into groups according to their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Pd score and then subdivided on the basis of MMPI Welsh Anxiety Scale (WAS) scores. Subjects in each group observed a model exhibiting either mild or severe distress to electric shock. Heart rate and skin conductance were measured over 15 trials in each subject. We hypothesized that the different clinical groups would exhibit different physiological emotional response patterns. The results showed that low-Pd subjects were more autonomically responsive to an emotional stimulus (modeled distress) than high-Pd subjects from the same prison population. Moreover, high-WAS subjects were more responsive than low-WAS subjects. The level of distress exhibited by the model had no effect. PMID:993975

  4. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  5. Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model

    E-print Network

    Richardson, John

    Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model E. C; accepted 10 February 2006; published 17 June 2006. [1] We present a model of Saturn's global auroral in the intensity of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). Our model, referred to as the centrifugal instability model

  6. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  7. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    E-print Network

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  8. Visual Attention Model Based on Statistical Properties of Neuron Responses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  9. Visual attention model based on statistical properties of neuron responses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  10. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  11. Professional hazards? The impact of models' body size on advertising effectiveness and women's body-focused anxiety in professions that do and do not emphasize the cultural ideal of thinness.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Helga; Howard, Sarah

    2004-12-01

    Previous experimental research indicates that the use of average-size women models in advertising prevents the well-documented negative effect of thin models on women's body image, while such adverts are perceived as equally effective (Halliwell & Dittmar, 2004). The current study extends this work by: (a) seeking to replicate the finding of no difference in advertising effectiveness between average-size and thin models (b) examining level of ideal-body internalization as an individual, internal factor that moderates women's vulnerability to thin media models, in the context of (c) comparing women in professions that differ radically in their focus on, and promotion of, the sociocultural ideal of thinness for women--employees in fashion advertising (n = 75) and teachers in secondary schools (n = 75). Adverts showing thin, average-size and no models were perceived as equally effective. High internalizers in both groups of women felt worse about their body image after exposure to thin models compared to other images. Profession affected responses to average-size models. Teachers reported significantly less body-focused anxiety after seeing average-size models compared to no models, while there was no difference for fashion advertisers. This suggests that women in professional environments with less focus on appearance-related ideals can experience increased body-esteem when exposed to average-size models, whereas women in appearance-focused professions report no such relief. PMID:15601505

  12. Integrating Professional and Folk Models of HIV Risk: YMSM’s Perceptions of High-Risk Sex

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, Katrina; Carpineto, Julie; McDavitt, Bryce; Weiss, George; Iverson, Ellen F.; Au, Chi-Wai; Kerrone, Dustin; Martinez, Miguel; Kipke, Michele D.

    2009-01-01

    Risks associated with HIV are well documented in research literature. While a great deal has been written about high-risk sex, little research has been conducted to examine how young men who have sex with men (YMSM) perceive and define high-risk sexual behavior. In this study, we compare the “professional’ and “folk” models of HIV-risk based on YMSM’s understanding of high-risk sex and where and how they gathered their understanding of HIV-risk behaviors. The findings reported here emerged from the quantitative and qualitative interviews from the Healthy Young Men’s Study (HYM), a longitudinal study examining risk and protective factors for substance use and sexual risk among an ethnically diverse sample of YMSM. Findings are discussed in relation to framing how service providers and others can increase YMSM’s knowledge of sexual behavior and help them build solid foundations of sexual health education to protect them from STI and HIV infection. PMID:18558819

  13. Professional Development for Professionals: Beyond Sufficiency Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Gerald A.; Calway, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    We question the current role of professional associations in developing a culture of learning beyond a sufficiency or competency level. This brings into question the underlying philosophy of Professional Standards legislation. This legislation mandates continuing professional development for professionals without stating what should be achieved…

  14. Professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  15. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  16. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program as a model for effective professional development experience in Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, S. L.; Kudela, R. M.; Clinton, N. E.; Atkins, N.; Austerberry, D.; Johnson, M.; McGonigle, J.; McIntosh, K.; O'Shea, J. J.; Shirshikova, Z.; Singer, N.; Snow, A.; Woods, R.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    With over half of the current earth and space science workforce expected to retire within the next 15 years, NASA has responded by cultivating young minds through programs such as the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). SARP is a competitive internship that introduces upper-level undergraduates and early graduate students to Earth System Science research and NASA's Airborne Science Program. The program serves as a model for recruitment of very high caliber students into the scientific workforce. Its uniqueness derives from total vertical integration of hands-on experience at every stage of airborne science: aircraft instrumentation, flight planning, mission participation, field-work, analysis, and reporting of results in a competitive environment. At the conclusion of the program, students presented their work to NASA administrators, faculty, mentors, and the other participants with the incentive of being selected as best talk and earning a trip to the fall AGU meeting to present their work at the NASA booth. We hope lessons learned can inform the decisions of scientists at the highest levels seeking to broaden the appeal of research. In 2011, SARP was divided into three disciplinary themes: Oceanography, Land Use, and Atmospheric Chemistry. Each research group was mentored by an upper-level graduate student who was supervised by an expert faculty member. A coordinator managed the program and was supervised by a senior research scientist/administrator. The program is a model of knowledge transfer among the several levels of research: agency administration to the program coordinator, established scientific experts to the research mentors, and the research mentors to the pre-career student participants. The outcomes from this program include mission planning and institutional knowledge transfer from administrators and expert scientists to the coordinator and research mentors; personnel and project management from the coordinator and expert scientists to the research mentors; and scholarship and training in specific analytical techniques for Earth Science research from the mentors to the student participants. Across every level, the program allowed for networking and career advice to help students gain entry to future job or graduate school opportunities. This poster details "engaging the next generation" by highlighting specific research questions proposed and developed by the students in the Oceanography group.

  17. The Order of Professionalization: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes the order in which professionalism occurs, using medicine as an example. Investigates a variety of basic events in professionalism--control of work, development of schools and other knowledge institutions, creation of professionally dominated work sites, association, licensing, and scientific transformation. Argues for a model of…

  18. Professional Learning Communities Impact on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the Professional Learning Community model on student achievement in the state of California. Specifically, the study compared student achievement between two school types: Professional Learning Community schools and Non Professional Learning schools. The research utilized existing API scores for California schools…

  19. Professional Schools: Information for Students and Advisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirer, C. James

    1983-01-01

    A professional school is a program, department, or school that trains students to deliver psychological services. The professional school movement as an alternative training model, the differences between Psy.D and Ph.D degrees, and the implications of accreditation for program quality are discussed. Professional schools are listed. (AM)

  20. Development of a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toru; Bartrand, Timothy A; Weir, Mark H; Omura, Tatsuo; Haas, Charles N

    2010-07-01

    In order to develop a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), the pooled data sets for infection of transgenic mice susceptible to SARS-CoV and infection of mice with murine hepatitis virus strain 1, which may be a clinically relevant model of SARS, were fit to beta-Poisson and exponential models with the maximum likelihood method. The exponential model (k= 4.1 x l0(2)) could describe the dose-response relationship of the pooled data sets. The beta-Poisson model did not provide a statistically significant improvement in fit. With the exponential model, the infectivity of SARS-CoV was calculated and compared with those of other coronaviruses. The does of SARS-CoV corresponding to 10% and 50% responses (illness) were estimated at 43 and 280 PFU, respectively. Its estimated infectivity was comparable to that of HCoV-229E, known as an agent of human common cold, and also similar to those of some animal coronaviruses belonging to the same genetic group. Moreover, the exponential model was applied to the analysis of the epidemiological data of SARS outbreak that occurred at an apartment complex in Hong Kong in 2003. The estimated dose of SARS-CoV for apartment residents during the outbreak, which was back-calculated from the reported number of cases, ranged from 16 to 160 PFU/person, depending on the floor. The exponential model developed here is the sole dose-response model for SARS-CoV at the present and would enable us to understand the possibility for reemergence of SARS. PMID:20497390

  1. Benchmarking nuclear models for Gamow-Teller response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, E.; Brown, B. A.; Fang, D.-L.; Marketin, T.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2014-03-01

    A comparative study of the nuclear Gamow-Teller response (GTR) within conceptually different state-of-the-art approaches is presented. Three nuclear microscopic models are considered: (i) the recently developed charge-exchange relativistic time blocking approximation (RTBA) based on the covariant density functional theory, (ii) the shell model (SM) with an extended “jj77” model space and (iii) the non-relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) with a Brueckner G-matrix effective interaction. We study the physics cases where two or all three of these models can be applied. The Gamow-Teller response functions are calculated for 208Pb, 132Sn and 78Ni within both RTBA and QRPA. The strengths obtained for 208Pb are compared to data that enable a firm model benchmarking. For the nucleus 132Sn, also SM calculations are performed within the model space truncated at the level of a particle-hole (ph) coupled to vibration configurations. This allows a consistent comparison to the RTBA where ph?phonon coupling is responsible for the spreading width and considerable quenching of the GTR. Differences between the models and perspectives of their future developments are discussed.

  2. Model-Based Collaborative Filtering Analysis of Student Response Data: Machine-Learning Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergner, Yoav; Droschler, Stefan; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Rayyan, Saif; Seaton, Daniel; Pritchard, David E.

    2012-01-01

    We apply collaborative filtering (CF) to dichotomously scored student response data (right, wrong, or no interaction), finding optimal parameters for each student and item based on cross-validated prediction accuracy. The approach is naturally suited to comparing different models, both unidimensional and multidimensional in ability, including a…

  3. Evaluating Cognitive Theory: A Joint Modeling Approach Using Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein Entink, Rinke H.; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias; Hornke, Lutz F.; Fox, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    In current psychological research, the analysis of data from computer-based assessments or experiments is often confined to accuracy scores. Response times, although being an important source of additional information, are either neglected or analyzed separately. In this article, a new model is developed that allows the simultaneous analysis of…

  4. Combining IRT and SEM: A Hybrid Model for Fitting Responses and Response Certainties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Anguiano-Carrasco, Cristina; Demestre, Josep

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a model-based procedure, intended for personality measures, for exploiting the auxiliary information provided by the certainty with which individuals answer every item (response certainty). This information is used to (a) obtain more accurate estimates of individual trait levels, and (b) provide a more detailed assessment of…

  5. A model for the synchronous machine using frequency response measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bacalao, N.J.; Arizon, P. de; Sanchez L., R.O.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents new techniques to improve the accuracy and velocity for the modeling of synchronous machines in stability and transient studies. The proposed model uses frequency responses as input data, obtained either directly from measurements or calculated from the available data. The new model is flexible as it allows changes in the detail in which the machine can be represented, and it is possible to partly compensate for the numerical errors incurred when using large integration time steps. The model can be used in transient stability and electromagnetic transient studies as secondary arc evaluation, load rejections and sub-synchronous resonance.

  6. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22

    Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  7. Using Data Augmentation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo for the Estimation of Unfolding Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Junker, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Unfolding response models, a class of item response theory (IRT) models that assume a unimodal item response function (IRF), are often used for the measurement of attitudes. Verhelst and Verstralen (1993)and Andrich and Luo (1993) independently developed unfolding response models by relating the observed responses to a more common monotone IRT…

  8. Time-delayed model of immune response in plants.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, G; Kyrychko, Y N; Blyuss, K B

    2016-01-21

    In the studies of plant infections, the plant immune response is known to play an essential role. In this paper we derive and analyse a new mathematical model of plant immune response with particular account for post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Besides biologically accurate representation of the PTGS dynamics, the model explicitly includes two time delays to represent the maturation time of the growing plant tissue and the non-instantaneous nature of the PTGS. Through analytical and numerical analysis of stability of the steady states of the model we identify parameter regions associated with recovery and resistant phenotypes, as well as possible chronic infections. Dynamics of the system in these regimes is illustrated by numerical simulations of the model. PMID:26551159

  9. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  10. Time-delayed model of immune response in plants

    E-print Network

    G. Neofytou; Y. N. Kyrychko; K. B. Blyuss

    2015-11-17

    In the studies of plant infections, the plant immune response is known to play an essential role. In this paper we derive and analyse a new mathematical model of plant immune response with particular account for post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Besides biologically accurate representation of the PTGS dynamics, the model explicitly includes two time delays to represent the maturation time of the growing plant tissue and the non-instantaneous nature of the PTGS. Through analytical and numerical analysis of stability of the steady states of the model we identify parameter regions associated with recovery and resistant phenotypes, as well as possible chronic infections. Dynamics of the system in these regimes is illustrated by numerical simulations of the model.

  11. MARX: Model of AXAF Response to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Davis, John E.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Houck, John C.; Dewey, Dan

    2013-02-01

    MARX (Model of AXAF Response to X-rays) is a suite of programs designed to enable the user to simulate the on-orbit performance of the Chandra satellite. MARX provides a detailed ray-trace simulation of how Chandra responds to a variety of astrophysical sources and can generate standard FITS events files and images as output. It contains models for the HRMA mirror system onboard Chandra as well as the HETG and LETG gratings and all focal plane detectors.

  12. A micromechanical constitutive model for the dynamic response of brittle materials "Dynamic response of marble"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Keith

    2001-07-01

    A micromechanically based constitutive model for the dynamic inelastic behavior of brittle materials, specifically "Dionysus-Pentelicon marble" with distributed microcracking is presented. Dionysus-Pentelicon marble was used in the construction of the Parthenon, in Athens, Greece. The constitutive model is a key component in the ability to simulate this historic explosion and the preceding bombardment form cannon fire that occurred at the Parthenon in 1678. Experiments were performed by Rosakis (1999) that characterized the static and dynamic response of this unique material. A micromechanical constitutive model that was previously successfully used to model the dynamic response of granular brittle materials is presented. The constitutive model was fitted to the experimental data for marble and reproduced the experimentally observed basic uniaxial dynamic behavior quite well. This micromechanical constitutive model was then implemented into the three dimensional nonlinear lagrangain finite element code Dyna3d(1998). Implementing this methodology into the three dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element code allowed the model to be exercised on several preliminary impact experiments. During future simulations, the model is to be used in conjunction with other numerical techniques to simulate projectile impact and blast loading on the Dionysus-Pentelicon marble and on the structure of the Parthenon.

  13. Modeling of eddy current probe response for steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1996-12-01

    Sample calculations were performed with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element model analysis that describe the response of an eddy current (EC) probe to steam generator (SG) tubing artifacts. Such calculations could be very helpful in understanding and interpreting of EC probe response to complex tube/defect geometries associated with the inservice inspection (ISI) of steam generator (SG) tubing. The governing field equations are in terms of coupled magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials in conducting media and of total or reduced scalar potentials in nonconducting regions. To establish the validity of the model, comparisons of the theoretical and experimental responses of an absolute bobbin probe are given for two types of calibration standard defects. Preliminary results are also presented from a recent theoretical study of the effect of ligament size in axial cracks on EC indications with conventional ISI bobbin probes.

  14. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply. PMID:24943884

  15. A Probabilistic Model for Simulating Magnetoacoustic Emission Responses in Ferromagnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) is a phenomenon where acoustic noise is generated due to the motion of non-180 magnetic domain walls in a ferromagnet with non-zero magnetostrictive constants. MAE has been studied extensively for many years and has even been applied as an NDE tool for characterizing the heat treatment of high-yield low carbon steels. A complete theory which fully accounts for the magnetoacoustic response, however, has not yet emerged. The motion of the domain walls appears to be a totally random process, however, it does exhibit features of regularity which have been identified by studying phenomena such as 1/f flicker noise and self-organized criticality (SOC). In this paper, a probabilistic model incorporating the effects of SOC has been developed to help explain the MAE response. The model uses many simplifying assumptions yet yields good qualitative agreement with observed experimental results and also provides some insight into the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for MAE. We begin by providing a brief overview of magnetoacoustic emission and the experimental set-up used to obtain the MAE signal. We then describe a pseudo-probabilistic model used to predict the MAE response and give an example of the predicted result. Finally, the model is modified to account for SOC and the new predictions are shown and compared with experiment.

  16. Models of the delayed nonlinear Raman response in diatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Pearson, A.

    2011-07-01

    We examine the delayed response of a diatomic gas to a polarizing laser field with the goal of obtaining computationally efficient methods for use with laser pulse propagation simulations. We demonstrate that for broadband pulses, heavy molecules such as O2 and N2, and typical atmospheric temperatures, the initial delayed response requires only classical physics. The linear kinetic Green's function is derived from the Boltzmann equation and shown to be in excellent agreement with full density-matrix calculations. A straightforward perturbation approach for the fully nonlinear, kinetic impulse response is also presented. With the kinetic theory a reduced fluid model of the diatomic gas’ orientation is derived. Transport coefficients are introduced to model the kinetic phase mixing of the delayed response. In addition to computational rapidity, the fluid model provides intuition through the use of familiar macroscopic quantities. Both the kinetic and the fluid descriptions predict a nonlinear steady-state alignment after passage of the laser pulse, which in the fluid model is interpreted as an anisotropic temperature of the diatomic fluid with respect to motion about the polarization axis.

  17. Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease Animal Models: A Cell Stress Response

    E-print Network

    Sulzer, David

    Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease Animal Models: A Cell Stress Response or a Step in Neurodegeneration? Carolina Cebrián, John D. Loike and David Sulzer Abstract The motor symptoms of Parkinson neuroin- flammatory processes are exacerbated in Parkinson's disease, including glial- mediated reactions

  18. Higher-Order Item Response Models for Hierarchical Latent Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Po-Hsi; Su, Chi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Many latent traits in the human sciences have a hierarchical structure. This study aimed to develop a new class of higher order item response theory models for hierarchical latent traits that are flexible in accommodating both dichotomous and polytomous items, to estimate both item and person parameters jointly, to allow users to specify…

  19. Item Response Theory Modeling of the Philadelphia Naming Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergadiotis, Gerasimos; Kellough, Stacey; Hula, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigated the fit of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996) to an item-response-theory measurement model, estimated the precision of the resulting scores and item parameters, and provided a theoretical rationale for the interpretation of PNT overall scores by relating…

  20. Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith

    E-print Network

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Modeling Building Thermal Response to HVAC Zoning Virginia Smith Department of Computer Science to enable room-level zoning where each room is conditioned individually based on its occupancy vision is to minimize this energy wastage through room-level zoning, where each room is conditioned

  1. A General Latent Trait Model for Response Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson (Whitely), Susan

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a general multicomponent latent trait model (LTM) for response processes. It combines the linear logistic LTM with the multicomponent LTM. Joint maximum likelihood estimators are presented for parameters of the general multicomponent LTM and an application to cognitive test items is described. (Author/BW)

  2. EXPERIMENTALLY-BASED MICROMECHANICAL MODELING OF DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF MOLYBDENUM

    E-print Network

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    EXPERIMENTALLY-BASED MICROMECHANICAL MODELING OF DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF MOLYBDENUM Sia Nemat-0416 (Received January 21, 1999) (Accepted February 1, 1999) 1. Introduction Molybdenum (Mo), a bcc metal properties of molybdenum reflect the high strength of interatomic bonding resulting from the overlap of the 4

  3. Dynamic Response of Model Lipid Membranes to Ultrasonic Radiation Force

    E-print Network

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    in a synthetic lipid bilayer system. We measured the response of protein-free model membranes to low Editor: William Phillips, University of Sydney, Australia Received June 12, 2013; Accepted August 29: This work was supported by the Goldwasser Family Fund and National Institutes of Health grant R21 NS076948

  4. Using SAS PROC MCMC for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Samonte, Kelli

    2015-01-01

    Interest in using Bayesian methods for estimating item response theory models has grown at a remarkable rate in recent years. This attentiveness to Bayesian estimation has also inspired a growth in available software such as WinBUGS, R packages, BMIRT, MPLUS, and SAS PROC MCMC. This article intends to provide an accessible overview of Bayesian…

  5. A Framework for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    A framework is introduced for considering dimensionality assessment procedures for multidimensional item response models. The framework characterizes procedures in terms of their confirmatory or exploratory approach, parametric or nonparametric assumptions, and applicability to dichotomous, polytomous, and missing data. Popular and emerging…

  6. Assessment of drug interactions relevant to pharmacodynamic indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Earp, Justin; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Zamacona, Miren K; Jusko, William J

    2004-10-01

    The assessment of drug interactions for a simple turnover system when the basic pharmacodynamic response is governed by indirect mechanisms was explored. This report describes a diverse array of possible in vivo pharmacodynamic effects from a combination of two drugs acting by similar or different indirect mechanisms. Various conditions of pharmacodynamic drug combinations were explored mathematically and by simulation: (a) interactions of two drugs acting simultaneously either on the production (k(in)) or on the dissipation (k(out)) processes controlling the in vivo response by competitive (four cases) or non-competitive interaction (six cases); and (b) combinations of two drugs acting on separate k(in) and k(out) processes simultaneously (four cases). A range of different combinations of drug doses was used. Plasma concentration time profiles were generated according to monoexponential disposition. Pharmacodynamic response profiles were simulated using the above conditions and characterized by descriptors such as Area Between Effect (and Baseline) Curve (ABEC) values. The interaction of agents by competitive mechanisms produced net responses that were additive in nature. Response profiles for non-competitive interactions on the same process were both antagonistic (for two drugs with effects that oppose each other) and synergistic (for two drugs that produce the same response). On the other hand, response signatures for agents acting non-competitively on the production and dissipation factors by opposing mechanisms (e.g. inhibiting k(in) plus stimulating k(out)) showed dramatic changes in net effects and produced apparent drug synergy. Net indirect response profiles for joint use of two or more drugs measured by ABEC values may look "additive", "antagonistic", or "synergistic" depending on doses, their intrinsic potencies, the nature of interaction (competitive or non-competitive) as well as their mechanisms of action. These models may help explain changes in pharmacologic responses to two agents in a more rational and mechanistic fashion than older empirical methods. PMID:15669772

  7. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland ; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland ; Hounsell, Alan R.; Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland ; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  8. Thermal Response Modeling System for a Mars Sample Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Miles, Frank S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-dimensional, coupled thermal response modeling system for analysis of hypersonic entry vehicles is presented. The system consists of a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS), a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), and a commercial finite-element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flowfield, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas eneration and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the heatshield is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of the entire vehicle can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a flat-faced arc-jet test model and a proposed Mars sample return capsule are presented and discussed.

  9. Thermal Response Modeling System for a Mars Sample Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, F. S.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-dimensional, coupled thermal response modeling system for analysis of hypersonic entry vehicles is presented. The system consists of a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS), a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), and a commercial finite element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flowfield, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas generation and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the heatshield is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of the entire vehicle can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a flat-faced arc-jet test model and a proposed Mars sample return capsule are presented and discussed.

  10. Verification of immune response optimality through cybernetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Batt, B C; Kompala, D S

    1990-02-01

    An immune response cascade that is T cell independent begins with the stimulation of virgin lymphocytes by antigen to differentiate into large lymphocytes. These immune cells can either replicate themselves or differentiate into plasma cells or memory cells. Plasma cells produce antibody at a specific rate up to two orders of magnitude greater than large lymphocytes. However, plasma cells have short life-spans and cannot replicate. Memory cells produce only surface antibody, but in the event of a subsequent infection by the same antigen, memory cells revert rapidly to large lymphocytes. Immunologic memory is maintained throughout the organism's lifetime. Many immunologists believe that the optimal response strategy calls for large lymphocytes to replicate first, then differentiate into plasma cells and when the antigen has been nearly eliminated, they form memory cells. A mathematical model incorporating the concept of cybernetics has been developed to study the optimality of the immune response. Derived from the matching law of microeconomics, cybernetic variables control the allocation of large lymphocytes to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate at any time during the response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen. A mouse is selected as the model organism and bacteria as the replicating antigen. In addition to verifying the optimal switching strategy, results showing how the immune response is affected by antigen growth rate, initial antigen concentration, and the number of antibodies required to eliminate an antigen are included. PMID:2338827

  11. Integrated functions for four basic models of indirect pharmacodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, W; Jusko, W J

    1998-01-01

    The integrated solutions (ABEC, area between baseline and effect curve) of four basic models of indirect pharmacodynamic responses are developed. These models assume that drug can inhibit or stimulate the production or loss of the response variable. For two models (I and III) with monoexponential drug disposition, explicit formulas for the ABEC were obtained, where ABEC is a function of ln (1 + (D/V)/IC50) or ln (1 + (D/V)/SC50) where D = dose, V = volume, and IC50 or SC50 = 50% effective concentration. Two other models (II and IV) were treated asymptotically with respect to small and large doses. Approximate formulas [e.g., ABEC = constant(1) x ln (1 + (D/V)/IC50) + constant (2)] were derived and the asymptotic behavior of the ABEC was established. In addition, simulations were performed to assess the effects of drug absorption rates and polyexponential disposition on ABEC values. These models show how pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors jointly determine the net response to a single dose of drug. PMID:9452970

  12. A cognitive computational model inspired by the immune system response.

    PubMed

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective. PMID:25003131

  13. A Cognitive Computational Model Inspired by the Immune System Response

    PubMed Central

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective. PMID:25003131

  14. Equivalent reduced model technique development for nonlinear system dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Louis; Avitabile, Peter; Foley, Jason; Wolfson, Janet

    2013-04-01

    The dynamic response of structural systems commonly involves nonlinear effects. Often times, structural systems are made up of several components, whose individual behavior is essentially linear compared to the total assembled system. However, the assembly of linear components using highly nonlinear connection elements or contact regions causes the entire system to become nonlinear. Conventional transient nonlinear integration of the equations of motion can be extremely computationally intensive, especially when the finite element models describing the components are very large and detailed. In this work, the equivalent reduced model technique (ERMT) is developed to address complicated nonlinear contact problems. ERMT utilizes a highly accurate model reduction scheme, the System equivalent reduction expansion process (SEREP). Extremely reduced order models that provide dynamic characteristics of linear components, which are interconnected with highly nonlinear connection elements, are formulated with SEREP for the dynamic response evaluation using direct integration techniques. The full-space solution will be compared to the response obtained using drastically reduced models to make evident the usefulness of the technique for a variety of analytical cases.

  15. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  16. Pharmacodynamic modeling of lansoprazole using an indirect irreversible response model.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, T A; Krzyzanski, W; Blum, R A; Jusko, W J

    2001-03-01

    A mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was used to assess lansoprazole effects on gastric pH. The irreversible inactivation of the H+/K+-ATPase enzyme by lansoprazole controls the secretion rate of H+ ions and gastric pH values. The basal circadian rhythm of gastric acid production was taken into account as well as the effects of food intake. A model was applied to multiple-dose data from a crossover study of four dosage regimens of lansoprazole in two groups of normal male subjects. Model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression and were compared to historical values reported in the literature. The predicted mean gastric ion concentration was 23.2 mM (pH 1.6) with the peak time at 12.6 hours (8:30 p.m.), and the half-time for H+ removal from the stomach averaged 1.7 hours. The estimated half-life of gastric food removal was 0.8 hours. The rate constant for normal H+/K+-ATPase degradation was 0.045 h(-1). The pharmacodynamic parameter describing lansoprazole action on gastric acid secretion was the second-order enzyme inactivation constant, which averaged 0.16 microg(-1) x L x h(-1). The parameters obtained for both the baseline and drug treatment data were consistent with the literature and physiologically relevant with the exception of effective food volume, which was large presumably due to buffer effects. The model successfully incorporated the physiological regulation of gastric acid production, the effects of food on gastric acid, and the effects of multiple-dosing regimens of lansoprazole on gastric acid production to give reasonable profiles of gastric pH. PMID:11269565

  17. Modelling mathematics problem solving item responses using a multidimensional IRT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Margaret; Adams, Raymond

    2006-10-01

    This research examined students' responses to mathematics problem-solving tasks and applied a general multidimensional IRT model at the response category level. In doing so, cognitive processes were identified and modelled through item response modelling to extract more information than would be provided using conventional practices in scoring items. More specifically, the study consisted of two parts. The first part involved the development of a mathematics problem-solving framework that was theoretically grounded, drawing upon research in mathematics education and cognitive psychology. The framework was then used as the basis for item development. The second part of the research involved the analysis of the item response data. It was demonstrated that multidimensional IRT models were powerful tools for extracting information from a limited number of item responses. A problem-solving profile for each student could be constructed from the results of IRT scaling.

  18. Stochastic Modeling of Behavioral Response to Anthropogenic Sounds.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Adam S; Ellison, William T; Vigness-Raposa, Kathleen J; Giard, Jennifer L; Southall, Brandon L

    2016-01-01

    The effect of anthropogenic sounds on marine wildlife is typically assessed by convolving the spatial, temporal, and spectral properties of a modeled sound field with a representation of animal distribution within the field. Both components benefit from stochastic modeling techniques based on field observations. Recent studies have also highlighted the effect of context on the probability and severity of the animal behavioral response to sound. This paper extends the stochastic approach to three modeling scenarios, including key contextual variables in aversion from a given level of sound and as a means of evaluating the effectiveness of passive acoustic monitoring. PMID:26610975

  19. A perspective on modeling the multiscale response of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-06-01

    The response of an energetic material to insult is perhaps one of the most difficult processes to model due to concurrent chemical and physical phenomena occurring over scales ranging from atomistic to continuum. Unraveling the interdependencies of these complex processes across the scales through modeling can be done only within a multiscale framework. In this talk, I will describe our philosophy and progress in the development of a predictive, experimentally validated multiscale reactive modeling capability for energetic materials. I will also describe new opportunities and challenges that have arisen in the course of our development that will be pursued in the future.

  20. A hypothesized model of Korean women's responses to abuse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myunghan; Harwood, Jake

    2004-07-01

    Many abused married Korean women have a strong desire to leave their abusive husbands but remain in the abusive situations because of the strong influence of their sociocultural context. The article discusses Korean women's responses to spousal abuse in the context of patriarchal, cultural, and social exchange theory. Age, education, and income as component elements share common effects on the emergent variable, sociostructural power. Gender role attitudes, traditional family ideology, individualism/collectivism, marital satisfaction, and marital conflict predict psychological-relational power as a latent variable. Sociostructural, patriarchal, cultural, and social exchange theories are reconceptualized to generate the model of Korean women's responses to abuse. PMID:15189642

  1. Computational modeling of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldt, Thomas; Shim, Eun B.; Kamm, Roger D.; Mark, Roger G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a model of the cardiovascular system capable of simulating the short-term (< or = 5 min) transient and steady-state hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt and lower body negative pressure. The model consists of a closed-loop lumped-parameter representation of the circulation connected to set-point models of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Model parameters are largely based on literature values. Model verification was performed by comparing the simulation output under baseline conditions and at different levels of orthostatic stress to sets of population-averaged hemodynamic data reported in the literature. On the basis of experimental evidence, we adjusted some model parameters to simulate experimental data. Orthostatic stress simulations are not statistically different from experimental data (two-sided test of significance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Transient response characteristics of heart rate to tilt also compare well with reported data. A case study is presented on how the model is intended to be used in the future to investigate the effects of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance.

  2. Professional Competence of Prospective Teachers in Business and Economics Education: Evaluation of a Competence Model Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouley, Franziska; Wuttke, Eveline; Schnick-Vollmer, Kathleen; Schmitz, Bernhard; Berger, Stefanie; Fritsch, Sabine; Seifried, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Teacher competence is crucial for quality of teaching and learner achievement. Competency models and competence measurement are prevalent in domains such as the natural sciences and lacking in others. We conducted our research in the field of business and economics education by focusing on the accounting domain because it is key to a deep…

  3. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse-rhythmic activity is regained downstream provided the input phase information in preserved centrally; (3) frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which causes temporal variations in synaptic strength due to changes in input frequency, is a possible mechanism of non-linear dynamic baroreflex gain control. Synaptic depression enables the NTS neuron to encode dBP/dt but to lose information about the steady state firing of the afferents.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Heterogeneous Electrophysiological Responses in Human ?-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riz, Michela; Braun, Matthias; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2014-01-01

    Electrical activity plays a pivotal role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic -cells. Recent findings have shown that the electrophysiological characteristics of human -cells differ from their rodent counterparts. We show that the electrophysiological responses in human -cells to a range of ion channels antagonists are heterogeneous. In some cells, inhibition of small-conductance potassium currents has no effect on action potential firing, while it increases the firing frequency dramatically in other cells. Sodium channel block can sometimes reduce action potential amplitude, sometimes abolish electrical activity, and in some cells even change spiking electrical activity to rapid bursting. We show that, in contrast to L-type -channels, P/Q-type -currents are not necessary for action potential generation, and, surprisingly, a P/Q-type -channel antagonist even accelerates action potential firing. By including SK-channels and dynamics in a previous mathematical model of electrical activity in human -cells, we investigate the heterogeneous and nonintuitive electrophysiological responses to ion channel antagonists, and use our findings to obtain insight in previously published insulin secretion measurements. Using our model we also study paracrine signals, and simulate slow oscillations by adding a glycolytic oscillatory component to the electrophysiological model. The heterogenous electrophysiological responses in human -cells must be taken into account for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying insulin secretion in health and disease, and as shown here, the interdisciplinary combination of experiments and modeling increases our understanding of human -cell physiology. PMID:24391482

  5. Mathematical modeling of heterogeneous electrophysiological responses in human ?-cells.

    PubMed

    Riz, Michela; Braun, Matthias; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2014-01-01

    Electrical activity plays a pivotal role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic ?-cells. Recent findings have shown that the electrophysiological characteristics of human ?-cells differ from their rodent counterparts. We show that the electrophysiological responses in human ?-cells to a range of ion channels antagonists are heterogeneous. In some cells, inhibition of small-conductance potassium currents has no effect on action potential firing, while it increases the firing frequency dramatically in other cells. Sodium channel block can sometimes reduce action potential amplitude, sometimes abolish electrical activity, and in some cells even change spiking electrical activity to rapid bursting. We show that, in contrast to L-type Ca2+-channels, P/Q-type Ca2+-currents are not necessary for action potential generation, and, surprisingly, a P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonist even accelerates action potential firing. By including SK-channels and Ca2+ dynamics in a previous mathematical model of electrical activity in human ?-cells, we investigate the heterogeneous and nonintuitive electrophysiological responses to ion channel antagonists, and use our findings to obtain insight in previously published insulin secretion measurements. Using our model we also study paracrine signals, and simulate slow oscillations by adding a glycolytic oscillatory component to the electrophysiological model. The heterogenous electrophysiological responses in human ?-cells must be taken into account for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying insulin secretion in health and disease, and as shown here, the interdisciplinary combination of experiments and modeling increases our understanding of human ?-cell physiology. PMID:24391482

  6. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  7. Computational modeling of drug response with applications to neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Herwig, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel high-throughput technologies has opened up the opportunity to deeply characterize patient tissues at various molecular levels and has given rise to a paradigm shift in medicine towards personalized therapies. Computational analysis plays a pivotal role in integrating the various genome data and understanding the cellular response to a drug. Based on that data, molecular models can be constructed that incorporate the known downstream effects of drug-targeted receptor molecules and that predict optimal therapy decisions. In this article, we describe the different steps in the conceptual framework of computational modeling. We review resources that hold information on molecular pathways that build the basis for constructing the model interaction maps, highlight network analysis concepts that have been helpful in identifying predictive disease patterns, and introduce the basic concepts of kinetic modeling. Finally, we illustrate this framework with selected studies related to the modeling of important target pathways affected by drugs. PMID:25733952

  8. Model updating using correlation analysis of strain frequency response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Yang, Zhichun; Jia, You; Wang, Le

    2016-03-01

    A method is proposed to modify the structural parameters of a dynamic finite element (FE) model by using the correlation analysis for strain frequency response function (SFRF). Sensitivity analysis of correlation coefficients is used to establish the linear algebraic equations for model updating. In order to improve the accuracy of updated model, the regularization technique is used to solve the ill-posed problem in model updating procedure. Finally, a numerical study and a model updating experiment are performed to verify the feasibility and robustness of the proposed method. The results show that the updated SFRFs and experimental SFRFs agree well, especially in resonance regions. Meanwhile, the proposed method has good robustness to noise ability and remains good feasibility even the number of measurement locations reduced significantly.

  9. Modeling Motu Profile Response to Varying Wave and Storm Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. C.; Ashton, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The atolls of the Pacific Ocean are low-lying landforms (less than 5m in elevation), typically consisting of reef-building corals often mounted by subaerial islets, or motu, which encircle a central lagoon. These motu, perched atop old coral reefs, typically consist of sand and gravel, and are sometimes anchored by relict geologic features (highstand coral reefs). Despite the vital role these islets play as home to terrestrial ecosystems and human infrastructure, the morphologic processes responsible for their formation and maintenance remain poorly understood. For example, although extreme events are hypothesized as a formation mechanism, motu are found in regions where hurricanes or tropical cyclones rarely occur and across varying storm gradients and frequency tracks. Here we use hydrodynamic and event-based morphodynamic modeling to better understand the role of storm events on the formation and evolution of motu. Using XBeach, a two-dimensional model of infragravity wave propagation and sediment transport, coupled with the coastal wave model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), we simulate the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic impacts of storm events on the nearshore, beach, and backbarrier portions of atolls. We investigate the effect of different representative profile morphology, for example motu height or the distance from the reef edge to the motu, on storm response. We further test the effect of storm intensity and inundation scenarios (i.e. difference in elevated water levels of the lagoon and ocean) on storm hydrodynamics and morphologic change. Model scenarios are informed and compared to basin-wide analysis of the variation of atoll and motu characteristics, such as reef width, motu width, and motu spacing across the Pacific Ocean. Atoll morphologies and storm responses are affected by both geographic location and, locally, the shoreline orientation (compared to storm tracks). Combining these different model scenarios with measured morphometrics allows us to develop a better understanding of the response of atolls and motu to climatic forcings, such as varying wave climate, storm frequency and intensity, and increased sea levels.

  10. Validation of a Deterministic Vibroacoustic Response Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E.; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the recently completed effort involving validation of a deterministic theory for the random vibration problem of predicting the response of launch pad structures in the low-frequency range (0 to 50 hertz). Use of the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) methods is not suitable in this range. Measurements of launch-induced acoustic loads and subsequent structural response were made on a cantilever beam structure placed in close proximity (200 feet) to the launch pad. Innovative ways of characterizing random, nonstationary, non-Gaussian acoustics are used for the development of a structure's excitation model. Extremely good correlation was obtained between analytically computed responses and those measured on the cantilever beam. Additional tests are recommended to bound the problem to account for variations in launch trajectory and inclination.

  11. Outcome Prediction in Mathematical Models of Immune Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Manuel; Wang, Kun; Huber, Greg; Kirby, Michael; Shattuck, Mark D.; O’Hern, Corey S.

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians need to predict patient outcomes with high accuracy as early as possible after disease inception. In this manuscript, we show that patient-to-patient variability sets a fundamental limit on outcome prediction accuracy for a general class of mathematical models for the immune response to infection. However, accuracy can be increased at the expense of delayed prognosis. We investigate several systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that model the host immune response to a pathogen load. Advantages of systems of ODEs for investigating the immune response to infection include the ability to collect data on large numbers of ‘virtual patients’, each with a given set of model parameters, and obtain many time points during the course of the infection. We implement patient-to-patient variability v in the ODE models by randomly selecting the model parameters from distributions with coefficients of variation v that are centered on physiological values. We use logistic regression with one-versus-all classification to predict the discrete steady-state outcomes of the system. We find that the prediction algorithm achieves near 100% accuracy for v = 0, and the accuracy decreases with increasing v for all ODE models studied. The fact that multiple steady-state outcomes can be obtained for a given initial condition, i.e. the basins of attraction overlap in the space of initial conditions, limits the prediction accuracy for v > 0. Increasing the elapsed time of the variables used to train and test the classifier, increases the prediction accuracy, while adding explicit external noise to the ODE models decreases the prediction accuracy. Our results quantify the competition between early prognosis and high prediction accuracy that is frequently encountered by clinicians. PMID:26287609

  12. Outcome Prediction in Mathematical Models of Immune Response to Infection.

    PubMed

    Mai, Manuel; Wang, Kun; Huber, Greg; Kirby, Michael; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians need to predict patient outcomes with high accuracy as early as possible after disease inception. In this manuscript, we show that patient-to-patient variability sets a fundamental limit on outcome prediction accuracy for a general class of mathematical models for the immune response to infection. However, accuracy can be increased at the expense of delayed prognosis. We investigate several systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that model the host immune response to a pathogen load. Advantages of systems of ODEs for investigating the immune response to infection include the ability to collect data on large numbers of 'virtual patients', each with a given set of model parameters, and obtain many time points during the course of the infection. We implement patient-to-patient variability v in the ODE models by randomly selecting the model parameters from distributions with coefficients of variation v that are centered on physiological values. We use logistic regression with one-versus-all classification to predict the discrete steady-state outcomes of the system. We find that the prediction algorithm achieves near 100% accuracy for v = 0, and the accuracy decreases with increasing v for all ODE models studied. The fact that multiple steady-state outcomes can be obtained for a given initial condition, i.e. the basins of attraction overlap in the space of initial conditions, limits the prediction accuracy for v > 0. Increasing the elapsed time of the variables used to train and test the classifier, increases the prediction accuracy, while adding explicit external noise to the ODE models decreases the prediction accuracy. Our results quantify the competition between early prognosis and high prediction accuracy that is frequently encountered by clinicians. PMID:26287609

  13. Of Elephant Blankets and Sieves: Designing a Professional Body for Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Examines elements in designing a single organization for outdoor education professionals in the United Kingdom. Discusses the responsibilities and activities of a professional association, characteristics of potential members, organizational structure, possible problems, professional image and qualifications, relationships with National Governing…

  14. ENGINEERING Professional Organizations

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    ENGINEERING Professional Organizations: National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) Virginia Society of Professional Engineers (VSPE) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) American Institute

  15. A new emergency response model for MACCS. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chanin, D.I.

    1992-11-11

    Under DOE sponsorship, as directed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) [Ch92] was modified to implement a series of improvements in its modeling of emergency response actions. The purpose of this effort has been to aid the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in its performance of the Level III analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) of K Reactor [Wo90]. To ensure its usefulness to WSRC, and facilitate the new model`s eventual merger with other MACCS enhancements, close cooperation with WSRC and the MACCS development team at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was maintained throughout the project. These improvements are intended to allow a greater degree of flexibility in modeling the mitigative actions of evacuation and sheltering. The emergency response model in MACCS version 1.5.11.1 was developed to support NRC analyses of consequences from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. The NRC code imposes unnecessary constraints on DOE safety analyses, particularly for consequences to onsite worker populations, and it has therefore been revamped. The changes to the code have been implemented in a manner that preserves previous modeling capabilities and therefore prior analyses can be repeated with the new code.

  16. Modeling sugarcane growth in response to age, insolation, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    How, K.T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling sugarcane growth in response to age of cane, insolation and air temperature using first-order multiple regression analysis and a nonlinear approach is investigated. Data are restricted to one variety from irrigated fields to eliminate the impact of varietal response and rainfall. Ten first-order models are investigated. The predictant is cane yield from 600 field tests. The predictors are cumulative values of insolation, maximum temperature, and minimum temperature for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, or for each crop period derived from weather observations near the test plots. The low R-square values indicate that the selected predictor variables could not account for a substantial proportion of the variations of cane yield and the models have limited predictive values. The nonlinear model is based on known functional relationships between growth and age, growth and insolation, and growth and maximum temperature. A mathematical expression that integrates the effect of age, insolation and maximum temperature is developed. The constant terms and coefficients of the equation are determined from the requirement that the model must produce results that are reasonable when compared with observed monthly elongation data. The nonlinear model is validated and tested using another set of data.

  17. Changing the attitudes and practices of professional developers through a constructivist model: The Technical Assistance Academy for Mathematics and Science Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Karen Jungblut

    For much of this century, mathematics and science have been taught in a didactic manner that is characterized by a passive student and a lecturing teacher. Since the late eighties national standards have encouraged professional developers specializing in mathematics and science education to deliver the messages of inquiry-based learning, active student engagement, and learner-constructed knowledge to the teachers they support. Follow-up studies of professional development programs, however, found that telling teachers was no more effective than telling students. Information transmitted in a passive setting was not transferring into effective classroom practices. This phenomenological case study was conducted to determine the effects of a constructivist-oriented professional development experience, the Technical Assistance Academy, in changing the practices and attitudes of mathematics and science professional developers regarding the use of constructivist strategies in workshop design. This study focused on 45 professional developers who participated in the Technical Assistance Academy. Data from a 2 1/2 year period were collected from session evaluations, journal reflections, a follow-up interview, and site visits that included observations and collaborative planning. Content analysis procedures were used to find common themes among the data. Use of new skills developed as a result of participation in the Technical Assistance Academy was determined using the Concerns-Based Adoption Model Levels of Use framework (Hall & Hord, 1987). Changes in attitude were determined by examining participants' journal reflections related to common constructivist themes such as those discussed by Fosnot (1996c): learning is developmental, disequilibrium and reflection facilitate learning, and the construction of "big ideas" results from the opportunity to struggle with new information. Results verified that all 45 participants demonstrated some level of use, and that most were in the 3 highest of 5 levels of use: mechanical (11%), routine (16%), refinement (27%), integration (24%), and renewal (22%). Participants reported valuing (a) active engagement necessary for the developmental progression of learning to occur, (b) their own disequilibrium, (c) opportunity to reflect, and they acknowledged a clearer understanding and appreciation of the big ideas in workshop design such as networking, collaboration, content and staff development standards, equity, and community building. Results support the conclusion that learning about constructivist instructional strategies in a long-term program that models them positively affects participants' attitudes and enhances their use of similar strategies in the design of professional development experiences for others. Knowledge developed in a constructivist setting transferred into effective facilitator practices.

  18. Physical model studies of seismic slope response and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Yu

    Seismic slope stability has been an important topic in geotechnical earthquake engineering for many years. Seismic stability of slopes and embankments is typically assessed by (1) conducting pseudostatic analyses, which will provide a stability parameter (e.g. factor of safety), and by (2) estimating permanent deformations likely to be induced by earthquake shaking. Among these, estimating permanent deformations has recently attracted much attention, and it is the primary topic of this thesis. A series of 1-g small-scale soil slope tests were performed on the U.C. Berkeley, Davis Hall shaking table to provide well-documented scale-model case history data including slope geometries, material properties, and slope response and performance. For each model slope, three types of physical tests were conducted: (1) Geophysical hammer-hit tests (to estimate shear wave velocity of the model soil), (2) Low-amplitude frequency-sweep tests (to acquire site responses of the model slope under a small-strain condition), and (3) Large-amplitude shaking tests (to acquire the slope responses and deformations data under strong shaking condition). The experimental data were then compared with calculations made by various analytical procedures for verification and calibration. Direct use of the undrained shear strength of the model clay based on small vane shear tests led to some discrepancies. Factors that make the "representative" shear strengths of the model slopes differ from the values measured by the small vane shear tests are: (1) Shearing rate, (2) Progressive development of failure, (3) Number of significant pulses of the earthquake motion, and (4) Post-peak strength response. To understand the effect of the progressive development of failure on the clay's "representative" shear strength, the model clay was tested by a series of the large-scale direct shear tests (12 inches by 12 inches). Two vane shear tests with different scales (2.25 inches and 1 inch in diameter, respectively) were also performed using the same material. It was found that the peak strengths decreased with the increasing testing scales. Conversely, the failure displacement at peak strength increased with increasing testing scales (i.e. soil responses were more ductile with larger testing scale). A procedure was developed to adjust the soil strength (measured by the vane shear tests) based on these factors. It was found that both conventional and advanced FE analyses provided better estimates using the adjusted "representative" shear strengths. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. Portrait professional.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Tim

    2011-12-01

    Most medical photographers, unless working as dedicated ophthalmic photographers or retinal screeners, will shoot portraits or publicity pictures. Many will spend a proportion of their time producing brochure shots for patient information material or their Trust's Annual Report. High-quality images of staff at work are often required by the strategic planning departments of Trusts to support bids for business from service commissioners. This "non-clinical" work is in reality commercial work - the jobs that high street portrait and general practice photographers would undertake in different settings. Medical photographers use many of the same tools as their commercial cousins. They use the same DSLR cameras and lenses. They use Adobe Photoshop to manipulate images. However, one software tool extensively used by portrait and social photographers, but possibly unfamiliar to many medical photographers, is Portrait Professional. Currently in its 10th version, it is produced by Anthropics Technology ( http://www.anthropics.com ), a London-based company specialising in image manipulation software. PMID:22229529

  20. Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    E-print Network

    Robock, Alan

    Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 geoengineering--deliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earth--has been proposed present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12

  1. Using Survey Responses to Determine the Value-Added Features of a Webinar Portal System for Adoption by Natural Resource Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharis, Laurie; Bardon, Robert E.; Hubbard, William; Taylor, Eric; Gonzalez-Jeuck, Grizel

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a recent survey of natural resource webinar providers. Respondents were asked a range of questions regarding their webinar services. Findings showed that respondents most commonly marketed their webinars through email or websites and targeted an audience of professionals. Respondents noted that the greatest…

  2. Agricultural Education Teacher Leaders' Development of Ownership and Responsibility for the Profession through Participation in Continuing Professional Education Program Planning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall-Rudd, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, planning and delivery of professional development for public school teachers was centralized in state departments of education and universities, with teachers having little input or control over the content. For many years the literature in adult and continuing education has reflected an emphasis on learner participation in program…

  3. A Response to Anastas and Coffey: The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Education and Professional Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Wong, Marleen; Samuels, Gina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Relationships are central to the profession of social work; relationships with allied disciplines, among professional social work organizations, and between classroom and field education. However, embedded within these relationships are historical tensions, and contemporary opportunities that can advance both the science of social work and the…

  4. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional

  5. Enhancing Professional Development through Reading Professional Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusarski, Susan B.

    Reading professional literature may be undertaken without a large investment of time or money, yet it still provides a way to increase one's professional knowledge and maintain competencies. To be successful in one's reading, the adult education practitioner needs to consider three aspects of a professional reading program: finding the time,…

  6. Changes in Student Attitudes Regarding Science When Taught by Teachers without Experiences with a Model Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Mohamed Moustafa; Yager, Robert; Hacieminoglu, Esme; Caliskan, Ilke

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on two main issues concerning changes in student attitudes toward science study and their perceptions of its usefulness in their lives. Information has been gathered concerning how student attitudes toward science have changed for teachers and schools not involved with any funded professional development project. Pretesting and…

  7. A Qualitative Case Study Analysis for a Potential Model for a K-12 Professional Development Using Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santacroce-Tejedor, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three e-learning technologies based on a pedagogical framework for virtual learning environments, and to explore how these technologies could be used to facilitate extended professional learning opportunities whereby K-12 educators could communicate, collaborate, and reflect on their practice. This…

  8. Chemistry Teachers' Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers' beliefs…

  9. A Model for Using a Concept Inventory as a Tool for Students' Assessment and Faculty Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McAdams, Katherine C.; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W.; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S.; Mosser, David; Quimby, B. Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V.; Smith, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in…

  10. Learning to Integrate New Technologies into Teaching and Learning through a Design-Based Model of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Susan; Pritchard, Robert; Huang, Cammy; Pella, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    As multimedia and technological savvy continue to expand existing notions of contemporary literacy, the need to prepare teachers to use a variety of classroom technologies has never been greater (Author1 & Author2, 2008a; Author1 & Author2, 2009). In order for teachers to be prepared to use such technologies, the structure of teacher professional

  11. Measuring Client Experiences in Maternity Care under Change: Development of a Questionnaire Based on the WHO Responsiveness Model

    PubMed Central

    Scheerhagen, Marisja; van Stel, Henk F.; Birnie, Erwin; Franx, Arie; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternity care is an integrated care process, which consists of different services, involves different professionals and covers different time windows. To measure performance of maternity care based on clients' experiences, we developed and validated a questionnaire. Methods and Findings We used the 8-domain WHO Responsiveness model, and previous materials to develop a self-report questionnaire. A dual study design was used for development and validation. Content validity of the ReproQ-version-0 was determined through structured interviews with 11 pregnant women (?28 weeks), 10 women who recently had given birth (?12 weeks), and 19 maternity care professionals. Structured interviews established the domain relevance to the women; all items were separately commented on. All Responsiveness domains were judged relevant, with Dignity and Communication ranking highest. Main missing topic was the assigned expertise of the health professional. After first adaptation, construct validity of the ReproQ-version-1 was determined through a web-based survey. Respondents were approached by maternity care organizations with different levels of integration of services of midwives and obstetricians. We sent questionnaires to 605 third trimester pregnant women (response 65%), and 810 women 6 weeks after delivery (response 55%). Construct validity was based on: response patterns; exploratory factor analysis; association of the overall score with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), known group comparisons. Median overall ReproQ score was 3.70 (range 1–4) showing good responsiveness. The exploratory factor analysis supported the assumed domain structure and suggested several adaptations. Correlation of the VAS rating and overall ReproQ score (antepartum, postpartum) supported validity (r = 0.56; 0.59, p<0.001 Spearman's correlation coefficient). Pre-stated group comparisons confirmed the expected difference following a good vs. adverse birth outcome. Fully integrated organizations performed slightly better (median = 3.78) than less integrated organizations (median = 3.63; p<0.001). Participation rate of women with a low educational level and/or a non-western origin was low. Conclusions The ReproQ appears suitable for assessing quality of maternity care from the clients' perspective. Recruitment of disadvantaged groups requires additional non-digital approaches. PMID:25671310

  12. Modeling physiological responses of soil microbes to drought (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Schimel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical models predict soil carbon (C) under varying environmental conditions, aiming to disentangle the effects of predicted changes in temperature and moisture regimes on C storage. While much work focuses on temperature sensitivity of decomposition, relatively less is known about decomposer responses to changes in soil moisture. Heterotrophic respiration is known to decline as soils become drier, but the underlying physiological mechanisms are not clear and rarely accounted for in models. In particular, we ask: what are the effects of different drought response strategies on C storage potential and the shape of the respiration-moisture relation? We have developed a process-based model to address these questions, including the main physiological responses thought to play a role under varying moisture conditions: i) dormancy, ii) patterns of extra-cellular enzyme production, and iii) osmoregulation. We show that these different drought response strategies play a major role in the long-term partitioning of soil C among stable and labile pools. In very dry conditions, microbes shifting to dormant state tend to favor long-term (steady state) accumulation of stable C at the expenses of microbial biomass, while increasing investment in enzymes leads to accumulation of dissolved organic C, which in turn may partly overcome the diffusion limitations imposed by dry soils. In contrast, entering a dormant state early during a dry down allows microbes to save C by respiring less (due to lowered active biomass), avoid C starvation when substrate diffusion breaks down, and use available C for growth and maintenance rather than osmoregulation. Hence, this strategy explains why little osmolytes are found in microbial biomass subjected to experimental drought. We conclude by highlighting how our results can be implemented in Earth System Models without excessively increasing their complexity.

  13. Efficient Estimation in a Regression Model with Missing Responses 

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Scott

    2012-10-19

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Ursula U. Mueller-Harknett Committee Members, Je Hart Soumendra N. Lahiri Joel Zinn Head of Department, Simon J. Sheather August 2012 Major Subject: Statistics iii ABSTRACT E cient... Estimation in a Regression Model with Missing Responses. (August 2012) Scott Daniel Crawford, B.S., Southern Utah University; M.S., Brigham Young University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ursula U. Mueller-Harknett This article examines methods to e...

  14. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  15. A Simple Theoretical Model Explains Dynein's Response to Load

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi Qin

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiment showed that cytoplasmic dynein 1, a molecular motor responsible for cargo transport in cells, functions as a gear in response to external load. In the presence of vanishing or small external load, dynein walks with 24- or 32-nm steps, whereas at high external load, its step size is reduced to 8 nm. A simple model is proposed to account for this property of dynein. The model assumes that the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis is used through a loose coupling between the chemical reaction and the translocation of dynein along microtubule. This loose chemomechanical coupling is represented by the loosely coupled motions of dynein along two different reaction coordinates. The first reaction coordinate is tightly coupled to the chemical reaction and describes the protein conformational changes that control the chemical processes, including ATP binding and hydrolysis, and ADP-Pi release. The second coordinate describes the translocation of dynein along microtubule, which is directly subject to the influence of the external load. The model is used to explain the experimental data on the external force dependence of the dynein step size as well as the ATP concentration dependence of the stall force. A number of predictions, such as the external force dependence of speed of translocation, ATP hydrolysis rate, and dynein step sizes, are made based on this theoretical model. This model provides a simple understanding on how a variable chemomechanical coupling ratio can be achieved and used to optimize the biological function of dynein. PMID:16284275

  16. Ocular surgical models for immune and angiogenic responses

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Takenori; Mashaghi, Alireza; Di Zazzo, Antonio; Dana, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Corneal transplantation serves as a reproducible and simple surgical model to study mechanisms regulating immunity and angiogenesis. The simplicity of the model allows for systematic analysis of different mechanisms involved in immune and angiogenic privilege and their failures. This protocol describes how to induce neovessels and inflammation in an actively regulated avascular and immune-privileged site. This involves placing intra-stromal corneal sutures for two weeks, disrupting the privileges, and performing corneal transplantation subsequently. Privileged and non-privileged recipient responses to donor cornea can be compared to identify key immunological mechanisms that underlie angiogenesis and graft rejection. This protocol can also be adapted to the growing repertoire of genetic models available in the mouse, and is a valuable tool to elucidate molecular mechanisms mediating acceptance or failure of corneal graft. The model could be used to assess the potential of therapeutic molecules to enhance graft survival in vivo. PMID:26550579

  17. Adaptation of health care for migrants: whose responsibility?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a context of increasing ethnic diversity, culturally competent strategies have been recommended to improve care quality and access to health care for ethnic minorities and migrants; their implementation by health professionals, however, has remained patchy. Most programs of cultural competence assume that health professionals accept that they have a responsibility to adapt to migrants, but this assumption has often remained at the level of theory. In this paper, we surveyed health professionals’ views on their responsibility to adapt. Methods Five hundred-and-sixty-nine health professionals from twenty-four inpatient and outpatient health services were selected according to their geographic location. All health care professionals were requested to complete a questionnaire about who should adapt to ethnic diversity: health professionals or patients. After a factorial analysis to identify the underlying responsibility dimensions, we performed a multilevel regression model in order to investigate individual and service covariates of responsibility attribution. Results Three dimensions emerged from the factor analysis: responsibility for the adaptation of communication, responsibility for the adaptation to the negotiation of values, and responsibility for the adaptation to health beliefs. Our results showed that the sense of responsibility for the adaptation of health care depended on the nature of the adaptation required: when the adaptation directly concerned communication with the patient, health professionals declared that they should be the ones to adapt; in relation to cultural preferences, however, the responsibility felt on the patient’s shoulders. Most respondents were unclear in relation to adaptation to health beliefs. Regression indicated that being Belgian, not being a physician, and working in a primary-care service were associated with placing the burden of responsibility on the patient. Conclusions Health care professionals do not consider it to be their responsibility to adapt to ethnic diversity. If health professionals do not feel a responsibility to adapt, they are less likely to be involved in culturally competent health care. PMID:25005021

  18. Using the Nominal Response Model to Evaluate Response Category Discrimination in the PROMIS Emotional Distress Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kathleen; Reise, Steven; Cai, Li; Hays, Ron D.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used a nominal response item response theory model to estimate category boundary discrimination (CBD) parameters for items drawn from the Emotional Distress item pools (Depression, Anxiety, and Anger) developed in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) project. For polytomous items with ordered response

  19. Professional Review Program for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    The faculty review program at Triton College fulfills responsibilities to accrediting and/or approving agencies while helping to maintain teaching effectiveness and to promote instructional improvement. The professional review consists of a comprehensive assessment of the instructor's total job performance as indicated through student, peer,…

  20. Professional Development and Administration: Report of the ASCO Project Team on Professional Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Optometric Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    An outline for a professional development and administration course in an optometry curriculum model is provided. It is designed to develop organizational, communicative, and management skills so the optometrist can become successful in the development and administration of a professional practice. Legal and professional development bibliographies…

  1. Online professionalism: A synthetic review.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G

    2015-04-01

    The rise of social media has increased connectivity and blurred personal and professional boundaries, bringing new challenges for medical professionalism. Whether traditional professionalism principles apply to the online social media space remains unknown. The purpose of this synthetic literature review was to characterize the original peer-reviewed research studies published between 1 January 2000-1 November 2014 on online professionalism, to assess methodologies and approaches used, and to provide insights to guide future studies in this area. The investigators searched three databases and performed manual searches of bibliographies to identify the 32 studies included. Most studies originated in the USA. Cross-sectional surveys and analyses of publicly available online content were the most common methodologies employed. Studies covered the general areas of use and privacy, assessment of unprofessional online behaviours, consensus-gathering of what constitutes unprofessional or inappropriate online behaviours, and education and policies. Studies were of variable quality; only around half of survey studies had response rates of 50% or greater. Medical trainees were the most common population studied. Future directions for research include public perspectives of online professionalism, impact on patient trust, and how to use social media productively as medical professionals. PMID:25804627

  2. Vibratory responses of synthetic, self-oscillating vocal fold models.

    PubMed

    Murray, Preston R; Thomson, Scott L

    2012-11-01

    The flow-induced responses of four self-oscillating synthetic vocal fold models are compared. All models were life-sized and fabricated using flexible silicone compounds with material properties comparable to those of human vocal fold tissue. Three of the models had two layers of different stiffness to represent the body-cover grouping of vocal fold tissue. Two of the two-layer models were based on the "M5" geometry [Scherer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 1616-1630 (2001)], while the third was based on magnetic resonance imaging data. The fourth model included several layers, including a thin epithelial layer, an exceedingly flexible superficial lamina propria layer, a ligament layer that included an anteriorly-posteriorly oriented fiber to restrict vertical motion, and a body layer. Measurements were performed with these models in full larynx and hemilarynx configurations. Data included onset pressure, vibration frequency, glottal flow rate, maximum glottal width, and medial surface motion, the latter two of which were acquired using high-speed imaging techniques. The fourth, multi-layer model exhibited onset pressure, frequency, and medial surface motion traits that are comparable to published human vocal fold data. Importantly, the model featured an alternating convergent-divergent glottal profile and mucosal wave-like motion, characteristics which are important markers of human vocal fold vibration. PMID:23145623

  3. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  4. Neural network model of cortical EEG response to olfactory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, George L.; Van Toller, Steve

    1995-04-01

    We describe three experiments attempting to model differences in cortical EEG following stimulation with different odors. The data used in these experiments was obtained in previous studies, described briefly here. Subjects sit in an environmentally stabilized low odor cubicle. Twenty-eight electrodes are placed on the scalp and connect the subject to a neurosciences brain imager, which digitizes cortical EEG response. In a given trial, a specific odor is introduced, and the response recorded. In the first experiment, alpha wave data from a subset of ten electrodes and a single subject was used. In the original experiment, the subject was presented with a number of odors and the resulting brain electrical activity was resolved into 16 time slices (5 preceding presentation, 4 during presentation and 7 following presentation). Only data from frames 6, 7 and 8 (during presentation) was used here. A model was constructed to discriminate morning from afternoon responses. The network used measurements from 10 electrodes as input, and backpropagation was used for training. During training, the network was presented with responses to just one odor. Generalization was demonstrated for five other odors. The weights in the network have been analyzed and indicate a role for a specific group of electrode sites in this discrimination. The second experiment involved constructing a network to discriminate cortical EEG responses to two odors. In the original experiment from which we drew our data, fourteen subjects were presented with each odor once. Data from only the frame at first presentation of the odor were used here. Data from three subjects (chosen pseudo-randomly) was selected for use in the generalization phase and dropped from the training set. Output targets were constructed that took account of subjective ratings of `pleasantness.' A feed-forward network with twenty-eight input units was trained using data from the eleven remaining subjects, using conjugate gradient descent.

  5. The Student Teacher and Professional Activities. AST Bulletin Number 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftis, Helen A.

    A student teacher, whose success may depend in part upon his acceptance of professional obligations as well as opportunities, may gain insight into his professional role through participation in professional organizations (which expose him to teacher models other than his own supervising teacher and permit professional identification and enhanced…

  6. Estimating Derived Response Levels at the Savannah River Site for Use with Emergency Response Models

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2002-12-06

    Emergency response computer models at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are coupled with real-time meteorological data to estimate dose to individuals downwind of accidental radioactive releases. Currently, these models estimate doses for inhalation and shine pathways, but do not consider dose due to ingestion of contaminated food products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed derived intervention levels (DIL) which refer to the radionuclide-specific concentration in food present throughout the relevant period of time, with no intervention, that could lead to an individual receiving a radiation dose equal to the protective action guide. In the event of an emergency, concentrations in various food types are compared with these levels to make interdictions decisions. Prior to monitoring results being available, concentrations in the environmental media (i.e. soil), called derived response levels (DRLs), can be estimated from the DILs and directly compared with computer output to provide preliminary guidance as to whether intervention is necessary. Site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) are developed for ingestion pathways pertinent to SRS: milk, meat, fish, grain, produce, and beverage. This provides decision-makers with an additional tool for use immediately following an accident prior to the acquisition of food monitoring data.

  7. Optimal hemodynamic response model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Jeong, Myung Yung; Mannan, Malik M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique and measures brain activities by means of near-infrared light of 650–950 nm wavelengths. The cortical hemodynamic response (HR) differs in attributes at different brain regions and on repetition of trials, even if the experimental paradigm is kept exactly the same. Therefore, an HR model that can estimate such variations in the response is the objective of this research. The canonical hemodynamic response function (cHRF) is modeled by two Gamma functions with six unknown parameters (four of them to model the shape and other two to scale and baseline respectively). The HRF model is supposed to be a linear combination of HRF, baseline, and physiological noises (amplitudes and frequencies of physiological noises are supposed to be unknown). An objective function is developed as a square of the residuals with constraints on 12 free parameters. The formulated problem is solved by using an iterative optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters in the model. Inter-subject variations in HRF and physiological noises have been estimated for better cortical functional maps. The accuracy of the algorithm has been verified using 10 real and 15 simulated data sets. Ten healthy subjects participated in the experiment and their HRF for finger-tapping tasks have been estimated and analyzed. The statistical significance of the estimated activity strength parameters has been verified by employing statistical analysis (i.e., t-value > tcritical and p-value < 0.05). PMID:26136668

  8. D optimal designs for three Poisson dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Alan; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Schaddelee, Marloes

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper was to find and investigate the performance of the D optimal designs for three Poisson dose-response models. Phase II dose ranging studies are pivotal in the drug development program, being used to select dose(s) for phase III. Count data is encountered in a number of clinical areas. The Poisson distribution provides an intuitive platform for modelling such data, especially when combined with random effects which allow subjects to differ in their response rates. This work investigated three Poisson dose-response models of increasing complexity. A simple E(max) model was used to describe the drug effect, and D optimal designs under a range of different parameter values (scenarios) were found. The relative performances between scenarios were assessed using: the precision of all parameters, the precision of the drug effect parameters, and the percent coefficient of variation (%CV) of the ED(50) parameter. The results showed that the D optimal designs were similar across models and scenarios, with the D optimal designs consisting of placebo, the maximum dose, and a dose just below the ED(50). However the relative performance of the optimal designs was very different. For example, with 1,000 subjects, the %CV of the ED(50) parameter ranged from 1.4 to 91 %. Performance typically improved with higher baseline counts, smaller random effects, and larger E(max). This work introduces a framework for determining and evaluating the performance of D optimal designs for phase II dose ranging studies with count data as the primary endpoint. PMID:23420229

  9. Style guide for oil and gas professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, T.R.; Freeman, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tailored for oil and gas professionals, this book addresses the writing and editing problems professionals encounter daily. Contains cross-referenced Glossary of Style and Model Documents sections. The glossary's alphabetized entries cover language, style, grammar, punctuation techniques, spelling, visual aids, and writing techniques. The model documents section illustrates letters, memos, reports, and other documents typically written by professionals to cover principles of effective business and technical writing.

  10. Interpretation of transit compartments pharmacodynamic models as lifespan based indirect response models

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Transit compartments (TC) models are used to describe pharmacodynamic responses that involve drug action on cells undergoing differentiation and maturation. Such pharmacodynamic systems can also be described by lifespan based indirect response (LIDR) models. The purpose of this report is to investigate conditions under which the transit compartments models can be considered a special case of LIDR models. An integral representation of a solution to TC model has been used to determine the lifespan distribution for cell population described by this model. The distribution served as a basis for definition of new LIDRE (lifespan based indirect response with an effect on the lifespan distribution) models. Time courses of responses described by both types of models were simulated for a monoexponential pharmacokinetic function. The limit response was calculated as the number of transit compartments approached infinity. The difference between the limit response and TC responses were evaluated by computer simulations using MATLAB 7.7. TC models are a special case of LIDR models with the lifespan distribution described by the gamma function. If drug affects only the production of cells, then the cell lifespan distribution is time invariant. In this case an increase in the number of compartments results in a basic LIDR model with a point lifespan distribution. When the drug inhibits or stimulates cell aging, the cell lifespan distribution becomes time dependent revealing a new mechanism for drug effect on the gamma probability density function. The TC model with a large number of transit compartments converges to an LIDRE model. The limit LIDR models are approximated by the TC models when the number of compartments is at least 5. A moderate improvement in the approximation is observed if this number exceeds 20. The lifespan distribution for a cell population described by a TC model is described by the gamma probability density function. A drug affects this distribution only if it stimulates or inhibits the rate of cell maturation. If the number of transit compartments increases, then the TC model converges to a new type of LIDR model. PMID:21107661

  11. Interpretation of transit compartments pharmacodynamic models as lifespan based indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2011-04-01

    Transit compartments (TC) models are used to describe pharmacodynamic responses that involve drug action on cells undergoing differentiation and maturation. Such pharmacodynamic systems can also be described by lifespan based indirect response (LIDR) models. The purpose of this report is to investigate conditions under which the transit compartments models can be considered a special case of LIDR models. An integral representation of a solution to TC model has been used to determine the lifespan distribution for cell population described by this model. The distribution served as a basis for definition of new LIDRE (lifespan based indirect response with an effect on the lifespan distribution) models. Time courses of responses described by both types of models were simulated for a monoexponential pharmacokinetic function. The limit response was calculated as the number of transit compartments approached infinity. The difference between the limit response and TC responses were evaluated by computer simulations using MATLAB 7.7. TC models are a special case of LIDR models with the lifespan distribution described by the gamma function. If drug affects only the production of cells, then the cell lifespan distribution is time invariant. In this case an increase in the number of compartments results in a basic LIDR model with a point lifespan distribution. When the drug inhibits or stimulates cell aging, the cell lifespan distribution becomes time dependent revealing a new mechanism for drug effect on the gamma probability density function. The TC model with a large number of transit compartments converges to an LIDRE model. The limit LIDR models are approximated by the TC models when the number of compartments is at least 5. A moderate improvement in the approximation is observed if this number exceeds 20. The lifespan distribution for a cell population described by a TC model is described by the gamma probability density function. A drug affects this distribution only if it stimulates or inhibits the rate of cell maturation. If the number of transit compartments increases, then the TC model converges to a new type of LIDR model. PMID:21107661

  12. ER Stress Response in Human Cellular Models of Senescence.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gouveia, Alexandra Monteiro; Almeida, Henrique

    2015-08-01

    The aging process is characterized by progressive accumulation of damaged biomolecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, as result of increased oxidative stress accompanying cellular senescence. In agreement, we hypothesized that WI-38 human cellular models of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-SIPS) or copper sulfate (CuSO4-SIPS) would present endoplasmic reticulum chaperoning mechanisms impairment and unfolded protein response activation. Results show that in replicative senescence and CuSO4-SIPS, immunoglobulin binding protein, calnexin, protein disulfide isomerase, and ER oxireductin-1 levels adjust to restore proteostasis and inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1)-, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6)-, and pancreatic ER kinase (PERK)-mediated unfolded protein response are activated. However, H2O2-SIPS does not exhibit IRE1 and ATF6 pathways activation but a PERK-mediated upregulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein, showing that CuSO4-SIPS mimics better the endoplasmic reticulum molecular events of replicative senescence than H2O2-SIPS. Moreover, unfolded protein response activation is required for both SIPS models induction, because PERK and IRE1 inhibitors decreased senescence-associated beta-galactosidase appearance. In CuSO4-SIPS, the decrease in senescence levels is associated with PERK-driven, but IRE1 independent, cell cycle arrest while in H2O2-SIPS cell proliferation is PERK independent. These results add a step further on the molecular mechanisms that regulate senescence induction; moreover, they validate CuSO4-SIPS model as a useful tool to study cellular stress responses during aging, hoping to postpone age-related health decline. PMID:25149687

  13. A Comparison of Model-Data Fit for Parametric and Nonparametric Item Response Theory Models Using Ordinal-Level Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyehouse, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the model-data fit of a parametric item response theory (PIRT) model to a nonparametric item response theory (NIRT) model to determine the best-fitting model for use with ordinal-level alternate assessment ratings. The PIRT Generalized Graded Unfolding Model (GGUM) was compared to the NIRT Mokken model. Chi-square statistics…

  14. Modeling Hydrologic and Vegetation Responses in Freshwater Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Low, Swee Yang; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2010-05-01

    Wetlands constitute 6 - 7 % of the Earth's land surface and provide various critical ecosystem services such as purifying the air and water, mitigating floods and droughts, and supporting wildlife habitats. Despite the importance of wetlands, they are under threat of degradation by human-induced land use changes and climate change. Even if the value of wetlands is recognized, they are often not managed properly or restored successfully due to an inadequate understanding of the ecosystems and their responses to management scenarios. A better understanding of the main components of wetlands, namely the interdependent hydrologic and vegetation systems, and the sensitivity of their responses to engineering works and climate change, is crucial for the preservation of wetlands. To assess these potential impacts, a model is developed in this study for characterizing the coupled dynamics between soil moisture and plant biomass in wetland habitats. The hydrology component of the model is based on the Richards' equation and simulates spatially-varying groundwater movement and provides information on soil moisture at different depths. The plant growth component of the model is described through an equation of the Lotka-Volterra type modified for plant growth dynamics and is adapted from published literature. The two components are coupled via transpiration and ecosystem carrying capacity for plants. Transpiration is modeled for both unsaturated and saturated zones, while the carrying capacity describes limiting oxygen and subsequent nutrient availability in the soil column as a function of water table depth. Vegetation is represented by two species characteristic of mudflat herbaceous plants ranging from facultative wetland to upland plants. The model is first evaluated using a simplified domain and the hydrological information available in the RG2 site of the Everglades wetlands region. The modeled water table fluctuations in general are comparable to field data collected on-site, indicating the potential of the model in capturing soil moisture dynamics. Further application of the model for impact assessments demonstrates that drainage of wetlands resulting in groundwater drawdown is expected to produce appreciable effects on vegetation biomass response. The model developed in this study simulates the coupled and spatially-varying groundwater movement and plant growth dynamics, which allows researchers to better understand and protect the integrated hydrologic and vegetation systems of wetlands worldwide.

  15. Dynamic causal models of steady-state responses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, R.J.; Stephan, K.E.; Seidenbecher, T.; Pape, H.-C.; Dolan, R.J.; Friston, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a dynamic causal model (DCM) of steady-state responses in electrophysiological data that are summarised in terms of their cross-spectral density. These spectral data-features are generated by a biologically plausible, neural-mass model of coupled electromagnetic sources; where each source comprises three sub-populations. Under linearity and stationarity assumptions, the model's biophysical parameters (e.g., post-synaptic receptor density and time constants) prescribe the cross-spectral density of responses measured directly (e.g., local field potentials) or indirectly through some lead-field (e.g., electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic data). Inversion of the ensuing DCM provides conditional probabilities on the synaptic parameters of intrinsic and extrinsic connections in the underlying neuronal network. This means we can make inferences about synaptic physiology, as well as changes induced by pharmacological or behavioural manipulations, using the cross-spectral density of invasive or non-invasive electrophysiological recordings. In this paper, we focus on the form of the model, its inversion and validation using synthetic and real data. We conclude with an illustrative application to multi-channel local field potential data acquired during a learning experiment in mice. PMID:19000769

  16. Intraspecific differences in bacterial responses to modelled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, P. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Bacteria are important residents of water systems, including those of space stations which feature specific environmental conditions, such as lowered effects of gravity. The purpose of this study was to compare responses with modelled reduced gravity of space station, water system bacterial isolates with other isolates of the same species. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates, Stenotrophomonas paucimobilis and Acinetobacter radioresistens, originally recovered from the water supply aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were grown in nutrient broth under modelled reduced gravity. Their growth was compared with type strains S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 and A. radioresistens ATCC 49000. Acinetobacter radioresistens ATCC 49000 and the two ISS isolates showed similar growth profiles under modelled reduced gravity compared with normal gravity, whereas S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 was negatively affected by modelled reduced gravity. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that microgravity might have selected for bacteria that were able to thrive under this unusual condition. These responses, coupled with impacts of other features (such as radiation resistance and ability to persist under very oligotrophic conditions), may contribute to the success of these water system bacteria. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Water quality is a significant factor in many environments including the ISS. Efforts to remove microbial contaminants are likely to be complicated by the features of these bacteria which allow them to persist under the extreme conditions of the systems.

  17. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Royce, Steven G.; Sarkar, Srijata; Thorley, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions. PMID:25541583

  18. Modeling in vitro cellular responses to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Royce, Steven G; Sarkar, Srijata; Thorley, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a "stepping stone" for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions. PMID:25541583

  19. A probabilistic model of ecosystem response to climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shevliakova, E.; Dowlatabadi, H.

    1994-12-31

    Anthropogenic activities are leading to rapid changes in land cover and emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. These changes can bring about climate change typified by average global temperatures rising by 1--5 C over the next century. Climate change of this magnitude is likely to alter the distribution of terrestrial ecosystems on a large scale. Options available for dealing with such change are abatement of emissions, adaptation, and geoengineering. The integrated assessment of climate change demands that frameworks be developed where all the elements of the climate problem are present (from economic activity to climate change and its impacts on market and non-market goods and services). Integrated climate assessment requires multiple impact metrics and multi-attribute utility functions to simulate the response of different key actors/decision-makers to the actual physical impacts (rather than a dollar value) of the climate-damage vs. policy-cost debate. This necessitates direct modeling of ecosystem impacts of climate change. The authors have developed a probabilistic model of ecosystem response to global change. This model differs from previous efforts in that it is statistically estimated using actual ecosystem and climate data yielding a joint multivariate probability of prevalence for each ecosystem, given climatic conditions. The authors expect this approach to permit simulation of inertia and competition which have, so far, been absent in transfer models of continental-scale ecosystem response to global change. Thus, although the probability of one ecotype will dominate others at a given point, others would have the possibility of establishing an early foothold.

  20. Modelling ionization chamber response to nonstandard beam configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantot, L.; Seuntjens, J.

    2008-02-01

    Novel technologies aiming at improving target dose coverage while minimising dose to organs at risk use delivery of radiation fields that significantly deviate from reference conditions defined in protocols such as TG-51 and TRS-398. The use of ionization chambers for patient-specific quality assurance of these new delivery procedures calibrated in reference conditions increases the uncertainties on dose delivery. The conversion of the dose to the chamber cavity to the dose to water becomes uncertain; and the geometrical details of the chamber, as well as the details of the delivery, are expected to be significant. In this study, a realistic model of the Exradin® A12 Farmer chamber is simulated. A framework is applied for the calculation of ionization chamber response to arbitrarily modulated fields as a summation of responses to pencil beams. This approach is used with the chamber model and tested against measurements in static open fields and dynamic MLC IMRT fields. As a benchmark test of the model, quality conversion factors values calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation with the chamber model are in agreement within 0.1 % and 0.4 % with those in the AAPM TG-51, for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil-beam kernels show a strong dependence on the geometrical details of the chamber. Kernel summations with open fields show a relative agreement within 4.0 % with experimental data; the agreement is within 2.0 % for dynamic MLC IMRT beams. Simulations show a strong sensitivity of chamber response on positioning uncertainties, sometimes leading to dose uncertainties of 15 %.