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1

The professional responsibility model of physician leadership.  

PubMed

The challenges physician leaders confront today call to mind Odysseus' challenge to steer his fragile ship successfully between Scylla and Charybdis. The modern Scylla takes the form of ever-increasing pressures to provide more resources for professional liability, compliance, patient satisfaction, central administration, and a host of other demands. The modern Charybdis takes the form of ever-increasing pressures to procure resources when fewer are available and competition is continuously increasing the need for resources, including managed care, hospital administration, payers, employers, patients who are uninsured or underinsured, research funding, and philanthropy. This publication provides physician leaders with guidance for identifying and managing common leadership challenges on the basis of the professional responsibility model of physician leadership. This model is based on Plato's concept of leadership as a life of service and the professional medical ethics of Drs John Gregory and Thomas Percival. Four professional virtues should guide physician leaders: self-effacement, self-sacrifice, compassion, and integrity. These professional virtues direct physician leaders to treat colleagues as ends in themselves, to provide justice-based resource management, to use power constrained by medical professionalism, and to prevent and respond effectively to organizational dysfunction. The professional responsibility model guides physician leaders by proving an explicit "tool kit" to complement managerial skills. PMID:22483086

Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L

2013-02-01

2

The Professional Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers in the Tucson Early Childhood Education Model (TEEM) are being encouraged to employ "the professional response" in classroom interactions to stimulate pupil thinking. The teacher uses the professional response when she responds to a child in such a way as to invite him to recall previous experiences and to predict in terms of these, to…

Rubow, Carol L.; Fillerup, Joseph M.

3

Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study  

PubMed Central

Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs) relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills"). The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90). In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006) though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1). Likewise, students with high peer ratings for professionalism had superior performance on anatomy SRQs but not professionalism themed questions. A trend of borderline significance (p = .07) was observed for performance on skills SRQs and professionalism nomination status. Conclusions SRQs related to professionalism are likely to have relatively poor psychometric properties and lack associations with other constructs associated with undergraduate professional behaviour. The findings suggest that such questions should not be included in undergraduate examinations and may raise issues with the introduction of Situational Judgement Tests into Foundation Years selection.

2011-01-01

4

Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting\\u000a the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism.\\u000a This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs) relating to the theme of professional\\u000a conduct and ethics comparing them with

Paul A Tiffin; Gabrielle M Finn; John C McLachlan

2011-01-01

5

First-Grade Teachers' Response to Three Models of Professional Development in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to compare 1st-grade teachers' responses to professional development (PD) programs in reading that differed in means and degree of support for teachers' learning and efforts to improve their reading instruction. We compared 3 models of PD: the 1st model provided only seminars for the teachers, the 2nd model provided…

Carlisle, Joanne F.; Cortina, Kai Schnabel; Katz, Lauren A.

2011-01-01

6

The Professional Will: An Ethical Responsibility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attention is directed to the ethical responsibility for the counselor to develop a professional will. Essentially the professional will is a roadmap for what the counselor directs to happen in the event that the counselor becomes incapacitated due to sudden death or illness. A model of a professional will is provided.

Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret; Kabell, Douglas R.

2012-01-01

7

Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

2011-01-01

8

Commentary: Taking Responsibility for Professional Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 contains numerous references to "high-quality professional development. The quantity and the quality of professional development are critical issues in the NCLB Act with direct impact on student achievement. Research proves that the most important factor in student achievement is the quality of the teacher. In this month's opinion piece, the author encourages teachers to take responsibility for their own professional development by becoming more involved in planning and developing their professional growth. The end result will be meaningful personal growth for educators and increased student achievement!

Long, Steven

2004-12-01

9

Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.  

PubMed

Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients. PMID:21366145

Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

2011-01-01

10

Networking for Professional Women: A Collegial Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that, for professional women, a male-patterned network is not professionally useful or psychologically desirable. Proposes an alternative, collegial model of networking based on mutual support between peers and colleagues, capitalizing on positive feminine characteristics. (Author)

Pancrazio, Sally Bulkley; Gray, Rosemarie G.

1982-01-01

11

Corporate social responsibility: issues for human resource development professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent human resource development (HRD) scholarship has called for greater focus on social responsibility and ecological sustainability. The purpose of this article is to explore the engagement of HRD professionals in corporate social responsibility (CSR), examining one central question: how do HRD professionals perceive their roles and challenges in implementing CSR in organizations that claim CSR to be a key

Tara Fenwick; Laura Bierema

2008-01-01

12

Model Legislation for Licensed Professional Counselors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Claims need for uniformity in counselor licensure is apparent. Presents model legislation for licensed professional counselors, along with a rationale for the content of this legislation. (Author/ABL)

Bloom, John; And Others

1990-01-01

13

Geriatric Health Teams: Classifying Models of Professional and Team Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines geriatric health teams, discussing four dimensions of models for professional functioning (logic of assessment, focus of efforts, locus of responsibility, and pace of action) and three dimensions of models for team functioning (focus of attention, decision-making style, and beliefs about interprofessional dependence). (Author/NB)

Qualls, Sara Honn; Czirr, Ruth

1988-01-01

14

Quality improvement in nursing: Administrative mandate or professional responsibility?  

PubMed Central

For professionals, providing quality service and striving for excellence are ethical responsibilities. In many hospitals in the U.S., however, there is evidence indicating current quality improvement (QI) involving nurses is not always driven by their professional accountability and professional values. QI has become more an administrative mandate than an ethical standard for nurses. In this paper, the tension between QI as nurses’ professional ethics and an administrative mandate will be described, and the implicit ideal-reality gap of QI will be examined. The threat to professional nursing posed by the current approach to QI will be examined, and ways to incorporate nursing professional values in a practical QI effort will be explored.

Izumi, Shigeko

2012-01-01

15

Professional ethics and the responsible engineer  

SciTech Connect

There are five basic ethical principles: truth, honesty, trustworthiness; respect for human life; welfare; and posterity; fair play; openness; and competence. A process has to be established to avoid ethical crises. The NRC procedure for differing professional opinions is outlined. (DLC)

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1987-01-01

16

Professional Learning Communities: A Middle School Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research project explored the transition from a traditional model to a Professional Learning Community model in a NJ Middle School. The administration overcame obstacles during the transition such as scheduling conflicts, teacher apathy, and resistance. This action research study gathered data to determine how to best structure the…

Gentile, David N.

2010-01-01

17

Analysis of Reflective Professional Development Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews the background of and compares three particular approaches to reflective professional development, specifically as used by Far West Laboratory: case methods, the Peer Assisted Leadership process, in which peer partners observe each other, conduct reflective interviews, construct leadership models, and explore alternate ways to…

Filby, Nikola N.

18

Model Professional Development Programs Win Recognition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin is designed to illustrate the broad range of research and improvement activities supported by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Contents include: "Model Professional Development Programs Win Recognition,""Are Our Schools Safe?,""Charter Schools on the Rise,""What to Expect Your First Year of Teaching,""Evaluating…

Price, Kathleen C., Ed.; Quinn, Peggy, Ed.

1999-01-01

19

Wanted: role models - medical students' perceptions of professionalism  

PubMed Central

Background Transformation of medical students to become medical professionals is a core competency required for physicians in the 21st century. Role modeling was traditionally the key method of transmitting this skill. Medical schools are developing medical curricula which are explicit in ensuring students develop the professional competency and understand the values and attributes of this role. The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education. Methods Survey on student perception of professionalism in general, the curriculum and learning environment at the University of Ottawa, and the perception of student behaviors, was developed by faculty and students and sent electronically to all University of Ottawa medical students. The survey included both quantitative items including an adapted Pritzker list and qualitative responses to eight open ended questions on professionalism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. All analyses were performed using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc. Cary, NC, USA). Chi-square and Fischer’s exact test (for cell count less than 5) were used to derive p-values for categorical variables by level of student learning. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the curriculum. 63% of the responses were from students in years 1 and 2 (preclerkship). Students identified role modeling as the single most important aspect of professionalism. The strongest curricular recommendations included faculty-led case scenario sessions, enhancing interprofessional interactions and the creation of special awards to staff and students to “celebrate” professionalism. Current evaluation systems were considered least effective. The importance of role modeling and information on how to report lapses and breaches was highlighted in the answers to the open ended questions. Conclusions Students identify the need for strong positive role models in their learning environment, and for effective evaluation of the professionalism of students and teachers. Medical school leaders must facilitate development of these components within the MD education and faculty development programs as well as in clinical milieus where student learning occurs.

2012-01-01

20

Teacher Change in Response to a Professional Learning Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on change in teachers' perceptions of important elements of their role as teachers of mathematics at the conclusion of a two-year professional learning project. Analyses of written responses to survey items indicated shifts in four categories describing important elements of their role: teaching skills, knowledge, concepts;…

McDonough, Andrea; Clarkson, Philip; Scott, Anne

2010-01-01

21

Modeling the Information Seeking of Professionals: A General Model Derived from Research on Engineers, Health Care Professionals, and Lawyers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of the literature concerning the information-seeking behavior of engineers, health care professionals, and lawyers and examines professional information-seeking models. Proposes an original model of information-seeking processes that would be applicable to professionals working in any field. Contains 90 references. (JMV)

Leckie, Gloria J.; And Others

1996-01-01

22

28 CFR 45.12 - Reporting to the Department of Justice Office of Professional Responsibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Reporting to the Department of Justice Office of Professional Responsibility...Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES...12 Reporting to the Department of Justice Office of Professional...

2013-07-01

23

Exploring Professional Identity in Response to Curriculum Reform and Professional Development: The Teaching Life Stories of Chemistry Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study contributes to the existing literature in teacher education on teacher professional identity (Beijaard, Meijer & Verloop, 2004; Lamote & Engels, 2010; Rots, 2007), particularly in response to curriculum change and professional development. It proposes to offer a much better understanding of how chemistry teachers’ professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and the tensions they experience associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their actual practice. Specifically, this study aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following the introduction of the latest chemistry curricula in Manitoba. These latest chemistry curricula advocate for a more learner focused 'tetrahedral orientation' (Mahaffy, 2004) teaching practice that supports chemistry learning through the use of Johnstone's (1991) three modes of representation - the symbolic, macroscopic and molecular levels - as well as a human element dimension. This study also aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following their participation in long-term professional development offered by teacher educators at the University of Manitoba. Additionally, this study aims to determine whether teachers feel they have experienced tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices as a result of sustained professional development. Finally, this study aims to determine whether the curriculum changes and associated professional development have led teachers to think about and reflect more on their teaching practice and whether this has led to a change in their beliefs about teaching and learning and their teaching practice. Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1979) Model of the Ecology of Human Development was used as a theoretical framework for this study. This study was informed by semi-structured interviews involving 32 teachers of chemistry that were conducted during the fourth phase of a five-year research and development project supported by the University of Manitoba's Centres for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and Learning (CRYSTAL). These interviews suggested that teachers have experienced some tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices. The study further elicited data from eight of these 32 teachers via a qualitative narrative inquiry study employing narrative interviews to reveal teachers' perceptions of their evolving professional identities and chemistry teaching practices. Teaching life stories constructed from the narrative interview data revealed that these teachers feel that their professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and that a change in curricula followed by supportive professional development has caused these teachers to reflect more on their teaching practices. Furthermore, though these teachers indicated that they have experienced tensions associated with how they want to teach and their actual teaching practices, they feel they have experienced a shift in their beliefs about teaching and learning such that they feel their teaching practices have improved through their more consistent use of the four modes of representation in chemistry learning. The qualitative data show, however, that these teachers still feel that they have a long way to go to achieve a truly learner focused classroom practice where these four modes of chemistry learning are being used the majority of the time. The study closes by recommending that a much broader study be undertaken to include more teachers of chemistry in Manitoba to verify and add to the findings of this study, among other suggestions.

Peters, Gayle D.

24

Beyond the Professional Development School Model: The Professional Development District.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the conditions of university/districtwide partnering that can aid systemic public education change. It introduces a university/school partnership known as the Triple "L" (Lifelong Learning and Leadership) Collaborative. The text details shared responsibility, shared accountability, alignment of teacher-performance standards,…

Markowitz, Nancy Lourie; Whittaker, Andrea

25

Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A systematic analysis of professional responsibilities in Canada  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Natural health products (natural health products) such as herbs, vitamins and homeopathic medicines are widely available in Canadian pharmacies. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic analysis of Canadian pharmacy policies and guidelines to explore pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products. METHODS Legislation, codes of ethics, standards of practice and guidance documents that apply to the practice of pharmacy in each Canadian jurisdiction were systematically collected and examined to identify if, and how, these instruments establish professional duties in regard to natural health products. RESULTS The majority of Canadian jurisdictions now include some explicit reference to natural health products in standards of practice policy or guideline documents. Often natural health products are simply assumed to be included in the over-the-counter (OTC) product category and thus professional responsibilities for OTCs are relevant for natural health products. A minority of provinces have specific policies on natural health products, herbals or homeopathy. In addition, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities’ Model Standards of Practice specifically refers to natural health products. Most policy documents indicate that pharmacists should inquire about natural health product use when counselling patients and, when asked, should provide accurate information regarding the efficacy, toxicity, side effects or interactions of natural health products. Public messaging also indicates that pharmacists are knowledgeable professionals who can provide evidence-based information about natural health products. CONCLUSIONS Explicit policies or guidelines regarding pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products currently exist in the majority of Canadian jurisdictions.

Farrell, Jennifer; Ries, Nola M.; Boon, Heather

2011-01-01

26

The Collaborative Apprenticeship Model: Situated Professional Development within School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional learning is a social enterprise where peers rely on the expertise and support of one another to adopt innovative practices. Reciprocal interactions in a community of practice, where teachers take responsibility for each other's learning and development, may provide an effective means of supporting situated professional learning. We…

Glazer, Evan M.; Hannafin, Michael J.

2006-01-01

27

Tweaking Common Professional Development Models for Added Value  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many kinds of professional development exist within and across schools, but the IMPACT Model School Grant has provided enough professional development dollars to allow some "best practice" modifications to two common models that have reputations for being less than effective: conference attendance and outside consultants. The principal of …

Bradburn, Frances Bryant

2004-01-01

28

Response to Section II: What's Needed Now--Professional Development Schools and the Professionalization of Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The professional development schools (PDS) effort, which grew out of the groundbreaking work of the Holmes Group (1986), was deliberately focused on the support and advancement of teachers as professionals and the professionalization of teaching, so the author argues that it is ironic that a volume about PDS might be seen as voicing an opinion…

Goodwin, A. Lin

2011-01-01

29

Responses to "Traditions and Professionalization: Reconceiving Work in Composition."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers two essays responding to Horner's article in a previous issue of this journal. Argues for redefinition of "professionalization,""evaluation," and the uses of professional authority in relation to students' and other laypeople's knowledges. Discusses the need for professional organizations and unions, and the ongoing need to theorize one's…

Gorzelsky, Gwen; France, Alan W.; Lalicker, William B.; Teutsch, Chris; Horner, Bruce

2000-01-01

30

Professional navigation: a comparative study of two Canadian models.  

PubMed

For many cancer control programs, cancer navigation has emerged as a specific strategy to improve access to supportive care and the patients' experience of cancer care. This study contributes to a better understanding of professional navigation by comparing two Canadian models: Quebec's Pivot Nurse in Oncology (PNO) and Nova Scotia's Cancer Patient Navigator (CPN). Qualitative interviews were conducted with professional navigators, patients and family members, front-line staff, physicians and health administrators (interviews: n = 49; focus groups: n = 10). The two models were analyzed using the professional navigation framework (Fillion et al., 2012). Although the models are different, results show that professional navigators in both programs perform similar functions and face similar challenges. This study highlights the complexity and the value of cancer navigation and recommends relevant actions to optimize its management within the health care system. PMID:23362659

Fillion, Lise; Cook, Sandra; Veillette, Anne-Marie; de Serres, Marie; Aubin, Michèle; Rainville, François; Fitch, Margaret; Doll, Richard

2012-01-01

31

The corporate organization of hospital work: balancing professional and administrative responsibilities.  

PubMed

The development of the hospital into a corporation has influenced the care of patients and the work of the professional staff. As a corporate enterprise, the modern hospital has a private agenda aimed at increasing growth and efficiency with an emphasis on technical services, professionals as employees, and patients as customers. These changes have resulted in a decrease in trustee and professional authority and an increase in administrative control. This shift in the control structure has continued in response to the need for accounting and regulation of services and in response to demands for increased growth and efficiency made by an increasingly competitive market environment. Strategies for the reorganization of hospital staff aimed at improving both inpatient and outpatient care are reviewed. The reorganization of the institution and staff, using either a staff group-practice corporation or an administrative staff model, is proposed. Clinicians have new responsibilities for developing collective arrangements for institutional governance, for allocating institutional resources, for providing public accountability regarding the use of these resources, and for defining the missions of care. PMID:1736774

Stoeckle, J D; Reiser, S J

1992-03-01

32

Responsibility Attribution for Violence against Women: A Study of Chinese Public Service Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined how Chinese public service professionals attributed responsibility to victims and perpetrators of violence against women (VAW). A total of 2,308 Chinese public service professionals in Hong Kong completed questionnaires on attitudes toward women, VAW-related perceptions, and assignment of responsibility to actors in written VAW…

Tang, Catherine So-kum; Pun, Shuk Han; Cheung, Fanny Mui-ching

2002-01-01

33

Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.  

PubMed

This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract. PMID:22002433

Welie, Jos V M

2012-08-01

34

The Professional Development School Model: Unpacking Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to Cochran-Smith and Lytle's (1998) call for Other ways of researching and thinking about educational research and the recent call by the US Secretary of Education to reform "teacher-training" programs (Schoicet 2002), this article presents a research study focusing on a reform effort in teacher education. The study moved beyond the…

Cary, Lisa J.

2004-01-01

35

Perceived Responsibility in Decision-Making in Ethical Death Issues: The Professional Socialization of Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The educational socialization process into the professional role of nurse is examined in light of two related processes: first, the hierarchy of responsibility in decision making in salient ethical issues concerning death and dying, and second, the attitude structure of nursing students and professionals toward these same ethical issues. (Author)

Shulz, Alfred; Cox, Scott C.

1978-01-01

36

Patient suicide in institutions: emotional responses and traumatic impact on swiss mental health professionals.  

PubMed

The reactions of professionals after a patient suicide are still a subject of controversy in academic literature. This article reports on retrospective data about the aftermath experienced by mental health professionals working in institutional settings in Switzerland. Findings indicate that both self-rated emotional responses and traumatic impact were low for the majority of the 258 professionals surveyed. Variables that mediated the impact included the support received and the characteristics of the professional-patient relationship. No significant differences were found with regard to gender and profession. PMID:24593010

Castelli Dransart, Dolores Angela; Gutjahr, Elisabeth; Gulfi, Alida; Kaufmann Didisheim, Nadine; Séguin, Monique

2014-01-01

37

The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

Hatcher, Tim

2000-01-01

38

Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

2011-01-01

39

Safety, celebration, and risk: educator responses to LGBTQ professional development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has explored multicultural teacher education from multiple, sometimes divergent perspectives; yet, these studies agree that what passes for multicultural education fails to address issues of educational inequity. This paper is part of a larger evaluation study of Reduction of Stigma in Schools (RSIS) – a professional development program aiming to empower educators to create affirming environments for Lesbian, Gay,

Elizabethe C. Payne; Melissa J. Smith

2012-01-01

40

Professional Learning: A Fuzzy Logic-Based Modelling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies have suggested that professional learning is influenced by two key parameters, i.e., climate and planning, and their associated variables (mutual respect, collaboration, mutual trust, supportiveness, openness). In this paper, we applied analysis of the relationships between the proposed quantitative, fuzzy logic-based model and a series of…

Gravani, M. N.; Hadjileontiadou, S. J.; Nikolaidou, G. N.; Hadjileontiadis, L. J.

2007-01-01

41

Evaluation of Professional Development: Deploying a Process-Focused Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This evaluation used a change transition model to explore the processes of development of a three-phase professional programme devised by two teams of researchers to support teachers' expertise in six domains of science teaching. The full programme operated over two years. Interviews with developers at the end of each phase (21 interviews) and…

Hanley, Pam; Maringe, Felix; Ratcliffe, Mary

2008-01-01

42

A Competency-Based Model for Developing Human Resource Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a framework for the design and implementation of a competency-based curriculum for graduate management education. The article also outlines how this model has been implemented at one university in the context of a graduate degree in human resource management. Among the significant challenges discussed are the identification of competencies required for professional success; the identification of the

Glenn M. McEvoy; James C. Hayton; Alan P. Warnick; Troy V. Mumford; Steven H. Hanks; Mary Jo Blahna

2005-01-01

43

Lesson Study: A Professional Development Model for Mathematics Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this action research report 4 teachers and 1 teacher educator use the Japanese lesson study model of professional development for 15 months in rural Carlinville, Illinois. In March 2001, 4 teachers identified a goal to improve their students' understanding of two step word problems in 2nd grade elementary mathematics. Teachers completed three…

Taylor, Ann R.; Anderson, Shari; Meyer, Karen; Wagner, Mary Kay; West, Christine

2005-01-01

44

Pacific CRYSTAL Teacher Professional Development Models: Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 2005 to 2010 Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) has been engaged in community-based research fostering teacher leadership in innovative science education through a variety of approaches to teacher professional development. Pacific CRYSTAL is a University of Victoria based, NSERC funded project founded on a collaborative research model involving scentists, science educators and community

E. van der Flier-Keller; L. Yore

2010-01-01

45

Certification Model for Professional School Media Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-part, model certification scheme for school media personnel is presented. The first part is a discussion of the planning of state certification designs including point-of-entry into the profession, continuing development of competencies, and basic entry-level competencies. The candidate assessment process is discussed in the second part…

American Association of School Librarians, Chicago, IL.

46

Professional Development and Training: A Consortium Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a group known as the Consortium for Education and Training (CET), composed of practitioners who are seeking sustained contact for formal continuing-education unit activities. Describes the consortium model, its philosophical and practical elements, participation needs, topic selection, and implications and opportunities open to…

Wilcoxon, S. Allen; Archer, Glenn D.

1997-01-01

47

Assessing the IRIS Professional Development Model: Impact Beyond the Workshops  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IRIS Education and Outreach (E&O) Program has developed a highly effective, one-day professional development experience for formal educators. Leveraging the expertise of its consortium, IRIS delivers content including: plate tectonics, propagation of seismic waves, seismographs, Earth's interior structure. At the core of the IRIS professional development model is the philosophy that changes in teacher behavior can be affected by increasing teacher comfort in the classroom. Science and research organizations such as IRIS are able to increase teachers' comfort in the classroom by providing professional development which: increases an educator's knowledge of scientific content, provides educators with a variety of high-quality, scientifically accurate activities to deliver content to students, and provides educators with experiences involving both the content and the educational activities as the primary means of knowledge transfer. As reflected in a 2002-2003 academic year assessment program, this model has proven to be effective at reaching beyond participants and extending into the educators' classrooms. 76% of respondents report increasing the amount of time they spend teaching seismology or related topics in their classroom as a result of participating in IRIS professional development experience. This increase can be directly attributed to the workshop as 90% of participants report using at least one activity modeled during the workshop upon returning to their classrooms. The reported mean activity usage by teachers upon was 4.5 activities per teacher. Since the inception of the professional development model in 1999, IRIS E&O has been committed to evaluation. Data derived from assessment is utilized as a key decision making tool, driving a continuous improvement process. As a result, both the model and the assessment methods have become increasingly refined and sophisticated. The alignment of the professional development model within the IRIS E&O Program framework has resulted in a clarified a definition of success and an increased demand for the collection of new data. Currently, the assessment program is testing tools to examine participant learning, measure the transfer of knowledge and resources from professional development into in classrooms, and measure the use of individual activities.

Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Taber, J. J.

2003-12-01

48

Physiological responses to simulated stair climbing in professional firefighters wearing rubber and leather boots  

Microsoft Academic Search

No studies have considered whether a firefighter’s boots are a factor influencing physiological responses. The purpose of\\u000a this study was to examine physiological responses to a fire simulation activity (stair climb) in professional firefighters\\u000a wearing rubber boots (RB) and leather boots (LB). Twelve professional firefighters participated in two counterbalanced simulated\\u000a firefighter stair climb (SFSC) sessions, one wearing RB and the

Chun-Jung Huang; Ryan S. Garten; Chip Wade; Heather E. Webb; Edmund O. Acevedo

2009-01-01

49

Preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math using the Geophysical Institute Framework for Professional Development in Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Geophysical Institute (GI) Framework for Professional Development was designed to prepare culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Professional development programs based on the framework are created for rural Alaskan teachers who instruct diverse classrooms that include indigenous students. This dissertation was written in response to the question, "Under what circumstances is the GI Framework for Professional Development effective in preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math?" Research was conducted on two professional development programs based on the GI Framework: the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) and the Science Teacher Education Program (STEP). Both programs were created by backward design to student learning goals aligned with Alaska standards and rooted in principles of indigenous ideology. Both were created with input from Alaska Native cultural knowledge bearers, Arctic scientists, education researchers, school administrators, and master teachers with extensive instructional experience. Both provide integrated instruction reflective of authentic Arctic research practices, and training in diverse methods shown to increase indigenous student STEM engagement. While based on the same framework, these programs were chosen for research because they offer distinctly different training venues for K-12 teachers. STEP offered two-week summer institutes on the UAF campus for more than 175 teachers from 33 Alaska school districts. By contrast, ACMP served 165 teachers from one rural Alaska school district along the Bering Strait. Due to challenges in making professional development opportunities accessible to all teachers in this geographically isolated district, ACMP offered a year-round mix of in-person, long-distance, online, and local training. Discussion centers on a comparison of the strategies used by each program to address GI Framework cornerstones, on methodologies used to conduct program research, and on findings obtained. Research indicates that in both situations the GI Framework for Professional Development was effective in preparing culturally responsive STEM teachers. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are discussed in the conclusion.

Berry Bertram, Kathryn

50

Pacific CRYSTAL Teacher Professional Development Models: Lessons Learned  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From 2005 to 2010 Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) has been engaged in community-based research fostering teacher leadership in innovative science education through a variety of approaches to teacher professional development. Pacific CRYSTAL is a University of Victoria based, NSERC funded project founded on a collaborative research model involving scentists, science educators and community members including schools, teachers, community groups and government. Pacific CRYSTAL professional development approaches embrace both in-service teachers and pre-service teachers, and include Lighthouse schools, workshops (ongoing as well as one-time), community-based partnerships in Pacific CRYSTAL research projects, teachers as researchers, and university science courses and workshops for pre-education and education students. A number of common themes, identified through these approaches, should be considered in the development and implementation of future science professional development initiatives. They include; teacher turnover, expanding and adding schools and participating teachers, teacher apprehension, building leadership capacity, further engagement of 'tourist' teachers, continuing professional support for teachers, as well as on-going mentoring.

van der Flier-Keller, E.; Yore, L.

2010-12-01

51

A model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy.  

PubMed

This model-testing correlational study was designed to predict a causal model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy in female baccalaureate nursing students by testing three carative factors embedded in Watson's Theory of Transpersonal Caring. Proportional quota and convenience sampling were used to collect data from 317 senior nursing students enrolled in 20 National League for Nursing-accredited baccalaureate nursing programs. Path analysis revealed that the hypothesized model was not testable. With removal of nonsignificant paths, 19.1% of the variance in perceived clinical competence was explained by self-esteem and perceptions of instructor caring behaviors. Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem, and perceived clinical competence contributed 11.1% to the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. These findings provide a baseline for understanding the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. A large percentage of the variance in the model was unexplained, suggesting the need for further study of other contributing variables. PMID:15072338

Wade, Gail Holland

2004-03-01

52

Using a model to evaluate nursing education and professional practise.  

PubMed

The concept of evaluation is becoming increasingly ambiguous and a lot of processes may be called evaluation without any clear definitions. A theoretical frame of reference may function as a compass in an evaluation context when collecting, analysing and interpreting data as well as drawing conclusions. The purpose of the present study was to present and discuss the applicability of an educational interaction model for the evaluation of nursing education programs and the professional competence of nurses. The model combines different dimensions in the educational process, using both a student and an educational perspective. It is not uncommon for evaluations to concentrate on one dimension only, which tends to give an insufficient picture of the process of interaction. Examples are provided from nurse students/nurses education and professional practise to show that the relationship between students' abilities and educational factors, in the form of intentional goals and educational frameworks, have an influence on educational outcome. PMID:12084019

Kapborg, Inez; Fischbein, Siv

2002-01-01

53

Models of professional regulation: institutionalizing an agency relationship  

PubMed Central

The regulation of medical practice can historically be understood as a second-level agency relationship whereby the state delegated authority to professional bodies to police the primary agency relationship between the individual physician and the patient. Borow, Levi and Glekin show how different national systems vary in the degree to which they insist on institutionally insulating the agency function from the promotion of private professional interests, and relate these variations to different models of the health care state. In fact these differences have even deeper roots in different “liberal” or “coordinated” varieties of capitalist political economies. Neither model is inherently more efficient than the other: what matters is the internal coherence or logic of these systems that conditions the expectations of actors in responding to particular challenges. The territory that Borow, Levi and Glekin have usefully mapped invites further exploration in this regard. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/8.

2013-01-01

54

Models of professional regulation: institutionalizing an agency relationship.  

PubMed

The regulation of medical practice can historically be understood as a second-level agency relationship whereby the state delegated authority to professional bodies to police the primary agency relationship between the individual physician and the patient. Borow, Levi and Glekin show how different national systems vary in the degree to which they insist on institutionally insulating the agency function from the promotion of private professional interests, and relate these variations to different models of the health care state. In fact these differences have even deeper roots in different "liberal" or "coordinated" varieties of capitalist political economies. Neither model is inherently more efficient than the other: what matters is the internal coherence or logic of these systems that conditions the expectations of actors in responding to particular challenges. The territory that Borow, Levi and Glekin have usefully mapped invites further exploration in this regard.This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/8. PMID:23537144

Tuohy, Carolyn Hughes

2013-01-01

55

Dissemination--Interpretation: Professional and Consumer Responsibility in Research Communications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If a consumer desires the interpretation of research findings, he must create the responsive force to obtain the interpretation, and, if he cannot create this responsive force, the only alternative is self-interpretation. (MM)

Gabert, Trent E.

1976-01-01

56

Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status  

PubMed Central

How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice.

Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

57

General Graded Response Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an individual's degree…

Samejima, Fumiko

58

Be safe, be prepared: emergency system for advance registration of volunteer health professionals in disaster response.  

PubMed

Following the September 11, 2001, incident in the United States (US) and subsequent natural disasters, the US, like other countries, has focused on improving its overall disaster response capabilities. One mechanism that is under development to improve the country's surge capacity, i.e., its ability to substantially increase the number of volunteer health care professionals available to respond during a disaster, is the Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP). Registries, like ESAR-VHP, are significant tools for disaster planning and deployment. The goal of ESAR-VHP is to create a state-based registry of volunteer health professionals, verify their credentials prior to a disaster, and provide opportunities for education and training in disaster response. Each of these steps is necessary in ensuring access to patient services during an emergency, while also providing for the safety of the volunteer health professional. This article speaks to the registered nurse as a volunteer acting within these types of registries. Specifically, it addresses the development of a personal and professional response plan, and registration programs that provide the preparation needed to enable a nurse responder to work effectively within a disaster response team and facilitate preregistration with one and only one registry. The legal implications of responding are also discussed. PMID:17279858

Peterson, Cheryl

2006-09-01

59

A Hybrid Evaluation Model for Evaluating Online Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online professional development is multidimensional. It encompasses: a) an online, web-based format; b) professional development; and most likely c) specific objectives tailored to and created for the respective online professional development course. Evaluating online professional development is therefore also multidimensional and as such both…

Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie; Zygouris-Coe, Vicky; Fiedler, Rebecca

2007-01-01

60

Response to Intervention: Implications for Early Childhood Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of building strong early childhood communities of interdisciplinary practice in the application of a comprehensive curriculum framework. A curriculum framework is proposed as a means of applying and extending the principles of response to intervention (RtI) to early childhood…

Jackson, Sarah; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Romani, Jeanne M.

2009-01-01

61

Using Blogs to Promote Literary Response during Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a project that studied 15 preservice teachers' perceptions of and reactions to responding to children's and young adult literature using a Ning blog. These perceptions and reactions provided insight into various practical aspects of using a social networking blog to facilitate literature response in a teacher education…

Colwell, Jamie; Hutchison, Amy; Reinking, David

2012-01-01

62

Professional Roles and Responsibilities: Challenges for Induction Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to identify challenges faced by induction-year teachers in Texas. The target population for the study was induction teachers in Texas during the 2005-2006 school year (N = 98). A census was conducted and 73 teachers responded resulting in a 77% response rate. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire…

Burris, Scott; Keller, Jamie

2008-01-01

63

Psychometric Latent Response Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some psychometric models are presented that belong to the larger class of latent response models (LRMs). Following general discussion of LRMs, a method for obtaining maximum likelihood and some maximum "a posteriori" estimates of the parameters of LRMs is presented and applied to the conjunctive Rasch model. (SLD)

Maris, Eric

1995-01-01

64

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY COURSE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent fraudule nt financia l scanda ls have the public questioning whether accountants and auditors have forgotten their professional responsibilities. Changes have been proposed by the Education Committee of the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) to increase the credit hour requirements in ethics education, supporting the importance of ethics training for our current students who will become

Tara J. Shawver

65

Culturally Responsive Teaching: Awareness and Professional Growth through a School-University Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preparing in-service and pre-service teachers to effectively work with culturally diverse students is an ongoing challenge for schools and universities alike. This article reports on a University-Professional Development School (PDS) initiative designed to enhance an awareness of culturally responsive pedagogy. This article describes a yearlong…

McCormick, Theresa M.; Eick, Charles J.; Womack, Janet S.

2013-01-01

66

Diversity Profile Report of the AEJMC Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the diversity profile of the Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) membership. Focuses on the gender and ethnic identity of members. Finds that women are overrepresented in 11 of 31 subgroups; males are overrepresented in 3 subgroups;…

Stephens, Lowndes F.

2003-01-01

67

Learning Agreements and Socially Responsible Approaches to Professional and Human Resource Development in the United Kingdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article draws upon original qualitative data to present an initial assessment of the significance of learning agreements for the development of socially responsible approaches to professional and human resource development within the workplace. The article suggests that the adoption of a partnership-based approach to learning is more…

Wallis, Emma

2008-01-01

68

Rural High School Mathematics Teachers' Response to Mathematics Reform Curriculum Integration and Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine rural high school mathematics teachers' responses to the initial implementation of Louisiana's "Comprehensive Curriculum" during their second year of involvement in a professional development program. The curriculum changes were the culmination of an alignment between standards, curriculum,…

Cox, Teodora B.

2009-01-01

69

Transplant ethics under scrutiny - responsibilities of all medical professionals  

PubMed Central

In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices.

Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L.; Lavee, Jacob

2013-01-01

70

Transplant ethics under scrutiny - responsibilities of all medical professionals.  

PubMed

In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices. PMID:23444249

Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L; Lavee, Jacob

2013-02-01

71

A Futures-Oriented Systems Model of Professional Development in Complex Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The professional development process can be organized as a continuous, multifaceted, proactive, and integrated system that is futures-oriented and focused on adaptation as an essential organizational function. A systems model employing a university professional school as an example is presented. It focuses on professional schools because they lend…

Clevenger, Charles

72

Authoring Professional Teacher Identities: A Journey from Understanding Culturally Responsive Teaching to Identifying as Culturally Responsive Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which four elementary preservice teachers came to understand culturally responsive teaching and began authoring their professional teacher identities. It examined the influence of course work and internship at a culturally and linguistically diverse school on their understandings and…

Tschida, Christina Marie

2009-01-01

73

Adding value to laboratory medicine: a professional responsibility.  

PubMed

Laboratory medicine is a medical specialty at the centre of healthcare. When used optimally laboratory medicine generates knowledge that can facilitate patient safety, improve patient outcomes, shorten patient journeys and lead to more cost-effective healthcare. Optimal use of laboratory medicine relies on dynamic and authoritative leadership outside as well as inside the laboratory. The first responsibility of the head of a clinical laboratory is to ensure the provision of a high quality service across a wide range of parameters culminating in laboratory accreditation against an international standard, such as ISO 15189. From that essential baseline the leadership of laboratory medicine at local, national and international level needs to 'add value' to ensure the optimal delivery, use, development and evaluation of the services provided for individuals and for groups of patients. A convenient tool to illustrate added value is use of the mnemonic 'SCIENCE'. This tool allows added value to be considered in seven domains: standardisation and harmonisation; clinical effectiveness; innovation; evidence-based practice; novel applications; cost-effectiveness; and education of others. The assessment of added value in laboratory medicine may be considered against a framework that comprises three dimensions: operational efficiency; patient management; and patient behaviours. The profession and the patient will benefit from sharing examples of adding value to laboratory medicine. PMID:23079513

Beastall, Graham H

2013-01-01

74

Nitrogen Crop Response Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This on-line dynamic model from Horticulture Research International (HRI) "simulates the growth response of 25 crops to applications of nitrogen fertilizer." The model incorporates the effects of climate, organic material and leaching. Users select a region of the world, enter input into the model (e.g., crop type, date of sowing, weather conditions, nitrogen applications, etc.), and run the model for numeric and graphical output. Substantial effort has been made to describe the model's behavior and to present useful output; interested users may select the "advanced" or "detailed" options for further information on each model.

Aycott, Ann.; Greenwood, Duncan J.; Rahn, Clive R.

75

The Happy Hooker in the Classroom: Female Rights and Professional Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper addresses the question of whether professional women present the best models for the young to follow, suggesting that perhaps women do much to substantiate the very myths that destroy them. Images that are used by women to amuse, bewilder, or infuriate their male counterparts (and that perpetuate sexist stereotypes) include (1) the…

Richardson, Betty

76

Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.  

PubMed Central

Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized.

Scott, W R

1982-01-01

77

Modeling Response Signal and Response Time Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) and the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA, Usher & McClelland, 2001) were tested against two-choice data collected from the same subjects with the standard response time procedure and the response signal procedure. In the response signal procedure, a stimulus is presented and then, at one of a number of…

Ratcliff, Roger

2006-01-01

78

Rehabilitation of Cleft Palate: Parents and Professionals, A Unifying Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are commonalities and differences between parents of children with cleft palate and rehabilitation professionals, and offered are suggestions to increase communication and joint effectiveness. (DB)

Pannbacker, Mary; Schneiderman, Carl

1977-01-01

79

Physiological responses to simulated stair climbing in professional firefighters wearing rubber and leather boots.  

PubMed

No studies have considered whether a firefighter's boots are a factor influencing physiological responses. The purpose of this study was to examine physiological responses to a fire simulation activity (stair climb) in professional firefighters wearing rubber boots (RB) and leather boots (LB). Twelve professional firefighters participated in two counterbalanced simulated firefighter stair climb (SFSC) sessions, one wearing RB and the other wearing LB. Heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), expiratory ventilation (V(E)), blood lactate (BLa), salivary cortisol (SCORT), and leg strength were assessed prior to and following a SFSC. LB elicited significantly greater SCORT values and knee flexion time to peak torque. Furthermore, RB revealed significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion peak torque after SFSC. BLa was positively related to knee flexion peak torque after SFSC in the RB. Firefighters when wearing the RB may be more effective at resisting fatigue and increase more force production. PMID:19543910

Huang, Chun-Jung; Garten, Ryan S; Wade, Chip; Webb, Heather E; Acevedo, Edmund O

2009-09-01

80

Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP): A Model for Professional Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2001, North Carolina Dance Theatre, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School system joined forces to create a multidimensional, professional development program for dance professionals (teachers and artists) in the public schools called, The Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP). DEEP was designed to strengthen and enrich the teaching skills of dance educators while providing additional

Pamela Anderson Sofras; Ambre Emory-Maier

2005-01-01

81

Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP): A Model for Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2001, North Carolina Dance Theatre, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School system joined forces to create a multidimensional, professional development program for dance professionals (teachers and artists) in the public schools called, The Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP). DEEP was designed…

Sofras, Pamela Anderson; Emory-Maier, Ambre

2005-01-01

82

Family Violence: An Intervention Model for Dental Professionals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Dental professionals are in a key position to identify neglect and abuse caused by family violence and to intervene on behalf of victimized patients. However, research shows that dental professionals are the least likely of all health care providers to do...

2004-01-01

83

Professional Practice Schools: Building a Model. Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers addresses three important aspects of professional practice schools: student learning, teacher development, and implementation issues related to collaboration among institutions and state policy environment. The first paper, "The Child as Meaning Maker: The Organizing Theme of Professional Practice Schools" (Ellen M.…

Levine, Marsha, Ed.

84

Towards an Etiological Model of Self-Directed Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role that individual learning proficiency, individual personality characteristics, and chance occurrences in the learner's environment play in self-directed professional development was examined through semistructured interviews with a purposeful sample of eight professional men and women of high achievement with no postsecondary schooling in…

Bouchard, Paul

85

European Religious Education Teachers' Perceptions of and Responses to Classroom Diversity and Their Relationship to Personal and Professional Biographies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on teachers of secondary level religious education in England, Estonia, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Norway. It presents a study of the teachers' perceptions of and responses to the diversity within their classes, in relation to their professional role and their personal and professional biographies. The study employed…

Everington, Judith; ter Avest, Ina; Bakker, Cok; van der Want, Anna

2011-01-01

86

Student perceptions of a community engagement experience: exploration of reflections on social responsibility and professional formation.  

PubMed

Physical therapy educators are challenged to emphasize the importance of social responsibility as a vital curricular element of professional development. Through reflection, students are able to identify core values, beliefs, and attitudes as part of the professional development process. The purpose of this study was to explore student perceptions and values of a community engagement experience based upon frequency of participation. This qualitative research report investigated student perceptions of the community experience following participation. Data collection tools included an open-ended questionnaire and focus group interviews. Comparisons were made across data for participants who engaged in the activity one time versus multiple times. Data analysis revealed participation in the community engagement experience had a positive impact on most participants. One time only participants demonstrated increased self-awareness, contemplating change, and capacity to serve while more than one time participants described a deeper understanding of community, impact on others, and professional transformation. Student involvement in community engagement activities combined with structured reflection provided meaningful insight into participants' personal beliefs. The results suggest incorporation of community-based learning experiences into academic curriculum may be beneficial in the students' preliminary understanding of social responsibility. PMID:20946070

Furze, Jennifer; Black, Lisa; Peck, Kirk; Jensen, Gail M

2011-08-01

87

Guest Editorial: A revolutionary model of professional development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Traditionally, professional development in education has focused on three main areas: content, general pedagogy, or pedagogical content knowledge. While each area has its own purpose, in this article the author focuses on what the literature states should

Royce, Christine A.

2010-11-01

88

Changing Mindsets: The Benefits of Implementing a Professional Development Model in Early Childhood Settings in Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the effectiveness of a professional development model (PDM) devised as part of a research project carried out to support early childhood professionals in Ireland in enhancing their pedagogy. The PDM was constructed on a socio-cultural theoretical framework whereby Vygotsky's zone of proximal development was applied in the…

McMillan, Dorothy J.; Walsh, Glenda; Gray, Colette; Hanna, Karen; Carville, Sheelagh; McCracken, Owen

2012-01-01

89

Critical Thinking as the Key to the Learning College: A Professional Development Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Critical thinking is foundational to the effective teaching of any subject, and it must be at the heart of any professional development program. This chapter presents a long-term professional development model based on a substantive concept of critical thinking, and ties critical thinking to the concept of the Learning College.

Elder, Linda

2005-01-01

90

Learning in Higher Education Symposia: A New Professional Development Model for University Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the findings of a case study of a novel professional development practice model for academic university staff developed by the Learning in Higher Education (LiHE) association. It describes the implementation of a social constructivist approach to professional development, characterised by various, structured collaborative…

Dobozy, Eva

2012-01-01

91

Modeling response signal and response time data?  

PubMed Central

The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) and the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA, Usher & McClelland, 2001) were tested against two-choice data collected from the same subjects with the standard response time procedure and the response signal procedure. In the response signal procedure, a stimulus is presented and then, at one of a number of experimenter-determined times, a signal to respond is presented. The models were fit to the data from the two procedures simultaneously under the assumption that responses in the response signal procedure were based on a mixture of decision processes that had already terminated at response boundaries before the signal and decision processes that had not yet terminated. In the latter case, decisions were based on partial information in one variant of each model or on guessing in a second variant. Both variants of the diffusion model fit the data well and both fit better than either variant of the LCA model, although the differences in numerical goodness-of-fit measures were not large enough to allow decisive selection between the models.

Ratcliff, Roger

2008-01-01

92

A Model for the Professional Development of Teachers of Thinking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching for the development of students' thinking is not a straightforward matter. It requires pedagogical skills, which are different from those of normal good quality teaching for conceptual development. It follows that providing professional development (PD) for teachers of thinking is a "hard case"--we can learn much of general value to…

Adey, Philip

2006-01-01

93

Putting the Research To Work: Professional Development Models from Michigan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes statewide professional development programs in Michigan that were developed to train teachers in technology use. Discusses Teach for Tomorrow, which combines online learning with local facilitators and peer support networks; and the Great Lakes Education Network Best Practices project, which combines lesson plans from the Web with…

Hoffman, Ellen; Thompson, Ginny

2000-01-01

94

EFL Teachers' Professional Development: A Concept, a Model, and Tools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this article is to propose the Distance Professional Development and Support System (DPDS), an approach specifically designed to help non-native speakers of English teach English-as-a-Foreign Language (EFL) in a non-English-speaking setting. English has become the primary language of international communication, and there is a…

Serdiukov, Peter; Tarnopolsky, Oleg

95

Professional credit guarantee principle-agent relationship model  

Microsoft Academic Search

By using the allocation of guarantee rate saving as incentive mechanism and considering the external supervision mechanism in credit guarantee contract, the principal-agent relationships between professional credit guarantee institution and small and medium sized enterprise (SME) is investigated in this paper. It has been proved that external supervision mechanism could not change the optimal effort level of SME under the

X. L. Cui; D. Z. Wang; Y. L. Zhuang

2009-01-01

96

Authentic and Simulated Professional Development: Teachers Reflect What Is Modeled  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science is a dynamic discipline, representative of the nature of science. Yet, young science students continue to think everything is already discovered. In this study, we examine why students are not actively doing science. From professional development to student engagement, how are classrooms and students changing as we increase teachers'…

Hanegan, Nikki; Friden, Kelley; Nelson, C. Riley

2009-01-01

97

Responsive Professional Education: Balancing Outcomes and Opportunities. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3, 1986.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Goals and outcomes in various fields of professional education are considered. Attention is directed to generic outcomes of professional preparation, the emphasis these outcomes receive among professional educators, some problems that concern professional educators, and recommendations for future action and study. The generic outcomes, which were…

Stark, Joan S.; And Others

98

K20 Model: Creating Networks, Professional Learning Communities, and Communities of Practice That Increase Science Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The K20 Model develops professional learning communities (PLCs) and has been successful in district-wide and school initiatives across Oklahoma. It is based on four interrelated structures for engaging people in communities: networks, PLCS, communities of

Slater, Janis; Cate, Jean M.; O'Hair, John; Atkinson, Linda

2009-04-02

99

Models of professional preparation: Pharmacy, nursing and teacher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study focuses on three areas of initial professional education at degree level—pharmacy, nursing and teacher education. All three are associated with professions where individual clients' needs are significant—the so-called caring professions. The project was conducted largely through interviews with teaching staff in both university and public sector institutions. The interviews focused on the interests, activities and values of the

R. A. Barnett; R. A. Becher; N. M. Cork

1987-01-01

100

Between professional autonomy and public responsibility: accountability and responsiveness in Dutch media and journalism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressures from politicians and the public have to greater demands for media accountability. Moreover, the growing structural changes in the media landscape have also challenged existing notions of how media should relate to and be responsive to the public. These changes include media concentration, commercialization, fiercer competition, an increasing fragmented public, and the advent of new media. By means of

Haan de Y. M

2012-01-01

101

Is compliance a professional virtue of researchers? Reflections on promoting the responsible conduct of research.  

PubMed

Evidence exists that behavioral and social science researchers have been frustrated with regulations and institutional review boards (IRBs) from the 1970s through today. Making matters worse, many human participants protection instruction programs--now mandated by IRBs--offer inadequate reasons why researchers should comply with regulations and IRBs. Promoting compliance either for its own sake or to avoid penalties is contrary to the developmental aims of moral education and may be ineffective in fostering the responsible conduct of research. This article explores the concept of professional virtue and argues that compliance is capable of becoming a professional virtue like scientific honesty. This requires, however, that regulatory and IRB demands contribute to human well-being and to the aims of research as a profession and that researchers, therefore, internalize the norms that underlie regulatory and IRB demands. This, in turn, requires a series of changes in the way society develops, promulgates, and enforces regulatory and IRB rules. The challenge is, simply put, to embed compliance into the world of living morality. PMID:16625734

DuBois, James M

2004-01-01

102

Teacher Preferences for Professional Development Delivery Models and Delivery Model Influence on Teacher Behavior in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current trends and research in education indicated that teacher learning is a crucial link to student achievement. There is a void in the research regarding teacher preferences for delivery models in professional development. Determining teacher preferences is an important component in professional development planning and the driving inquiry for…

Sauer, Eve R.

2011-01-01

103

Current Models for Evaluating Effectiveness of Teacher Professional Development: Recommendations to State Leaders from Leading Experts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CCSSO received a grant from the National Science Foundation to plan and conduct a meeting that would bring together research and evaluation experts and state leaders for professional development in mathematics and science education. In April 2008 CCSSO invited 10 leaders in the field of research and evaluation of teacher professional development to meet with state education program managers and evaluators to present and discuss models for evaluating effects of professional development. Recent developments with state data systems, use of experimental designs in education research, and use of surveys and assessments has provided the tools for improved methods of evaluating professional development. The two-day conference provided an opportunity for leaders from states to learn how they can apply the models in their state programs. The following summary of presentations and discussions from the April conference are intended to provide a wider audience with information about its recommendations and results.

Blank, Rolf; De Las Alas, Nina

2011-09-02

104

State regulations and the HIV-positive health care professional: a response to a problem that does not exist.  

PubMed

An announcement in July 1990 concerning the possible transmission of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus from an HIV-positive health care professional to a patient launched a public outcry for patient protection from acquiring HIV from health care professionals. As a result of numerous debates, Congress issued a mandate requiring the states to adopt the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines concerning HIV-positive health care professionals or an equivalent policy. This Note explores the regulations and guidelines established by various states in response to this mandate. The author concludes that policies requiring adherence to universal precautions within the health care setting, and not mandatory testing of health care professionals or mandatory disclosure of their HIV status, are best for protecting public health. PMID:7942866

DiMaggio, S L

1993-01-01

105

A Model of Professional Development for Practicing Genetic Counselors: Adaptation of Communication Skills Training in Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ongoing professional development for practicing genetic counselors is critical in maintaining best practice. Communication\\u000a skills training (CST) workshops for doctors in oncology, utilizing trained actors in role plays, have been implemented for\\u000a many years to improve patient-centred communication. This model was adapted to provide professional development in counseling\\u000a skills for practicing genetic counselors, already highly trained in counseling skills. Detailed

Kate L. Dunlop; Kristine Barlow-Stewart; Phyllis Butow; Paul Heinrich

2011-01-01

106

A Model of Clinical Supervision for Preservice Professionals in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors present a model of clinical supervision to guide preservice professionals embarking on a career in early intervention and early childhood special education. Established models of clinical supervision in the general education field are described, followed by a description of the clinical supervision model used by the University of…

Clifford, Jantina R.; Macy, Marisa G.; Albi, Linda D.; Bricker, Diane D.; Rahn, Naomi L.

2005-01-01

107

AN ACTION RESEARCH MODEL FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE IN CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DISTANCE EDUCATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an action research model as basis for the management of change in continuing professional distance education (CPDE). The model proposed emerged from the need to manage a complex change process from traditional paper-based distance education to e-learning. In order to illustrate and support the model proposed, this paper describes and discusses such a change process in a

Miguel Baptista Nunes; Maggie McPherson

108

The University of Wyoming Early Childhood Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development that Leads to Changes in Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the greatest challenges we face as an early childhood professional community is providing short-term, affordable professional development that results in depth of understanding and change of practice. The University of Wyoming Early Childhood Summer Institute is a model for professional development that fosters reflection, inquiry, and change in beliefs and practice for early childhood practitioners. The 3-day Institute

Michelle L. Buchanan; Michael Morgan; Margaret Cooney; Mitch Gerharter

2006-01-01

109

Attachment representations and response to video-feedback intervention for professional caregivers.  

PubMed

Interventions to improve caregiving may have different effects for persons with autonomous or nonautonomous attachment representations. The current study used the Adult Attachment Interview to investigate attachment representations of professional caregivers who participated in an intervention to improve interaction with children and adults with serious intellectual and visual disabilities. Caregivers (N = 51) completed a video-feedback interaction program. Twice during a baseline period and three times during the intervention period, each caregiver was videotaped during a standard situation with their client. Of the caregivers, 28 were classified as autonomous, 12 as dismissing, and 11 as preoccupied. Unresolved loss or trauma (n = 7) was not included in the analyses. Generally, interaction quality improved from baseline to intervention period as indicated by confirmation of signals, responsiveness to signals, and affective mutuality. Caregivers with dismissing classifications continued to show less confirmation of clients' signals. Caregivers with dismissing or preoccupied classifications improved their responsiveness to the level of caregivers with autonomous classifications. Attachment representations may modify in some ways the impact of interventions to improve caregiving. PMID:22385308

Schuengel, Carlo; Kef, Sabina; Damen, Saskia; Worm, Mijkje

2012-01-01

110

The Effect of a Professional Development Classroom Management Model on At-Risk Elementary Students' Misbehaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The problem in the study was that at-risk elementary school students had too many classroom disruptive behaviors. The purpose was to investigate the effect a Professional Development Classroom Management Model would have on reducing these students' misbehaviors. The study implemented a classroom management model to improve the classroom management…

Reglin, Gary; Akpo-Sanni, Joretta; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

2012-01-01

111

Implementing a New Model for Teachers' Professional Learning in Papua New Guinea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a study that investigates the possibilities of developing a professional learning model based on action research that could lead to sustained improvements in teaching and learning in schools in remote areas of Papua New Guinea. The issues related to the implementation of this model are discussed using a critical lens that…

Honan, Eileen; Evans, Terry; Muspratt, Sandy; Paraide, Patricia; Reta, Medi; Baroutsis, Aspa

2012-01-01

112

A Semantic and Multidisciplinary Model for Professional and Social Networks Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

By bridge-building between the classical models of social networks analysis, ontologies engineering and physics, our work defines a multidisciplinary model of professional social networks analysis, dedicated to human and social capital management in enterprises and institutions. We introduce a semantic process of social graphs static and dynamic analysis, based on the enterprise content and producing decisional tools for the performance

Christophe Thovex; Francky Trichet

2011-01-01

113

A model and exploratory study for promoting professional sales in winery visitor centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a model for promoting professional sales in winery visitor centers, as well as the results of an exploratory study to test the model. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey methodology was used to evaluate the sales behavior of winery personnel in three popular wine tourist regions of California, USA. In total, 284

Janeen Olsen; Liz Thach

2008-01-01

114

A model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education.  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the results of a two year project to design a model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education. The core of the curriculum are sixteen modules which cover the broad range of medical informatics and which are closely related to the profiles of the professions involved (nursing, physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietetics). The curriculum emphasizes the need of using structured data and information to perform tasks in health care delivery and management, for which modern information technology is indispensable. The model curriculum will enable faculty to redesign existing undergraduate programs and to select the contents they see appropriate. In this way we hope that the model curriculum will contribute to an innovative attitude of future graduating health care professionals. A new three year project just has started to develop learning materials using professional health care software based on the sixteen modules of the curriculum.

Aarts, J.

1995-01-01

115

Application of a Psychosocial Model of Alienation: Sex Differences in Locus of Control, Fear of Success and Affective Hostility With a Professional Career Sample.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An empirical test of a contemporary model of psychosocial stress was conducted to evaluate expected differences in cognitive and affective functioning for males and females in a professional career sample. Perceived powerlessness and affective hostility were viewed as constituting a cluster of adaptive responses to personal/social conditions…

Roffe, Michael; Fraser, Kathleen

116

How Professionally Relevant Can Language Tests Be?: A Response to Wette (2011)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recently published article "English Proficiency Tests and Communication Skills Training for Overseas-Qualified Health Professionals in Australia and New Zealand" (Wette, 2011) aims to address perceived problems and misconceptions associated with the testing of English language skills and professional communicative competence of…

Pill, John; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

2012-01-01

117

The Graying of the Library Profession: A Survey of Our Professional Associations and Their Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need for better recruitment and education of librarians to fill anticipated retirement patterns and describes a survey of professional associations that investigated best practices. Includes the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL); Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP); American Library Association…

Lenzini, Rebecca T.

2002-01-01

118

The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for

K. B. Bertram

2009-01-01

119

The Effect of a Mentoring Model for Elementary Science Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes an elementary science model of professional development through mentoring by university science education professors working with teachers at a private elementary school in a regional city in Queensland, Australia. A cross-cultural collaboration involving professors from the United States and Australia resulted in the socially…

Koch, Janice; Appleton, Ken

2007-01-01

120

Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning at a Distance: A Model for Change in At-Risk Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the effectiveness of a professional learning model developed to support early years teachers in rural and remote communities in Queensland as they began to implement the Australian Curriculum in Mathematics. The data are drawn from 35 teachers at the initial stage of a large, four year longitudinal study RoleM (Representations,…

Warren, Elizabeth A.; Quine, Janine; DeVries, Eva

2012-01-01

121

Using an Empowerment Professional Development Model to Support Beginning Primary Mathematics Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a case study report from a larger study that focused on how an empowerment professional development model influenced the mathematics pedagogical practices and beliefs of Australian primary school teachers during their first year of teaching. The research used an interpretive approach for analysis of data from interviews, observations,…

Sparrow, Len; Frid, Sandra

2003-01-01

122

Articulation and Student Intentionality in Professional Development: A Proactive Model for Teacher Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) professional development movement, community college students' emerging intentionality, and the role of two- and four-year higher education faculty intersect in a proactive model proposed by the author that advocates ECEC community college programs separate from the vocational tradition and establishes…

Apple, Peggy

2004-01-01

123

The Problem-Solving Cycle: A Model to Support the Development of Teachers' Professional Knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC), a model of professional development designed to assist teachers in supporting their students' mathematical reasoning. Each PSC is a series of three interrelated workshops in which teachers share a common mathematical and pedagogical experience, organized around a rich mathematical task. Throughout the workshops, teachers delve deeply into issues involving mathematical content, pedagogy,

Karen Koellner; Jennifer Jacobs; Hilda Borko; Craig Schneider; Mary E. Pittman; Eric Eiteljorg; Kim Bunning; Jeffrey Frykholm

2007-01-01

124

Models of Professional and Paraprofessional Training in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pursuant to the mission of the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs, this report presents models of culturally sensitive training for professional and paraprofessional personnel who provide mental health service to refugees. After an introduction which places this report in…

Hoshino, George; Bamford, Pauline

125

An Analysis of Academic Research Libraries Assessment Data: A Look at Professional Models and Benchmarking Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research provides the first review of publicly available assessment information found on Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members' websites. After providing an overarching review of benchmarking assessment data, and of professionally recommended assessment models, this paper examines if libraries contextualized their assessment…

Lewin, Heather S.; Passonneau, Sarah M.

2012-01-01

126

Academic Professionalism and the Business Model in Education: Reflections of a Community College Historian.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the path to professional recognition of the community college historian. Considers the increasing commercialization of higher education, a trend that threatens the role of faculty in the education of college students, by focusing on the imposition of the business model of operation. Asserts that education encompasses more than the…

Zappia, Charles A.

1999-01-01

127

Respecting the Dual Sided Identity of Clinical Pastoral Education and Professional Chaplaincy: The Phenomenological Research Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question discussed in this volume opens a debate on what kind of scientific research model should be used by professional chaplaincy and Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The problem begins with the assumption that “becoming more scientific” means using the natural sciences approach employed by psychology; an approach unsuitable to account for factors relative to faith, spiritual and religious issues.

Marie-Line Morin

2002-01-01

128

Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.  

PubMed

According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes. PMID:18358441

Newton, Sarah E

2008-01-01

129

Using the Communication in Science Inquiry Project professional development model to facilitate learning middle school genetics concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the effect of embedding content in the Communication in Inquiry Science Project professional development model for science and language arts teachers. The model uses four components of successful professional development (content focus, active learning, extended duration, participation by teams of teachers from the same school or grade level) and instructional strategies for inquiry, academic language development, written

Dale R. Baker; Elizabeth B. Lewis; Sibel Uysal; Senay Purzer; Michael Lang; Perry Baker

2011-01-01

130

Trust Model Based on M-CRGs in Emergency Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many research results demonstrate that government itself cannot handle all the requests from residents in emergency response. Some scholars proposed that building community response grids which utilized pre-existing communities to support citizen request. Unfortunately, little attention has been given to achieve effective and trustworthy collaboration between professional emergency responders and residents. In this paper, the authors modify the architecture of CRGs to provide a valid organizational pattern in emergency response. Based on the modified CRGs (M-CRGs), the trust modeling framework is discussed in detail. Through recording the total behaviors and evaluation of all agents in the systems, the society network is built and the global trustworthiness which reflects the agents' true synthetical ability is gained in the model. An application of this model to Snow Disasters in Southern China is illustrated. Analysis shows that the model contributes to developing efficiency in emergency response.

Deng, Shasha; Zhang, Pengzhu; Jia, Zhaoqing

131

Beyond altruistic and commercial contract motherhood: the professional model.  

PubMed

It has become common to distinguish between altruistic and commercial contract motherhood (or 'surrogacy'). Altruistic arrangements are based on the 'gift relationship': a woman is motivated by altruism to have a baby for an infertile couple, who are free to reciprocate as they see fit. By contrast, in commercial arrangements both parties are motivated by personal gain to enter a legally enforceable agreement, which stipulates that the contract mother or 'surrogate' is to bear a child for the intending parents in exchange for a fee. She is required to undergo medical examinations and to refrain from behaviour that could harm the foetus. The intending parents are the child's legal parents from the outset. The parties to the contract can, but are not expected to, maintain contact after the transaction is completed. We argue that contract motherhood should not be organized according to the norms of the gift relationship, and that contract mothers should be compensated for their labour. However, we accept that there are good reasons for rejecting the commercial model as a suitable framework for contract pregnancy, and argue, instead, in favour of viewing it as a profession. PMID:22500585

Van Zyl, Liezl; Walker, Ruth

2013-09-01

132

Role-model concepts before and after the formal professional socialization period.  

PubMed

Physical therapy students in baccalaureate-degree programs used a forced-choice Q sort of 49 characteristics of physical therapists to describe their concepts of a physical therapy role model at the beginning and again at the end of basic professional training. In ranking the items with the 10 highest mean values (most descriptive) for each sorting, two items represented technical and eight items represented personal characteristics. The same nine items remained highest for both Q sorts. In comparing the high-ranking items to those rankings of sortings performed by recent graduates and by physical therapists, six items were the same. The majority of the correlations between the students' pretraining and posttraining Q-sort scores were significant, with moderate degrees of correlation. The investigator concluded that physical therapy students' role-model concepts were fairly similar before and after professional training. Personal, rather than technical, characteristics best described the physical therapy role model. PMID:7355150

Jacobson, B F

1980-02-01

133

A Beta Item Response Model for Continuous Bounded Responses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An item response model is proposed for the analysis of continuous response formats in an item response theory (IRT) framework. With such formats, respondents are asked to report their response as a mark on a fixed-length graphical segment whose ends are labeled with extreme responses. An interpolation process is proposed as the response mechanism…

Noel, Yvonnick; Dauvier, Bruno

2007-01-01

134

Teaching and Teaming More Responsively: Case Studies in Professional Growth at the Middle Level  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study examined the experiences of two middle level teachers as they worked with a literacy coach and university partners in an instructional improvement initiative. Robert and Janice worked together as a two-teacher team. Across the three years of the study, they collaborated with Melissa, the literacy coach, to integrate reading and writing across the curriculum and to create connections with reluctant students. Analysis of observations, interviews, and archival documents showed that professional growth accelerated with discussions of instructional practices and student performance, guided by informal assessments of student achievement. Patterns of professional growth and student accomplishment document the power of collaboration and suggest possibilities for supporting professional development more productively through interdisciplinary teamwork.

Strahan, David; Hedt, Melissa

2009-01-01

135

Professionalism, honor, and respect on September 11th: a historical view of the Initial Response and Recovery Mortuary Team.  

PubMed

The author is an Army nurse who is assigned as the Assistant Director, Reserve and Medical Manpower in the Accession Policy Directorate of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Military Personnel Policy). She provided the leadership for the Initial Response and Recovery Mortuary Team. This team was responsible for retrieving the dead and wounded from the wreckage of the Pentagon in the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon during September 2001. The article is written as a personal account. The intent is to learn from this event and to assure families and friends their loved ones were taken care of with professionalism, honor, and respect. PMID:12363143

Edmondson, Mauhee W

2002-09-01

136

From Learning to Research: Developing a Hybrid Teacher Professional Development Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In conjunction with The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign, the From Learning to Research (L2R) project seeks to develop a successful model for student-teacher-scientist interaction and collaboration using 21st century technologies. The culminating event for each year of the project is the GLOBE Virtual Student Conference, which is held in May. At the conference, students present their locally relevant climate projects. To get to this final event, teachers participate in hybrid professional development including a weeklong summer professional development institute followed by twice monthly webinars. The weeklong professional development institute focused on project-based learning, Next Generation Science Standards, climate and climate change education, dealing with climate change misconceptions and controversies, and 21st century skills. Webinars included career talks by professionals in a variety of STEM careers, teacher updates on the climate projects, and science, technology, or education information. Now over halfway into the second year of the project, this presentation will highlight strategies and successes in developing this professional development model. 75 GLOBE-trained teachers (30 the first year, 45 the second year) from 22 US states and Puerto Rico have participated in the From Learning to Research project. The teachers represent a wide diversity of populations, including schools ranging from extremely rural to inner city and low-income public schools to Ivy League prep private schools. Regardless of the location, students and teachers were able to collaborate with other schools and scientists to study their local climates. The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) is an international K-12 science and education program, engaging teachers and their students in an exploration of the environment. Using scientific protocols, students collect environmental data in their community, asking questions, developing scientific projects, and ultimately gaining a better understanding of their world. GLOBE has been implemented at over 25,000 schools in over 110 countries since 1995.

Malmberg, J. S.; Odell, M. R.; Hoadley, C.; Sumner, T.; Maull, K.; Dibie, O.; Sundberg, C.; Kennedy, T.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Wegner, K.

2012-12-01

137

A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

2007-01-01

138

Modelling hormonal response and development?  

PubMed Central

As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin–cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges.

Voss, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J.

2014-01-01

139

The Impact of Professional Development: A Theoretical Model for Empirical Research, Evaluation, Planning and Conducting Training and Development Programmes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers several trends in professional development programmes found internationally. The use of multiple learning approaches and of different modes and types of learning in PD is described. Various theories and models of evaluation are discussed in the light of common professional development activities. Several recommendations are…

Huber, Stephan Gerhard

2011-01-01

140

Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners in Inclusive Pre-Kindergartens: An Evaluation of a Professional Development Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the "Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners" (TFC) project was to implement and evaluate a sustainable model of high-quality professional development focused on improving inclusive pre-kindergarten services for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families. The professional development program…

Hardin, Belinda J.; Lower, Joanna K.; Smallwood, Gretchen Robinson; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Li, Linlin; Jordan, Carol

2010-01-01

141

Responses of established healthcare to the professionalization of complementaryand alternative medicine in Ontario  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the reactions of leaders of established health professions in Ontario, Canada to the efforts of selected complementaryand alternative (CAM) occupational groups (chiropractors, naturopaths, acupuncture\\/ traditional Chinese doctors, homeopaths and Reiki practitioners) to professionalize. Stakeholder theoryprovides the framework for analysis of competing interests among the various groups in the healthcare system. The data are derived from personal interviews

Heather Boonb

142

Tensions across Federalism, Localism, and Professional Autonomy: Social Media and Stakeholder Response to Increased Accountability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing upon research on federalism, localism, and professional autonomy, this article explores how educational stakeholders used social media to discuss and organize against the implementation of Differentiated Accountability in a large Florida school district. The results showed that the stakeholders used social media to engage in sense making…

Berry, Kimberly Scriven; Herrington, Carolyn D.

2013-01-01

143

Racism's Impact on Counselors' Professional and Personal Lives: A Response to the Personal Narratives on Racism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Common themes among the personal narratives pertaining to racism in this issue include racial socialization, "passing," biracial identity issues, awareness of racism, counselors as social change agents, racism in counselor training programs and counseling practice, and striving for nonracist identity. Implications for counselors' professional and…

Constantine, Madonna G.

1999-01-01

144

A professional development model for medical laboratory scientists working in the Core Laboratory.  

PubMed

The Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has implemented a professional development model designed to further the education, expertise, and experiences of medical laboratory scientists in the core laboratory. The professional development model (PDM) has four competency levels: Discovery, Application, Maturation and Expert. All levels require the medical laboratory scientist to learn new skill sets, complete task and projects, and meet continuing education and certification requirements. Each level encourages personal development, recognizes increased competencies, and sets high standards for all services provided. Upon completion of a level within a given timeframe, the medical laboratory scientist receives a salary adjustment based on the competency level completed. PMID:22693774

Ali, Faheem A; Pulido, Lila A; Garza, Melinda N; Amerson, Megan H; Greenhill, Brandy; Brown, Krystyna N; Lim, Shari K; Manyam, Venkatesara R; Nguyen, Hannah N; Prudhomme, Carrie C; Regan, Laura E; Sims, Willie R; Umeh, Afamefuna U; Williams, Rosemary; Tillman, Patricia K; Hu, Peter C

2012-01-01

145

Applying a Cognitive-Affective Model of Conceptual Change to Professional Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated Gregoire’s (2003) Cognitive–Affective Conceptual Change model (CAMCC) for predicting and assessing conceptual change in science teachers engaged\\u000a in a long-term professional development project set in a large school district in the southwestern United States. A multiple\\u000a case study method with data from three teacher participants was used to understand the process of integrating and applying\\u000a a reform

Ellen K. EbertKent; Kent J. Crippen

2010-01-01

146

Migration of professionals from Fiji to New Zealand: A reduced form supply-demand model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we estimate a reduced-form equation for migration of highly skilled and professionally trained workers from Fiji to New Zealand during 1987–1990. Explanatory variables include previous period's migrants, occupational income in New Zealand, the supply of graduates in New Zealand and political instability in Fiji. Using a reduced-form supply-demand model to estimate the determinants of migration, the study

Bert D. Ward

1995-01-01

147

[Professional secrecy].  

PubMed

Confidentiality is a "sensitive" subject known to all professional nursing personnel. The perception of confidentiality in nursing students was determined during a research project. Some responses were surprising. The surprises were mostly due to the fast development in the medical and technology fields. These findings proved to be of significance in that guidelines for confidentiality are not up to date with the developments in these fields. These guidelines should be revised or rewritten to bring them up to date and help the professional nurse in decisions on aspects concerning confidentiality. PMID:9257596

Buckle, H C; Lundie, L; Treadwell, I

1996-06-01

148

Design of a case management model for people with chronic disease (Heart Failure and COPD). Phase I: modeling and identification of the main components of the intervention through their actors: patients and professionals (DELTA-icE-PRO Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic diseases account for nearly 60% of deaths around the world. The extent of this silent epidemic has not met determined responses in governments, policies or professionals in order to transform old Health Care Systems, configured for acute diseases. There is a large list of research about alternative models for people with chronic conditions, many of them with an

Jose M Morales-Asencio; Francisco J Martin-Santos; Juan C Morilla-Herrera; Magdalena Cuevas Fernández-Gallego; Miriam Celdrán-Mañas; Francisco J Navarro-Moya; Maria M Rodríguez-Salvador; Francisco J Muñoz-Ronda; Elena Gonzalo-Jiménez; Almudena Millán Carrasco

2010-01-01

149

Regulating preimplantation genetic diagnosis: a criminal model versus a professional model.  

PubMed

This article examines a criminal and professional approach to the regulation of preimplantation diagnosis (PGD) in the two Australian States of Victoria and New South Wales. Under the Assisted Reproductive Treatment Act 2008 (Vic), Victorian medical practitioners face criminal sanctions if they ignore legal requirements. The criminal sanctions do not apply directly to patients, but those seeking PGD treatment have to satisfy guiding legislative principles, statutory rules and the controversial new "presumption against treatment" hurdle. On the other hand, the Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2008 (NSW) does not specifically address PGD and medical practitioners in New South Wales are not subject to criminal sanctions but must follow the National Health and Medical Research Council Guidelines. As far as patients in New South Wales are concerned, PGD is essentially a medical procedure. In both Victoria and New South Wales, PGD practice is relatively liberal compared to that in many other countries, although the Victorian approach is clearly the more restrictive model of regulation with the threat of criminal sanctions overriding the medical practitioner's ethical duty to act in the best interests of a patient. PMID:20169804

Petersen, Kerry

2009-12-01

150

Effect of empowerment on professional practice environments, work satisfaction, and patient care quality: further testing the Nursing Worklife Model.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test Leiter and Laschinger's Nursing Worklife Model linking structural empowerment to Lake's 5-factor professional practice work environment model and work quality outcomes. A predictive, nonexperimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 234 staff nurses. The analysis revealed that professional practice environment characteristics mediated the relationship between structurally empowering work conditions and both job satisfaction and nurse-assessed patient care quality. PMID:18431259

Spence Laschinger, Heather K

2008-01-01

151

Responses of established healthcare to the professionalization of complementary and alternative medicine in Ontario.  

PubMed

This paper examines the reactions of leaders of established health professions in Ontario, Canada to the efforts of selected complementary and alternative (CAM) occupational groups (chiropractors, naturopaths, acupuncture/traditional Chinese doctors, homeopaths and Reiki practitioners) to professionalize. Stakeholder theory provides the framework for analysis of competing interests among the various groups in the healthcare system. The data are derived from personal interviews with 10 formal leaders from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, clinical nutrition and public health. We conceived of these leaders as one group of stakeholders, with both common and conflicting interests. The findings demonstrate that these stakeholders are reluctant to endorse the professionalization of CAM. They propose a series of strategies to contain the acceptance of CAM groups, such as insisting on scientific evidence of safety and efficacy, resisting integration of CAM with conventional medicine and opposing government support for research and education. These strategies serve to protect the dominant position of medicine and its allied professions, and to maintain existing jurisdictional boundaries within the healthcare system. The popular support for CAM will require that health professional stakeholders continue to address the challenges this poses, and at the same time protect their position at the apex of the healthcare pyramid. PMID:15186894

Kelner, Merrijoy; Wellman, Beverly; Boon, Heather; Welsh, Sandy

2004-09-01

152

Ethics and Professional Trainers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An intense interest and concern for morality has emerged among professionals in training and development, as well as in the other professions. While there are some professionals who blatantly abuse their responsibilities to clients, most professionals make ethical errors because of some basic misunderstandings, such as considering moral judgments…

Maidment, Robert; Losito, William F.

153

An investigation of a professional development model in science education: A systems approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mathematics and Science Cooperative (MSEC), a four year longevity model of professional development education for in-service teachers, is closely aligned with the spirit and tenets of science for all. This partnership of a university, a school district, and a higher education coordinating board, seeks to promote and improve science and mathematics achievement for underserved and underrepresented populations. This study sought to explore how this model affects elementary in-service teachers' feelings of self-efficacy toward science and science teaching. Interactive Qualitative Research (IQR), a systems approach of natural inquiry, was used for this study. Theory is grounded in the data collected and analyzed through group processes. A core group of teachers, key teachers representing grades one through six and lead teachers the campus contact representatives, received professional development education from university professors in semi-monthly after school workshops and in a three week summer science institute held on-site. In this study, (N = 18) key and lead teachers participated in a focus group, a picture board exercise (a projective type exercise), interviews, and classroom observations. Within the system of the MSEC professional development model, cause and effect relationships among eleven phenomena were identified which had the greatest impact on the teachers' feelings of self-efficacy and science teaching practices. Changed teaching practices were indicated by inquiry-based science lessons with students as active learners. Five principles of self-efficacy: (1) efficacy; (2) goals setting; (3) values; (4) expectancy; and, (5) control beliefs were used to evaluate efficacy beliefs. Findings from the data collection and analysis identified two phenomena, the university instructional leadership role and teacher time commitments and time constraints, both internally and externally imposed, which seemed to have the greatest impact on elementary teachers' efficacy and science teaching practices. Provision of science materials and equipment and college level science content, process skills, and pedagogical skills knowledge facilitated by the university and the amount of time teachers chose to commit to professional development education work sessions and to the preparation and implementation of inquiry-based instruction in contrast to other professional and personal commitments were significant factors.

Bell, Glenda Love

154

Core Temperature and Sweat Responses in Professional Women's Tennis Players During Tournament Play in the Heat  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. Objective: To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Women's Tennis Association Tour–sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Patients or Other Participants: Seven professional tennis players. Main Outcome Measure(s): Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Results: Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of ?0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P ?=? .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Conclusions: Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight.

Tippet, Melissa L.; Stofan, John R.; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A.

2011-01-01

155

Mentor Modeling: The Internalization of Modeled Professional Thinking in an Epistemic Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Players of epistemic games--computer games that simulate professional practica--have been shown to develop epistemic frames: a profession's particular way of seeing and solving problems. This study examined the interactions between players and mentors in one epistemic game, Urban Science. Using a new method called epistemic network analysis, we…

Nash, Padraig; Shaffer, David Williamson

2011-01-01

156

Conceptual Issues in Response-Time Modeling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two different traditions of response-time (RT) modeling are reviewed: the tradition of distinct models for RTs and responses, and the tradition of model integration in which RTs are incorporated in response models or the other way around. Several conceptual issues underlying both traditions are made explicit and analyzed for their consequences. We…

van der Linden, Wim J.

2009-01-01

157

Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ ( N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed lessons to advance thinking from macroscopic to abstract models. Middle/secondary teachers gained PSTE, PCK, and introduced macroscopic models to develop understanding of previously taught abstract models. All implemented representational thinking and conceptual change strategies. Results suggest that: (1) constructivist PD meets the needs of teachers of varying CK, and (2) instruction should connect representational models with alternative conceptions, integrating radical and social constructivism.

Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

2009-10-01

158

Analysis of the Response Speed of Musculature of the Knee in Professional Male and Female Volleyball Players  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to evaluate the normalized response speed (Vrn) of the knee musculature (flexor and extensor) in high competitive level volleyball players using tensiomyography (TMG) and to analyze the muscular response of the vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) in accordance with the specific position they play in their teams. One hundred and sixty-six players (83 women and 83 men) were evaluated. They belonged to eight teams in the Spanish women's superleague and eight in the Spanish men's superleague. The use of Vrn allows avoiding possible sample imbalances due to anatomical and functional differences and demands. We found differences between Vrn in each of the muscles responsible for extension (VM, RF, and VL) and flexion (BF) regardless of the sex. Normalized response speed differences seem to be larger in setters, liberos and outside players compared to middle blockers and larger in males when compared to females. These results of Vrn might respond to the differences in the physical and technical demands of each specific position, showing an improved balance response of the knee extensor and flexor musculature in male professional volleyball players.

Rodriguez-Ruiz, D.; Diez-Vega, I.; Rodriguez-Matoso, D.; Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Sagastume, R.; Molina, J. J.

2014-01-01

159

Considerations in Psychometric Modeling of Response Time.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of semiparametric models may require incorporating additional functions which do not vary across distributions and may require expressing the models in terms of the joint distribution of response class and response time. (Author/LMO)

Bloxom, Bruce

1985-01-01

160

Analysis and modelling of the multi-professional treatment process: preliminary results.  

PubMed

This paper presents first results of a research project aimed at improving co-operative work initiatives in hospitals. A holistic analysis of the treatment process is presented as a precondition for process reengineering, quality measurements and improvement of multi-professional co-operation. Treatment process modelling attempts within the last years have concentrated on specialised points of views, such as business process modelling or communication modelling. In contrast, we have developed a framework consisting of several views of the treatment process. We tested our framework in a broad system analysis within the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry of the Heidelberg University Hospitals. Our preliminary results support the framework. Weaknesses were described precisely in both the field of organisational procedures and information management. PMID:11604756

Ehlers, F; Ammenwerth, E; Haux, R; Pohl, U; Resch, F

2001-01-01

161

Interest item response arrangement as it affects discrimination between professional groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two interest inventories were administered to 418 education students, and 94 electrical engineering students. One inventory was of the Strong type, with responses made in terms of Like Indifferent or Dislike, and the other inventory was of the Kuder type, with responses being forced among comparable choices. It was concluded that the L-I-D test item arrangement is clearly superior to

John V. Zuckerman

1952-01-01

162

Health Information on the Web and Consumers' Perspectives on Health Professionals' Responses to Information Exchange  

PubMed Central

Background Health information technology, which is sometimes referred to as informaticization of medicine, is changing the extent to which patients become competent producers of their own health by enabling them access to health information anytime and anywhere. Objective This research provides preliminary information on users' perceptions of the extent to which use of the Internet for health information impacts medical encounters. We specifically explored the following questions: (1) To what extent perceptions of positive or negative changes in medical encounters are associated with sociodemographic background of online health information seekers, and how often the Internet information is discussed with providers? (2) To what extent is there an association between perceived changes in medical encounters and frequency of referring to the Internet during medical encounters? (3) To what extent is there an association between sociodemographic background of online health information users and frequency of discussing of the Internet information with providers? Methods The data for this study was derived from a national sampling of online health and medical information users who participated in the Study of Health and Medical Information in Cyberspace—Survey of User Perceptions (N=710). This study used a nationally representative online research panel of the US adults maintained by the Knowledge Networks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square, and t tests were performed to examine the data. Results Although Internet sources allow people the opportunity to gather health or medical information, discussion of this information was not a very common activity. It is noteworthy that half of the sample never or rarely discussed health/medical information obtained from Internet sources with health professionals. Chi-square analyses revealed that discussion of online health information with providers were associated with education, income, and marital status. We also found that discussion of the Internet information mostly promotes better physician-patient interactions. Analyses with post-hoc tests identified that perceived changes in medical encounters were associated with age, education, and income. However, 9.1% (64/703) of our respondents strongly agreed that the interactions with their providers have been strained. T test analyses showed that marital status, race, and gender were not significant. Conclusions Embracing new technologies, and adapting to changing roles and relationships in delivery of medical care are critical to effective delivery of patient-centered care. Health professionals could also guide patients on how to evaluate information and where to access to reliable and accurate information.

2014-01-01

163

Neuromuscular function, hormonal, and mood responses to a professional rugby union match.  

PubMed

We examined the recovery time-course of neuromuscular function (NMF), the testosterone and cortisol hormonal milieu, and mood for 60 hours after a competitive match in professional rugby union players (n = 14). Thirty-six hours prematch (19:30 hours kick-off), baseline saliva samples (testosterone, cortisol, and testosterone to cortisol [T/C] ratio), countermovement jump performances (peak power output [PPO]), and mood disruption (Brief Assessment of Mood Questionnaire) were collected and was repeated at 12, 36, and 60 hours postmatch. Peak power output decreased below baseline at 12 hours (baseline 6,100 ± 565 W vs. 12 h 5,680 ± 589 W; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (5,761 ± 639 W; p < 0.001) but had recovered at 60 hours (5,950 ± 505 W; p = 0.151). Cortisol concentrations increased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 0.40 ± 0.09 µg·dl-1 vs. 12 h 0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.027) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. Testosterone concentrations decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 214 ± 84 pg·ml-1 vs. 12 h 151 ± 56 pg·ml-1; p = 0.023) and 36 hours (173 ± 71 pg·ml-1; p = 0.016) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. The T/C ratio decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 551 ± 219 vs. 12 h 266 ± 123; p = 0.001) and 36 hours (310 ± 148; p = 0.027) before returning to baseline at 60 hours postmatch. Mood disturbance increased at 12 hours (p = 0.031) before returning to baseline at 36 and 60 hours postmatch. There were no relationships between changes in PPO, testosterone, cortisol, T/C ratio, and mood. In conclusion, postmatch changes in NMF, salivary hormones, and mood disturbance were identified in professional rugby union players. Players and coaches can expect reduced NMF and hormonal disruption for 36 hours before recovering at 60 hours postmatch, with mood recovered by 36 hours postmatch. Knowledge of these recovery time-courses may prove useful for player training program design and postmatch recovery strategies. PMID:23539085

West, Daniel J; Finn, Charlotte V; Cunningham, Daniel J; Shearer, David A; Jones, Marc R; Harrington, Bradley J; Crewther, Blair T; Cook, Christian J; Kilduff, Liam P

2014-01-01

164

Taking Professional Learning to Isolated Schools: Perceptions of Providers and Principals, and Lessons for Effective Professional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the implementation and outcomes, as perceived by the professional learning providers and school principals, of a professional learning (PL) model devised in response to recognition that models of PL that are effective in urban settings are not effective in rural and remote areas. Rather than expecting the teachers to travel…

Beswick, Kim; Jones, Tammy

2011-01-01

165

The Context of Professional Learning for Inclusion: A 4-Ply Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines the findings from one dimension of a large-scale research project which addressed the PL requirements of specialist inclusion/SEN teachers in Ireland. Two aspects relating to the context of professional learning are explored here: the professional learning opportunities preferred by teachers and the professional learning…

O'Gorman, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

166

Support for midwives - A model of professional supervision based on the recertification programme for midwives in New Zealand.  

PubMed

Following a traumatic practice experience the physiological and psychological effects experienced by midwives are exacerbated as a result of dysfunctional health organisations and the counterproductive behaviours therein. It is suggested the stress experienced would have been reduced if support in the form of professional supervision had been available. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that professional supervision should be viewed as a competency requirement by the Midwifery Council of New Zealand and incorporated into the midwifery recertification programme. A model of professional supervision for midwives based on the recertification programme is introduced and the importance of reflection on practice emphasised. Providing support by means of professional supervision in the midwifery recertification programme, has the potential to make midwives feel valued, improve their job satisfaction, reduce violence in the workplace, aid in the attrition rate and improve the care for the childbearing woman. PMID:24486026

Calvert, Irene

2014-06-01

167

Implementing inquiry-based kits within a professional development school model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Implementation of guided inquiry teaching for the first time carries inherent problems for science teachers. Reform efforts on inquiry-based science teaching are often unsustainable and are not sensitive to teachers' needs and abilities as professionals. Professional development schools are meant to provide a research-based partnership between a public school and a university. These collaborations can provide support for the professional development of teachers. This dissertation reports a study focused on the implementation of inquiry-based science kits within the support of one of these collaborations. The researcher describes the difficulties and successful adaptations experienced by science teachers and how a coteaching model provided support. These types of data are needed in order to develop a bottom-up, sustainable process that will allow teachers to implement inquiry-based science. A qualitative methodology with "researcher as participant" was used in this study of two science teachers during 2002--2003. These two teachers were supported by a coteaching model, which included preservice teachers for each teacher as well as a supervising professor. Data were collected from the researcher's direct observations of coteachers' practice. Data were also collected from interviews and reflective pieces from the coteachers. Triangulation of the data on each teacher's case supported the validity of the findings. Case reports were prepared from these data for each classroom teacher. These case reports were used and cross-case analysis was conducted to search for major themes and findings in the study. Major findings described the hurdles teachers encounter, examples of adaptations observed in the teachers' cases and the supportive interactions with their coteachers while implementing the inquiry-based kits. In addition, the data were used to make recommendations for future training and use of the kits and the coteaching model. Results from this study showed that the kit's guided structure of inquiry and the collaboration both affected the inservice teachers in the following ways: The coteaching model supported behavioral and material management issues caused by the implementation of the kits; collaboration with preservice teachers created a "smaller-class-size" effect, which allowed teachers to attend to a smaller number of students for cooperative learning and assessment, and the elementary inservice teachers learned pedagogical strategies and science content from collaborating with secondary preservice teachers in kit use and from the kits' curriculum. Results were used as a self-study for future training and support for implementation of inquiry-based kits.

Jones, Mark Thomas

168

An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in the implementation of curriculum. Data on student learning outcomes implied that both content knowledge and inquiry skills were critical bases for curriculum in terms of teacher efficacy and student achievement. Teachers needed to examine student work as a professional development strategy to also promote reflection on teaching and learning. Further research and professional development in the area of science assessment, in terms of scientific content and processes, was suggested.

Zender, Georgi Anne

169

Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists  

PubMed Central

Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a “reverse science fair” in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study focuses on results of assessments conducted with neuroscientist presenters during Expositions at two sites, Atlanta, Georgia and Corpus Christi, Texas. The effects of participating in the Expositions on presenters' perceptions of their own presentation and communication skills were evaluated, as was the potential for increased active participation by neuroscientists in future outreach programs. In four of the five Expositions studied, pre- versus post-event surveys demonstrated significant changes in presenters' perceptions of their own abilities to explain neuroscience concepts to children. Over the course of an Exposition, presenters learned to fit their approaches to conveying neuroscience concepts to fifth through eighth graders and learned to link information they presented about the brain and nervous system to children's past experiences to improve comprehension. The present data suggest that Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions are effective in improving communication and teaching skills among neuroscience professionals and contribute to professional stewardship by increasing motivation to participate in future informal education programs.

Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

2006-01-01

170

Brains Rule!: a model program for developing professional stewardship among neuroscientists.  

PubMed

Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a "reverse science fair" in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study focuses on results of assessments conducted with neuroscientist presenters during Expositions at two sites, Atlanta, Georgia and Corpus Christi, Texas. The effects of participating in the Expositions on presenters' perceptions of their own presentation and communication skills were evaluated, as was the potential for increased active participation by neuroscientists in future outreach programs. In four of the five Expositions studied, pre- versus post-event surveys demonstrated significant changes in presenters' perceptions of their own abilities to explain neuroscience concepts to children. Over the course of an Exposition, presenters learned to fit their approaches to conveying neuroscience concepts to fifth through eighth graders and learned to link information they presented about the brain and nervous system to children's past experiences to improve comprehension. The present data suggest that Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions are effective in improving communication and teaching skills among neuroscience professionals and contribute to professional stewardship by increasing motivation to participate in future informal education programs. PMID:17012206

Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L; Frantz, Kyle J

2006-01-01

171

How Do You Evaluate Everyone Who Isn't a Teacher? An Adaptable Evaluation Model for Professional Support Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evaluation of professional support personnel in the schools has been a neglected area in educational evaluation. The Center for Research on Educational Accountability and Teacher Evaluation (CREATE) has worked to develop a conceptually sound evaluation model and then to translate the model into practical evaluation procedures that facilitate…

Stronge, James H.; And Others

172

A Professional Development Model to Promote Internet Integration into P-12 Teachers' Practice: A Mixed Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This mixed method study reports long-term effects of a staff development model on P-12 teachers' instructional practices and dispositions regarding Internet integration into teaching. The model design was guided by participants' varying professional developmental levels and their values and beliefs about teaching and learning. A survey,…

Giordano, Victoria A.

2008-01-01

173

Statewide and District Professional Development in Standards: Addressing Teacher Equity. Models of Inservice. National Writing Project at Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Writing Project at Work (NWP) monograph series documents how the National Writing Project model is implemented and developed at local sites across the country. These monographs describe NWP work, which is often shared informally or in workshops. Richard Koch and Laura Roop present a model of standards-based professional development…

Koch, Richard; Roop, Laura; Setter, Gail

2006-01-01

174

Can instruction in engineering ethics change students' feelings about professional responsibility?  

PubMed

How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student's feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of two short cases that posed moral problems. For each case, the role of the engineer was successively changed and the student was asked how each change altered his or her decisions about the case. Students who had completed the ethics course considered more options before making a decision, and they responded consistently despite changes in the cases. For both cases, even when they were not directly involved, they were more likely to feel responsible and take corrective action. Students who were less successful in the ethics course gave answers similar to students who had not taken the course. This latter group of students seemed to have weaker feelings of responsibility: they would say that a problem was "not my business." It appears that instruction in ethics can increase awareness of responsibility, knowledge about how to handle a difficult situation, and confidence in taking action. PMID:20146104

Hashemian, Golnaz; Loui, Michael C

2010-03-01

175

Learning for Professional Life: Student Teachers' and Graduated Teachers' Views of Learning, Responsibility and Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this study is on how final-semester students and newly-graduated teachers experience the formal objectives of teacher education, with a particular view of the concepts of learning, responsibility and collaboration. The ways of experiencing these concepts varied from conceptions in which only one dimension is discerned from in the…

Dahlgren, Madeline Abrandt; Chiriac, Eva Hammar

2009-01-01

176

Response to Comments: Practical Wisdom in the Service of Professional Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a response to comments by Rodney Evans on an earlier "Educational Researcher" (ER) article that the author cowrote with three colleagues at The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the author shows that Evans' critique is based largely on a misreading or misrepresentation of their argument, its rationale, and associated…

Shulman, Lee S.

2007-01-01

177

Restructuring a traditional student teacher supervision model: Fostering enhanced professional development and mentoring within a professional development school context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to pilot an alternative student teaching supervision model at a college of education in a US context. In the study, the collaborators used multiple paired dyads to supervise student teachers with multiple supports from college faculty. This study examined how teachers and university faculty planned the use of paired dyads and how participants responded

Adrian Rodgers; Virginia L. Keil

2007-01-01

178

Restructuring a Traditional Student Teacher Supervision Model: Fostering Enhanced Professional Development and Mentoring within a Professional Development School Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to pilot an alternative student teaching supervision model at a college of education in a US context. In the study, the collaborators used multiple paired dyads to supervise student teachers with multiple supports from college faculty. This study examined how teachers and university faculty planned the use of paired…

Rodgers, Adrian; Keil, Virginia L.

2007-01-01

179

Optimization of Multiple-Response Simulation Models.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes several computerized multiple-variable, multiple-response optimization procedures for use in connection with computer simulation models. These procedures include complex search, a sequential first-order response surface approach, a s...

W. E. Biles

1978-01-01

180

The sweating response of elite professional soccer players to training in the heat.  

PubMed

Sweat rate and sweat composition vary extensively between individuals, and quantification of these losses has a role to play in the individualisation of a hydration strategy to optimise training and competitive performance. Data were collected from 26 male professional football (soccer) players during one 90 min pre-season training session. This was the 2nd training session of the day, carried out between 19.30 and 21.00 h when the mean +/- SD environment was 32 +/- 3 degrees C, 20 +/- 5 %rh and WBGT 22 +/- 2 degrees C. Training consisted of interval running and 6-a-side games during which the average heart rate was 136 +/- 7 bpm with a maximum rate of 178 +/- 7 bpm (n = 19). Before and after training all players were weighed nude. During training all players had free access to sports drinks (Gatorade) and mineral water (Solan de Cabras). All drink bottles were weighed before and after training. Players were instructed to drink only from their own bottles and not to spit out any drink. No player urinated during the training session. Sweat was collected by patches from the chest, arm, back, and thigh of a subgroup of 7 players. These remained in place for the first 15 - 30 min of the training session, and sweat was analysed for sodium (Na (+)) and potassium (K (+)) concentration. Body mass loss was 1.23 +/- 0.50 kg (ranging from 0.50 to 2.55 kg), equivalent to dehydration of 1.59 +/- 0.61 % of pre-training body mass. The sweat volume lost was 2193 +/- 365 ml (1672 to 3138 ml), but only 972 +/- 335 ml (239 to 1724 ml) of fluid was consumed. 45 +/- 16 % of the sweat volume loss was replaced, but this ranged from 9 % to 73 %. The Na (+) concentration of the subgroup's sweat was 30.2 +/- 18.8 mmol/l (15.5 to 66.3 mmol/l) and Na (+) losses averaged 67 +/- 37 mmol (26 to 129 mmol). The K (+) concentration of the sweat was 3.58 +/- 0.56 mmol/l (2.96 to 4.50 mmol/l) and K (+) losses averaged 8 +/- 2 mmol (5 to 12 mmol). The drinking employed by these players meant that only 23 +/- 21 % of the sweat Na (+) losses were replaced: This ranged from replacing virtually none (when water was the only drink) to replacing 62 % when the sports drink was consumed. These elite soccer players did not drink sufficient volume to replace their sweat loss. This, however, is in accord with data in the literature from other levels of soccer players and athletes in other events. These measurements allow for an individualisation of the club's hydration strategy. PMID:15726482

Shirreffs, S M; Aragon-Vargas, L F; Chamorro, M; Maughan, R J; Serratosa, L; Zachwieja, J J

2005-03-01

181

Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7  

PubMed Central

Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further.

2013-01-01

182

Construction of the integrated model for practical career support to the professional athletes.  

PubMed

Recently, along with the enhancement of the argument for career of athletes, many researchers who major in sports psychology focus mainly on athletic retirement, a coordination of transitions in sport or and outside sport, social support and professional assistance in career transition, in the context of the second career concerning to professional athletes in Japan. However, when it comes to career transition of professional athletes, it is necessary to consider "career" from the whole perspectives of human life. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to clarify the career transition of professional athletes by the way of questionnaire and interview survey, which is approached from the view point of industrial/organizational psychology. For this purpose, we implemented the interview survey to professional athletes in 2008. In addition, we carried out the investigation to professional football players (interview survey: 5 players, questionnaire survey: 102 players) in 2009. Consequently, three following findings were led in conclusion. (1)Career intervention to professional athletes should be performed before the turning point of the career (career transition). (2)It is important to assess the career intervention to professional athletes. (3)It is an important stance to watch the processes when professional athletes open up one's career by oneself. PMID:22317681

Mizuno, Motoki; Hochi, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Mami; Kaneko, Ikuyo; Yamada, Yasuyuki

2012-01-01

183

Professional responsibilities versus familial responsibilities: an examination of role conflict among first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.  

PubMed

In the event of a human-caused or natural disaster, the police are essential front-line first responders. The ability of police departments to provide adequate services is contingent upon critical response personnel working and functioning in an efficient manner. Currently, it is assumed that first responders will continue to work in the event of a disaster, even if they are personally impacted by the disaster to which they are expected to respond. This study examines role conflict among police officers who served as first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. PMID:24691915

Adams, Terri; Turner, Mila

2014-01-01

184

The Maturing of Hormesis as a Credible Dose-Response Model  

PubMed Central

Hormesis is a dose-response phenomenon that has received little recognition, credibility and acceptance as evidenced by its absence from major toxicological/risk assessment texts, governmental regulatory dose-response modeling for risk assessment, and non-visibility in major professional toxicological society national meetings. This paper traces the historical evolution of the hormetic dose-response hypothesis, why this model is not only credible but also more common than the widely accepted threshold model in direct comparative evaluation, and how the toxicological community made a critical error in rejecting hormesis, a rejection sustained over 70 years.

Calabrese, Edward J.

2003-01-01

185

Professional Practice Schools: Linking Teacher Education and School Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional practice schools are restructured public schools that are: (1) models of good practice; (2) responsible for education and socialization of teachers for new roles; and (3) designed to support ongoing research directed at improving practice. The seven essays in this book focus on the rationale for professional practice schools and the…

Levine, Marsha, Ed.

186

Evaluating the Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education Professional Development Program at the Elementary School Level in the Los Angeles Unified School District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overall effectiveness of the culturally relevant and responsive education (CRRE) professional development program in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) was evaluated. Recruitment procedures included general and special educators and school administrators as participants. The "CRRE Observation Coding Scheme" and reflective field…

Patton, Daniel C.

2011-01-01

187

Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers.

Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

2012-01-01

188

Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

1985-03-01

189

e-PD: Blended Models of Sustaining Teacher Professional Development in Digital Literacies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is commonly agreed that professional development of teachers in the use of information and communication technologies should be sustained over time. Most professional development, however, is delivered in single or short sequences of face-to-face sessions, paying little heed to this requirement. Once the face-to-face training is completed, a…

Anderson, Neil; Henderson, Michael

2004-01-01

190

Teachers Explore Knowledge Management and E-Learning as Models for Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between online professional development, knowledge management, and electronic learning based on an online discussion in a graduate course in instructional technology. Discusses changing definitions of professional development and how it is now being evaluated through measures of school and student improvement. (LRW)

Zahner, Jane

2002-01-01

191

Generalized Model for Semiconductor Radiation Response Prediction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The lumped model technique of representing semiconductor device response to radiation was applied to diodes, bipolar transistors and integrated circuit elements. The lumped model formalism was first developed by approximating the equations governing elect...

J. P. Raymond R. E. Johnson

1967-01-01

192

Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

2001-01-01

193

Turning the Corner: Towards a Model of Sustainable Collaborative Partnerships in Master's-Level Postgraduate Professional Development in England  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines the approach of one higher education institution in England to the research dialogue involved in designing an M.A. Education programme that focuses on partnership collaborations in postgraduate professional development with school-based staff groups as a catalyst to sustainable school improvement. The paper draws on the model

Ibbotson, Julia

2008-01-01

194

Exploring a Community of Practice Model for Professional Development to Address Challenges to Classroom Practices in Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored whether or not, and how, an on-site and research-teacher community of practice model for professional development addressed the challenges to classroom practices in a Head Start program. Data sources included interviews with teachers, videos of planning and teaching sessions, and the researchers' fieldwork log and…

Christ, Tanya; Wang, X. Christine

2013-01-01

195

Linkage analysis in cases of serial burglary: comparing the performance of university students, police professionals, and a logistic regression model  

Microsoft Academic Search

University students, police professionals, and a logistic regression model were provided with information on 38 pairs of burglaries, 20% of which were committed by the same offender, in order to examine their ability to accurately identify linked serial burglaries. For each offense pair, the information included: (1) the offense locations as points on a map, (2) the distance (in km)

Craig Bennell; Sarah Bloomfield; Brent Snook; Paul Taylor; Carolyn Barnes

2010-01-01

196

School/University Partnerships and the UNI Teaching Associates Cadre Model: Professional Benefits to PreK-12 Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implementation of the University of Northern Iowa's (UNI) Teaching Associates Cadre Model (TAC) Professional Development School (PDS) program is discussed within the context of Kagan's six stages of collaborative relationships: formation, conceptualization, development, implementation, evaluation, and termination or reformation. The TAC was…

Selke, Mary J.; Kueter, Roger A.

197

Design of a Model for a Professional Development Programme for a Multidisciplinary Science Subject in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools are increasingly integrating multidisciplinary education into their programmes. The Minister of Education, Culture and Science has introduced a new, integrated science subject in secondary education in the Netherlands, called Nature, Life and Technology (NLT). This research note describes the design of a generic model for a professional

Visser, Talitha C.; Coenders, Fer G. M.; Terlouw, Cees; Pieters, Jules M.

2012-01-01

198

IMPACT (Interactive Model for Professional Action and Change for Teachers): A Summary Report, September 1, 1979 to August 30, 1982.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Activities and outcomes of a project to assist South Burlington High School (Vermont) special education students in mastering state-mandated basic competencies are described. The Interactive Model for Professional Action and Change for Teachers (IMPACT), which was conducted in cooperation with the University of Vermont, was designed to provide…

South Burlington School District, VT.

199

Texas 4-H Agents' Perceptions of Selected Competencies in the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many competencies necessary for success as a 4-H agent. The 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies (PRKC) Model organizes competencies into six domains: (a) Youth Development, (b) Youth Program Development, (c) Volunteerism, (d) Partnerships, (e) Organizational Systems, and (f) Equity, Access and Opportunity (National 4-H…

Harder, Amy; Wingenbach, Gary J.

2008-01-01

200

Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

2014-01-01

201

Advocacy -- Professional School Counselors Closing the Achievement Gap Through Empowerment: A Response to Hipolito-Delgado and Lee  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author comments on several aspects of an article by Hipolito-Delgado and Lee entitled "Empowerment Theory for the Professional School Counselor: A Manifesto for What Really Matters" (Professional School Counseling, v10 n4 p327-332 Apr 2007; see EJ767346). Hipolito-Delgado and Lee's article highlights a critical need for a comprehensive,…

Mitcham-Smith, Michelle

2007-01-01

202

The response of mental health professionals to clients seeking help to change or redirect same-sex sexual orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: we know very little about mental health practitioners' views on treatments to change sexual orientation. Our aim was to survey a representative sample of professional members of the main United Kingdom psychotherapy and psychiatric organisations about their views and practices concerning such treatments. METHODS: We sent postal questions to mental health professionals who were members of British Psychological Society,

Annie Bartlett; Glenn Smith; Michael King

2009-01-01

203

The Research Dynamic: A Professional Development Model for Secondary School Science Teachers  

PubMed Central

This essay summarizes the author's 10 years of experience at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation mentoring secondary school science teachers during 8-wk Summer Research Institutes. The summary is presented as a learning model, which we call the research dynamic. This model consists of three interlocked components: specified ignorance, peer interactions, and gateway experiments. Specified ignorance is based on the work of the sociologist Robert K. Merton. It is essentially the art of highlighting what is not known about a phenomenon but must become known for further progress. In practice, specified ignorance is framed as a hypothesis, a prediction, or a question. It is commonly the outcome of peer interactions, which are the second essential component of the research dynamic. Peer interactions are the inevitable outcome of having teachers work together in the same laboratory on related research topics. These topics are introduced as gateway experiments, the third component. The most important attribute of gateway experiments is their authenticity. These experiments, when first carried out, opened new scientific vistas. They are also technically, conceptually, and logically simple. We illustrate the research dynamic with a line of seminal experiments in biochemical genetics. We provide evidence that the research dynamic produced significantly positive effects on teachers' confidence in their professional preparedness.

2009-01-01

204

From "Mentor" to "Role Model": Scaling the Involvement of STEM Professionals through Role Model Videos  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mentors and role models can play a significant role in high school students' motivation to pursue specific careers later in life. Although the use of role models in the classroom is an important research topic, little research has been conducted on scaling up STEM role models reach through the use of video vignettes. This essay outlines a series…

Ware, Jennifer; Stein, Sarah

2013-01-01

205

Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

Peress, Michael

2012-01-01

206

Developing a Parent-Professional Team Leadership Model in Group Work: Work with Families with Children Experiencing Behavioral and Emotional Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on the respective strengths of parent-led and professional-led groups, a parent-professional team leadership model for group interventions was developed and evaluated for families of youths with emotional and behavioral problems. The model was developed based on feedback from 26 parents in focus group sessions and recommendations from…

Ruffolo, Mary C.; Kuhn, Mary T.; Evans, Mary E.

2006-01-01

207

One Size Doesn't Fit All: Customizing Educational Technology Professional Development. Part Three--Combining Goals & Models to Fit Teachers' Characteristics & Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational technology-related professional development (ETPD) can be designed in many different ways. It varies by general purposes and goals, specific learning objectives, curriculum content, the student grade levels for which the strategies and tools presented are appropriate, professional development model(s) used, how it is matched to…

Harris, Judi

2008-01-01

208

An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

Hough, David L.

2011-01-01

209

Restoring medical professionalism.  

PubMed

The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

Bernat, James L

2012-08-21

210

The influence of personal and environmental factors on professionalism in medical education  

PubMed Central

Background Professionalism is a critical quality for physicians to possess. Physician professionalism has received increased attention in recent years, with many authorities suggesting that professionalism is in decline. An understanding of the factors contributing to professionalism may allow the development of more effective approaches to promoting this quality in medical education. Discussion We propose a model of personal and environmental factors that contribute to physician professionalism. Personal factors include distress/well-being, individual characteristics, and interpersonal qualities. Environmental factors include institutional culture, formal and informal curricula, and practice characteristics. Promotion of professionalism requires efforts directed at each of these elements. Summary One responsibility of medical education is to foster the development of professionalism among its learners. Both personal and environmental factors play a role in physician professionalism. Accordingly, institutions should consider these factors as efforts to promote physician professionalism evolve.

West, Colin P; Shanafelt, Tait D

2007-01-01

211

Validating a conceptual model for an inter-professional approach to shared decision making: a mixed methods study  

PubMed Central

Rationale, aims and objectives Following increased interest in having inter-professional (IP) health care teams engage patients in decision making, we developed a conceptual model for an IP approach to shared decision making (SDM) in primary care. We assessed the validity of the model with stakeholders in Canada. Methods In 15 individual interviews and 7 group interviews with 79 stakeholders, we asked them to: (1) propose changes to the IP-SDM model; (2) identify barriers and facilitators to the model's implementation in clinical practice; and (3) assess the model using a theory appraisal questionnaire. We performed a thematic analysis of the transcripts and a descriptive analysis of the questionnaires. Results Stakeholders suggested placing the patient at its centre; extending the concept of family to include significant others; clarifying outcomes; highlighting the concept of time; merging the micro, meso and macro levels in one figure; and recognizing the influence of the environment and emotions. The most common barriers identified were time constraints, insufficient resources and an imbalance of power among health professionals. The most common facilitators were education and training in inter-professionalism and SDM, motivation to achieve an IP approach to SDM, and mutual knowledge and understanding of disciplinary roles. Most stakeholders considered that the concepts and relationships between the concepts were clear and rated the model as logical, testable, having clear schematic representation, and being relevant to inter-professional collaboration, SDM and primary care. Conclusions Stakeholders validated the new IP-SDM model for primary care settings and proposed few modifications. Future research should assess if the model helps implement SDM in IP clinical practice.

Legare, France; Stacey, Dawn; Gagnon, Susie; Dunn, Sandy; Pluye, Pierre; Frosch, Dominick; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Elwyn, Glyn; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Graham, Ian D

2011-01-01

212

Organizational and media stress among professional football players: testing an achievement goal theory model.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate media and coach-athlete stress experienced by professional football players and their relationship to motivational variables by testing an achievement goal theory (AGT) stress model. In order to do so, we developed scales specifically designed to assess media and coach-athlete stress. Eighty-two elite football players (M(age) =25.17 years, SD=5.19) completed a series of questionnaires. Correlations and bootstrapping were used as primary statistical analyses, supplemented by LISREL, to test the hypotheses. Results revealed that a mastery climate was directly and negatively associated with coach-athlete stress, while a performance climate was directly and positively associated with coach-athlete stress. In addition, an indirect positive path between the performance climate and media stress was revealed through ego orientation. These findings support some of the key postulates of AGT; a mastery climate reduces the perception of stress among athletes, and the converse is true for a performance climate. Coaches of elite footballers are advised to try to reduce the emphasis on performance criteria because of its stress-reducing effects. PMID:21210857

Kristiansen, E; Halvari, H; Roberts, G C

2012-08-01

213

Climate Change: Modeling the Human Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrated assessment models have historically relied on forward modeling including, where possible, process-based representations to project climate change impacts. Some recent impact studies incorporate the effects of human responses to initial physical impacts, such as adaptation in agricultural systems, migration in response to drought, and climate-related changes in worker productivity. Sometimes the human response ameliorates the initial physical impacts, sometimes it aggravates it, and sometimes it displaces it onto others. In these arenas, understanding of underlying socioeconomic mechanisms is extremely limited. Consequently, for some sectors where sufficient data has accumulated, empirically based statistical models of human responses to past climate variability and change have been used to infer response sensitivities which may apply under certain conditions to future impacts, allowing a broad extension of integrated assessment into the realm of human adaptation. We discuss the insights gained from and limitations of such modeling for benefit-cost analysis of climate change.

Oppenheimer, M.; Hsiang, S. M.; Kopp, R. E.

2012-12-01

214

COBRA ATD multispectral camera response model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new multispectral camera response model has been developed in support of the US Marine Corps (USMC) Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis (COBRA) Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) Program. This analytical model accurately estimates response form five Xybion intensified IMC 201 multispectral cameras used for COBRA ATD airborne minefield detection. The camera model design is based on a series of camera response curves which were generated through optical laboratory test performed by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division, Coastal Systems Station (CSS). Data fitting techniques were applied to these measured response curves to obtain nonlinear expressions which estimates digitized camera output as a function of irradiance, intensifier gain, and exposure. This COBRA Camera Response Model was proven to be very accurate, stable over a wide range of parameters, analytically invertible, and relatively simple. This practical camera model was subsequently incorporated into the COBRA sensor performance evaluation and computational tools for research analysis modeling toolbox in order to enhance COBRA modeling and simulation capabilities. Details of the camera model design and comparisons of modeled response to measured experimental data are presented.

Holmes, V. Todd; Kenton, Arthur C.; Hilton, Russell J.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H.

2000-08-01

215

Professional Responsibility in Crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some rare, often catastrophic, events present in stark terms a need for careful reflection over the role of attorneys in our society and their ethical duties as members of the legal profession. The devastation caused by both Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 certainly falls within this category. Professor Colbert uses these events as

Douglas L. Colbert

2008-01-01

216

Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This specific…

Samejima, Fumiko

2008-01-01

217

Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based…

Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

2013-01-01

218

Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER) and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachersâ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the modelâs implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6) developed during a year and a half (about 330 h ), several lessons (minimodules) dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of studentsâ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a) Teachersâ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their studentsâ knowledge; (b) teachersâ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c) a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d) the formation of a community of practice; and (e) acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachersâ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

2007-04-24

219

Impact of feeling responsible for adverse events on doctors' personal and professional lives: the importance of being open to criticism from colleagues  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the impact of adverse events that had caused patient injury and for which the doctor felt responsible, and the experience of acceptance of criticism among colleagues. Design: Self-reports based on postal questionnaires to 1616 doctors. Setting: Norway. Participants: A representative sample of 1318 active doctors. Results: 368/1294 (28%) reported that they had experienced at least one adverse event with serious patient injury. Being male and working within a surgical discipline (including anaesthesiology, obstetrics and gynaecology) significantly increased the probability of such reports. 38% of the events had been reported to official authorities and, for 17% of doctors, the incident had a negative impact on their private life; 6% had needed professional help. 50% and 54%, respectively, found it difficult to criticise colleagues for their ethically or professionally unacceptable conduct. Doctors who found it easy to criticise colleagues also reported having received more support from their colleagues after a serious patient injury. Conclusion: Male surgeons report the highest prevalence of adverse events. Criticism for professionally and ethically unacceptable conduct is difficult to express among doctors. More acceptance of criticism of professional conduct may not only prevent patient harm, but may also give more support to colleagues who have experienced serious patient injury.

Aasland, O; Forde, R

2005-01-01

220

Addressing the hidden curriculum: understanding educator professionalism.  

PubMed

Several authors agree that student observations of behaviors are a far greater influence than prescriptions for behavior offered in the classroom. While these authors stress the importance of modeling of professional relationships with patients and colleagues, at times they have fallen short of acknowledging the importance of the values inherent in the role of the professional educator. This includes relationships and concomitant behaviors that stem from the responsibilities of being an educator based on expectations of institutional and societal culture. While medical professionals share standards of medical practice in exercising medical knowledge, few have obtained formal training in the knowledge, skills and attitudes requisite for teaching excellence. Attention needs to be paid to the professionalization of medical educators as teachers, a professionalization process that parallels and often intersects the values and behaviors of medical practice but remains a distinct and important body of knowledge and skills unto itself. Enhancing educator professionalism is a critical issue in educational reform, increasing accountability for meeting student needs. Assumptions regarding educator professionalism are subject to personal and cultural interpretation, warranting additional dialogue and research as we work to expand definitions and guidelines that assess and reward educator performance. PMID:17538835

Glicken, Anita Duhl; Merenstein, Gerald B

2007-02-01

221

Teacher Professional Continuum (TPC)  

NSF Publications Database

1. The Research Studies category now includes three levels of projects: Exploratory Research Projects that are limited in scope, Full Scale Research Projects that are larger studies, and Research on Models for Professional Learning that study professional development models. Full Scale Research Projects, Research on Models and Full Development Resource projects should also budget for the participation an additional project team member. TPC supports three subcategories of research projects: ...

222

Reflective professionalism: interpreting CanMEDS' "professionalism"  

PubMed Central

Residency training in the Netherlands is to be restructured over the coming years. To this end a general competence profile for medical specialists has been introduced. This profile is nearly the same as the Canadian CanMEDS 2000 model, which describes seven general areas of medical specialist competence, one of which is professionalism. In order to establish a training programme for residents and their instructors based on this competence, it is necessary to develop a vision that does justice to everyday medical practice. The two most prevailing views of professionalism—as personal, or as a behavioural characteristic—fall short of this. Only when professionalism is understood as reflective professionalism does it encompass the fundamental contextuality of medical treatment. This means that the focus of training and assessment must be shifted to accountability for treatment.

Verkerk, M A; de Bree, M J; Mourits, M J E

2007-01-01

223

Exposure-Response Modeling of Clinical End Points Using Latent Variable Indirect Response Models  

PubMed Central

Exposure–response modeling facilitates effective dosing regimen selection in clinical drug development, where the end points are often disease scores and not physiological variables. Appropriate models need to be consistent with pharmacology and identifiable from the time courses of available data. This article describes a general framework of applying mechanism-based models to various types of clinical end points. Placebo and drug model parameterization, interpretation, and assessment are discussed with a focus on the indirect response models.

Hu, C

2014-01-01

224

Mayak film dosimeter response studies, part II: response models.  

PubMed

A study was performed of energy and angular responses of the film dosimeters that were used for worker monitoring at the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA) in 1948-1992. The study used experimental data from tests with three types of individual film dosimeters, and the data were used to determine the dosimeters' energy and angular response characteristics in the range from 9 keV to Co energies, with the dosimeters exposed both free-in-air and on-phantom at horizontal and vertical rotation. Mathematical models of the dosimeters were developed to calculate the response characteristics of the dosimeters. The models of the film dosimeters were validated by comparing calculations to measurements. The models were then used as the basis for individual dose reconstruction in realistic photon spectra and worker exposure geometries at the Mayak PA workplaces. Reconstructed individual doses have been included in the Mayak worker database "Doses-2005" that is used for epidemiological studies of the Mayak workers' radiation exposures and subsequent health effects. PMID:17693773

Smetanin, M; Vasilenko, E K; Lyubarskaya, I; Knyazev, V; Gorelov, M; Scherpelz, R I; Fix, J J

2007-09-01

225

‘Train the Trainer’ Model: Implications for Health Professionals and Farm Family Health in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for

Susan Brumby; Andrew Smith

2009-01-01

226

Undergraduates' Intentions to Take Examinations for Professional Certification: Examinations of Four Competing Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research on professional certification has primarily focused on graduate certificates in intensive care nursing, writing certificates for practitioners, maintenance of certification in radiation oncology, and the certification of teachers and surgeons. Research on certification in the domain of business and management from an…

Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Hsu, Ping-Kun; Chiou, Wen-Bin

2012-01-01

227

Managing invasive alien species with professional and hobby farmers: Insights from ecological-economic modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biosecurity is a great challenge to policy-makers globally. Biosecurity policies aim to either prevent invasions before they occur or to eradicate and\\/or effectively manage the invasive species and diseases once an invasion has occurred. Such policies have traditionally been directed towards professional producers in natural resource based sectors, including agriculture. Given the wide scope of issues threatened by invasive species

M. G. Ceddia; J. Heikkilä; J. Peltola

2009-01-01

228

Implementing a Professional Development Model Using Gifted Education Strategies with All Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings of a 5-year study on using professional development to extend gifted education pedagogy to regular education programs. Following an executive summary, the 15 chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "Introduction and Overview of the 5-Year Study" (E. Jean Gubbins); (2) "Review of Literature" (Lori R.…

Gubbins, E. Jean; Westberg, Karen L.; Reis, Sally M.; Dinnocenti, Susan T.; Tieso, Carol L.; Muller, Lisa M.; Park, Sunghee; Emerick, Linda J.; Maxfield, Lori R.; Burns, Deborah E.

229

An Integrative Psychological Developmental Model of Supervision for Professional School Counselors-in-Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional school counselors (PSCs) at higher levels of psychological development negotiate complex situations and perform counselor-related tasks with empathy, flexibility, tolerance for ambiguity, boundary setting, personal and interpersonal awareness, and self-care more effectively than do individuals at lower levels of development. This…

Lambie, Glenn W.; Sias, Shari M.

2009-01-01

230

Integrative Psycho-Pedagogical Model of Early Childhood Education Professionals in the Kibbutzim in Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The changes in the kibbutzim went through a transition from a collectivistic society to an individualistic one, with an emphasis on family units. Parents found themselves in a new role that was not passed to them by inter-generational transfer, while caregivers lost their socialisation roles, expressed by exhaustion and low professional

Plotnik, Ronit; Wahle, Nira

2010-01-01

231

The Defining Issues Test and the Four Component Model: Contributions to Professional Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews studies examining effects of professional education on ethical development. Argues that most studies limit assessment to measuring moral judgment. Validates assessment methods for sensitivity, reasoning, role concept, and ethical implementation that could be adapted to provide individuals with a more complete picture of abilities needed…

Bebeau, Muriel J.

2002-01-01

232

After the Funding Flees: A How-To Model for Sustaining the Professional Development School Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article deals with one of the most important components of a professional development school (PDS) partnership--sustainability without funding. According to Ganesan, Das, Edwards, and Okogbaa (2004), sustainability is one of the most difficult components of actualizing a school-university partnership. The PDS partnership depicted in this…

Foster, Karen; Reed, Hope; McGinnis, Kreslyn

2009-01-01

233

Models for Effective and Scalable Teacher Professional Development. Research Report. ETS RR-09-07  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The minute-to-minute and day-by-day use of assessment for learning holds great potential to change the trajectory of student learning in U.S. classrooms. But without effective and scalable systems of professional development that actually lead teachers to adopt these practices, the utility and impact of assessment for learning will be quite…

Thompson, Marnie; Goe, Laura

2009-01-01

234

Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers' (N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed…

Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

2009-01-01

235

Differential Effects of Three Professional Development Models on Teacher Knowledge and Student Achievement in Elementary Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To identify links among professional development, teacher knowledge, practice, and student achievement, researchers have called for study designs that allow causal inferences and that examine relationships among features of interventions and multiple outcomes. In a randomized experiment implemented in six states with over 270 elementary teachers…

Heller, Joan I.; Daehler, Kirsten R.; Wong, Nicole; Shinohara, Mayumi; Miratrix, Luke W.

2012-01-01

236

A Model for Assessing the Effectiveness of Professional Development for Improving Student Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For most of the last 50 years, teachers and administrators have perceived professional development and the instructional role primarily in terms of what one individual does with classes of others. Teachers, like their students, were considered to be rather passive acceptors of the instruction, rather than active modifiers. Thus, there was very…

O'Connell, John Francis

2009-01-01

237

Teachers' Learning Journeys: The Quality Learning Circle as a Model of Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces an alternative approach to teacher professional development in New Zealand, known as the Quality Learning Circle (QLC), to show how it can empower teachers to become agents of change able to meet local needs alongside national agendas. (Contains 31 references.) (Authors/PKP)

Lovett, Susan; Gilmore, Alison

2003-01-01

238

Occupational stress and psychopathology in health professionals: an explorative study with the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model approach.  

PubMed

Occupational stress is a multivariate process involving sources of pressure, psycho-physiological distress, locus of control, work dissatisfaction, depression, anxiety, mental health disorders, hopelessness, and suicide ideation. Healthcare professionals are known for higher rates of occupational-related distress (burnout and compassion fatigue) and higher rates of suicide. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationships between occupational stress and some psychopathological dimensions in a sample of health professionals. We investigated 156 nurses and physicians, 62 males and 94 females, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess occupational stress [occupational stress inventory (OSI)], temperament (temperament evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego autoquestionnaire), and hopelessness (Beck hopelessness scale). The best Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes model with five OSI predictors yielded the following results: ?2(9) = 14.47 (p = 0.11); ?2/df = 1.60; comparative fit index = 0.99; root mean square error of approximation = 0.05. This model provided a good fit to the empirical data, showing a strong direct influence of casual variables such as work dissatisfaction, absence of type A behavior, and especially external locus of control, psychological and physiological distress on latent variable psychopathology. Occupational stress is in a complex relationship with temperament and hopelessness and also common among healthcare professionals. PMID:22632290

Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Spencer-Thomas, Sally; Ferracuti, Stefano; Erbuto, Denise; Lester, David; Candilera, Gabriella; Girardi, Paolo

2013-03-01

239

Unique Challenges, Hopeful Responses: A Handbook for Professionals Working with Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides information about emotional, behavioral, learning and developmental disabilities; disability-specific entitlements; and approaches for professionals who work with youthful offenders with disabilities throughout the juvenile process. Chapter 1 describes characteristics of common disabilities among youthful offenders and details…

Garfinkel, Lili Frank; Jordan, Dixie; Kragthorpe, Candy

240

Unique Challenges, Hopeful Responses: A Handbook for Professionals Working with Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook provides information about emotional, behavioral, and learning and developmental disabilities; disability-specific entitlements; and approaches for professionals who work with youthful offenders with disabilities throughout the juvenile process. Chapter 1 describes characteristics of common disabilities among youthful offenders and…

Garfinkel, Lili Frank; Jordan, Dixie; Goldberg, Paula; Pernu, Caryn; Bill, Lissa A.

241

Red Cells Responses of Professional Soccer Players Submitted to Specific Training Methods in the Intensity of the Anaerobic Threshold  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to observe the effect of three different methods of training in the red cells of the professional soccer players, from 2 nd division in the Rio de Janeiro Championship. The sample was composed by 20 individu- als of the masculine gender, being selected of randomized form, the age of the group were of 23,42 ± 6,5 years.

André Luiz Marques Gomes; Ignácio Antônio Seixas-da-Silva; Jorge Diaz Otañez; Franz Kanifis; Sílvio Romero; Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas

2009-01-01

242

Professionalism and American Librarianship.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper traces a brief history of the development of American librarianship as a profession and examines the social climate from which it emerged. Several traditional and modern models of professionalism are discussed and applied to librarianship. Shor...

L. R. Oberg

1980-01-01

243

Dose-Response Model for Lassa Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article develops dose-response models for Lassa fever virus using data sets found in the open literature. Dose-response data were drawn from two studies in which guinea pigs were given subcutaneous and aerosol exposure to Lassa virus. In one study, six groups of inbred guinea pigs were inoculated subcutaneously with doses of Lassa virus and five groups of out-bred guinea

Sushil B. Tamrakar; Charles N. Haas

2008-01-01

244

Modelling Placebo Response via Infinite Mixtures  

PubMed Central

Non-specific treatment response, also known as placebo response, is ubiquitous in the treatment of mental illness, particularly in treating depression. The study of placebo effect is complicated because the factors that constitute non-specific treatment effects are latent and not directly observed. A flexible infinite mixture model is introduced to model these nonspecific treatment effects. The infinite mixture model stipulates that the non-specific treatment effects are continuous and this is contrasted with a finite mixture model that is based on the assumption that the non-specific treatment effects are discrete. Data from a depression clinical trial is used to illustrate the model and to study the evolution of the placebo effect over the course of treatment.

Petkova, Eva

2010-01-01

245

An Introduction to Polytomous Item Response Theory Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that polytomous item response theory (IRT) models are appropriate for Likert scale and other polytomous item types. Presents polytomous IRT models, including graded response, nominal response, partial credit, and rating scale models. (Author/NB)

De Ayala, R. J.

1993-01-01

246

The Professional Development of Teachers in Australia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the concept of and various forms of professional development in Australia, examining the personal professional development plans required in some Australian states and focusing on the effectiveness of professional development, teacher response to professional development, and the dynamic interaction between three elements necessary for…

Ling, Lorraine M.; MacKenzie, Noella

2001-01-01

247

Professional Behaviors for the Beginning Teacher.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers must be more than effective classroom instructors; they must also be good employees and behave professionally. This article discusses issues related to teacher professionalism; positive attitude/friendliness; relationships with professionals, students, and parents; professional responsibilities outside the classroom; teachers as role…

Morehead, Michael A.

1998-01-01

248

Professional Trust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the concept of professional trust and argues that trust is an essential component of what it means to be a professional. The first part of the paper discusses the nature of trust in general and attempts to establish two main points: that we are all involved in relationships of trust and that all trust involves risk. The second…

Frowe, Ian

2005-01-01

249

Action research as a professional development model for the teaching of writing in early stage one\\/stage one classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature addressing the professional development of teachers is abundant, presenting many different components of what constitutes successful professional development. An investigation of the literature suggests that the overwhelming tendency has been to provide professional development opportunities for teachers external to their classroom and school setting, and frequently neglecting to consider the individual teachers professional needs. The purpose of this

Lisa K Kervin

2004-01-01

250

Advanced Atmospheric Transport Modeling for Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Local and regional weather forecasts are an important component of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) response capabilities in the event of hazardous accidental releases to the atmosphere. The fate of radiological or chemical releases can be determined by providing winds and turbulence input to atmospheric transport models. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) system consists of a network of computers and instruments that collect meteorological data from towers situated throughout the 800 square kilometer site, display updated results every 15 minutes, and supplies real-time data to a suite of personal computer (PC) based Gaussian dispersion models for assessing downwind hazards. It has been the primary consequence assessment tool for emergency response for many years. Several years ago, the SRS began using an advanced three-dimensional numerical model, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) as a source of local forecast data for the basic WIND system models. The information RAMS provides to these dispersion models is spatially homogeneous. However, recently a more complete utilization of the spatially inhomogeneous RAMS forecasts has been realized by using a three-dimensional stochastic Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) to advect and disperse particles representing pollutant mass in the atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design and implementation of LPDM for use on a PC for real-time emergency response applications at the SRS.

Buckley, R.L.

2002-06-24

251

Integrative psycho?pedagogical model of early childhood education professionals in the kibbutzim in Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The changes in the kibbutzim went through a transition from a collectivistic society to an individualistic one, with an emphasis on family units. Parents found themselves in a new role that was not passed to them by inter?generational transfer, while caregivers lost their socialisation roles, expressed by exhaustion and low professional self?esteem. This crisis gave rise to the ‘integrative psycho?pedagogical

Ronit Plotnik; Nira Wahle

2010-01-01

252

Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ (N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical\\u000a content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative\\u000a measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed\\u000a lessons

Claudia Khourey-Bowers; Christopher Fenk

2009-01-01

253

Cognitive models in training health professionals to protect patients' confidential information.  

PubMed

Recent advances in theories of learning and knowledge acquisition in culturally-situated environments have illuminated the role of cognition in changing behavior, and in turn on influencing performance for the long term. One such advance focuses on the relationship between explicit formal training and implicit knowledge acquired through daily interactive activities in schools and organizations. The former relates more to instruction regarding the policy issues whereas the latter is tied closely to cultural, moral and organizational values. In this paper, we draw on these theories of cognition and learning to show the shift in thinking that is needed regarding education of health professionals, including steps required to assure that the protection of confidential information becomes part of their routine practices. Illustrative examples are used to show the nature of conceptual change in the health professional's knowledge organization and reasoning strategies that is necessary for more sustained behavior change with regards to protecting data confidentiality and privacy of individual patients. This re-conceptualization is intended to be reflected at various levels of training and education for health professionals, including influences on personal and organizational practices as well as revisions in medical-school and graduate-medical curricula. PMID:11154965

Patel, V L; Arocha, J F; Shortliffe, E H

2000-11-01

254

Evaluation of Online, On-Demand Science Professional Development Material Involving Two Different Implementation Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report presents pilot-test results for a science professional development program featuring online, on-demand materials developed by the National Science Teachers Association. During the spring 2006 semester, 45 middle school teachers from three different school districts across the United States participated in a professional development program designed to facilitate content knowledge and skills in the area of Newtonian force and motion. Participants from one of the school districts experienced a full-day instructor-led workshop along with two web-based seminars with a content-area expert. This was followed by a 4-week period of time in which they had access to self-directed, online, on-demand instructional materials that included activities, information, simulations, examples, and practice with immediate feedback over the targeted outcomes. Participants from the two other school districts only had access to the online materials with no instructor-led experience. This report documents positive gains in achievement as well as levels of confidence in teaching the material within all of the professional development groups. Data about the use of specific features within the online material are included, as well as completion rates and attitude survey results. Recommendations for future study are also included.

Sherman, Greg; Byers, Al; Rapp, Steve

2008-02-01

255

Roles and responsibilities of health care professionals in combating environmental degradation and social injustice: education and activism.  

PubMed

This article describes the causes and health consequences of environmental degradation and social injustice. These issues, which impact primarily on the poor and underserved (both in the United States and internationally) are rarely or inadequately covered in the curriculums of traditional health care professions. The discussion offers ways for health care professionals to promote equality and justice and uses the example of Rudolph Virchow's social activism to illustrate how one physician can lead society toward major public health gains. There is also an examination of the roles of institutions and organisations in enhancing environmental preservation and promoting social justice. Specific curricular suggestions from history and the humanities are offered for those teaching and mentoring new health professionals. PMID:19205317

Donohoe, Martin

2008-01-01

256

Advanced Atmospheric Transport Modeling for Emergency Response  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local and regional weather forecasts are an important component of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) response capabilities in the event of hazardous accidental releases to the atmosphere. The fate of radiological or chemical releases can be determined by providing winds and turbulence input to atmospheric transport models. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) system consists of

Buckley

2002-01-01

257

Mesoscale atmospheric modeling for emergency response  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric transport models for emergency response have traditionally utilized meteorological fields interpolated from sparse data to predict contaminant transport. Often these fields are adjusted to satisfy constraints derived from the governing equations of geophysical fluid dynamics, e.g. mass continuity. Gaussian concentration distributions or stochastic models are then used to represent turbulent diffusion of a contaminant in the diagnosed meteorological fields. The popularity of these models derives from their relative simplicity, ability to make reasonable short-term predictions and, most important, execution speed. The ability to generate a transport prediction for an accidental release from the Savannah River Site in a time frame which will allow protective action to be taken is essential in an emergency response operation.

O'Steen, B.L.; Fast, J.D.

1992-01-01

258

Mesoscale atmospheric modeling for emergency response  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric transport models for emergency response have traditionally utilized meteorological fields interpolated from sparse data to predict contaminant transport. Often these fields are adjusted to satisfy constraints derived from the governing equations of geophysical fluid dynamics, e.g. mass continuity. Gaussian concentration distributions or stochastic models are then used to represent turbulent diffusion of a contaminant in the diagnosed meteorological fields. The popularity of these models derives from their relative simplicity, ability to make reasonable short-term predictions and, most important, execution speed. The ability to generate a transport prediction for an accidental release from the Savannah River Site in a time frame which will allow protective action to be taken is essential in an emergency response operation.

O`Steen, B.L.; Fast, J.D.

1992-12-31

259

Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect

An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

Ragaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

260

Collaborative action learning: a professional development model for educational innovation in nursing.  

PubMed

The paper describes the processes and outcomes of a major curriculum innovation which was conducted by a collaborative multi-disciplinary team (nurse academics, educational developers and software developers). The paper argues that collaborative professional development in pedagogical innovation in nursing can be successfully supported by action learning as a framework for practice. In presenting this argument the paper draws on the experience of the School of Nursing and Midwifery (SNM) at the University of Tasmania in integrating high-fidelity simulation-based learning into an existing undergraduate case-based learning curriculum in the three year Bachelor of Nursing (BN). PMID:17716945

Marlow, Annette; Spratt, Christine; Reilly, Amanda

2008-05-01

261

The response of mental health professionals to clients seeking help to change or redirect same-sex sexual orientation  

PubMed Central

Background we know very little about mental health practitioners' views on treatments to change sexual orientation. Our aim was to survey a representative sample of professional members of the main United Kingdom psychotherapy and psychiatric organisations about their views and practices concerning such treatments. Methods We sent postal questions to mental health professionals who were members of British Psychological Society, the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. Participants were asked to give their views about treatments to change homosexual desires and describe up to five patients each, whom they has treated in this way. Results Of 1848 practitioners contacted, 1406 questionnaires were returned and 1328 could be analysed. Although only 55 (4%) of therapists reported that they would attempt to change a client's sexual orientation if one consulted asking for such therapy, 222 (17%) reported having assisted at least one client/patient to reduce or change his or her homosexual or lesbian feelings. 413 patients were described by these 222 therapists: 213 (52%) were seen in private practice and 117 (28%) were not followed up beyond the period of treatment. Counselling was the commonest (66%) treatment offered and there was no sign of a decline in treatments in recent years. 159 (72%) of the 222 therapists who had provided such treatment considered that a service should be available for people who want to change their sexual orientation. Client/patient distress and client/patient autonomy were seen as reasons for intervention; therapists paid attention to religious, cultural and moral values causing internal conflict. Conclusion A significant minority of mental health professionals are attempting to help lesbian, gay and bisexual clients to become heterosexual. Given lack of evidence for the efficacy of such treatments, this is likely to be unwise or even harmful.

Bartlett, Annie; Smith, Glenn; King, Michael

2009-01-01

262

NGC1300 dynamics - II. The response models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stellar response in a spectrum of potentials describing the barred spiral galaxy NGC1300. These potentials have been presented in a previous paper and correspond to three different assumptions as regards the geometry of the galaxy. For each potential we consider a wide range of ?p pattern speed values. Our goal is to discover the geometries and the ?p supporting specific morphological features of NGC1300. For this purpose we use the method of response models. In order to compare the images of NGC1300 with the density maps of our models, we define a new index which is a generalization of the Hausdorff distance. This index helps us to find out quantitatively which cases reproduce specific features of NGC1300 in an objective way. Furthermore, we construct alternative models following a Schwarzschild-type technique. By this method we vary the weights of the various energy levels, and thus the orbital contribution of each energy, in order to minimize the differences between the response density and that deduced from the surface density of the galaxy, under certain assumptions. We find that the models corresponding to ?p ~ 16 and 22 kms-1kpc-1 are able to reproduce efficiently certain morphological features of NGC1300, with each one having its advantages and drawbacks. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile: programme ESO 69.A-0021. E-mail: ckalapot@phys.uoa.gr (CK); patsis@academyofathens.gr (PAP); pgrosbol@eso.org (PG)

Kalapotharakos, C.; Patsis, P. A.; Grosbøl, P.

2010-10-01

263

A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

2012-01-01

264

Population-expression models of immune response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immune response to a pathogen has two basic features. The first is the expansion of a few pathogen-specific cells to form a population large enough to control the pathogen. The second is the process of differentiation of cells from an initial naive phenotype to an effector phenotype which controls the pathogen, and subsequently to a memory phenotype that is maintained and responsible for long-term protection. The expansion and the differentiation have been considered largely independently. Changes in cell populations are typically described using ecologically based ordinary differential equation models. In contrast, differentiation of single cells is studied within systems biology and is frequently modeled by considering changes in gene and protein expression in individual cells. Recent advances in experimental systems biology make available for the first time data to allow the coupling of population and high dimensional expression data of immune cells during infections. Here we describe and develop population-expression models which integrate these two processes into systems biology on the multicellular level. When translated into mathematical equations, these models result in non-conservative, non-local advection-diffusion equations. We describe situations where the population-expression approach can make correct inference from data while previous modeling approaches based on common simplifying assumptions would fail. We also explore how model reduction techniques can be used to build population-expression models, minimizing the complexity of the model while keeping the essential features of the system. While we consider problems in immunology in this paper, we expect population-expression models to be more broadly applicable.

Stromberg, Sean P.; Antia, Rustom; Nemenman, Ilya

2013-06-01

265

Modeling the constitutive response of bimodal metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical response of metals with a bimodal grain-size distribution is modeled using the secant Mori-Tanaka (M-T) mean-field approach. The actual microstructure of bimodal metals involves a grain size distribution in the ultrafine and coarse regimes; the model approximates this in terms of two phases with distinct grain sizes and with specific volume fractions. The model is applied to two bimodal materials: the Al-5083 alloys of Lavernia et al. and the Cu of Wang et al. In both the materials, the predictions agree well with the experiments. In the bimodal Al alloy, the effect of extrusion on the anisotropy in yield strength and flow behavior is also addressed. Finally, based on the model predictions, an empirical expression of the Voce form is proposed to describe the overall flow behavior of both bimodal metals.

Joshi, S. P.; Ramesh, K. T.; Han, B. Q.; Lavernia, E. J.

2006-08-01

266

Modelling electromagnetic responses from seismic data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper considers the problem of recovering subsurface resistivities from controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. CSEM data obey a diffusion equation in a conducting earth. Methods used in the processing of seismic data, which obey the wave equation, do not apply to CSEM data and there is no theory that allows resistivities to be extracted directly from CSEM data. The conventional approach is to perform iterative forward modelling, or inversion. Synthetic data are created using the data acquisition configuration and a subsurface resistivity model. The model is adjusted until the synthetic data fit the measured data. However, there are many different models that fit the data equally well and it is a problem to select the range of most likely models. Constraints are required. Seismic data yield complementary information, which can constrain the range of possible resistivity models that fit the data. We present a methodology to estimate resistivities from seismic velocities. We apply known methods, including rock physics to transform velocities into resistivities, depth trends to account for depth-dependent rock parameters, structural information to include lithology variations, and uncertainty analysis to estimate the error of the data, the physical parameters, and the model itself. The result of applying this methodology to data in the neighbourhood of the CSEM data is a range of background resistivity models that is consistent with the known seismic velocities. We successfully apply our methodology to real data from the North Sea. We use a well log from a well in a field nearby to calibrate our model, and well logs from our study field to verify our transform. The transform proves robust at depths where we have well control, but uncertainty remains in the shallower and deeper sections. We use these background resistivity models to calculate synthetic electromagnetic responses, and compare them with measured multi-transient electromagnetic data. Our initial resistivity model represents the horizontal resistivities, as we calibrate our transform with resistivity measurements from (almost) vertical well logs, which measure horizontal resistivity. Since the study area contains horizontally-layered sediments in the shallow part, this allows the shallow section to be approximated by a one-dimensional (1D) model. CSEM data at short source-receiver offsets are sensitive to the shallow layers. Allowing the shallow layers to be anisotropic in 1D inversions of the measured CSEM data improves the agreement of the synthetic and real data. The shallow section of the background resistivity model is improved and an estimate of the anisotropy is obtained. Separate step response and impulse response anisotropic inversions are used to determine the most accurate anisotropy factor. This approach yields a detailed background resistivity model from seismic velocities. We believe this is far better than the usual approach of a uniform resistivity background, or a resistivity background from fast, unconstrained 1D inversions. The next step is to create in this way a three-dimensional resistivity background model, and compare the resulting CSEM responses to the measured CSEM data.

Werthmüller, Dieter; Ziolkowski, Anton; Wright, David

2013-04-01

267

New disruptive technologies: the information professional’s role  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is noted how the traditional role of the information professional has been changed by the responsibility for assessing and introducing the wide range of new information technologies (IT). In addition to considering the content and value to the organization of new information resources, information professionals must also consider the readiness of the organization to accept their introduction and the

Susan Hallam

2001-01-01

268

A Model to Systematically Employ Professional Judgment in the Bayesian Decision Analysis for a Semiconductor Industry Exposure Assessment.  

PubMed

Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA) uses Bayesian statistics to integrate multiple types of exposure information and classify exposures within the exposure rating categorization scheme promoted in American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) publications. Prior distributions for BDA may be developed from existing monitoring data, mathematical models, or professional judgment. Professional judgments may misclassify exposures. We suggest that a structured qualitative risk assessment (QLRA) method can provide consistency and transparency in professional judgments. In this analysis, we use a structured QLRA method to define prior distributions (priors) for BDA. We applied this approach at three semiconductor facilities in South Korea, and present an evaluation of the performance of structured QLRA for determination of priors, and an evaluation of occupational exposures using BDA. Specifically, the structured QLRA was applied to chemical agents in similar exposure groups to identify provisional risk ratings. Standard priors were developed for each risk rating before review of historical monitoring data. Newly collected monitoring data were used to update priors informed by QLRA or historical monitoring data, and determine the posterior distribution. Exposure ratings were defined by the rating category with the highest probability-i.e., the most likely. We found the most likely exposure rating in the QLRA-informed priors to be consistent with historical and newly collected monitoring data, and the posterior exposure ratings developed with QLRA-informed priors to be equal to or greater than those developed with data-informed priors in 94% of comparisons. Overall, exposures at these facilities are consistent with well-controlled work environments. That is, the 95th percentile of exposure distributions are ?50% of the occupational exposure limit (OEL) for all chemical-SEG combinations evaluated; and are ?10% of the limit for 94% of chemical-SEG combinations evaluated. PMID:24274915

Torres, Craig; Jones, Rachael; Boelter, Fred; Poole, James; Dell, Linda; Harper, Paul

2014-06-01

269

Examining the Relationship between Teachers' Attitudes and Motivation toward Web-Based Professional Development: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to investigate elementary school teachers' attitudes and motivation toward web-based professional development. The relationship between teachers' attitudes and motivation was explored using the AWPD (Attitudes toward Web-based Professional Development) and MWPD (Motivation toward Web-based Professional Development)…

Chien, Hui-Min; Kao, Chia-Pin; Yeh, I-Jan; Lin, Kuen-Yi

2012-01-01

270

A Resource Guide for Establishing Local Professional Development Committees. Transforming Professional Development in Ohio.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph offers information and resources to help school districts build the capacity to transform professional development. Part 1, "Ohio's Professional Development System," discusses the transformation of professional development in Ohio and explains what professional development is. Part 2, "Requirements and Responsibilities," discusses…

Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

271

Revisiting Professional Dispositions: Research Redux  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the authors progressed through their research agenda last year, they contributed an article to "School Library Monthly" entitled "Forecasting Professional Dispositions of School Librarians" (January 2011, 54-56) wherein they described a Delphi study they conducted in the fall of 2009 that identified professional dispositions based on responses

Bush, Gail; Jones, Jami L.

2011-01-01

272

Replication-deficient mutant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 targets professional antigen presenting cells and induces efficient CD4+ T helper responses.  

PubMed

Both neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T-cells are necessary to control a viral infection. However, vigorous T helper responses are essential for their elicitation and maintenance. Here we show that a recombinant replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 vector encoding the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein p17 (T0-p17) was capable of infecting professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) in vitro and in vivo. The injection of T0-p17 in the mouse dermis generated a strong p17-specific CD4+ T helper response preceding both p17-specific humoral and effector T cell responses. Moreover, we show that T0-p17 infection did not interfere with the endogenous processing of the transgene encoded antigen, since infected APCs were able to evoke a strong recall response in vitro. Our results demonstrate that replication-deficient HSV vectors can be appealing candidates for the development of vaccines able to trigger T helper responses. PMID:17553721

Fiorentini, Simona; Marconi, Peggy; Avolio, Manuela; Marini, Elena; Garrafa, Emirena; Caracciolo, Sonia; Rossi, Daniele; Bozac, Alexandra; Becker, Pablo D; Gentili, Francesca; Facchetti, Fabio; Guzman, Carlos A; Manservigi, Roberto; Caruso, Arnaldo

2007-07-01

273

Assessing Professionalism in Early Medical Education: Experience with Peer Evaluation and Self-evaluation in the Gross Anatomy Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: As today's healthcare model moves toward more streamlined and corporate industrialism, it is our responsibility, as doctors, to ensure the integrity of medicine's foundation in professionalism. The erosion of professional values not only creates a climate of animosity, but reverberates negatively to impact the development of students, who model their behaviour after those they most respect. This hazard has

AJ Krych; SW Carmichael; W Pawlina

2005-01-01

274

Four Ages of Professionalism and Professional Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper conceptualizes the development of teacher professionalism as passing through four historical phases in many countries: the pre-professional age, the age of the autonomous professional, the age of the collegial professional and the fourth age-post-professional or postmodern. Current experiences and perceptions of teacher professionalism and professionalization, it is argued, draw on all these ages. Conclusions are drawn regarding new

Andy Hargreaves

2000-01-01

275

Evaluating the Teacher-Intern-Professor Model in a Professional Development School Partnership Setting Using a Bayesian Approach to Mix Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two needs of Georgia State University Professional Development School Partnerships are to show increases in both student academic achievement and teacher efficacy. The Teacher-Intern-Professor (TIP) Model was designed to address these needs. The TIP model focuses on using the university and school partnership to support Georgia State University…

Ogletree, August E.

2009-01-01

276

EvalPartners: Facilitating the Development of a New Model of Voluntary Organization for Professional Evaluation to Support the Development of National Evaluation Capacities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In many less developed democracies Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluation (VOPEs) face the challenges of low demand for evaluation and the resulting low economic capacity of national evaluation communities. The VOPE model that evolved in well-developed democracies is not directly applicable under these circumstances, so a new model

Kosheleva, Natalia; Segone, Marco

2013-01-01

277

Communities of practice as a professional and organizational development strategy in local public health organizations in Quebec, Canada: an evaluation model.  

PubMed

Communities of practice (CoPs) are among the professional development strategies most widely used in such fields as management and education. Though the approach has elicited keen interest, knowledge pertaining to its conceptual underpinnings is still limited, thus hindering proper assessment of CoPs' effects and the processes generating the latter. To address this shortcoming, this paper presents a conceptual model that was developed to evaluate an initiative based on a CoP strategy: Health Promotion Laboratories are a professional development intervention that was implemented in local public health organizations in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). The model is based on latest theories on work-group effectiveness and organizational learning and can be usefully adopted by evaluators who are increasingly called upon to illuminate decision-making about CoPs. Ultimately, validation of this conceptual model will help advance knowledge and practice pertaining to CoPs as well as professional and organizational development strategies in public health. PMID:24726072

Richard, Lucie; Chiocchio, François; Essiembre, Hélène; Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Lamy, Geneviève; Champagne, François; Beaudet, Nicole

2014-02-01

278

Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The central dilemma of staff development--training to perform a task versus professional learning and growth--must be addressed by distance education managers. Distance education organizations need to be learning organizations, fostering a culture of learning among students and staff. (SK)

Lentell, Helen

1994-01-01

279

Professional Bookshelf  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Exemplary professional development publications in the areas of general instruction, science education, and literacy instruction in the elementary grades are described in each issue of Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle. This free, online magazine is structured around the seven essential principles of climate literacy and emphasizes integrating science and literacy skills in grades K-5.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

2011-07-01

280

Professional Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This serial issue contains 12 articles on the theme of "Professional Development," specifically about how teachers in the Bread Loaf Rural Teacher Network (BLRTN) are fostering their own and each other's development as teachers. The BLRTN consists of approximately 260 rural teachers in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, New…

Benson, Chris, Ed.

2000-01-01

281

Professional Technician  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center explains various aspects of being a professional technician such as tool controls, security and safety, team qualifications, equipment care and calibration, certifications and job qualifications, systems thinking and troubleshooting, and personal integrity and ethics. This one minute video is one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

2011-07-27

282

Professional Whining.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whining about not being treated as professionals buys teachers little respect. Teaching is hard work, but confers some plush benefits, while discouraging voluntary self-improvement efforts. The notion that pay should be commensurate with work is a noble delusion. Nannies and mothers are also underpaid. (MLH)

Lorenz, Sarah

2000-01-01

283

Modeling of Cardiovascular Response to Weightlessness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It was the hypothesis of this Project that the Simple lack of hydrostatic pressure in microgravity generates several purely physical reactions that underlie and may explain, in part, the cardiovascular response to weightlessness. For instance, hydrostatic pressure within the ventricles of the heart may improve cardiac performance by promoting expansion of ventricular volume during diastole. The lack of hydrostatic pressure in microgravity might, therefore, reduce diastolic filling and cardiac performance. The change in transmural pressure is possible due to the difference in hydrostatic pressure gradients between the blood inside the ventricle and the lung tissue surrounding the ventricle due to their different densities. On the other hand, hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature may reduce cardiac inlet pressures because of the typical location of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level (the level at which pressure remains constant throughout changes in gravity). Additional physical responses of the body to changing gravitational conditions may influence cardiovascular performance. For instance, fluid shifts from the lower body to the thorax in microgravity may serve to increase central venous pressure (CVP) and boost cardiac output (CO). The concurrent release of gravitational force on the rib cage may tend to increase chest girth and decrease pedcardial pressure, augmenting ventricular filling. The lack of gravity on pulmonary tissue may allow an upward shifting of lung mass, causing a further decrease in pericardial pressure and increased CO. Additional effects include diuresis early in the flight, interstitial fluid shifts, gradual spinal extension and movement of abdominal mass, and redistribution of circulatory impedance because of venous distention in the upper body and the collapse of veins in the lower body. In this project, the cardiovascular responses to changes in intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, in intravascular hydrostatic pressure and, to a limited extent, in extravascular and pedcardial hydrostatic pressure were investigated. A complete hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system was built and flown aboard the NASA KC-135 and a computer model was developed and tested in simulated microgravity. Results obtained with these models have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume. When combined with the acute increase in ventricular pressure associated with the elimination of hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature and the resultant cephalad fluid shift with the models in the upright position, however, stroke volume increased in the models. Imposition of a decreased pedcardial pressure in the computer model and in a simplified hydraulic model increased stroke volume. Physiologic regional fluid shifting was also demonstrated by the models. The unifying parameter characterizing of cardiac response was diastolic ventricular transmural pressure (DVDELTAP) The elimination of intraventricular hydrostatic pressure in O-G decreased DVDELTAP stroke volume, while the elimination of intravascular hydrostatic pressure increased DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the upright posture, but reduced DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the launch posture. The release of gravity on the chest wall and its associated influence on intrathoracic pressure, simulated by a drop in extraventricular pressure4, increased DVDELTAP ans stroke volume.

Sharp, M. Keith

1999-01-01

284

Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses  

SciTech Connect

Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

1984-11-25

285

Polychotomous Rasch Model and Dichotomization of Graded Responses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper discusses the compatibility of the polychotomous Rasch model with dichotomization of the response continuum. It is argued that in the case of graded responses, the response categories presented to the subject are essentially an arbitrary polych...

P. G. W. Jansen E. E. Roskam

1983-01-01

286

Developing a Professional Competence Model for Nursing Education. Final Report, Research Report Number Nine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A generic competence model for effective nursing performance was developed and compared with nurses' perceptions of job elements that discriminate outstanding nursing performance and that are critical in the selection and education of nurses. The model is to be used to validate the nursing faculty's existing competence model for nursing education…

Mentkowski, Marcia; And Others

287

The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Implications for Professional School Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model, which is designed to help school counselors integrate students' academic and personal-social development into their group work. We first describe this group model in detail and then offer one case example of a middle school counselor using the ASE model to…

Steen, Sam; Henfield, Malik S.; Booker, Beverly

2014-01-01

288

Professional musicians listen differently to music.  

PubMed

Introduction: Experience-based adaptation of emotional responses is an important faculty for cognitive and emotional functioning. Professional musicians represent an ideal model in which to elicit experience-driven changes in the emotional processing domain. The changes of the central representation of emotional arousal due to musical expertise are still largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of experience-driven changes in the domain of emotional arousal. Therefore, the differences in perceived (subjective arousal via ratings) and physiologically measured (EEG) arousal between amateur and professional musicians were examined. Procedure: A total of 15 professional and 19 amateur musicians listened to the first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's 5th symphony (duration=?7.4min), during which a continuous 76-channel EEG was recorded. In a second session, the participants evaluated their emotional arousal during listening. In a tonic analysis, we examined the average EEG data over the time course of the music piece. For a phasic analysis, a fast Fourier transform was performed and covariance maps of spectral power were computed in association with the subjective arousal ratings. Results: The subjective arousal ratings of the professional musicians were more consistent than those of the amateur musicians. In the tonic EEG analysis, a mid-frontal theta activity was observed in the professionals. In the phasic EEG, the professionals exhibited an increase of posterior alpha, central delta, and beta rhythm during high arousal. Discussion: Professionals exhibited different and/or more intense patterns of emotional activation when they listened to the music. The results of the present study underscore the impact of music experience on emotional reactions. PMID:24637097

Mikutta, C A; Maissen, G; Altorfer, A; Strik, W; Koenig, T

2014-05-30

289

Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response

Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

2012-01-01

290

Formation of medical student professional identity: categorizing lapses of professionalism, and the learning environment  

PubMed Central

Background Acquiring the values of medical professionalism has become a critical issue in medical education. The purpose of this study was to identify lapses in professionalism witnessed by medical students during their four year MD curriculum, and to categorize, from the students’ perspective, who was responsible and the settings in which these occurred. Methods An electronic survey, developed by faculty and medical students, was sent to all students with two email reminders. It included quantitative responses and some open-ended opportunities for comments. All analyses were performed with SAS version 9.1. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the medical school curriculum. Thirty six percent of students had witnessed or been part of an exemplary demonstration of professionalism; 64% responded that they had witnessed a lapse of professionalism. At the pre-clerkship level, the most frequent lapses involved students: arrogance (42.2%), impairment (24.2%), followed by cultural or religious insensitivity (20.5%). At the clerkship level of training, where students are exposed to real clinical situations, the lapses involved primarily faculty (including preceptor and clinician) or other staff; these included arrogance (55.3%), breach of confidentiality (28.3%), and cultural or religious insensitivity (26.6%); impairment involved mostly students (25.5%). These findings are analyzed from the perspective of role modeling by faculty and in the context of the learning environment. Conclusions Medical students witnessed a lapse of professionalism involving both fellow students as well as faculty and administrative staff, in several domains. Results from this study emphasize the importance of role modeling and the need for faculty development, to improve the learning environment. This study adds to the limited emerging literature on the forces that influence medical student professional identity formation.

2014-01-01

291

The social environment during a post-match video presentation affects the hormonal responses and playing performance in professional male athletes.  

PubMed

This study examined the social environment effects during a post-match video presentation on the hormonal responses and match performance in professional male rugby union players. The study participants (n=12) watched a 1-hour video of mixed content (player mistakes and successes) from a match played 1day earlier in the presence of; (1) strangers who were bigger (SB), (2) strangers who were smaller (SS), (3) friends who were bigger (FB) and (4) friends who were smaller (FS). The salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) responses to a physical stress test were assessed 3days later, along with pre-match T levels and match-ranked performance 6-7days later. All treatments were associated with elevated T responses (% change from baseline) to the stress test with SS>SB and FB>FS. The C stress responses after the SS and SB interventions were both greater than FS and FB. On match-day, the FB approach was linked to higher T concentrations than SB and better ranked performance than FS and SS. The subsequent testing of a population sub-group (n=8) across a video (V) and a non-video (NV) presentation in a neutral social environment produced similar stress-test and performance outcomes, but pre-match T concentrations differed (V>NV). In conclusion, the presence of other males during a post-match video assessment had some influence on the hormonal responses of male athletes and match performance in the week that followed. Thus, the social environment during a post-match assessment could moderate performance and recovery in elite sport and, in a broader context, could be a possible modulator of human stress responses. PMID:24726389

Cook, Christian J; Crewther, Blair T

2014-05-10

292

Learning Skills of Professionalism: a Student-Led Professionalism Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Medical schools must address the fact that students embarking on careers in medicine are idealistic but have a vague understanding of the values and characteristics that define medical professionalism. Traditionally, we have relied primarily on unsystematic role modeling and lectures or seminars on related topics to teach professionalism. Methods: A committee of students and a faculty advisor created a

Margaret Horlick; Deirdre Masterton; Adina Kalet

293

The Haitian Health Cluster Experience: A comparative evaluation of the professional communication response to the 2010 earthquake and the subsequent cholera outbreak  

PubMed Central

The 2010 Haitian earthquake and consequent Cholera epidemic taxed the already fragile health system. A large number of humanitarian organizations participated in the disaster response and the health communication response was analysed. Health Cluster updates from both periods were analysed for contents with a World Health Organization draft check list for monitoring and evaluating the quality of epidemiological data contained in WHO and Health Cluster emergency reports. The Pan-American Health Organization Emergency Operations Centre reports from the Earthquake had the lowest score with an average score of 2.54/17 and the Health Cluster – Cholera reports had the highest average score of 11/17. There is a wide variety and quality of information published in terms of epidemiological information in emergency reports with a distinct difference found between the earthquake reporting and the cholera event. A comprehensive and modifiable template for emergency reporting could alleviate these differences and allow for improved reporting. Citation: Dhillon P, Annunziata G. The Haitian Health Cluster Experience: A comparative evaluation of the professional communication response to the 2010 earthquake and the subsequent cholera outbreak. PLOS Currents Disasters. 2012 Sep 5. doi: 10.1371/5014b1b407653.

Dhillon, Paul; Annunziata, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

294

The Haitian Health Cluster Experience: A comparative evaluation of the professional communication response to the 2010 earthquake and the subsequent cholera outbreak.  

PubMed

The 2010 Haitian earthquake and consequent Cholera epidemic taxed the already fragile health system. A large number of humanitarian organizations participated in the disaster response and the health communication response was analysed. Health Cluster updates from both periods were analysed for contents with a World Health Organization draft check list for monitoring and evaluating the quality of epidemiological data contained in WHO and Health Cluster emergency reports. The Pan-American Health Organization Emergency Operations Centre reports from the Earthquake had the lowest score with an average score of 2.54/17 and the Health Cluster - Cholera reports had the highest average score of 11/17. There is a wide variety and quality of information published in terms of epidemiological information in emergency reports with a distinct difference found between the earthquake reporting and the cholera event. A comprehensive and modifiable template for emergency reporting could alleviate these differences and allow for improved reporting. Citation: Dhillon P, Annunziata G. The Haitian Health Cluster Experience: A comparative evaluation of the professional communication response to the 2010 earthquake and the subsequent cholera outbreak. PLOS Currents Disasters. 2012 Sep 5. doi: 10.1371/5014b1b407653. PMID:23074693

Dhillon, Paul; Annunziata, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

295

Value Analysis: A Model of Personal and Professional Ethics in Marriage and Family Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents Ethics Model of Marriage and Family Counseling and its underlying assumptions. Analyzes six basic counseling values in relation to microsystems of counselor and client, mesosystem of counseling process, and societal value context as the macrosystem. Utilizes discussion of suicide to apply these values to the model. Includes 17 references.…

Thomas, Volker

1994-01-01

296

Models and Domains of Supervision and Their Relationship to Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author describes four models of supervision--administrative, traditional mental health, relationship-based, and mindfulness practice--with their corresponding domains of staff development. Each model's communication style, participant roles, and assumptions of how change occurs provide a framework for understanding the relative needs…

Schafer, William M.

2007-01-01

297

Market optimization for microgrid with Demand Response model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops a market optimization model for a microgrid with Demand Side Bidding (DSB) and Demand Response (DR) by residential consumers. Demand Response (DR) models have been developed by utilizing consumer behavior modeling by Price Elasticity Matrices (PEMs) considering different scenarios and levels of consumer rationality. These PEMs are utilized to calculate the levels of demand response for different

Jignesh Solanki; Naveen Venkatesan; Sarika Khushalani Solanki

2011-01-01

298

Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

2010-01-01

299

Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in contrast possessed no adhesion to the pure component C11EG6OH SAM at both temperatures examined, 25 and 40°C. The protein adhesion data to the mixed SAM also supports the hypothesis that the mixed SAM displays a non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it displays a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. Advancing contact angles obtained through tensiometry were used to find the surface free energy of the mixed SAM before and after the thermal response using the van Oss-Good-Chaudhury method. The surface tension values obtained, 42 and 38 mN/m for 22 and 40°C, respectively, are not dissimilar enough with regard to error to make conclusions. In a similar manner, the surface free energy of another mixed SAM composed of alkyl and trimethylamine thiolates was also calculated. PNIPAAm brushes grown on a silicon substrate by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were imaged by AFM and characterized by XPS. The height of the resulting brushes could be controlled from ˜5 to 55 nm by reaction time. A thermal response was observed for polymer brushes with a length greater than 20 nm. For polymer brush lengths greater than 20 nm, the static contact angle at 22°C was 35° and varied from 60 to 80° at 40°C. The thermal response was also observed using the captive bubble method. Force-distance curves of the PNIPAAm brushes were taken with an unmodified silicon nitride AFM cantilever at incremental temperature steps. At room temperature the force-distance data was fit to the Alexander-de Gennes model resulting in a hydrated polymer length of 235 nm. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Hertz model and changed from ˜80 MPa at 26°C to ˜350 MPa at 40°C. The solvent condition of the Alexander-de Gennes model was set to the case of good solvent and showed close match to the force-distance data at 26°C. The match was not as close when the solvent condition was set to theta solvent condition and compared to the force-distance data at 40°C. Finally, the effective diffusion coefficients of a dye were obtained for the uptake, encapsulation, a

Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

300

Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE  

SciTech Connect

The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reanyansky, Anatoly D [DSTO, AUSTRALIA; Bourne, Neil K [AWE, UK; Millett, Jeremy C F [AWE, UK

2009-01-01

301

A Systematic Quantitative-Qualitative Model: How To Evaluate Professional Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The proposed evaluation model provides for the assignment of relative weights to each criterion, and establishes a weighting system for calculating a quantitative-qualitative raw score for each service activity of a faculty member being reviewed. (Author)

Yoda, Koji

1973-01-01

302

Connecting to professional knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of students’ educational outcomes tend to be based on rather simple input–output models. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that more informed theoretical perspectives are appropriate to analyses of quantitative data on professional learning processes. It is suggested that ‘connection to knowledge’ and ‘wanting structure’ are appropriate concepts in this respect. Results from a study of college

2007-01-01

303

Facilitating Respectful Diversity Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changing demographics continue to challenge professional development programs to prepare school personnel to serve a rapidly expanding diverse student body. Popular diversity professional development models are on a continuum. They range from preparing teachers to design themes and activities that are culturally relevant all the way to enabling…

Bell, David L.; Thomas, Earl E.

2007-01-01

304

The Collier Chautauqua program: A formative evaluation of the implementation of the Iowa Chautauqua model of professional development and its effectiveness in improving science teaching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A formative evaluation of the implementation of the Iowa Chautauqua model of professional development in Collier County, Florida, was conducted during 1995-97, focusing on implementation issues and teacher enhancement. Major findings are as follows: Implementation issues. (1) Development of a shared vision through collaborative interaction between teachers, school administrators, and district administrators is critical to successful program implementation. (2) When a new program is implemented on a district-wide basis, the success of implementation depends upon how well the program matches local goals and needs and how ready the district and teachers are to make changes necessary for implementing the tenets of the program. (3) Development of proper understanding of desired pedagogical approaches requires modeling of these approaches in program activities, with explicit attention drawn to the modeling. (4) Successful implementation of desired pedagogical approaches in the classroom is critically influenced by the support and continual feedback teachers receive from district administrators, building administrators, and their peers. (5) Unwavering commitment of district and school administrators is essential for encouraging more teachers to participate in the program, leading to district-wide implementation without making it mandatory. Teacher Enhancement. (1) Participants developed leadership skills in mentorship, teamwork, presenting at professional meetings, and assuming responsibility within the program. (2) Participants learned to focus more on student questions and concerns, value prior conceptions of students, and develop instructional activities accordingly. They grew in their understanding and use of the constructivist pedagogy. (3) Participants attitude toward teaching in general and science in particular improved markedly, leading to new excitement and enthusiasm toward their profession. (4) Participants became more confident about teaching science. Elementary teachers reported spending more time on science activities and integrating science topics more with other curricular areas. (5) Participants collaborated more with their peers, administrators, and local community resources in improving instructional activities, providing more meaningful learning experiences for their students. (6) Participants integrated more technological resources than they did formerly, helping students explore avenues otherwise inaccessible. This investigation reveals that teacher enhancement is closely related to changed practice, which is critically influenced by implementation issues at broader levels.

Dass, Pradeep Maxwell

1997-11-01

305

A Model of Levels of Involvement and Strategic Roles of Human Resource Development (HRD) Professionals as Facilitators of Due Diligence and the Integration Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a model of the levels of involvement and key strategic roles of human resource development (HRD) professionals during mergers and acquisitions (M&A), as supported by literary findings. Traditionally, mergers and acquisitions are initiated by the parent company’s finance expertise, with little or no input from its HRD expertise. Often, when HRD is involved in the process, it

Tammy L. McIntyre

2004-01-01

306

District Professional Development Models as a Way to Introduce Primary-School Teachers to Natural Science Curriculum Reforms in One District in South Africa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a study that investigated whether district continued professional development (CPD) sufficiently prepared teachers for their classroom practice. Analysis of CPD models used with primary-school natural science teachers in a district in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa was conducted. Findings indicated that the…

Bantwini, Bongani D.

2009-01-01

307

Is Authentic Cross-Cultural Collaboration Possible between Universities and Public Schools within a Professional Development School Model? Perceptions from the Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2003, a state in the Rocky Mountain region combined the concept of partner schools (Goodlad, 1993) and the model of a professional development school (Holmes Group, 1986, 1995) to develop four university public school partnerships. This study asked two guiding questions: Is authentic cross-cultural collaboration possible between a university…

Parkinson, Debra D.; Muir Welsh, Kate

2009-01-01

308

Stochastic earthquake modeling and dynamic response analysis  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model is developed to simulate the ground motion during an earthquake, taking into consideration the dislocation source, seismic-wave propagation, reflection, and transmission in horizontally stratified earth media. The transfer-matrix formulation is used to relate the dislocation source and the displacement response on the surface. This formulation also provides a convenient means to impose the boundary conditions. A new numerical procedure is devised for the construction of reflection and transmission matrices for each medium layer so that the problem of numerical instability in the computation can be circumvented. The dislocation process at the source is modeled as a random pulse train. It is shown that the generated ground motion is also a random-pulse train which has an evolutionary spectral-density representation, and the random vibration analysis of linear and nonlinear structures under such an excitation can be simply formulated. Several artificial seismograms are generated based on different assumed earth structures. The final part of the thesis is devoted to the exact solutions of nonlinear system subject to external and parametric random excitations. A general procedure is given for systematically solving the reduced Fokker-Planck equations based on the concept of detailed balance.

Yong, Y.

1987-01-01

309

TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS  

SciTech Connect

Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.

Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J. [Earth and Planetary Science Department, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sasselov, Dimitar D., E-mail: henning@fas.harvard.ed [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2009-12-20

310

A model for using a concept inventory as a tool for students' assessment and faculty professional development.  

PubMed

This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in nine linked undergraduate microbiology courses. To support evidence-based curriculum reform, we administered our HPI Concept Inventory as a pre- and postsurvey to approximately 400 students each year since 2006. The resulting data include student scores as well as their open-ended explanations for distractor choices. The data have enabled us to address curriculum reform goals of 1) reconciling student learning with our expectations, 2) correlating student learning with background variables, 3) understanding student learning across institutions, 4) measuring the effect of teaching techniques on student learning, and 5) demonstrating how our courses collectively form a learning progression. The analysis of the concept inventory data has anchored and deepened the team's discussions of student learning. Reading and discussing students' responses revealed the gap between our understanding and the students' understanding. We provide evidence to support the concept inventory as a tool for assessing student understanding of HPI concepts and faculty development. PMID:21123686

Marbach-Ad, Gili; McAdams, Katherine C; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S; Mosser, David; Quimby, B Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V; Smith, Ann C

2010-01-01

311

A Model for Using a Concept Inventory as a Tool for Students' Assessment and Faculty Professional Development  

PubMed Central

This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in nine linked undergraduate microbiology courses. To support evidence-based curriculum reform, we administered our HPI Concept Inventory as a pre- and postsurvey to approximately 400 students each year since 2006. The resulting data include student scores as well as their open-ended explanations for distractor choices. The data have enabled us to address curriculum reform goals of 1) reconciling student learning with our expectations, 2) correlating student learning with background variables, 3) understanding student learning across institutions, 4) measuring the effect of teaching techniques on student learning, and 5) demonstrating how our courses collectively form a learning progression. The analysis of the concept inventory data has anchored and deepened the team's discussions of student learning. Reading and discussing students' responses revealed the gap between our understanding and the students' understanding. We provide evidence to support the concept inventory as a tool for assessing student understanding of HPI concepts and faculty development.

McAdams, Katherine C.; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W.; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S.; Mosser, David; Quimby, B. Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V.

2010-01-01

312

The Principal's Role in Evaluating Professional Support Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among the principal's most powerful tools for school improvement and effectiveness are program and personnel evaluation. Professional specialists, however, are especially difficult to evaluate. This document presents the Professional Support Personnel (PSP) Evaluation Model for evaluating nonteaching, nonadministrative professionals. These…

Stronge, James H.; Tucker, Pamela D.

1995-01-01

313

Emerging E-Trends and Models in Teacher Education and Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of the knowledge era, teacher education needs to prepare teachers to face the changing technological contexts and to model pedagogies and tools for better forms of learning. Despite much enthusiasm about the roles of technology in education, its role in transforming teacher learning, in ways aligned with advances in the learning…

Laferriere, Therese; Lamon, Mary; Chan, Carol K. K.

2006-01-01

314

Explore Elementary Teachers' Professional Knowledge of Guiding Science Fair Product by Using Different Instruction Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research is about using two different instruction models, "theory course combined with sample introduction" and "theory course combined with case method teaching", to instruct elementary teachers on how to guide the science fair product in two courses (16 and 12 teachers in each class) and observe their guiding tactics after the instructed…

Lu, Chow-Chin

2013-01-01

315

Using the 360° multisource feedback model to evaluate teaching and professionalism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Student ratings have dominated as the primary and, frequently, only measure of teaching performance at colleges and universities for the past 50 years. Recently, there has been a trend toward augmenting those ratings with other data sources to broaden and deepen the evidence base. The 360? multisource feedback (MSF) model used in management and industry for half a century

Ronald A. Berk

2009-01-01

316

Satisfaction with Components of the Therapeutic Model: Perspectives of Consumers and Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We provide information about consumer and provider perceptions using a mixed-model pilot study within the Intensive Mental Health Project (IMHP), a school-based treatment service for children with SED and their families. Caregiver, youth, and provider questionnaires developed for this project elicited quantitative and qualitative information on…

Lazicki, Tammy A.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Roberts, Michael C.; Benson, Eric R.

2008-01-01

317

THE PRIVATE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL AS A CRUCIBLE FOR INNOVATIVE MODELS OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article discusses the development of an interdisciplinary vehicle for the delivery of mental health services that is based in a private psychiatric hospital. One of many possible models, it offers an example of ways psychologists can develop innovative service programs that 1) preserve a \\

A. Steven Frankel

1988-01-01

318

Prediction of Participation in Continuing Professional Education: A Test of Two Behavioral Intention Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of 551 Alberta veterinarians' intention to participate in continuing education revealed that the Triandis model of behavioral intention had greater predictive utility than the Fishbein-Azjen. Participation was largely determined by behavioral intention, which was influenced by attitude toward the program. (SK)

Yang, Baiyn; And Others

1994-01-01

319

Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a "reverse science fair" in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study…

Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

2006-01-01

320

Discrete Latent Markov Models for Normally Distributed Response Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Van de Pol and Langeheine (1990) presented a general framework for Markov modeling of repeatedly measured discrete data. We discuss analogical single indicator models for normally distributed responses. In contrast to discrete models, which have been studied extensively, analogical continuous response models have hardly been considered. These…

Schmittmann, Verena D.; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Neale, Michael C.

2005-01-01

321

Applications of Item Response Models to NAEP Mathematics Exercise Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Item response model applications to National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) data specifically aimed at the uses of item response models in mathematics item banking are discussed. Approaches for addressing goodness of fit were organized into three categories: Checks on model assumptions, expected features, and additional model

Hambleton, Ronald K.; And Others

322

Professional Education. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aspects of professional competence and professional socialization that are being emphasized in professional education programs are summarized. Of concern are generic outcomes of professional preparation, outcome-related issues and trends common to professional education in diverse fields, some problems that concern professional educators, and…

Stark, Joan S.; And Others

323

Adding heat to the live-high train-low altitude model: a practical insight from professional football  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine with a parallel group study design the performance and physiological responses to a 14-day off-season ‘live high-train low in the heat’ training camp in elite football players. Methods Seventeen professional Australian Rules Football players participated in outdoor football-specific skills (32±1°C, 11.5?h) and indoor strength (23±1°C, 9.3?h) sessions and slept (12 nights) and cycled indoors (4.3?h) in either normal air (NORM, n=8) or normobaric hypoxia (14±1?h/day, FiO2 15.2–14.3%, corresponding to a simulated altitude of 2500–3000?m, hypoxic (HYP), n=9). They completed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 2 (Yo-YoIR2) in temperate conditions (23±1°C, normal air) precamp (Pre) and postcamp (Post). Plasma volume (PV) and haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured at similar times and 4?weeks postcamp (4WPost). Sweat sodium concentration ((Na+)sweat) was measured Pre and Post during a heat-response test (44°C). Results Both groups showed very large improvements in Yo-YoIR2 at Post (+44%; 90% CL 38, 50), with no between-group differences in the changes (?1%; ?9, 9). Postcamp, large changes in PV (+5.6%; ?1.8, 5.6) and (Na+)sweat (?29%; ?37, ?19) were observed in both groups, while Hbmass only moderately increased in HYP (+2.6%; 0.5, 4.5). At 4WPost, there was a likely slightly greater increase in Hbmass (+4.6%; 0.0, 9.3) and PV (+6%; ?5, 18, unclear) in HYP than in NORM. Conclusions The combination of heat and hypoxic exposure during sleep/training might offer a promising ‘conditioning cocktail’ in team sports.

Buchheit, M; Racinais, S; Bilsborough, J; Hocking, J; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Bourdon, P C; Voss, S; Livingston, S; Christian, R; Periard, J; Cordy, J; Coutts, A J

2013-01-01

324

Evaluation of the Pacific CHILD Professional Development Program. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Pacific Communities with High-performance in Literacy Development (Pacific CHILD) Professional Development Model research project was initiated in response to an overwhelming need in PREL's Pacific service region for improvement of teachers' knowledge and instructional practices in early reading. This report examines the question of the…

Chesswas, Roger; Keir, Scott S.; Leung, Eunice; Terada, Wayne

2005-01-01

325

Family-Professional Partnerships: Practice that Matches Philosophy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses current models of family-professional partnerships and barriers to true collaboration, including turf issues, the nature of trust, expertise differences, and differences in scope of responsibility. Offers recommendations for practice, including questions for self-evaluation. Asserts that as educators change their practice and ways of…

File, Nancy

2001-01-01

326

Music Teacher Practice and Identity in Professional Development Partnerships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1995, the author has been the university music educator responsible to a professional development partnership. Over an 8-year span, she has collected narratives of experience from approximately 100 pre-service music teachers, following, to some extent, the research model of Connelly and Clandinin. In developing their notion of "personal…

Conkling, Susan Wharton

2004-01-01

327

Professional development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

2013-03-01

328

Technology Mentor Fellowship Program: A Technology Integration Professional Development Model for Classroom Teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This multi-year program was based on the premise a digital divide exists between the technology skill levels of public school faculties compared to those of undergraduate teacher education candidates. The Technology Mentor Fellowship Program (TMFP) matched technologically-proficient pre-service teachers with K-12 teachers to model technology as an instructional tool. A consortium consisting of seven school districts and a university designed

Jon J. Denton; Trina J. Davis; Ben L. Smith; R. Arlen Strader; Francis E. Clark; Li Wang

329

DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: III. STATISTICAL MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of dose-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. Recently, statistical models appropriate for developmental toxicity testing have been developed and applied (Rai...

330

Development and Calibration of an Item Response Model That Incorporates Response Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes an item response model that incorporates response time. A parameter estimation procedure using the EM algorithm is developed. The procedure is evaluated with both real and simulated test data. The results suggest that the estimation procedure works well in estimating model parameters. By using response time data, estimation…

Wang, Tianyou; Hanson, Bradley H.

2005-01-01

331

An Item Response Theory Model for Incorporating Response Time Data in Binary Personality Items  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a general item response theory model for personality items that allows the information provided by the item response times to be used to estimate the individual trait levels. The submodel describing the item response times is a modification of Thissen's log-linear model and is based on the distance-difficulty hypothesis in…

Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

2007-01-01

332

Public High School Assistant Principals' Reports of Self-Efficacy in Performing Their Professional Job Responsibilities in Accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe public high school assistant principals' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) in performing their professional job responsibilities in accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's (ELCC) Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership (National Policy Board…

Bell, Susan A.

2011-01-01

333

Modeling mechanical response of heterogeneous materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heterogeneous materials are ubiquitous in nature and as synthetic materials. These materials provide unique combination of desirable mechanical properties emerging from its heterogeneities at different length scales. Future structural and technological applications will require the development of advanced light weight materials with superior strength and toughness. Cost effective design of the advanced high performance synthetic materials by tailoring their microstructure is the challenge facing the materials design community. Prior knowledge of structure-property relationships for these materials is imperative for optimal design. Thus, understanding such relationships for heterogeneous materials is of primary interest. Furthermore, computational burden is becoming critical concern in several areas of heterogeneous materials design. Therefore, computationally efficient and accurate predictive tools are highly essential. In the present study, we mainly focus on mechanical behavior of soft cellular materials and tough biological material such as mussel byssus thread. Cellular materials exhibit microstructural heterogeneity by interconnected network of same material phase. However, mussel byssus thread comprises of two distinct material phases. A robust numerical framework is developed to investigate the micromechanisms behind the macroscopic response of both of these materials. Using this framework, effect of microstuctural parameters has been addressed on the stress state of cellular specimens during split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A voronoi tessellation based algorithm has been developed to simulate the cellular microstructure. Micromechanisms (microinertia, microbuckling and microbending) governing macroscopic behavior of cellular solids are investigated thoroughly with respect to various microstructural and loading parameters. To understand the origin of high toughness of mussel byssus thread, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based optimization framework has been developed. It is found that two different material phases (collagens) of mussel byssus thread are optimally distributed along the thread. These applications demonstrate that the presence of heterogeneity in the system demands high computational resources for simulation and modeling. Thus, Higher Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) based surrogate modeling concept has been proposed to reduce computational complexity. The applicability of such methodology has been demonstrated in failure envelope construction and in multiscale finite element techniques. It is observed that surrogate based model can capture the behavior of complex material systems with sufficient accuracy. The computational algorithms presented in this thesis will further pave the way for accurate prediction of macroscopic deformation behavior of various class of advanced materials from their measurable microstructural features at a reasonable computational cost.

Pal, Siladitya

334

Physiological response curve analysis using nonlinear mixed models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonlinear response curves are often used to model the physiological responses of plants. These models are preferable to polynomials because the coefficients fit to the curves have biological meaning. The response curves are often generated by repeated measurements on one subject, over a range of values for the environmental variable of interest. However, the typical analysis of differences in coefficients

Michael S. Peek; Estelle Russek-Cohen; Alexander D. Wait; Irwin N. Forseth

2002-01-01

335

Item Response Modeling with Sum Scores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the distinctions between classical test theory and item response theory is that the former focuses on sum scores and their relationship to true scores, whereas the latter concerns item responses and their relationship to latent scores. Although item response theory is often viewed as the richer of the two theories, sum scores are still…

Johnson, Timothy R.

2013-01-01

336

Latent trait models and dichotomization of graded responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses thecompatibility of the polychotomous Rasch model with dichotomization of the response continuum. It is argued that in the case of graded responses, the response categories presented to the subject are essentially an arbitrary polychotomization of the response continuum, ranging for example from total rejection or disagreement to total acceptance or agreement of an item or statement. Because

Paul G. W. Jansen; Edward E. Roskam

1986-01-01

337

Modeling Multiple Response Processes in Judgment and Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, I show how item response models can be used to capture multiple response processes in psychological applications. Intuitive and analytical responses, agree-disagree answers, response refusals, socially desirable responding, differential item functioning, and choices among multiple options are considered. In each of these cases, I…

Bockenholt, Ulf

2012-01-01

338

Robust Estimation of Latent Ability in Item Response Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of response disturbances such as guessing, cheating, or carelessness, item response models often can only approximate the "true" individual response probabilities. As a consequence, maximum-likelihood estimates of ability will be biased. Typically, the nature and extent to which response disturbances are present is unknown, and, therefore,…

Schuster, Christof; Yuan, Ke-Hai

2011-01-01

339

The Professional Phagocyte Dictyostelium discoideum as a Model Host for Bacterial Pathogens  

PubMed Central

The use of simple hosts such as Dictyostelium discoideum in the study of host pathogen interactions offers a number of advantages and has steadily increased in recent years. Infection-specific genes can often only be studied in a very limited way in man and even in the mouse model their analysis is usually expensive, time consuming and technically challenging or sometimes even impossible. In contrast, their functional analysis in D. discoideum and other simple model organisms is often easier, faster and cheaper. Because host-pathogen interactions necessarily involve two organisms, it is desirable to be able to genetically manipulate both the pathogen and its host. Particularly suited are those hosts, like D. discoideum, whose genome sequence is known and annotated and for which excellent genetic and cell biological tools are available in order to dissect the complex crosstalk between host and pathogen. The review focusses on host-pathogen interactions of D. discoideum with Legionella pneumophila, mycobacteria, and Salmonella typhimurium which replicate intracellularly.

Bozzaro, Salvatore; Eichinger, Ludwig

2011-01-01

340

Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

Woods, Carol M.

2008-01-01

341

Multidimensional Vector Model of Stimulus-Response Compatibility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study proposes and examines the multidimensional vector (MDV) model framework as a modeling schema for choice response times. MDV extends the Thurstonian model, as well as signal detection theory, to classification tasks by taking into account the influence of response properties on stimulus discrimination. It is capable of accounting…

Yamaguchi, Motonori; Proctor, Robert W.

2012-01-01

342

The Gradual Increase of Responsibility Model: Coaching for Teacher Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the gradual increase of responsibility (GIR) model for teacher coaching (Collet, 2008), an adaptation of Pearson and Gallagher's (1983) Gradual Release of Responsibility model. In GIR, instructional coaches model, make recommendations, ask probing questions, affirm teachers' appropriate decisions, and praise in order to provide…

Collet, Vicki S.

2012-01-01

343

Estimating the Nominal Response Model under Nonnormal Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nominal response model (NRM), a much understudied polytomous item response theory (IRT) model, provides researchers the unique opportunity to evaluate within-item category distinctions. Polytomous IRT models, such as the NRM, are frequently applied to psychological assessments representing constructs that are unlikely to be normally…

Preston, Kathleen Suzanne Johnson; Reise, Steven Paul

2014-01-01

344

Professionals' views on interprofessional stroke team functioning  

PubMed Central

Introduction The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39%) completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1) nested in 34 teams (level 2). Results Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members’ social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams’ performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals’ interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.

Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

2011-01-01

345

Response functions in the CC3 iterative triple excitation model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The derivation of response functions for coupled cluster models is discussed in a context where approximations can be introduced in the coupled cluster equations. The linear response function is derived for the approximate coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples model CC3. The linear response functions for the approximate triples models, CCSDT-1a and CCSDT-1b, are obtained as simplifications to the CC3

Ove Christiansen; Henrik Koch; Poul Jørgensen

1995-01-01

346

Response modeling methodology (RMM) - maximum likelihood estimation procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Response modeling methodology (RMM) is a new approach for empirical modeling. ML estimation procedures for the RMM model are developed. For relational modeling, the RMM model is estimated in two phases. In the first phase, the structure of the linear predictor (LP) is determined and its parameters estimated. This is accomplished by combining canonical correlation analysis with linear regression analysis.

Haim Shore

2005-01-01

347

Resilience and professional chaplaincy: a paradigm shift in focus.  

PubMed

Research into the area of resilience provides a challenge and a great opportunity for professional chaplaincy. In this article, we will consider the challenge that the research primarily of George Bonanno of Columbia University offers to the traditional, clinical perspectives and assessments of professional chaplains serving in health care. Secondly, we will propose the practical implications for a wider paradigm and an expanded focus on intentionality and interventions of chaplains. Resilience is seen as a positive response possibility for those facing potentially traumatic events. It is understood to be a predominant response to traumatic events more often than the grief recovery model usually presumed to be active. Resilience has heuristic value and merits being factored in to professional chaplaincy as it relates to patient assessment, interventions, interdisciplinary care, staff and corporate support, and transcultural usefulness. PMID:24579955

Spidell, Steven

2014-01-01

348

Blurring the boundaries between professional and para-professional catalogers at California State University, Northridge  

Microsoft Academic Search

What used to be a clear-cut division between the duties of professional and para-professional catalogers has become blurred in many libraries. The authors will illustrate this point by discussing the evolution of responsibilities held by para-professional and professional catalogers over the course of a 10-year period in the Cataloging Department at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). Comparisons will be made

Jina Choi Wakimoto; Gina R Hsiung

2000-01-01

349

Professional Development of Early Childhood Administrators Within A Professional Development School (PDS) Learning Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATORS WITHIN A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOL (PDS) LEARNING COMMUNITY\\u000aGinger LuAnne Zierdt, Ph.D. University of Nebraska, 2009\\u000aAdvisor: Marilyn L. Grady\\u000aThe traditional roles of early childhood educators have expanded to include management and leadership responsibilities. Through the stories and observations of early childhood administrators who participated in a Professional Learning Community within a Professional

Ginger L Zierdt

2009-01-01

350

Generalized Model for Semiconductor Radiation Response Prediction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Study in the fourth quarter of the program extended the electrical performance and radiation response predictions of the DTL gate and differential amplifier microcircuits. In the DTL gate study, electrical performance characterization included the d-c tra...

J. P. Raymond W. W. Chang R. Budris

1968-01-01

351

Modeling of Cardiovascular Response to Weightlessness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It was the hypothesis of this Project that the Simple lack of hydrostatic pressure in microgravity generates several purely physical reactions that underlie and may explain, in part, the cardiovascular response to weightlessness. For instance, hydrostatic...

M. K. Sharp

1999-01-01

352

Modeling Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A number of procedures have been used to analyze nonmonotonic binary data to predict the probability of response. Some classical procedures are the Up and Down strategy, the Robbins-Monro procedure, and other sequential optimization designs. Recently, non...

Q. J. Nottingham, J. B. Birch, B. A. Bodt

2001-01-01

353

Mathematical Model of Cardiovascular Response to Dynamic Exercise.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented, The model includes the pulsating heart, the systemic and pulmonary, circulation, a functional description of muscle exercise hyperemia, the mechanical effects of muscle cont...

E. Magosso A. Felicani M. Ursino

2001-01-01

354

CHARACTERIZATION OF A DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY DOSE-RESPONSE MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model (1) proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling developmental toxicity data. odifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biol...

355

Generals die in friendly fire, or modeling immune response to HIV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a kinetic model for CD8 T lymphocytes (CTL) whose purpose is to kill cells infected with viruses and intracellular parasites. Using a set of first-order nonlinear differential equations, the model predicts how numbers of different cell types involved in CTL response depend on time. The model postulates that CTL response requires continuous presence of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) comprised of macrophages and dendritic cells. It assumes that any virus present in excess of a threshold level activates APC that, in turn, activate CTL that expand in number and become armed "effector" cells. In the end, APC are deactivated after virus is cleared. The lack of signal from APC causes effector cells to differentiate, by default, into "transitory cells" that either die, or, in a small part, become long-lived memory cells. Viruses capable of infecting APC will cause premature retirement of effector CTL. If transitory cells encounter virus, which takes place after the premature depletion, CTL become anergic (unresponsive to external stimuli). The model is designed to fit recent experiments on primary CTL response to simian immunodeficiency virus closely related to HIV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The two viruses are known to infect APC and make them targets for CTL they are supposed to control. Both viruses cause premature depletion and anergy of CTL and persist in the host for life.

Rouzine, Igor M.; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi

2005-12-01

356

A New Mathematical Model for the Heat Shock Response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present in this paper a novel molecular model for the gene regulatory network responsible for the eukaryotic heat shock response. Our model includes the temperature-induced protein misfolding, the chaperone activity of the heat shock proteins, and the backregulation of their gene transcription. We then build a mathematical model for it, based on ordinary differential equations. Finally, we discuss the parameter fit and the implications of the sensitivity analysis for our model.

Petre, Ion; Mizera, Andrzej; Hyder, Claire L.; Mikhailov, Andrey; Eriksson, John E.; Sistonen, Lea; Back, Ralph-Johan

357

A Laboratory Model for Studying Response-Class Hierarchies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If the members of a functional response class occur in a predictable order, a response-class hierarchy is said to exist. Although this topic has received some attention in the applied literature, it remains relatively understudied. The purpose of the current investigation was to develop an analogue model of a response-class hierarchy. Children…

Shabani, Daniel B.; Carr, James E.; Petursdottir, Anna Ingeborg

2009-01-01

358

Seismic Response Modeling of Water Supply Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a comprehensive model for simulating the earthquake performance of water supply systems. The model is developed in conjunction with the water system operated by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) and validated throu...

P. Shi T. D. O'Rourke

2008-01-01

359

Professional hazards? The impact of models' body size on advertising effectiveness and women's body-focused anxiety in professions that do and do not emphasize the cultural ideal of thinness.  

PubMed

Previous experimental research indicates that the use of average-size women models in advertising prevents the well-documented negative effect of thin models on women's body image, while such adverts are perceived as equally effective (Halliwell & Dittmar, 2004). The current study extends this work by: (a) seeking to replicate the finding of no difference in advertising effectiveness between average-size and thin models (b) examining level of ideal-body internalization as an individual, internal factor that moderates women's vulnerability to thin media models, in the context of (c) comparing women in professions that differ radically in their focus on, and promotion of, the sociocultural ideal of thinness for women--employees in fashion advertising (n = 75) and teachers in secondary schools (n = 75). Adverts showing thin, average-size and no models were perceived as equally effective. High internalizers in both groups of women felt worse about their body image after exposure to thin models compared to other images. Profession affected responses to average-size models. Teachers reported significantly less body-focused anxiety after seeing average-size models compared to no models, while there was no difference for fashion advertisers. This suggests that women in professional environments with less focus on appearance-related ideals can experience increased body-esteem when exposed to average-size models, whereas women in appearance-focused professions report no such relief. PMID:15601505

Dittmar, Helga; Howard, Sarah

2004-12-01

360

Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

2012-01-01

361

The Professional Responsibilities of Professors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores why, as trustees of legal traditions, legal educators have an obligation to inspire and equip future lawyers to address issues such as access to justice, the regulation of lawyers' conduct, the pressures of legal workplaces, and the erosion of support for pro bono contributions. (EV)

Rhode, Deborah L.

2001-01-01

362

"Guessing" Parameter Estimates for Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two software packages commonly used for multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models require the user to input values for the lower asymptotes of the item response functions. One way of selecting these values is to estimate lower asymptotes with a one-dimensional IRT model and use those estimates as fixed values in the multidimensional…

DeMars, Christine E.

2007-01-01

363

Empowering Supervisees to Empower Others: A Culturally Responsive Supervision Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educating therapists to provide culturally responsive psychotherapy constitutes one of the major mental health challenges of this decade. This article describes a model of clinical supervision for assisting supervisees in developing culturally responsive therapy approaches. The model includesfourstages, which are intended to unfold in a systematic way, aimed at increasing cultural competence and awareness of sociocultural issues. The stages move

Natalie Porter

1994-01-01

364

Item Response Theory: Understanding the One-Parameter Rasch Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the limitations of Classical Test Theory, the purpose of Item Response Theory/Latent Trait Measurement models, and the step-by-step calculations in the Rasch measurement model. The paper explains how Item Response Theory (IRT) transforms person abilities and item difficulties into the same metric for test-independent and…

Cantrell, Catherine E.

365

Scoring Subscales Using Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several methods for estimating item response theory scores for multiple subtests were compared. These methods included two multidimensional item response theory models: a bi-factor model where each subtest was a composite score based on the primary trait measured by the set of tests and a secondary trait measured by the individual subtest, and a…

DeMars, Christine E.

2005-01-01

366

Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

2013-01-01

367

Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional

Zascerinska, Jelena

2010-01-01

368

Concept analysis of professional commitment in Iranian nurses  

PubMed Central

Aim: Professional commitment has been widely discussed during the last decade. There is no comprehensive definition about “professional commitment in Iranian nurses.” Hence, this study was conducted with the aim of analyzing the concept of professional commitment in Iranian nurses. Materials and Methods: Hybrid model was used in three phases. Firstly, in the theoretical phase, data were retrieved from the CINHAl, MEDLINE, PubMed, OVID, Google scholar, and SID databases. The literature search used the keywords “professional commitment” and “nursing.” The final sample included 27 papers published in English between 2001 and 2011.Secondly, in the fieldwork phase, deep interviews with five clinical nurses were carried out, and thirdly, in the final analytical phase, the obtained data from theoretical and fieldwork phases were combined and a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Results: Loyalty and tendency to remain in the profession and responsibility to the professional issues were extracted in theoretical phase. Commitment to promote caring abilities, satisfying of being a nurse, and belonging to the nursing profession were obtained in fieldwork phase. Finally, two main themes including “commitment to offering the best nursing care” and “commitment to promotion of the nursing profession” were extracted. Conclusion: Nursing is a humanistic profession; it has some particular characteristics due to the profession’s nature. In this paper, a definition composed of two main dimensions of professional commitment in nursing has been introduced.

Jafaragaee, Fateme; Parvizy, Soroor; Mehrdad, Neda; Rafii, Forough

2012-01-01

369

Posterior Predictive Assessment of Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Model checking in item response theory (IRT) is an underdeveloped area. There is no universally accepted tool for checking IRT models. The posterior predictive model-checking method is a popular Bayesian model-checking tool because it has intuitive appeal, is simple to apply, has a strong theoretical basis, and can provide graphical or numerical…

Sinharay, Sandip; Johnson, Matthew S.; Stern, Hal S.

2006-01-01

370

Posterior Predictive Model Checking for Multidimensionality in Item Response Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If data exhibit multidimensionality, key conditional independence assumptions of unidimensional models do not hold. The current work pursues posterior predictive model checking, a flexible family of model-checking procedures, as a tool for criticizing models due to unaccounted for dimensions in the context of item response theory. Factors…

Levy, Roy; Mislevy, Robert J.; Sinharay, Sandip

2009-01-01

371

Cultural Considerations with Response to Intervention Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Now that the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004) has been reauthorized, states have the option of discontinuing the use of IQ-achievement discrepancy formulas and using Response to Intervention (RTI) criteria as part of the special education identification process. This change has dramatic implications for…

Klingner, Janette K.; Edwards, Patricia A.

2006-01-01

372

Response to Intervention and the Pyramid Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Response to Intervention (RtI) is a systematic decision-making process that has gained widespread popularity as a problem-solving framework for organizing hierarchies of evidence-based interventions in the context of ongoing progress monitoring. Initially applied to literacy instruction, RtI is being incorporated into an expanding breadth of…

Fox, Lise; Carta, Judith; Strain, Phillip S.; Dunlap, Glen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

2010-01-01

373

MODEL OF TOXICANT RESPONSE IN ENGINEERED LIVER  

EPA Science Inventory

This project proposes to: engineer a tissue to mimic liver behavior (a so-called 3-Dimensional or 3D liver model); simulate liver toxicity by exposing the 3D liver model to two known toxicants ( carbon tetrachloride and 1,2 dichloroethylene); and ...

374

Modeling streamflow response from Minnesota peatlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

To aid in the development of Minnesota's 7 million acres of peatlands, and to evaluate the hydrologic impacts and reclamation options associated with such development, a Peatland Hydrologic Impact Model (PHIM) was devised. PHIM is a deterministic, continuous simulation model designed to simulate streamflow resulting from rainfall and snowmelt under both natural and altered (mined) conditions. It is largely physically

Guertin

1984-01-01

375

Building Mental Health Professionals' Decisional Models into Tests of Predictive Validity: The Accuracy of Contextualized Predictions of Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

To safely manage potentially violent patients in the community, mental health professionals (MHPs) must assess when and under what conditions a patient may be involved in a violent act. This study applies a more ecologically sensitive approach than past research by building the conditions that MHPs believe make patient violence more likely into tests of their predictive validity. In specific,

Jennifer L. Skeem; Edward P. Mulvey; Charles W. Lidz

2000-01-01

376

The "Whole Approach": An Investigation of a School-Based Practicum Model of Teacher Professional Development in ICT  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The question of what makes for effective teacher professional development in ICT is an enduring one. In a recent study in Queensland (Australia), we visited 19 rural and regional schools and interviewed teachers, administrators and ICT coordinators to find that a school-based practicum was effective in impacting the practice and beliefs of…

Lloyd, Margaret; Mcrobbie, Campbell

2005-01-01

377

An Innovative Model: Undergraduate Poster Sessions by Health Professional Majors as a Method for Communicating Chemistry in Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops the methods used to conduct poster sessions for undergraduate health professional majors. There are two main goals of the project. The first goal is to learn chemistry in the context of health professions, everyday activities and contemporary issues. The second goal is to continue to develop research and written and oral communication skills. The topics are chosen

Marie Dunstan; Pat Bassinger

1997-01-01

378

A Model for Using a Concept Inventory as a Tool for Students' Assessment and Faculty Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in…

Marbach-Ad, Gili; McAdams, Katherine C.; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W.; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S.; Mosser, David; Quimby, B. Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V.; Smith, Ann C.

2010-01-01

379

Chemistry Teachers' Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers' beliefs…

Rushton, Gregory T.; Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan

2011-01-01

380

The Reduction of Stigma in Schools: A New Professional Development Model for Empowering Educators to Support LGBTQ Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the rationale and design of The Reduction of Stigma in Schools—an innovative professional development program that aims to empower educators to create supportive learning environments for LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) students. Part of a larger evaluation study, the authors illustrate how the core design components are visible in participants’ experiences with the program itself and

Elizabethe C. Payne; Melissa Smith

2011-01-01

381

Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

Grus, Catherine L.

2009-01-01

382

Response modeling methodology (RMM) - a new approach to model a chemo-response for a monotone convex\\/concave relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modeling the variation of a response in terms of the variation transmitted to it by a related factor (or factors) comprises the bulk of the scientific and engineering research effort. Often, we may reasonably assume that the relationship between the response and the affecting factor (or a linear combination of factors) is monotone convex (concave). To model such a relationship,

Haim Shore

2003-01-01

383

From lecture to learning tasks: use of the 4C/ID model in a communication skills course in a continuing professional education context.  

PubMed

This article describes the use of four-component instructional design (4C/ID), a model to plan educational interventions for complex learning. This model was used to design a continuing education course on communication skills for health professionals in a context that is hierarchical and communal. The authors describe the 4C/ID model and provide an example of its application in designing the course. In the 4C/ID model, learning tasks serve as the backbone of the course, with lectures and other supportive information organized around them. The 4C/ID model is different from traditional models that base the course on lectures on different topics and connect part-task assignments to these topics. The use of the 4C/ID model to develop the educational intervention moves the paradigm from lectures to learning tasks to better prepare learners for real practice. PMID:23654295

Susilo, Astrid Pratidina; van Merriënboer, Jeroen; van Dalen, Jan; Claramita, Mora; Scherpbier, Albert

2013-06-01

384

Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

DeLoach, Richard

2010-01-01

385

Modeling response to repetitive promotional stimuli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marketers frequently include promotional stimuli which elicit some form of response from the recipient among the tactics used\\u000a to market products or services. Print ads, including 800 numbers which allow consumers to respond, and direct mail campaigns\\u000a are examples of such activities. Promotions of this nature are often repeated a number of times, thus providing several opportunities\\u000a to respond. Understanding

Richard J. Fox; Srinivas K. Reddy; Bharat Rao

1997-01-01

386

Critical gradient response of the Weiland model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The success the Weiland model has had in reproducing modulation experiments prompted this in-depth investigation into its behaviour as a critical gradient model (CGM). The critical gradient properties of the Weiland model is examined analytically and numerically and compared with the empirical CGM commonly used in experiment. A simplified Weiland CGM is derived in which the height-above-threshold dependence is not necessarily linear. Simultaneously, the validity of the empirical CGM was examined. It is shown that an effective threshold, which is higher than the instability threshold, can be obtained if pinches influence the diffusivity.

Asp, E.; Weiland, J.; Garbet, X.; Parail, V.; Strand, P.; JET EFDA contributors, the

2007-08-01

387

ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: MODELING THE INTRACELLULAR RESPONSE  

EPA Science Inventory

WE ARE DEVELOPING A MECHANISTIC MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE INTRATESTICULAR AND INTRAOVARIAN METABOLIC NETWORK THAT MEDICATES STEROID SYNTHESIS TO IDENTIFY A LINK NEW ROBUST MOLECULAR BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE THAT ARE INDICATIVE OF THE ULTIMATE ADVERSE EFFECTS....

388

Unified constitutive modeling for proportional and nonproportional cyclic plasticity responses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several features of cyclic plasticity, e.g. cyclic hardening/softening, ratcheting, relaxation, and their dependence on strain range, nonproportionality of loading, time, and temperature determine the stress-strain responses of materials under cyclic loading. Numerous efforts have been made in the past decades to characterize and model these responses. Many of these responses can be simulated reasonably by the existing constitutive models, but the same models would fail in simulating the structural responses, local stress-strain or global deformation. One of the reasons for this deficiency is that the constitutive models are not robust enough to simulate the cyclic plasticity responses when they interact with each other. This deficiency can be understood better or resolved by developing and validating constitutive models against a broad set of experimental responses and two or more of the responses interacting with each other. This dissertation develops a unified constitutive model by studying the cyclic plasticity features in an integrated manner and validating the model by simulating a broad set of proportional and nonproportional cyclic plasticity responses. The study demonstrates the drawbacks of the existing nonlinear kinematic hardening model originally developed by Chaboche and then develop and incorporate novel ideas into the model for improving its cyclic response simulations. The Chaboche model is modified by incorporating strain-range dependent cyclic hardening/softening through the kinematic hardening rule parameters, in addition to the conventional method of using only the isotropic hardening parameters. The nonproportional loading memory parameters of Tanaka and of Benallal and Marquis are incorporated to study the influence of nonproportionality. The model is assessed by simulating hysteresis loop shape, cyclic hardening-softening, cross-effect, cyclic relaxation, subsequent cyclic softening, and finally a series of ratcheting responses under uniaxial and biaxial loading responses. Next, it is demonstrated that the hysteresis loop shape and width can be improved by incorporation of time dependence (visco-effect) and a novel modeling scheme of backstress shift. Overall, this dissertation demonstrates a methodical and systematic development of a constitutive model for simulating a broad set of low-cycle fatigue responses.

Krishna, Shree

389

A model of plant canopy polarization response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sensors to remotely measure the linear polarization of ground scenes have been proposed for the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS), a satellite sensor system proposed to complement the Thematic Mapper. At present justification for a sensor on MRS to measure scene polarization is limited. This paper discusses a model for the amount of linearly polarized light reflected by the shiny leaves of such crops as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The theory demonstrates that, potentially, measurements of the linearly polarized light from a crop canopy may be used as an additional feature to discriminate between crops. Examination of the model suggests that, potentially, satellite polarization measurements may be used to monitor crop development stage, leaf water content, leaf area index, hail damage, and certain plant diseases. The model adds to the understanding of the potential information content of scene polarization measurements acquired by future satellite sensor systems such as MRS.

Vanderbilt, V. C.

1980-01-01

390

An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

2001-01-01

391

A Bayesian Semiparametric Item Response Model with Dirichlet Process Priors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Item Response Theory (IRT), item characteristic curves (ICCs) are illustrated through logistic models or normal ogive models, and the probability that examinees give the correct answer is usually a monotonically increasing function of their ability parameters. However, since only limited patterns of shapes can be obtained from logistic models

Miyazaki, Kei; Hoshino, Takahiro

2009-01-01

392

Modelling and Validation of Response Times in Zoned RAID  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present and validate an enhanced analytical queueing network model of zoned RAID. The model focuses on RAID levels 01 and 5, and yields the distribution of I\\/O request response time. Whereas our previous work could only sup- port arrival streams of I\\/O requests of the same type, the model presented here supports heterogeneous streams with a mixture of read

Abigail S. Lebrecht; Nicholas J. Dingle; William J. Knottenbelt

2008-01-01

393

Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article provides an overview of goodness-of-fit assessment methods for item response theory (IRT) models. It is now possible to obtain accurate "p"-values of the overall fit of the model if bivariate information statistics are used. Several alternative approaches are described. As the validity of inferences drawn on the fitted model

Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

2013-01-01

394

Modeling Investigation of Volume Variation Kinetics of Fast Response Hydrogels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast response hydrogels have attracted great attention recently. Three kinds of models with different complexity are available in the literature to investigate their volume variation kinetics. A phenomenal model based on second?order reaction kinetics provides a simple method to correlate the experimental kinetic data. A power law model can be employed to evaluate different volume variation mechanisms according to the

Shunnian Wu; Hua Li; J. Paul Chen

2004-01-01

395

A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

Segall, Daniel O.

2004-01-01

396

Hankel-type model reduction based on frequency response matching  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a stability preserving model reduction algorithm for single-input single-output linear time invariant systems is presented. It performs a data fitting in the frequency domain using semidefinite programming methods. Computing the frequency response of a model can be done efficiently even for large scale models making this approach applicable to those. The relaxation used to obtain a semidefinite

Aivar Sootla

2010-01-01

397

Chemistry Teachers’ Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation\\u000a in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class\\u000a observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers’ beliefs and practice. The data indicated\\u000a that the teachers developed

Gregory T. Rushton; Christine Lotter; Jonathan Singer

2011-01-01

398

Compensatory and non-compensatory multidimensional randomized item response models.  

PubMed

Randomized response (RR) models are often used for analysing univariate randomized response data and measuring population prevalence of sensitive behaviours. There is much empirical support for the belief that RR methods improve the cooperation of the respondents. Recently, RR models have been extended to measure individual unidimensional behaviour. An extension of this modelling framework is proposed to measure compensatory or non-compensatory multiple sensitive factors underlying the randomized item response process. A confirmatory multidimensional randomized item response theory model (MRIRT) is proposed for the analysis of multivariate RR data by modelling the response process and specifying structural relationships between sensitive behaviours and background information. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is developed to estimate simultaneously the parameters of the MRIRT model. The model extension enables the computation of individual true item response probabilities, estimates of individuals' sensitive behaviour on different domains, and their relationships with background variables. An MRIRT analysis is presented of data from a college alcohol problem scale, measuring alcohol-related socio-emotional and community problems, and alcohol expectancy questionnaire, measuring alcohol-related sexual enhancement expectancies. Students were interviewed via direct or RR questioning. Scores of alcohol-related problems and expectancies are significantly higher for the group of students questioned using the RR technique. Alcohol-related problems and sexual enhancement expectancies are positively moderately correlated and vary differently across gender and universities. PMID:23713765

Fox, Jean-Paul; Entink, Rinke Klein; Avetisyan, Marianna

2013-05-28

399

A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

1988-01-01

400

Detecting Answer Copying when the Regular Response Process Follows a Known Response Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A statistical test for detecting answer copying on multiple-choice items is presented. The test is based on the exact null distribution of the number of random matches between two test takers under the assumption that the response process follows a known response model. The null distribution can easily be generalized to the family of distributions…

van der Linden, Wim J.; Sotaridona, Leonardo

2006-01-01

401

Modeling streamflow response from Minnesota peatlands  

SciTech Connect

To aid in the development of Minnesota's 7 million acres of peatlands, and to evaluate the hydrologic impacts and reclamation options associated with such development, a Peatland Hydrologic Impact Model (PHIM) was devised. PHIM is a deterministic, continuous simulation model designed to simulate streamflow resulting from rainfall and snowmelt under both natural and altered (mined) conditions. It is largely physically based and requires watershed information and hydrometeorological data that are usually available in an operational setting. PHIM can provide both daily and hourly estimates of streamflow, PHIM consists of 5 submodels, 3 land type submodels for natural peatlands, mined peatlands and mineral soil uplands and 2 routing submodels for channel reaches and reservoirs. Streamflow from headwater peatland watersheds can be simulated by combining the submodels in the order that best describes the basin. The model was tested on the basis of stormflow events form a 3758 ha undisturbed peatland and a 155 ha peatland that had undergone ditching and peat mining for horticultural purposes. Simulated streamflow volumes averaged 86 and 91% of observed volumes for the undisturbed and mined area, respectively. Peat discharges were simulated within 84 and 65% of observed values, respectively.

Guertin, D.P.

1984-01-01

402

Job Stress among Hispanic Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores job stress among a random sample of 219 Hispanic professionals. Participants complete the Job Stress Survey by Spielberger and Vagg and a demographic questionnaire. Responses are analyzed using descriptive statistics, a factorial analysis of variance, and coefficients of determination. Results indicate that Hispanic…

Rodriguez-Calcagno, Maria; Brewer, Ernest W.

2005-01-01

403

Professional Liability Insurance in Minnesota  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Minnesota, a local mental health center is typically administered by a nine-man board, selected to represent various areas of interest in the community. It is the board then that is responsible for formulating overall policies and plans, hiring (or firing) staff, securing financial support, etc. Professional liability or malpractice insurance ordinarily available to psychiatrists and psychologists offered no protection

Herbert Dörken

1960-01-01

404

Professional Development Programs That Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The professional development program at Golden West College has successfully maximized instructional change and innvovation for several years. The success of the program is due to factors such as support from the president; the appointment of a dean of educational development whose sole responsibility is to work with faculty on new developmental…

Shawl, William F.

405

Dynamic causal modelling of anticipatory skin conductance responses  

PubMed Central

Anticipatory skin conductance responses [SCRs] are a widely used measure of aversive conditioning in humans. Here, we describe a dynamic causal model [DCM] of how anticipatory, evoked, and spontaneous skin conductance changes are generated by sudomotor nerve activity. Inversion of this model, using variational Bayes, provides a means of inferring the most likely sympathetic nerve activity, given observed skin conductance responses. In two fear conditioning experiments, we demonstrate the predictive validity of the DCM by showing it has greater sensitivity to the effects of conditioning, relative to alternative (conventional) response estimates. Furthermore, we establish face validity by showing that trial-by-trial estimates of anticipatory sudomotor activity are better predicted by formal learning models, relative to response estimates from peak-scoring approaches. The model furnishes a potentially powerful approach to characterising SCR that exploits knowledge about how these signals are generated.

Bach, Dominik R.; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

2010-01-01

406

A spatial diffusion model for police emergency response system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Police emergency response system plays a nuclear and key role in the emergency management system. The spatial range of emergency event spread area is usually dynamic diffused through time. This problem will make emergency response difficult to assess emergency event and dispatch emergency resources. Therefore, it is imperative to design and implement a spatial diffusion model to solve this problem.

Xuefei Li; Peihong Fu

2011-01-01

407

An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

Penfield, Randall David

2014-01-01

408

Analysis of Residuals for the Multinomial Item Response Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the item response model as developed on the multinomial distribution, asymptotic variances are obtained for residuals with response patterns and first- and second-order marginal frequencies of manifest variables. A limited-information test of fit is developed by using residuals defined for the first- and second-order marginals. (Author/SLD)

Reiser, Mark

1996-01-01

409

Demand Response model considering EDRP and TOU programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demand side management (DSM) is one of the most important methods which has been used to maximize the benefits of the electric power market participants. In the deregulated power systems, DSM is called demand response (DR). In this paper, two DR programs have been focused: time-of-use (TOU) and emergency demand response program (EDRP). In this paper DR is modeled considering

H. Aalami; G. R. Yousefi; M. Parsa Moghadam

2008-01-01

410

DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING FOR HAZARD CHARACTERIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation outlines the 1)Components of Risk Assessment/Management, 2)Data, 3)Approaches to Characterizing Dose-Response. It also discusses Dose-Response Modeling, Creative Tensions-conceptual differences between NOAELs and BMDs, and Risk-benefit analyses...

411

Dose-response modeling of etoposide-induced DNA damage response.  

PubMed

The 2007 National Research Council Report "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy" recommended an integrated, toxicity pathway-oriented approach for chemical testing. As an integral component of the recommendation, computational dose-response modeling of toxicity pathways promises to provide mechanistic interpretation and prediction of adverse cellular outcomes. Among the many toxicity pathways, the DNA damage response is better characterized and thus more suited for computational modeling. In the present study, we formulated a minimal mathematical model of this pathway to examine the dose response for etoposide (ETP), an anticancer drug that causes DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In the model, DSB results from inhibition of topoisomerase by ETP and p53 is activated by a bistable switch composed of a positive feedback loop between ATM and ?H2AX. Our stochastic model recapitulated the dose response for several molecular biomarkers measured with flow cytometry in HT1080 cells, including phosphorylated p53, ATM, ?H2AX, and micronuclei. Model simulations were consistent with a bimodal pattern of p53 activation and a graded population-averaged response at high ETP concentrations. The graded response was a result of heterogeneous activation of individual cells due to molecular stochasticity. This work shows the value of combining data collection on single cell responses and mechanistic, stochastic modeling to develop and test hypothesis for the circuitry of important toxicity pathways. Future studies will determine how well this initial modeling effort agrees with a broader set of experimental studies on pathway responses by examining a more diverse group of DNA-damaging compounds. PMID:24241721

Li, Zhenhong; Sun, Bin; Clewell, Rebecca A; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E; Zhang, Qiang

2014-02-01

412

Nursing Schools: Students' Beacon to Professionalism?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nurses Professional Orientation Scale was completed by 309 students and 23 faculty members in the baccalaureate nursing program at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Results indicate that the professional socialization process is in operation; the further students advanced in the program, the more closely their responses correlated with those of…

Cohen, Barbara J.; Jordet, Caroline P.

1988-01-01

413

Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

Beatty, Rebecca M.

2000-01-01

414

Classic dose-response and time postinoculation models for leptospira.  

PubMed

Leptospirosis is a preeminent zoonotic disease concentrated in tropical areas, and prevalent in both industrialized and rural settings. Dose-response models were generated from 22 data sets reported in 10 different studies. All of the selected studies used rodent subjects, primarily hamsters, with the predominant endpoint as mortality with the challenge strain administered intraperitoneally. Dose-response models based on a single evaluation postinfection displayed median lethal dose (LD50 ) estimates that ranged between 1 and 10(7) leptospirae depending upon the strain's virulence and the period elapsed since the initial exposure inoculation. Twelve of the 22 data sets measured the number of affected subjects daily over an extended period, so dose-response models with time-dependent parameters were estimated. Pooling between data sets produced seven common dose-response models and one time-dependent model. These pooled common models had data sets with different test subject hosts, and between disparate leptospiral strains tested on identical hosts. Comparative modeling was done with parallel tests to test the effects of a single different variable of either strain or test host and quantify the difference by calculating a dose multiplication factor. Statistical pooling implies that the mechanistic processes of leptospirosis can be represented by the same dose-response model for different experimental infection tests even though they may involve different host species, routes, and leptospiral strains, although the cause of this pathophysiological phenomenon has not yet been identified. PMID:24117870

Watanabe, Toru; Teske, Sondra S; Haas, Charles N

2014-03-01

415

Modeling Clinical Radiation Responses in the IMRT Era  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

Schwartz, J. L.; Murray, D.; Stewart, R. D.; Phillips, M. H.

2014-03-01

416

Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

1978-01-01

417

Modeling of an alternator using Stand Still Frequency Response Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an equivalent circuit model of an alternator in d- and q-axes, and a Standstill Frequency-Response (SSFR) Test is employed to estimate model parameters. Unlike a conventional model, damper windings are introduced to represent the solid claw-pole rotor structure. The rotor saliency effect is also taken into account. Starting from a simpler model with one damper winding in

Lei Hao; Chandra Namuduri

2009-01-01

418

Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

1973-01-01

419

Ground-penetrating radar responses of dispersive models  

SciTech Connect

Using a three-layer 1-D model and a 3-D model the authors have demonstrated that GPR (ground penetrating radar) waves are greatly attenuated in dispersive media because dispersion results in increased effective conductivities and reduced effective permittivities. This can be further illustrated by using equivalent conductivities and equivalent permittivities that are the effective conductivities and effective permittivities of dispersive models at the principal GPR frequency. Dispersive model responses are very similar to their nondispersive equivalents.

Xiong, Z.; Tripp, A.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1997-07-01

420

The Music Educator's Professional Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional knowledge in teaching is broadly based on personal knowledge. Hence, it is important to build teachers' development out of their initial knowledge. The idea of a sociogenesis of educational knowledge, teacher knowledge and training models as well as teaching models are the basis of this study. It aims to diagnose the knowledge…

Jorquera Jaramillo, Maria Cecilia

2008-01-01

421

Shaping the Responsible, Successful and Contributing Citizen of the Future: "Values" in the New Zealand Curriculum and Its Challenge to the Development of Ethical Teacher Professionality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The revised New Zealand Curriculum became mandatory for use in New Zealand schools in February 2010. The ongoing reform agenda in education in New Zealand since 1989 and elsewhere internationally has had corrosive effects on teacher professionality. State-driven neo-liberal policy and education reforms are deeply damaging to the mental and moral…

Benade, Leon

2011-01-01

422

Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected Rebt Cognoscenti: A Response to My Colleagues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a discussion and evaluation of the views of the authors of the article "Post-September 11th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti." Several of the authors are shown to endorse most of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy…

Ellis, Albert

2004-01-01

423

Formulating latent growth using an explanatory item response model approach.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a way to extend the Hierarchical Generalized Linear Model (HGLM; Kamata (2001), Raudenbush (1995)) to include the many forms of measurement models available under the formulation known as the Random Coefficients Multinomial Logit (MRCML) Model (Adams, Wilson and Wang, 1997), and apply that to growth modeling. First, we review two different traditions in modeling growth studies: the first is based in the hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) tradition, and the second, which is the topic of this paper, is rooted in the Rasch measurement tradition - this is the linear Latent Growth Item Response Model (LG-IRM). Going beyond the linear case, the LG-IRM approach allows us to considerably extend the range of models available in the HLM tradition to incorporate several of the extensions of IRT models that are used in creating explanatory item response models (EIRM; De Boeck and Wilson, 2004). We next present a number of extensions - including polynomial growth modeling, differential item functioning (DIF) effects, growth functions that can be approximated by polynomial expressions, provision for polytomous responses, person and item covariates (and time varying covariates), and multiple dimensions of growth. We provide two empirical examples to illustrate several of the models, using the ConQuest software (Wu, Adams, Wilson and Haldane, 2008) to carry out the analyses. We also provide several simulations to investigate the success of the estimation procedures. PMID:22677494

Wilson, Mark; Zheng, Xiaohui; McGuire, Leah

2012-01-01

424

Leadership and the Professional Learning Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe the transformation of one small, rural school district's professional development program. The study focused on the actions that school leaders took to replace a traditional, workshop-based program that was deemed ineffective with a new professional development model. The new model was designed to create…

Gaspar, Sandra

2010-01-01

425

Using SAS PROC NLMIXED to fit item response theory models.  

PubMed

Researchers routinely construct tests or questionnaires containing a set of items that measure personality traits, cognitive abilities, political attitudes, and so forth. Typically, responses to these items are scored in discrete categories, such as points on a Likert scale or a choice out of several mutually exclusive alternatives. Item response theory (IRT) explains observed responses to items on a test (questionnaire) by a person's unobserved trait, ability, or attitude. Although applications of IRT modeling have increased considerably because of its utility in developing and assessing measuring instruments, IRT modeling has not been fully integrated into the curriculum of colleges and universities, mainly because existing general purpose statistical packages do not provide built-in routines with which to perform IRT modeling. Recent advances in statistical theory and the incorporation of those advances into general purpose statistical software such as the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) allow researchers to analyze measurement data by using a class of models known as generalized linear mixed effects models (McCulloch & Searle, 2001), which include IRT models as special cases. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the generality and flexibility of using SAS to estimate IRT model parameters. With real data examples, we illustrate the implementations of a variety of IRT models for dichotomous, polytomous, and nominal responses. Since SAS is widely available in educational institutions, it is hoped that this article will contribute to the spread of IRT modeling in quantitative courses. PMID:16171193

Sheu, Ching-Fan; Chen, Cheng-Te; Su, Ya-Hui; Wang, Wen-Chung

2005-05-01

426

A dynamic causal model for evoked and induced responses  

PubMed Central

Neuronal responses exhibit two stimulus or task-related components: evoked and induced. The functional role of induced responses has been ascribed to ‘top-down’ modulation through backward connections and lateral interactions; as opposed to the bottom-up driving processes that may predominate in evoked components. The implication is that evoked and induced components may reflect different neuronal processes. The conventional way of separating evoked and induced responses assumes that they can be decomposed linearly; in that induced responses are the average of the power minus the power of the average (the evoked component). However, this decomposition may not hold if both components are generated by nonlinear processes. In this work, we propose a Dynamic Causal Model that models evoked and induced responses at the same time. This allows us to explain both components in terms of shared mechanisms (coupling) and changes in coupling that are necessary to explain any induced components. To establish the face validity of our approach, we used Bayesian Model Selection to show that the scheme can disambiguate between models of synthetic data that did and did not contain induced components. We then repeated the analysis using MEG data during a hand grip task to ask whether induced responses in motor control circuits are mediated by ‘top-down’ or backward connections. Our result provides empirical evidence that induced responses are more likely to reflect backward message passing in the brain, while evoked and induced components share certain characteristics and mechanisms.

Chen, Chun-Chuan; Kiebel, Stefan J.; Kilner, James M.; Ward, Nick S.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Wang, Wei- Jen; Friston, Karl J.

2012-01-01

427

NDA SYSTEM RESPONSE MODELING AND ITS APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant (PORTS) is a uranium enrichment facility that was historically used to enrich uranium to levels that range from 2% to greater than 97%. The feed material for PORTS was obtained from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) that produced uranium in the form of UF6 that was enriched to about 1 to 2%. The enrichment process involves a multistage process by which gaseous UF{sub 6} passed through a diffusion barrier in each stage. The porous diffusion barrier in each stage retards the rate of the diffusion of the heavier {sup 238}U atoms relative to the diffusion of the lighter {sup 235}U atoms. By this process the product stream is slightly enriched by each stage of the process. Each stage consists of a compressor, converter and a motor. There are more than 4000 stages that are linked together with piping of various diameters to form the PORTS cascade. The cascade spans three interconnected buildings and comprises miles of piping, thousands of seals, converters, valves, motors, and compressors. During operation, PORTS process equipment contained UF{sub 6} gas with uranium enrichment that increased in the process stream from the first to the last stage in a known manner. Gaseous UF{sub 6} moving through the PORTS process equipment had potential to form deposits within the process equipment by several mechanisms, including solidification due to incorrect temperature and pressure conditions during the process, inleakage of atmospheric moisture that chemically reacts with UF{sub 6} to form hydrated uranyl fluoride solids, reduction reactions of UF{sub 6} with cascade metals, and UF{sub 6} condensation on the internal equipment surfaces. As a result, the process equipment of the PORTS contains a variable and unknown quantity of uranium with variable enrichment that has been deposited within the equipment during plant operations. The exact chemical form of this uranium is variable, although it is expected that the bulk of the material is of the form of uranyl fluoride that will become hydrated on exposure to moisture in air when the systems are no longer buffered. The deposit geometry and thickness is uncertain and variable. However, a reasonable assessment of the level of material holdup in this equipment is necessary to support decommissioning efforts. The assessment of nuclear material holdup in process equipment is a complex process that requires integration of process knowledge, nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, and computer modeling to maximize capabilities and minimize uncertainty. The current report is focused on the use of computer modeling and simulation of NDA measurements.

Vinson, D.

2010-03-01

428

Modelling and validation of magnetorheological brake responses using parametric approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetorheological brake (MR Brake) is one x-by-wire systems which performs better than conventional brake systems. MR brake consists of a rotating disc that is immersed with Magnetorheological Fluid (MR Fluid) in an enclosure of an electromagnetic coil. The applied magnetic field will increase the yield strength of the MR fluid where this fluid was used to decrease the speed of the rotating shaft. The purpose of this paper is to develop a mathematical model to represent MR brake with a test rig. The MR brake model is developed based on actual torque characteristic which is coupled with motion of a test rig. Next, the experimental are performed using MR brake test rig and obtained three output responses known as angular velocity response, torque response and load displacement response. Furthermore, the MR brake was subjected to various current. Finally, the simulation results of MR brake model are then verified with experimental results.

Z, Zainordin A.; A, Abdullah M.; K, Hudha

2013-12-01

429

Modelling tropical forests response to logging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems by large-scale fragmentation due to human activity such as heavy logging and agricultural clearance. Although, they provide crucial ecosystem goods and services, such as sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity. In several countries forest resource extraction has experienced a shift from clearcutting to selective logging to maintain a significant forest cover and understock of living biomass. However the knowledge on the short and long-term effects of removing selected species in tropical rainforest are scarce and need to be further investigated. One of the main effects of selective logging on forest dynamics seems to be the local disturbance which involve the invasion of open space by weed, vines and climbers at the expense of the late-successional state cenosis. We present a simple deterministic model that describes the dynamics of tropical rainforest subject to selective logging to understand how and why weeds displace native species. We argue that the selective removal of tallest tropical trees carries out gaps of light that allow weeds, vines and climbers to prevail on native species, inhibiting the possibility of recovery of the original vegetation. Our results show that different regime shifts may occur depending on the type of forest management adopted. This hypothesis is supported by a dataset of trees height and weed/vines cover that we collected from 9 plots located in Central and West Africa both in untouched and managed areas.

Cazzolla Gatti, Roberto; Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

2013-04-01

430

Estimating Derived Response Levels at the Savannah River Site for Use with Emergency Response Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergency response computer models at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are coupled with real-time meteorological data to estimate dose to individuals downwind of accidental radioactive releases. Currently, these models estimate doses for inhalation and shine pathways, but do not consider dose due to ingestion of contaminated food products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed derived intervention levels (DIL)

Simpkins

2002-01-01

431

A MODEL FOR THE THERMOACOUSTIC RESPONSE OF A PREMIXED SWIRL BURNER, PART II: THE FLAME RESPONSE  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive model for the response of a premixed flame to acoustic velocity fluctuations is developed and applied to the same small laboratory swirl burner as was treated in Part I, using the validated model for the acoustics of the system. A number of possible mechanisms of acoustic interactions with the flame are reviewed, and the three judged to be

C. J. LAWN; W. POLIFKE

2004-01-01

432

Bayesian Structural Equations Modeling for Ordinal Response Data with Missing Responses and Missing Covariates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structural equations models (SEMs) have been extensively used to model survey data arising in the fields of sociology, psychology, health, and economics with increasing applications where self assessment questionnaires are the means to collect the data. We propose the SEM for multilevel ordinal response data from a large multilevel survey conducted by the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The proposed

Sungduk Kim; Sonali Das; Ming-Hui Chen; Nicholas Warren

2009-01-01

433

The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

2011-01-01

434

Cancer Dose-Response Models Incorporating Clonal Expansion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under the assumption that a malignant tumor develops through a sequence of steps (normal cells->initiated cells/foci->nodules->tumors) two classes of mathematical models of carcinogenesis that have a potential to be used for cancer dose-response modeling ...

C. W. Chen A. Moini

1989-01-01

435

An experimental procedure for simulation response surface model identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental method for identifying an appropriate model for a simulation response surface is presented. This technique can be used for globally identifying those factors in a simulation that have a significant influence on the output. The experiments are run in the frequency domain. A simulation model is run with input factors that oscillate at different frequencies during a run.

Lee W. Schruben; V. James Cogliano

1987-01-01

436

Modeling thermal\\/chemical\\/mechanical response of energetic materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve

M. R. Baer; M. L. Hobbs; R. J. Gross

1995-01-01

437

Application of Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models to Longitudinal Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The application of multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models to longitudinal educational surveys where students are repeatedly measured is discussed and exemplified. A marginal maximum likelihood (MML) method to estimate the parameters of a multidimensional generalized partial credit model for repeated measures is presented. It is shown…

te Marvelde, Janneke M.; Glas, Cees A. W.; Van Landeghem, Georges; Van Damme, Jan

2006-01-01

438

Separability of Item and Person Parameters in Response Time Models.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses two forms of separability of item and person parameters in the context of response time models. The first is "separate sufficiency," and the second is "ranking independence." For each form a theorem stating sufficient conditions is proved. The two forms are shown to include several cases of models from psychometric and biometric…

Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.

1997-01-01

439

The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work (RMSGW), offering a trans-theoretical framework through which

Kristopher M. Goodrich; Melissa Luke

2011-01-01

440

Analysis of the fluxgate response through a simple spice model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, harmonics content of sinusoidal excited fluxgate sensors response is analyzed by means of a simple electrical model developed for SPICE. The model construction is detailed and it is applied to the simplest fluxgate sensor. Well known characteristics of these sensors are confirmed through the simulations, while new useful outcomes are discussed. In particular it is found that

Héctor Trujillo; Juan Cruz; Mairée Rivero; Mario Barrios

1999-01-01

441

Item Response Theory Models Applied to Data Allowing Examinee Choice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A set of conditions is presented for the validity of inference for Item Response Theory (IRT) models applied to data collected from examinations that allow students to choose a subset of items. Common low-dimensional IRT models estimated by standard methods do not resolve the difficult problems posed by choice-based data. (SLD)

Bradlow, Eric T.; Thomas, Neal

1998-01-01

442

Symposium: Professionalization and professionalism in public administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Symposium on Professionalization and Professionalism in Public Administration, contained in this volume of The International Journal of Public Administration, presents some of the most recent outlooks of prominent scholars and practitioners in the field. They have offered their research and insights into a subject of perennial importance. They have charted the significant progress being made in public administration toward

James A. Gazell; Darrell L. Pugh

1993-01-01

443

Dose-response modeling of Salmonella using outbreak data.  

PubMed

Salmonella is a key human pathogen worldwide, most often associated with food poisoning incidences. There is a small number of predominant serotypes found in human cases. The role of exposure in the epidemiology of Salmonella can be explained using dose-response assessment both for infection and acute enteric illness. Dose-response studies are traditionally based on human challenge experiments but an alternative is to use outbreak data. Such data were collected from the published literature which included estimates of the dose ingested and the attack rate. Separate dose-response models for infection and illness given infection were fitted using a multi-level statistical framework. These models incorporated serotype and susceptibility as categorical covariates, and adjusted for heterogeneity in exposure. The results indicate that both the risk of infection and the risk of illness given infection increase with dose. The dose-response model incorporating data from all outbreaks had an infection ID50 of 7 CFU's and illness ID50 of 36 CFUs. This is indicative of much higher infectivity and pathogenicity compared with feeding studies of healthy human volunteers with laboratory adapted strains. No differences were found in the outbreak models between serotypes and susceptibility categories. However, for serotypes other than S. Enteritidis or S. Typhimurium, results indicate that a minor proportion of individuals exposed will not fall ill even at high doses. The dose-response relations indicate that outbreaks are associated with higher doses making it more likely to have a higher attack rate. Applications of the dose-response model in outbreak situations where either dose or attack rate is missing were successfully used to clarify the epidemiology. Finally, the dose-response models described here can be readily used in quantitative microbiological risk assessment to predict human infection and illness rates. A simple Excel spreadsheet implementing the model has been prepared and is available from the authors. PMID:21036411

Teunis, Peter F M; Kasuga, Fumiko; Fazil, Aamir; Ogden, Iain D; Rotariu, Ovidiu; Strachan, Norval J C

2010-12-15

444

STELLOPT Modeling of the 3D Diagnostic Response in ITER  

SciTech Connect

The ITER three dimensional diagnostic response to an n=3 resonant magnetic perturbation is modeled using the STELLOPT code. The in-vessel coils apply a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fi eld which generates a 4 cm edge displacement from axisymmetry as modeled by the VMEC 3D equilibrium code. Forward modeling of flux loop and magnetic probe response with the DIAGNO code indicates up to 20 % changes in measured plasma signals. Simulated LIDAR measurements of electron temperature indicate 2 cm shifts on the low field side of the plasma. This suggests that the ITER diagnostic will be able to diagnose the 3D structure of the equilibria.

Lazerson, Samuel A

2013-05-07

445

Professional attitudes and behaviors acquired during undergraduate education in the College of Dentistry, King Saud University  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of the study was to investigate and evaluate the professional attitudes and behaviors acquired by students and recently graduated dentists during undergraduate education at King Saud University. Methods This cross-sectional survey used a 27-item questionnaire covering four cumulative theoretical dimensions of professionalism. Questionnaires were distributed to fifth-year students, interns, and demonstrators in the College of Dentistry during the academic year 2010–2011, and 203 completed questionnaires were used in analyses. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Crosstab and chi-squared tests were used, with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results The response rate was 79.3% (43.6% of males, 94% of females). Eighty-seven questionnaires were collected from fifth-year students, 92 from interns, and 24 from demonstrators. Many (59%) participants demonstrated high levels of professional attitudes and behaviors, whereas 40% did not comply with the elements of professionalism. Analyses revealed highly significant differences in certain responses with regard to gender, academic level, and grade point average. Conclusions Although some participants did not possess all professional qualities, all participants possessed at least some elements of professionalism measured in this study. We thus recommend a strategic effort to develop targeted plans emphasizing professionalism at all levels of the dental school curriculum. High-profile role modeling, lectures, seminars, and academic ceremonies are ways of achieving professional development among dental students in parallel with their acquisition of basic scientific knowledge and clinical skills. This approach will formally and informally communicate that professionalism is a core value.

Al-Sudani, Dina; Al-Abbas, Fatima; Al-Bannawi, Zainab; Al-Ramadhan, Anwaar

2013-01-01

446

Modeling the responses of TSM resonators under various loading conditions  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a general model that describes the electrical responses of thickness shear mode resonators subject to a variety of surface conditions. The model incorporates a physically diverse set of single component loadings, including rigid solids, viscoelastic media, and fluids (Newtonian or Maxwellian). The model allows any number of these components to be combined in any configuration. Such multiple loadings are representative of a variety of physical situations encountered in electrochemical and other liquid phase applications, as well as gas phase applications. In the general case, the response of the composite load is not a linear combination of the individual component responses. The authors discuss application of the model in a qualitative diagnostic fashion to gain insight into the nature of the interfacial structure, and in a quantitative fashion to extract appropriate physical parameters such as liquid viscosity and density, and polymer shear moduli.

BANDEY,HELEN L.; MARTIN,STEPHEN J.; CERNOSEK,RICHARD W.; HILLMAN,A. ROBERT

1999-03-01

447

Comparison of stream invertebrate response models for bioassessment metric  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We aggregated invertebrate data from various sources to assemble data for modeling in two ecoregions in Oregon and one in California. Our goal was to compare the performance of models developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques with models developed using three relatively new techniques: classification and regression trees (CART), random forest (RF), and boosted regression trees (BRT). We used tolerance of taxa based on richness (RICHTOL) and ratio of observed to expected taxa (O/E) as response variables and land use/land cover as explanatory variables. Responses were generally linear; therefore, there was little improvement to the MLR models when compared to models using CART and RF. In general, the four modeling techniques (MLR, CART, RF, and BRT) consistently selected the same primary explanatory variables for each region. However, results from the BRT models showed significant improvement over the MLR models for each region; increases in R2 from 0.09 to 0.20. The O/E metric that was derived from models specifically calibrated for Oregon consistently had lower R2 values than RICHTOL for the two regions tested. Modeled O/E R2 values were between 0.06 and 0.10 lower for each of the four modeling methods applied in the Willamette Valley and were between 0.19 and 0.36 points lower for the Blue Mountains. As a result, BRT models may indeed represent a good alternative to MLR for modeling species distribution relative to environmental variables.

Waite, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

2012-01-01

448

A normalization model of attentional modulation of single unit responses.  

PubMed

Although many studies have shown that attention to a stimulus can enhance the responses of individual cortical sensory neurons, little is known about how attention accomplishes this change in response. Here, we propose that attention-based changes in neuronal responses depend on the same response normalization mechanism that adjusts sensory responses whenever multiple stimuli are present. We have implemented a model of attention that assumes that attention works only through this normalization mechanism, and show that it can replicate key effects of attention. The model successfully explains how attention changes the gain of responses to individual stimuli and also why modulation by attention is more robust and not a simple gain change when multiple stimuli are present inside a neuron's receptive field. Additionally, the model accounts well for physiological data that measure separately attentional modulation and sensory normalization of the responses of individual neurons in area MT in visual cortex. The proposal that attention works through a normalization mechanism sheds new light a broad range of observations on how attention alters the representation of sensory information in cerebral cortex. PMID:19247494

Lee, Joonyeol; Maunsell, John H R

2009-01-01

449

Robustness of the network models of immune response  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a quantitative measure of the robustness of the network models of immune response against damage of inter-cellular interactions. As an illustrative example, we compute the robustness of a model which is equivalent to the one proposed recently by Chowdhury and Stauffer (J. Stat. Phys. 59 (1990) 1019). We also study the basins of attraction of the fixed points of this model with damaged inter-cellular interactions.

Chowdhury, Debashish; Chakrabarti, B. K.

1990-09-01

450

Professional practice leadership roles: the role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a professional practice environment for nurses.  

PubMed

Professional practice leadership (PPL) roles are those roles responsible for expert practice, providing professional leadership, facilitating ongoing professional development, and research. Despite the extensive implementation of this role, most of the available literature focuses on the implementation of the role, with few empirical studies examining the factors that contribute to PPL role effectiveness. This article will share the results of a research study regarding the role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a high-quality professional practice environment for nurses. Survey results from nurses and PPLs from 45 hospitals will be presented. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized model and relationships between the key variables of interest. Results indicate that there is a direct and positive relationship between PPL organizational power and achievement of PPL role functions, as well as an indirect, partially mediated effect of PPL influence tactics on PPL role function. There is also a direct and positive relationship between PPL role functions and nurses' perceptions of their practice environment. The evidence generated from this study highlights the importance of organizational power and personal influence as significantly contributing to the ability of those in PPL roles to achieve desired outcomes. This information can be used by administrators, researchers, and clinicians regarding the factors that can optimize the organizational and systematic strategies for enhancing the practice environment for nursing and other health care professionals. PMID:23044835

Lankshear, Sara; Kerr, Michael S; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Wong, Carol A

2013-01-01

451

Cancer Genetics Professionals  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Genetics Professionals The information below is from the NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory.  This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility

452

Professional Military Ethic.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Understanding the professional military ethic (PME) first requires understanding the conceptual foundations upon which it stands. This foundation includes objective morality, the sociology of professions, professional ethics in general, and the profession...

J. D. Cazier

2012-01-01

453

The response of mesoscale models to changes in surface roughness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Downscaling mesoscale model wind speed fields to microscales for wind energy resource mapping entails knowledge not only of the surface roughness used in the mesoscale terrain description, but also of the `effective roughness' of the mesoscale model. The effective mesoscale roughness is a function of both the input roughness values, as well as the physical and dynamical filtering in the model. In this work, the responses of two mesoscale models (the WRF and KAM models) to changes in surface roughness are explored in an idealised framework. Both step roughness changes the response to small roughness elements are examined using idealised domains forced by a geostrophic wind perpendicular to the roughness changes in near-neutral conditions. The concept of effective roughness is explored based on the modelled wind profiles, and by considering generalisation of a single roughness change. Furthermore, the effective resolutions of the models are explored using spectra of the wind speeds over the step roughness changes, and by considering the horizontal extent of roughness element required for the models to fully adjust to the altered surface conditions. Thus the precise nature of the surface wind variability induced by roughness elements is described. Results from the two models are contrasted and described in terms of the different dynamical and physical characteristics of the models. The work is of importance for the fundamental understanding of the spectral response and filtering of mesoscale models. In addition, the analysis is of critical importance for practical downscaling problems in wind energy resource mapping. The effective roughness is the roughness that a mesoscale model actually responds to, and must be taken into account before using the model output in microscale models, where higher resolution roughness information is applied. Incorrect treatment of surface effects can significantly alter assessments of regional wind energy potential, or influence planning decisions relating to global wind energy resources. This work was supported by the Danish Council for Independent Research - Technology and Production under contract number 10-093196.

Vincent, Claire Louise; Badger, Jake; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Kelly, Mark C.

2013-04-01

454

Teaching ultrasound professionalism.  

PubMed

Professionalism is part of the milestone program instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Radiology. A unique feature of ultrasound professionalism is the relationship between the radiologist and the sonographer. Because this relationship is important for sonographic quality and ultimately patient outcome, residents should be trained to achieve an optimal professional relationship with sonographers. This article describes milestones for ultrasound professionalism and suggests methods of implementation. PMID:24850024

Hashimoto, Beverly E; Kasales, Claudia; Wall, Darci; McDowell, Jennifer; Lee, Marie; Hamper, Ulrike M

2014-06-01

455

Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology.  

PubMed

Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box-Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

2014-05-01

456

Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology  

PubMed Central

Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM.

Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

2014-01-01

457

Smoking, reward responsiveness, and response inhibition: tests of an incentive motivational model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Incentive-motivation models of addiction suggest impairment of functional activity in mesocorticolimbic reward pathways during abstinence. This study tested implications for subjective and behavioral responses to nondrug incentives, cue-elicited craving, and prefrontal cognitive functions, particularly response inhibition.Methods: We tested 26 smokers after smoking and after overnight abstinence in counterbalanced order; 26 nonsmokers were also tested twice. Measures included a simple

Jane Powell; Lynne Dawkins; Robert E Davis

2002-01-01

458

Professionalism in Dance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

2012-01-01

459

Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling  

SciTech Connect

We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez [Depto. de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Ap. Post. 14-740, Mexico, D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Cadena, S. Reyes [Lab. de Bioquimica Muscular, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, C.P.14389, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sierra, L. C. Gaitan [Centro Gestalt, C.P. 11590, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2008-08-11

460

Measuring Professionalism in Medicine and Nursing: Results of a European Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Leveraging professionalism has been put forward as a strategy to drive improvement of patient care. We investigate professionalism as a factor influencing the uptake of quality improvement activities by physicians and nurses working in European hospitals. Objective To (i) investigate the reliability and validity of data yielded by using the self-developed professionalism measurement tool for physicians and nurses, (ii) describe their levels of professionalism displayed, and (iii) quantify the extent to which professional attitudes would predict professional behaviors. Methods and Materials We designed and deployed survey instruments amongst 5920 physicians and nurses working in European hospitals. This was conducted under the cross-sectional multilevel study “Deepening Our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe” (DUQuE). We used psychometric and generalized linear mixed modelling techniques to address the aforementioned objectives. Results In all, 2067 (response rate 69.8%) physicians and 2805 nurses (94.8%) representing 74 hospitals in 7 European countries participated. The professionalism instrument revealed five subscales of professional attitude and one scale for professional behaviour with moderate to high internal consistency and reliability. Physicians and nurses display equally high professional attitude sum scores (11.8 and 11.9 respectively out of 16) but seem to have different perceptions towards separate professionalism aspects. Lastly, professionals displaying higher levels of professional attitudes were more involved in quality improvement actions (physicians: b?=?0.019, P<0.0001; nurses: b?=?0.016, P<0.0001) and more inclined to report colleagues’ underperformance (physicians – odds ratio (OR) 1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.24; nurses – OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01–1.23) or medical errors (physicians – OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.23; nurses – OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22–1.67). Involvement in QI actions was found to increase the odds of reporting incompetence or medical errors. Conclusion A tool that reliably and validly measures European physicians’ and nurses’ commitment to professionalism is now available. Collectively leveraging professionalism as a quality improvement strategy may be beneficial to patient care quality.

Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Plochg, Thomas; Thompson, Caroline A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

2014-01-01

461

Multiple Response Regression for Gaussian Mixture Models with Known Labels  

PubMed Central

Multiple response regression is a useful regression technique to model multiple response variables using the same set of predictor variables. Most existing methods for multiple response regression are designed for modeling homogeneous data. In many applications, however, one may have heterogeneous data where the samples are divided into multiple groups. Our motivating example is a cancer dataset where the samples belong to multiple cancer subtypes. In this paper, we consider modeling the data coming from a mixture of several Gaussian distributions with known group labels. A naive approach is to split the data into several groups according to the labels and model each group separately. Although it is simple, this approach ignores potential common structures across different groups. We propose new penalized methods to model all groups jointly in which the common and unique structures can be identified. The proposed methods estimate the regression coefficient matrix, as well as the conditional inverse covariance matrix of response variables. Asymptotic properties of the proposed methods are explored. Through numerical examples, we demonstrate that both estimation and prediction can be improved by modeling all groups jointly using the proposed methods. An application to a glioblastoma cancer dataset reveals some interesting common and unique gene relationships across different cancer subtypes.

Lee, Wonyul; Du, Ying; Sun, Wei; Hayes, D. Neil; Liu, Yufeng

2013-01-01

462

Teaching Professional Sexual Ethics across the Seminary Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clergy often begin their ministerial careers unprepared to handle issues of professional power, sexuality and intimacy, and interpersonal boundaries. In response, denominational bodies and theological schools are seeking together ways to enhance the teaching of "professional sexual ethics"--referring to the integration of professional ethics,…

Stephens, Darryl W.

2013-01-01

463

Inquiry and Action: Implementation Guide for Professional Development Facilitators. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to assist professional development facilitators responsible for helping Virginia's adult literacy practitioners develop and implement the professional development plans that constitute a key component of the state's professional development system for paid and volunteer literacy training providers. The following are among…

Drennon, Cassandra; Erno, Susan

464

Teacher Efficacy and Teacher Professional Learning: Implications for School Leaders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines urban high-school teachers' professional-development experiences through the lenses of personal teaching efficacy and professional learning, highlighting interview responses of 20 teachers with highest and lowest scores. Degree of personal teaching efficacy influences how individual teachers experience professional development. Programs…

Scribner, Jay Paredes

1999-01-01

465

Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

2002-01-01

466

Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model  

SciTech Connect

The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

Chen, E.P.

1994-12-31

467

Theoretical and Empirical Comparisons between Two Models for Continuous Item Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the relations between two continuous response models intended for typical response items: the linear congeneric model and Samejima's continuous response model (CRM). Illustrated the relations described using an empirical example and assessed the relations through a simulation study. (SLD)

Ferrando, Pere J.

2002-01-01

468

FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

2012-01-01

469

Generalized hydromechanical model for stomatal responses to hydraulic perturbations.  

PubMed

Stomata respond in a common pattern to various hydraulic perturbations on any part of the 'soil-plant-air' system: initial transient 'wrong-way' responses and final stationary 'right-way' responses. In order to describe this pattern on the basis of statistical physics, we propose a simple model where turgor pressure of a cell is taken to be a power function of its volume, and obtain results in qualitative agreement with experimental data for responses to a variety of hydraulic perturbations: Firstly, stationary stomatal conductance as a function of the vapor pressure deficit divides into three regimes characterized by sensitivities of the stomatal conductance and the transpiration rate with respect to vapor pressure deficit; secondly, for every hydraulic perturbation, the initial transient 'wrong-way' responses always appear; thirdly, on condition that water is supplied insufficiently, stomatal oscillations are often observed; finally, stomatal responses following leaf excision exhibit, after the initial transient wrong-way responses, slow relaxation to stomatal closing. In particular, comparison of areoles having different numbers of stomata demonstrates that areoles with small numbers of stomata tend to provoke lack of water in the soil as well as in the plant. In addition, our model also describes well dependence of the stomatal conductance on temperature. It may be extended further to describe stomatal responses to other environmental factors such as carbon dioxide, light, and temperature. PMID:24060618

Kwon, H W; Choi, M Y

2014-01-01

470

Modeling and using a web-based and tutored portfolio to support certification of professional competence in transfusion medicine  

PubMed Central

In order to manage a nationwide assessment program leading to certification of professional competence in blood transfusion throughout France, the National Institute of Blood Transfusion (INTS) and the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis designed and developed a structured and tutored web-based portfolio. The entire process of certification has been approved by the national healthcare agency (HAS). Eleven assessment programs have been written. The structure of this e-portfolio is based on a matrix of actions defined according to standards of practice. For each action, elements of proof are uploaded by the physician and peer-reviewed by an expert (a tutor) before validation. The electronic portfolio stores all the history of the actions performed by users. This tracking feature generates alerts which are e-mailed to users (physicians and tutors) according to a list of monitored events. After one year of design and development, the application is now being used routinely.

Staccini, Pascal; Rouger, Philippe

2008-01-01

471

Parameter variability estimation using stochastic response surface model updating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From a practical point of view, uncertainties existing in structural parameters and measurements must be handled in order to provide reliable structural condition evaluations. At this moment, deterministic model updating loses its practicability and a stochastic updating procedure should be employed seeking for statistical properties of parameters and responses. Presently this topic has not been well investigated on account of its greater complexity in theoretical configuration and difficulty in inverse problem solutions after involving uncertainty analyses. Due to it, this paper attempts to develop a stochastic model updating method for parameter variability estimation. Uncertain parameters and responses are correlated through stochastic response surface models, which are actually explicit polynomial chaos expansions based on Hermite polynomials. Then by establishing a stochastic inverse problem, parameter means and standard deviations are updated in a separate and successive way. For the purposes of problem simplification and optimization efficiency, in each updating iteration stochastic response surface models are reconstructed to avoid the construction and analysis of sensitivity matrices. Meanwhile, in the interest of investigating the effects of parameter variability on responses, a parameter sensitivity analysis method has been developed based on the derivation of polynomial chaos expansions. Lastly the feasibility and reliability of the proposed methods have been validated using a numerical beam and then a set of nominally identical metal plates. After comparing with a perturbation method, it is found that the proposed method can estimate parameter variability with satisfactory accuracy and the complexity of the inverse problem can be highly reduced resulting in cost-efficient optimization.

Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin