Sample records for professional responsibility model

  1. [Nurses' professional responsibility].

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, G; Gori, F; Lenci, E; Benci, L; Fioroni, S

    2005-01-01

    As managed care relevance is growing, several old issues related to personal institutional responsibility are increasing among practitioners. Therefore, as a professional figure a nurse bases his/her job on a mix of personal knowledge and skills along with training, and he/she is responsible for giving advice in line with professional care standards. In addition, he/she is in charge of the treatment pattern agreed with the patient. However, nursing is a much more complex job, which leads professional figures facing the controversial issue of combining institutional responsibility and nursing professional tasks and duties daily. As far as nursing institutional responsibility is concerned, different view points or approaches can be applied to investigate it. The most common one is the legal approach, yet this is not the most appropriate one. Therefore, our professional background is mainly based on a management prospective rather than a legal one; dealing with the issue legally would lead, essentially, to a summary of laws and regulations without any kind of argumentative discussion. Consequently, this study aimed to analyze nurses' institutional responsibility by approaching the issue from an innovative human resources management prospective; therefore, defining the gap between nursing institutional responsibility and its tasks. PMID:15786411

  2. Professional Development in Implementing and Sustaining Multitier Prevention Models: Implications for Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Volpiansky, Paula; Clements, Melissa; Ball, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the role professional development plays in multitiered prevention and intervention models. Specifically, professional development is discussed within the context of establishing sustainable improvement in schools as professionals implement multitiered models of prevention and intervention services, programs, and practices…

  3. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  4. Social Need, Public Response: The Volunteer Professional Model for Human Services Agencies and Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenihan, Genie O.; Jackson, Louise

    1984-01-01

    Describes a model process of assessment and integration that allows community agencies and professional counselors to engage in more effective volunteer activity. Outlines agency development by stages, using the experiences of agencies providing domestic violence services. (JAC)

  5. Leadership Responsibilities of Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitstifer, Dorothy I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a leadership development model that raises the question "Leadership for what?" Leadership is about going somewhere-personally and in concert with others-in an organization. Although leadership, especially position (elected or appointed) leadership, often is discussed in terms of leader qualities and skills, the…

  6. 32 CFR 776.8 - Professional Responsibility Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT OF ATTORNEYS... General § 776.8 Professional Responsibility Committee...will not normally provide ethics advice or opinions concerning professional responsibility...

  7. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients. PMID:21366145

  8. 28 CFR 0.129 - Professional Responsibility Advisory Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...specific questions involving professional responsibility, including...comply with state rules of ethics. (2) Assist or support...concerning Section 530B and other professional responsibility requirements...centralize and maintain ethics reference materials,...

  9. [Medical Professionalism-on Social Responsibilities Viewed from Historical Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-25

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society. (Korean J Gastroenterol 2015;65:165-172). PMID:25797380

  10. A Professional Development Model for Technical Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, James W.; Shum, Ronald M.

    Drawing from research and related literature on successful staff development activities, a professional development model was developed and implemented at J. F. Ingram Technical College (JFITC) in Alabama. Designed to serve the professional development needs of support staff, apprentice and master teachers, and administrators, the model provides…

  11. From the Teachers Professional Ethics to the Personal Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seghedin, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Following the idea of civic responsibility of all adults for the new generation, we have tried, in different previous studies, to demonstrate that teaching is involving a lot of moral principles and values. Our present article aim is to present a part of our research about the teaching ethics under the idea of being a stable dimension of teaching…

  12. Professionals: Their Problems, Their Fears, and Their Social Responsibilities *

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Martin L.

    1973-01-01

    Professional societies have been reluctant to enter actively into the public processes by which decisions are made on economic, social, and political issues. This reluctance comes from (1) fears about the status of the profession and the professional society, (2) fears about economic reprisal, (3) potential conflicts between the goals of a philosophy of trade unionism and the goals of a philosophy of professional social responsibility, and (4) domination of some professional societies by nonprofessional business, industrial, or administrative groups. This reluctance has been justified by the development of a myth that the professional can exercise individual social responsibility while maintaining the neutrality of his institutions and societies. This myth must be ignored because our public decision-making processes can only function properly if groups, such as professional societies, actively enter that decision-making process. PMID:4691329

  13. Balancing Personal and Professional Responsibilities. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2008-01-01

    A high school principal seldom has a day that goes according to plan. The principal's schedule more often than not, is dictated by others and routinely extends several hours beyond a regular school day. It is a job that could easily consume one's life, to the detriment of finding and maintaining any semblance of balance between their professional

  14. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

  15. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

  16. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

  17. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

  18. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...113 Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities...specimen test result. (c) Substance Abuse Professional (SAP)....

  19. Professional Learning Communities: A Middle School Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, David N.

    2010-01-01

    This research project explored the transition from a traditional model to a Professional Learning Community model in a NJ Middle School. The administration overcame obstacles during the transition such as scheduling conflicts, teacher apathy, and resistance. This action research study gathered data to determine how to best structure the…

  20. Wanted: role models - medical students’ perceptions of professionalism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transformation of medical students to become medical professionals is a core competency required for physicians in the 21st century. Role modeling was traditionally the key method of transmitting this skill. Medical schools are developing medical curricula which are explicit in ensuring students develop the professional competency and understand the values and attributes of this role. The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education. Methods Survey on student perception of professionalism in general, the curriculum and learning environment at the University of Ottawa, and the perception of student behaviors, was developed by faculty and students and sent electronically to all University of Ottawa medical students. The survey included both quantitative items including an adapted Pritzker list and qualitative responses to eight open ended questions on professionalism at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. All analyses were performed using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc. Cary, NC, USA). Chi-square and Fischer’s exact test (for cell count less than 5) were used to derive p-values for categorical variables by level of student learning. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the curriculum. 63% of the responses were from students in years 1 and 2 (preclerkship). Students identified role modeling as the single most important aspect of professionalism. The strongest curricular recommendations included faculty-led case scenario sessions, enhancing interprofessional interactions and the creation of special awards to staff and students to “celebrate” professionalism. Current evaluation systems were considered least effective. The importance of role modeling and information on how to report lapses and breaches was highlighted in the answers to the open ended questions. Conclusions Students identify the need for strong positive role models in their learning environment, and for effective evaluation of the professionalism of students and teachers. Medical school leaders must facilitate development of these components within the MD education and faculty development programs as well as in clinical milieus where student learning occurs. PMID:23153359

  1. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE CLASSROOM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Evans; Gregory Neff

    The vast majority of technology programs are working to prepare for their first accreditation visit under the Technology Accreditation Commission, 2003 TC2K accreditation criteria. Similarly, engineering programs are undergoing a second iteration under the Engineering Accreditation Commission's EC2000 accreditation criteria. Both sets of general criteria require that programs demonstrate that graduates have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities. This

  2. Cultivating professional responsibility in a dental hygiene curriculum.

    PubMed

    Blue, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    To prepare dental hygienists for future roles in the health care system, dental hygiene education must prepare graduates with skills, ethics, and values that align with professional responsibility. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of curricular changes designed to develop professional identity and responsibility over the entire span of the dental hygiene curriculum. Twenty-four dental hygiene students at the University of Minnesota were surveyed about their attitudes toward access to dental care, society's and health professionals' responsibility to care for the underserved, and their personal efficacy to provide care for the underserved. Surveys were conducted at three time points in the curriculum. The Attitudes Toward Health Care instrument adapted by Holtzman for dental use was used to survey the students. The findings indicate that this institution's curricular changes were effective in cultivating professional responsibility among these students. Their attitude scores increased across the six-semester curriculum, and students in their last semester of the program believed that all individuals have a right to dental care and that society has an obligation to provide dental care. These students' sense of obligation to care for the needy became stronger and their perceptions of their own ability to impact the community and act as an agent of change also increased. PMID:23929574

  3. The Role of Science Professionals in Teaching Responsible Research Conduct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Stephanie J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the reaction of the scientific community to the issue of responsible conduct in research. Cites the importance of professional standards and ethical values in scientific disciplines and explains that these are not readily learned from observation alone but must be addressed consciously. (DDR)

  4. Impact of Professional Development on Preschool Teachers' Conversational Responsivity and Children's Linguistic Productivity and Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Wiggins, Alice K.; Turnbull, Khara Pence; Curenton, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of professional development (PD) on preschool teachers' conversational responsivity in the classroom, defined as teachers' use of strategies to promote children's participation in extended conversational exchanges (communication-facilitating strategies) and exposure to advanced linguistic models

  5. Exploring Professional Identity in Response to Curriculum Reform and Professional Development: The Teaching Life Stories of Chemistry Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Gayle D.

    This study contributes to the existing literature in teacher education on teacher professional identity (Beijaard, Meijer & Verloop, 2004; Lamote & Engels, 2010; Rots, 2007), particularly in response to curriculum change and professional development. It proposes to offer a much better understanding of how chemistry teachers’ professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and the tensions they experience associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their actual practice. Specifically, this study aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following the introduction of the latest chemistry curricula in Manitoba. These latest chemistry curricula advocate for a more learner focused 'tetrahedral orientation' (Mahaffy, 2004) teaching practice that supports chemistry learning through the use of Johnstone's (1991) three modes of representation - the symbolic, macroscopic and molecular levels - as well as a human element dimension. This study also aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following their participation in long-term professional development offered by teacher educators at the University of Manitoba. Additionally, this study aims to determine whether teachers feel they have experienced tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices as a result of sustained professional development. Finally, this study aims to determine whether the curriculum changes and associated professional development have led teachers to think about and reflect more on their teaching practice and whether this has led to a change in their beliefs about teaching and learning and their teaching practice. Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1979) Model of the Ecology of Human Development was used as a theoretical framework for this study. This study was informed by semi-structured interviews involving 32 teachers of chemistry that were conducted during the fourth phase of a five-year research and development project supported by the University of Manitoba's Centres for Research in Youth, Science Teaching and Learning (CRYSTAL). These interviews suggested that teachers have experienced some tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices. The study further elicited data from eight of these 32 teachers via a qualitative narrative inquiry study employing narrative interviews to reveal teachers' perceptions of their evolving professional identities and chemistry teaching practices. Teaching life stories constructed from the narrative interview data revealed that these teachers feel that their professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and that a change in curricula followed by supportive professional development has caused these teachers to reflect more on their teaching practices. Furthermore, though these teachers indicated that they have experienced tensions associated with how they want to teach and their actual teaching practices, they feel they have experienced a shift in their beliefs about teaching and learning such that they feel their teaching practices have improved through their more consistent use of the four modes of representation in chemistry learning. The qualitative data show, however, that these teachers still feel that they have a long way to go to achieve a truly learner focused classroom practice where these four modes of chemistry learning are being used the majority of the time. The study closes by recommending that a much broader study be undertaken to include more teachers of chemistry in Manitoba to verify and add to the findings of this study, among other suggestions.

  6. A Model for Research-Based State Professional Development Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Allan; McArdle, Felicity

    2009-01-01

    Federal, State and school-based professional development has become a multi-million dollar educational enterprise in Australia. Yet there are no published models for the making of systems-level professional development policy. Reviewing the literature on the characteristics of effective professional development programs, this paper proposes a…

  7. Beyond the Professional Development School Model: The Professional Development District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Nancy Lourie; Whittaker, Andrea

    This paper examines the conditions of university/districtwide partnering that can aid systemic public education change. It introduces a university/school partnership known as the Triple "L" (Lifelong Learning and Leadership) Collaborative. The text details shared responsibility, shared accountability, alignment of teacher-performance standards,…

  8. A marketing model: applications for dietetic professionals.

    PubMed

    Parks, S C; Moody, D L

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally, dietitians have communicated the availability of their services to the "public at large." The expectation was that the public would respond favorably to nutrition programs simply because there was a consumer need for them. Recently, however, both societal and consumer needs have changed dramatically, making old communication strategies ineffective and obsolete. The marketing discipline has provided a new model and new decision-making tools for many health professionals to use to more effectively make their services known to multiple consumer groups. This article provides one such model as applied to the dietetic profession. The model explores a definition of the business of dietetics, how to conduct an analysis of the environment, and, finally, the use of both in the choice of new target markets. Further, the model discusses the major components of developing a marketing strategy that will help the practitioner to be competitive in the marketplace. Presented are strategies for defining and re-evaluating the mission of the profession, for using future trends to identify new markets and roles for the profession, and for developing services that make the profession more competitive by better meeting the needs of the consumer. PMID:3079782

  9. Response to Section II: What's Needed Now--Professional Development Schools and the Professionalization of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, A. Lin

    2011-01-01

    The professional development schools (PDS) effort, which grew out of the groundbreaking work of the Holmes Group (1986), was deliberately focused on the support and advancement of teachers as professionals and the professionalization of teaching, so the author argues that it is ironic that a volume about PDS might be seen as voicing an opinion…

  10. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  11. [Continuous responsibility for professionalism and informatics literacy of nurses].

    PubMed

    Marinkovi?, Martina Fruk

    2014-03-01

    Nurses should be aware of their responsibilities and standards that are expected from their work. They are aware of their need of continuous professional development. Their choice of profession has confirmed their readiness for lifelong training and acquiring new knowledge and skills to transfer them to others. Witnessing an explosion of information on the Internet and opportunity to approach them, there is a must to go for them. For searching the Internet, some new abilities and skills are required from nurses. They should not only be able to access the information but also to evaluate it. The leading role in such activities belongs to nurse-educators--they should practice Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy and insist on ICT literacy standards. All other nurses should follow them and implement ICT in their daily practice. PMID:24979894

  12. Promoting professional nursing practice: linking a professional practice model to performance expectations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Marcia; Hinch, Barbara; Llewellyn, Jane; Dillon, Paula J; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Professional practice models (PPMs) provide the conceptual framework for establishing professional nursing practice. Integrating a PPM requires complex organizational change. One strategy for integrating a PPM is to directly link the PPM with performance expectations to ensure that underlying beliefs are integrated into everyday practice. This article describes the development, implementation, and successful outcomes of a clinical advancement system that was aligned with a PPM. PMID:21320662

  13. Complex Harmony: The Military and Professional Models of Policing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen C. Leichtman

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of the military model throughout police reform, and how it has coexisted with, rather\\u000a than been supplanted by, the professional model. Early reformers chose the military upon which to structure their concept\\u000a of the urban police. That concept was refashioned into the professional model as the background of the reformers changed.\\u000a This new model then

  14. Addressing the marketplace mentality and improving professionalism in dental education: response to Richard Masella's "Renewing professionalism in dental education".

    PubMed

    Botto, Ronald W

    2007-02-01

    Richard Masella has written a very thought-provoking article that makes many excellent arguments regarding critical issues about professionalism in dental education. Rather than focus on minor points of contention, this response to his article highlights two main areas for further discussion. The first is the impact of the "marketplace" mentality and how there needs to be a balance between fiscal responsibility and ethical and professional responsibility. Changes in language are suggested as a starting point. Instead of using the term "productivity" to describe the goal, we need to focus on the process of behaving ethically, effectively, and efficiently in the provision of care to patients as well as in general professional behavior. The second major emphasis is on recommendations for improving the ethical climate of the dental college community and the teaching, exhibition, and celebration of professionalism. Included in this area are discussions of white coat ceremonies and honor codes, as well as the importance of recognizing the impact of the hidden curriculum in dental ethical education. Masella has made a major contribution by bringing forth strong arguments for discussing whether dental education truly is committed to teaching professionalism in a way that has meaning and impact rather than simply complying with accreditation standards. While there are certainly several points that appear to be speculative and could be debated in Masella's article, he has provided a valuable catalyst for discussion and introspection by identifying critical issues for both dental education and organized dentistry to address. PMID:17314382

  15. Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos V M

    2012-08-01

    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract. PMID:22002433

  16. Professional Practice Schools: Building a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Marsha; And Others

    This report summarizes the discussions of a task force which focused on the concept of professional practice schools. These schools are public elementary, middle, or secondary schools which are structured, staffed, and supported to achieve three goals: student achievement, teacher induction, and support of research directed at the continuous…

  17. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare ProfessionalsResponse

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  18. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  19. A supervisory model of professional competence: a joint service/education initiative.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S; Marr, J

    1995-08-01

    This article is concerned with describing how a National Health Service (NHS) Hospital Trust teamed up with a College of Nursing and Midwifery to develop a model of clinical supervision. The article discusses definitions of clinical supervision, which were used as a basis for the development of the model; identifies the roles and responsibilities of clinical supervisors and describes the foundations of an integrated system of educational and professional development. The model aims to set standards for clinical competence which facilitate continuity in professional development throughout the practitioner's career. The collaboration between the two organisations has ensured that the model reflects the inter-relationship between theory and practice, thus enhancing both academic and professional development. The result is a comprehensive model for clinical supervision which encompasses key national initiatives in both professional and educational fields; in particular the United Kingdom Central Council (UKCC) requirements for continuing registration, maintenance of a portfolio of professional development, and continuing education (PREP) and the Ten Key Characteristics of the English National Board (ENB) Higher Award. It also encourages practitioners to demonstrate good practice through the requirement to articulate and enhance professional knowledge using a portfolio, along with a system of peer review and defined clinical competencies. PMID:7565513

  20. Modeling Instruction: The Impact of Professional Development on Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Angela T.; Frick, Tasha M.; Barker, Heather L.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling Instruction holds the potential for transforming science instruction and improving student achievement. Key to the success of Modeling Instruction, however, is the fidelity of implementation of its curriculum. This qualitative study examined the impact of Modeling Instruction professional development on participating teachers'…

  1. The Practitioner's Model: Designing a Professional Development Program for Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debbi; Robbie, Diane; Borland, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of staff responsible for developing and delivering professional development (PD) in online teaching in three universities in the same Australian state. Each university draws on a similar pool of staff and students, and operates under the same government regulations, but has used different models of policy and…

  2. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  3. UAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive, effective practitioners"

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    Enhance the professional skills of Alaska's K-12 educators #12;2 Develop and support ongoing systemic1 UAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive Merrill/Prentice Hall. This textbook was selected because of its currency, efficient writing style

  4. The Impact of an Innovative Model of Technology Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Vivian

    This paper describes participant reaction to an informal field test of the Identifying Changes, Exploring Possibilities, and Developing Technology Skills (ICED) Professional Development Model. The theoretical framework for the ICED model is drawn from three sources: (1) literature review of the change process, specifically the adoption of…

  5. Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

  6. Te Kotahitanga: Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Russell; Berryman, Mere

    2010-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is a research and professional development project that aims to support teachers to raise the achievement of New Zealand's indigenous Maori students in public/mainstream classrooms. An Effective Teaching Profile, developed from the voices of Maori students, their families, principals and some of their teachers, provides direction…

  7. Child Safety – Health Professionals Capability Requirements and Reporting Responsibilities Human Resources Policy

    E-print Network

    unknown authors

    2008-01-01

    To ensure that all health professionals are aware of their roles and responsibilities in recognising, reporting and responding to children and young people who have been harmed or who are at risk of harm. 2 APPLICATION This policy applies to all health professionals. More specifically, it applies to those health professionals who as part of their normal duties are likely to engage with or deliver services to children and young people and/or adults who have parental/carer roles and responsibilities in relation to children and young people. 3 GUIDELINES Guidelines may be developed to facilitate implementation of this policy. The guidelines must be consistent with this policy. 4

  8. Preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math using the Geophysical Institute Framework for Professional Development in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry Bertram, Kathryn

    2011-12-01

    The Geophysical Institute (GI) Framework for Professional Development was designed to prepare culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Professional development programs based on the framework are created for rural Alaskan teachers who instruct diverse classrooms that include indigenous students. This dissertation was written in response to the question, "Under what circumstances is the GI Framework for Professional Development effective in preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math?" Research was conducted on two professional development programs based on the GI Framework: the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) and the Science Teacher Education Program (STEP). Both programs were created by backward design to student learning goals aligned with Alaska standards and rooted in principles of indigenous ideology. Both were created with input from Alaska Native cultural knowledge bearers, Arctic scientists, education researchers, school administrators, and master teachers with extensive instructional experience. Both provide integrated instruction reflective of authentic Arctic research practices, and training in diverse methods shown to increase indigenous student STEM engagement. While based on the same framework, these programs were chosen for research because they offer distinctly different training venues for K-12 teachers. STEP offered two-week summer institutes on the UAF campus for more than 175 teachers from 33 Alaska school districts. By contrast, ACMP served 165 teachers from one rural Alaska school district along the Bering Strait. Due to challenges in making professional development opportunities accessible to all teachers in this geographically isolated district, ACMP offered a year-round mix of in-person, long-distance, online, and local training. Discussion centers on a comparison of the strategies used by each program to address GI Framework cornerstones, on methodologies used to conduct program research, and on findings obtained. Research indicates that in both situations the GI Framework for Professional Development was effective in preparing culturally responsive STEM teachers. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are discussed in the conclusion.

  9. The Professional Development School Model: Unpacking Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Lisa J.

    2004-01-01

    In response to Cochran-Smith and Lytle's (1998) call for Other ways of researching and thinking about educational research and the recent call by the US Secretary of Education to reform "teacher-training" programs (Schoicet 2002), this article presents a research study focusing on a reform effort in teacher education. The study moved beyond the…

  10. Professional Development Schools: A Model for Preparing School Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Michael; Steen, Sam; Williams, Franklyn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a training model, based on The Education Trust, The American School Counselor Association, and The Holmes Partnership, consisting of school counselor trainees completing their clinical experiences in a Professional Development School. A case study demonstrating the role of the school counselor is presented along with…

  11. Models of Continuing Professional Development: A Framework for Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Aileen

    2014-01-01

    The area of teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) is of growing interest internationally. However, while an increasing range of literature focuses on particular aspects of CPD, there is a paucity of literature addressing the spectrum of CPD models in a comparative manner. This article therefore considers a wide range of…

  12. Assessing the IRIS Professional Development Model: Impact Beyond the Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Taber, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Education and Outreach (E&O) Program has developed a highly effective, one-day professional development experience for formal educators. Leveraging the expertise of its consortium, IRIS delivers content including: plate tectonics, propagation of seismic waves, seismographs, Earth's interior structure. At the core of the IRIS professional development model is the philosophy that changes in teacher behavior can be affected by increasing teacher comfort in the classroom. Science and research organizations such as IRIS are able to increase teachers' comfort in the classroom by providing professional development which: increases an educator's knowledge of scientific content, provides educators with a variety of high-quality, scientifically accurate activities to deliver content to students, and provides educators with experiences involving both the content and the educational activities as the primary means of knowledge transfer. As reflected in a 2002-2003 academic year assessment program, this model has proven to be effective at reaching beyond participants and extending into the educators' classrooms. 76% of respondents report increasing the amount of time they spend teaching seismology or related topics in their classroom as a result of participating in IRIS professional development experience. This increase can be directly attributed to the workshop as 90% of participants report using at least one activity modeled during the workshop upon returning to their classrooms. The reported mean activity usage by teachers upon was 4.5 activities per teacher. Since the inception of the professional development model in 1999, IRIS E&O has been committed to evaluation. Data derived from assessment is utilized as a key decision making tool, driving a continuous improvement process. As a result, both the model and the assessment methods have become increasingly refined and sophisticated. The alignment of the professional development model within the IRIS E&O Program framework has resulted in a clarified a definition of success and an increased demand for the collection of new data. Currently, the assessment program is testing tools to examine participant learning, measure the transfer of knowledge and resources from professional development into in classrooms, and measure the use of individual activities.

  13. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  14. Responsibility-Based Continuing Professional Development for In-Service Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the National Standards for Physical Education have endorsed the notion that physical educators should teach personal and social responsibility. Continuing professional development (CPD) programs, based on teaching personal and social responsibility, are needed to support teacher's adherence to the national standards. The purpose…

  15. Paraeducator Professional Development Curriculum. Module I: Building an Effective Instructional Team Part One: Paraeducator Roles, Responsibilities, and Professional Ethics. Trainer's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory NWREL, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Module I provides paraeducators an opportunity to increase what they know about professional ethics and the appropriate roles and responsibilities of paraeducators. The module has been designed to address two goals: to develop an understanding of paraeducator professional and ethical standards; to develop a basic understanding of paraeducator…

  16. Pacific CRYSTAL Teacher Professional Development Models: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Flier-Keller, E.; Yore, L.

    2010-12-01

    From 2005 to 2010 Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) has been engaged in community-based research fostering teacher leadership in innovative science education through a variety of approaches to teacher professional development. Pacific CRYSTAL is a University of Victoria based, NSERC funded project founded on a collaborative research model involving scentists, science educators and community members including schools, teachers, community groups and government. Pacific CRYSTAL professional development approaches embrace both in-service teachers and pre-service teachers, and include Lighthouse schools, workshops (ongoing as well as one-time), community-based partnerships in Pacific CRYSTAL research projects, teachers as researchers, and university science courses and workshops for pre-education and education students. A number of common themes, identified through these approaches, should be considered in the development and implementation of future science professional development initiatives. They include; teacher turnover, expanding and adding schools and participating teachers, teacher apprehension, building leadership capacity, further engagement of 'tourist' teachers, continuing professional support for teachers, as well as on-going mentoring.

  17. [Conceptual models; a power strategy with professional implications].

    PubMed

    Miró Bonet, Margalida

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual models and nursing theories are considered by some authors as standards that guide the thinking on how to be a nurse and practice nursing. Some authors defend that without the use of nursing models it could be difficult to improve the discipline and nursing practice, and even to transform a professional identity linked to submission, obedience and humility. The purpose of this article is not to argue about the truth or falseness, the usefulness, or not, of conceptual nursing models, but to analyse, from a post-structuralist perspective, their use as a power strategy exercised mainly by nurses since the 1970's in Spain and the unintentional professional implications of their adoption by the nursing profession. The basis of this analysis is from the results obtained in the PhD thesis of the author, in which it analysed the processes of continuity and transformation which constituted the professional identity of nurses in Spain between 1956 and 1976. Some political and social consequences are highlighted on nursing practices, on the holistic, humanist and moralist discourses transmitted by nursing models, on occasions compared with bio-pathological, technical and clinical discourses. PMID:20965762

  18. Nitrogen Crop Response Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Draycott, Ann.

    This on-line dynamic model from Horticulture Research International (HRI) "simulates the growth response of 25 crops to applications of nitrogen fertilizer." The model incorporates the effects of climate, organic material and leaching. Users select a region of the world, enter input into the model (e.g., crop type, date of sowing, weather conditions, nitrogen applications, etc.), and run the model for numeric and graphical output. Substantial effort has been made to describe the model's behavior and to present useful output; interested users may select the "advanced" or "detailed" options for further information on each model.

  19. DECLARATION OF PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY MEDICINE'S SOCIAL CONTRACT WITH HUMANITY

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    . As physicians, we are bound in our response by a common heritage of caring for the sick and the suffering that ameliorate suffering and contribute to human well-being. VII. Educate the public and polity about present changes that ameliorate suffering and contribute to human well-being. IX. Teach and mentor those who

  20. Response to Intervention: Implications for Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sarah; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Romani, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of building strong early childhood communities of interdisciplinary practice in the application of a comprehensive curriculum framework. A curriculum framework is proposed as a means of applying and extending the principles of response to intervention (RtI) to early childhood…

  1. Using Blogs to Promote Literary Response during Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie; Hutchison, Amy; Reinking, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that studied 15 preservice teachers' perceptions of and reactions to responding to children's and young adult literature using a Ning blog. These perceptions and reactions provided insight into various practical aspects of using a social networking blog to facilitate literature response in a teacher education…

  2. Professionalism Professionalism

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    for others. · Seven issues that challenge or diminish the elements of professionalism include abuse of power for others (patients and their families, other physicians and professional colleagues such as nurses, medical · Abuse of Power ­ Interactions with colleagues, staff, faculty ­ Bias and sexual harassment ­ Breach

  3. Learning Agreements and Socially Responsible Approaches to Professional and Human Resource Development in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon original qualitative data to present an initial assessment of the significance of learning agreements for the development of socially responsible approaches to professional and human resource development within the workplace. The article suggests that the adoption of a partnership-based approach to learning is more…

  4. UAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive, effective practitioners"

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    . Touchstone, ISBN-13: 9781439194140 Scheuermann, B. & Webber, J., Educating Students with Autism, A Quick · Governer's Council on Disabilities and Special Education · Autism Society of America, Golden Heart ChapterUAF School of Education: "Preparing professional educators who are culturally responsive, effective

  5. Response selection and execution skills of professionals and novices during singles tennis competition.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, T M; McPherson, S L

    2001-10-01

    This study extended research on sport expertise concerning the development of cognitive and motor skills in singles tennis (McPherson, 1999). 12 adult male professional and novice tennis players were videotaped during singles competition. Opponents for matches were randomly selected within each group of participants. Two tennis experts utilized an observational scale to judge players' performance generated during competition for serves and shots following the serve, e.g.. return of serves, lobs. Each player was scored on three performance components: quality of movement to or control of the ball for serves or shots attempted (control skills), appropriateness of serve or shot selections in the context of game situations (response selection skills), and quality of serves or shots produced (response execution skills). Relative frequency scores for the highest category of each performance component were derived according to the number of opportunities to respond. Serve performance indicated both groups were able to control their serves: however, professionals made more tactical selections and forceful executions. Shot performance indicated professionals made more successful movement to and control of shots, tactical shot selections, and forcing shot executions than novices. Overall, players' tactical response selections were greater than their forceful response executions. Thus, assessing players' decisions during competition may provide vital information concerning tactical skill development. Further, professional players exhibited higher and more consistent tactical behavior than elite collegiate players examined in 1999 by McPherson. Findings were attributed to tactical knowledge and motor skill development resulting from competition and practice experiences. PMID:11769911

  6. Diversity Profile Report of the AEJMC Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lowndes F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the diversity profile of the Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) membership. Focuses on the gender and ethnic identity of members. Finds that women are overrepresented in 11 of 31 subgroups; males are overrepresented in 3 subgroups;…

  7. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Awareness and Professional Growth through a School-University Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Theresa M.; Eick, Charles J.; Womack, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing in-service and pre-service teachers to effectively work with culturally diverse students is an ongoing challenge for schools and universities alike. This article reports on a University-Professional Development School (PDS) initiative designed to enhance an awareness of culturally responsive pedagogy. This article describes a yearlong…

  8. Item Response Theory Modeling

    Cancer.gov

    Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling is a statistical technique that is applied after data have been collected. IRT represents the field of psychometrics -- that is, evaluation of the degree of precision and breadth of scales that are used to measure latent constructs, or underlying traits of concepts that are not directly observable and must therefore be measured indirectly.

  9. Adding value to laboratory medicine: a professional responsibility.

    PubMed

    Beastall, Graham H

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is a medical specialty at the centre of healthcare. When used optimally laboratory medicine generates knowledge that can facilitate patient safety, improve patient outcomes, shorten patient journeys and lead to more cost-effective healthcare. Optimal use of laboratory medicine relies on dynamic and authoritative leadership outside as well as inside the laboratory. The first responsibility of the head of a clinical laboratory is to ensure the provision of a high quality service across a wide range of parameters culminating in laboratory accreditation against an international standard, such as ISO 15189. From that essential baseline the leadership of laboratory medicine at local, national and international level needs to 'add value' to ensure the optimal delivery, use, development and evaluation of the services provided for individuals and for groups of patients. A convenient tool to illustrate added value is use of the mnemonic 'SCIENCE'. This tool allows added value to be considered in seven domains: standardisation and harmonisation; clinical effectiveness; innovation; evidence-based practice; novel applications; cost-effectiveness; and education of others. The assessment of added value in laboratory medicine may be considered against a framework that comprises three dimensions: operational efficiency; patient management; and patient behaviours. The profession and the patient will benefit from sharing examples of adding value to laboratory medicine. PMID:23079513

  10. A Practice-Based Theory of Professional Education: Teach For America's Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, Ball and Cohen proposed a practice-based theory of professional education, which would end inadequate professional development efforts with a more comprehensive approach. Their work has been referenced over the past decade, yet there have been limited attempts to actualize their ideals and research their implications. In this article, I…

  11. The transformational model for professional practice: a system integration focus.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail A; Hayden, Margaret; Bradle, Judith A

    2004-04-01

    Healthcare organizations face the increasingly difficult challenge of providing services that are of high quality, reasonable cost, and easy accessibility for their constituents. Mergers and acquisitions are one strategy for accomplishing this, but in doing so it is critical to have a "road map" to create an integrated system, rather than merely a consortium of hospitals. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has successfully created an integrated healthcare system of 19 hospitals. The authors describe the professional practice model used as a framework for success in integrating patient care. PMID:15097213

  12. Enhancing surveys of health care professionals: a meta-analysis of techniques to improve response.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ik; Johnson, Timothy P; Vangeest, Jonathan B

    2013-09-01

    Surveys involving health care providers are characterized by low and declining response rates (RRs), and researchers have utilized various strategies to increase survey RRs among health professionals. Based on 48 studies with 156 subgroups of within-study conditions, a multilevel meta-regression analysis was conducted to summarize the effects of different strategies employed in surveys of health professionals. An estimated overall survey RR among health professionals was 0.53 with a significant downward trend during the last half century. Of the variables that were examined, mode of data collection, incentives, and number of follow-up attempts were all found to be significantly related to RR. The mail survey mode was more effective in improving RR, compared to the online or web survey mode. Relative to the non-incentive subgroups, subgroups receiving monetary incentives were more likely to respond, while nonmonetary incentive groups were not significantly different from non-incentive groups. When number of follow-ups was considered, the one or two attempts of follow-up were found to be effective in increasing survey RR among health professionals. Having noted challenges associated with surveying health professionals, researchers must make every effort to improve access to their target population by implementing appropriate incentive- and design-based strategies demonstrated to improve participation rates. PMID:23975761

  13. The PKRC's Value as a Professional Development Model Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Dale

    2013-01-01

    After a brief review of the 4-H professional development standards, a new model for determining the value of continuing professional development is introduced and applied to the 4-H standards. The validity of the 4-H standards is affirmed. 4-H Extension professionals are encouraged to celebrate the strength of their standards and to engage the…

  14. The Role of Positive Emotion towards Work as a Mediator in the Relationship between Organizational Responsiveness towards Teachers and Isolation in Professional Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostanci, Aynur B.

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed for the purpose of determining the mediator role of positive emotion towards work within the relationship between organizational responsiveness towards teachers in schools and social isolation in professional life, based on teacher opinions. The study was designed using a relational survey model. The study group was made…

  15. Physiological responses to simulated stair climbing in professional firefighters wearing rubber and leather boots.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Garten, Ryan S; Wade, Chip; Webb, Heather E; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2009-09-01

    No studies have considered whether a firefighter's boots are a factor influencing physiological responses. The purpose of this study was to examine physiological responses to a fire simulation activity (stair climb) in professional firefighters wearing rubber boots (RB) and leather boots (LB). Twelve professional firefighters participated in two counterbalanced simulated firefighter stair climb (SFSC) sessions, one wearing RB and the other wearing LB. Heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), expiratory ventilation (V(E)), blood lactate (BLa), salivary cortisol (SCORT), and leg strength were assessed prior to and following a SFSC. LB elicited significantly greater SCORT values and knee flexion time to peak torque. Furthermore, RB revealed significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion peak torque after SFSC. BLa was positively related to knee flexion peak torque after SFSC in the RB. Firefighters when wearing the RB may be more effective at resisting fatigue and increase more force production. PMID:19543910

  16. ['See and Treat' in the Emergency Department: legal aspects and professional nursing responsibility].

    PubMed

    Radice, Cristiano; Ghinaglia, Monica; Doneda, Renzo; Bollini, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The article aim to analyze the legal aspects of professional responsibility in the autonomous nursing care of a patient with a minor health problem treated in a See and Treat area of the Emergency Department through a literature review and an analyses of the Italian legislation about professional exercise. Recent studies have shown that the treatment of the emergency patients affected by minor health problems in separated areas of the A&E by skilled nurses proved to be effective in reducing time to medical examination and the overall time spent in the Emergency Department. Several studies have shown the positive effects of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) in terms of reduction of time to medical examination with an increase in patient satisfaction, maintaining an adequate level of quality in the care of patients with minor health problems. The introduction of a See and Treat area, together with the institution of advanced post-triage protocols, represents a possible answer to the overcrowding of the Emergency Department. The aim is the reduction of waiting times and proper allocation of both material and professional resources. The "See and Treat" nurse represents an expert nurse, with an adequate level of competence, who acts in respect to the clinical protocols shared between physicians and nurses. The Italian legislation is not in contrast with the introduction of the See and Treat nurse, on the contrary it offers opportunities for further professional development. PMID:24083498

  17. Striving for a culturally responsive process in training health professionals on Asian American and Pacific Islander youth violence prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony P. S. Guerrero; Deborah A. Goebert; Daniel A. Alicata; Cathy K. Bell

    2009-01-01

    The quality of youth violence prevention practice is dependent on the quality of education and training of professionals who will care for disadvantaged and\\/or underserved youth. The authors propose that culturally responsive youth violence prevention curricula, focused on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, should: 1) target institutions that train health professionals likely to serve Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders; 2)

  18. European Religious Education Teachers' Perceptions of and Responses to Classroom Diversity and Their Relationship to Personal and Professional Biographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everington, Judith; ter Avest, Ina; Bakker, Cok; van der Want, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on teachers of secondary level religious education in England, Estonia, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Norway. It presents a study of the teachers' perceptions of and responses to the diversity within their classes, in relation to their professional role and their personal and professional biographies. The study employed…

  19. Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, W R

    1982-01-01

    Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

  20. How dentists account for social responsibility: economic imperatives and professional obligations.

    PubMed

    Dharamsi, Shafik; Pratt, Daniel D; MacEntee, Michael I

    2007-12-01

    This study explores how dentists explain the concept of social responsibility and its relationship to issues affecting access to oral health care by vulnerable segments of the population. Analysis of open-ended interviews with thirty-four dentists, including dental educators, and administrators and officials of dental public health programs in Canada and the United States revealed that four main themes-economics, professionalism, individual choice, and politics-influenced the respondents' sense of social responsibility in dentistry. There was a belief that social responsibility in dentistry is dominated by economic imperatives that impact negatively on the policies and practices directing access to care. Yet, despite the highly critical stance on dentistry as a business, there was practical recognition of the economic realities of dental practice. Nevertheless, those who focused on social responsibility as a professional obligation highlighted the privileges of self-governance along with the accompanying duty to serve the welfare of everyone and not just those who are socioeconomically advantaged. PMID:18096884

  1. Police and mental health professionals. Collaborative responses to the impact of violence on children and families.

    PubMed

    Marans, S; Berkowitz, S J; Cohen, D J

    1998-07-01

    Coordinating responses through the Child Development-Community Policing Program has led to multiple changes in the delivery of clinical and police services. Mental health clinicians and police officers have developed a common language for assessing and responding to the needs of children and families who have been exposed to or involved in violence. Learning from each other, these unlikely partners have established close working relationships that improve and expand the range of interventions they are able to provide while preserving the areas of expertise and responsibilities of each professional group. The immediate access to witnesses, victims, and perpetrators of violent crimes through the consultation service provides a unique opportunity to expand the understanding of clinical phenomena from the acute traumatic moment to longer-term adaptation, symptom formation, and recovery. In turn, the initiative introduces the systematic study of basic psychological and neurobiologic functions involved in traumatization as well as the investigation of psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic therapies. Similarly, program involvement with juvenile offenders has led to a coordinated response from the police, mental health, and juvenile justice systems. This project provides an opportunity to develop detailed psychological profiles and typologies of children engaged in different levels of antisocial behavior as well as to determine the characteristics that might predict with whom community-based interventions might be most successful. A recent survey of New Haven public school students has yielded promising evidence that community policing and the program are having a positive impact on the quality of life. In a survey of sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-grade students there were substantial improvements in students' sense of safety and experience of violence between 1992 and 1996. When asked if they felt safe in their neighborhood, there was an increase in the percentage of positive responses from 57% to 62% for sixth-grade students, 48% to 66% for eighth-grade students, and 53% to 73% for tenth-grade students, and when asked if they had seen someone shot or stabbed there was a decrease in positive responses from 43% to 28% for sixth-grade students, 46% to 31% for eighth-grade students, and 34% to 28% for tenth-grade students. Today, we are all too familiar with the developmental trajectory that leads children into violent crime. Newspaper articles and clinical case reports have taken on a dreary repetitiveness. These young criminals are often poor, minority, inner-city children who are known to many agencies to be at risk because of family disorganization, neglect, and abuse. They are failing in school or are already on the streets. One day they are victims and the very next they are assailants. We are all familiar with the inadequacies in the social response to these children, from their preschool years through the point at which they become assailants themselves. What is shocking is that the age at which children make the transition from being abused to being abusive seems to be getting earlier, and the number appears to be increasing. On the positive side, there is an increased awareness of the need and the ability of the various sectors of society to respond in concert. The institutions that function in the inner city--schools, police, mental health and child welfare agencies, churches--are all concerned about the same children and families. By working together, with a shared orientation to the best interests of the children, they can intervene earlier and more effectively: first, to disrupt the trajectory leading to violence; and, second, to help those children who are already caught in the web of exposure to violent crime and inner-city trauma. The experience with community-based policing and mental health in New Haven, now being replicated throughout the United States, can thus stand as a model of an active social response to an overwhel PMID:9894059

  2. Teacher Study Groups: Toward a Model of Differentiated Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox-Mallory, Michelle Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    While there is extensive research related to the study of high-quality professional development, the research shows that there is limited evidence to indicate that teachers are provided with this type of professional development on a consistent, ongoing basis. The research also suggests that there is a lack of adequate evidence to show that…

  3. Teachers’ continuing professional development: contested concepts, understandings and models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Fraser; Aileen Kennedy; Lesley Reid; Stephen Mckinney

    2007-01-01

    Teachers’ continuing professional development (CPD) is being given increasing importance in countries throughout the world. In Scotland, the changing professional and political context has resulted in unprecedented investment in CPD. However, analysis and evaluation of CPD policies, practice and impact is complex. In seeking to understand some of the complexities, this article proposes a triple?lens framework, drawing on three different

  4. Instructional Technology Professional Development Evaluation: Developing a High Quality Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge A.; McEwen, Beryl C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The literature contains very few studies that focused on evaluating the impact of professional development activities on student learning. And, many of these studies failed to determine whether the professional development activities met their primary goal--to improve the learning process. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use…

  5. Expanding the Professional Development School Model: Developing Collaborative Partnerships with School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Gretchen E.; Goslee, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The Professional Development School (PDS) model, a successful collaborative partnership model between university teacher education programs and P-12 schools, focuses on ''preparing future educators, providing current educators with ongoing professional development, encouraging joint school-university faculty investigation of…

  6. Randomized Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The randomized response (RR) technique is often used to obtain answers on sensitive questions. A new method is developed to measure latent variables using the RR technique because direct questioning leads to biased results. Within the RR technique is the probability of the true response modeled by an item response theory (IRT) model. The RR…

  7. A Primer on Responsibility Centre Budgeting and Responsibility Centre Management. Professional File, Winter 1999, Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Daniel W.

    This monograph is a "how-to" manual on responsibility center budgeting (RCB) and responsibility center management (RCM) in the context of Canadian and U.S. institutions. It explains how RCB/RCM works in practice and discusses some of the problems encountered in implementing this strategy at a number of Canadian and U.S. universities. The paper…

  8. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  9. Subjective models of psychological disorders: mental health professional's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldy, Bruce David; Siefen, Rainer Georg

    2012-12-01

    This exploratory study is an extension of previous studies which have applied personal construct theory (PCP) methodology toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of multidisciplinary mental (and physical) health care (Kirkcaldy and Pope, 1992; Kirkcaldy et al., 1993, 2000, 2005; Kirkcaldy and Siefen, 1999). In this study we wanted to use similar cluster statistical analyses, not unlike PCP analysis, to identify the diverse subjective models of psychological ailments such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, mania, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post stress traumatic disorder (PTSD), etc., using not the idiosyncratic constructs generated by individual triadic element comparisons, but by selecting those constructs which have been clearly identified in various psychiatric and psychological rating scales (e.g. somatic preoccupation, social withdrawal, conceptual disorganization, hostility, disinhibition and controlling). Clinical experts (psychological psychotherapists, and medical psychotherapist and psychiatrist) each with over 25 years of clinical and research experience were required to complete the ratings of each disorder listed in terms of the pre-formulated behavioral, emotional and cognitive concepts. What emerged are several multivariate (grid) analyses based on mental health professionals' perception of diverse elements (disorders) and their interrelationship derived from the similarity of composite profiles of ill-related constructs. Overall, the analyses revealed clear associations between the subjective evaluations of psychological ailments suggesting some uniformity in mental health assessment of such disorders. The implications of these findings are discussed within the theoretical framework of improved mental health care. PMID:23174440

  10. Guest Editorial: A revolutionary model of professional development

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Anne Royce

    2010-11-01

    Traditionally, professional development in education has focused on three main areas: content, general pedagogy, or pedagogical content knowledge. While each area has its own purpose, in this article the author focuses on what the literature states should

  11. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  12. Implementing a K-12 Train the Trainer Professional Development Model through the School Improvement Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnow, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Effective professional development has been shown to improve instruction and increase student academic achievement. The Train the Trainer professional development model is often chosen by the state Department of Education for its efficiency and cost effectiveness of delivering training to schools and districts widely distributed throughout the…

  13. The National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology Educational Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger L. Peterson; Donald R. Peterson; Jules C. Abrams; George Stricker

    2006-01-01

    Beginning with its historical context, the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology's model for education and training in professional psychology is summarized in 5 areas: (a) broadened view of psychology with a flexible epistemology, multiple ways of knowing, and how practitioners doing practice remain local clinical scientists doing disciplined inquiry; (b) integrative pedagogy; (c) competency-based core curriculum

  14. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  15. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  16. Collaborative Partnerships : A Model for Science Teacher Education and Professional Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mellita M. Jones

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a collaborative partnership between practicing and pre-service teachers as a model for implementing science teacher education and professional development. This model provides a structure within which partnerships will work collaboratively to plan, implement and reflect on a series of Science lessons in cycles of action-reflection adapted from Korthagen’s (2001) ALACT model. Issues within Science education, teacher professional

  17. Putting the Research To Work: Professional Development Models from Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Ellen; Thompson, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Describes statewide professional development programs in Michigan that were developed to train teachers in technology use. Discusses Teach for Tomorrow, which combines online learning with local facilitators and peer support networks; and the Great Lakes Education Network Best Practices project, which combines lesson plans from the Web with…

  18. Professional credit guarantee principle-agent relationship model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. L. Cui; D. Z. Wang; Y. L. Zhuang

    2009-01-01

    By using the allocation of guarantee rate saving as incentive mechanism and considering the external supervision mechanism in credit guarantee contract, the principal-agent relationships between professional credit guarantee institution and small and medium sized enterprise (SME) is investigated in this paper. It has been proved that external supervision mechanism could not change the optimal effort level of SME under the

  19. EFL Teachers' Professional Development: A Concept, a Model, and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serdiukov, Peter; Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    The main purpose of this article is to propose the Distance Professional Development and Support System (DPDS), an approach specifically designed to help non-native speakers of English teach English-as-a-Foreign Language (EFL) in a non-English-speaking setting. English has become the primary language of international communication, and there is a…

  20. The Identification of Effective Models for Developing Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy Herard, Berretta

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive study was to determine whether significant differences existed in the perceptions of elementary school teachers regarding the presence of the 5 dimensions of professional learning communities (PLCs) in Title I schools scoring above versus Title I schools scoring below the 55th percentile on state…

  1. [Qualification concept for delegation of medical tasks to nonmedical professional groups. The "Greifswalder 3-level model"].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W; van den Berg, N; Dreier, A

    2013-04-01

    To manage the current demographics and the expected medical, nursing, and social care needs of the population, structural changes are needed in the German health care system. On the regional level, there is a shortage of general practitioners in Germany. In the future, the number of affected regions will likely increase. These trends require new support strategies, which include the delegation of medical tasks to nonphysician professionals of which nurses and medical assistants are the primary profession. Thus, they will expand their traditional scope of work. However, their traditional training does not qualify them to perform medical tasks responsibly and with high quality. Hence, there is a need for further development of advanced training programs. The goal is to tailor modular advanced training to the specific support needs of the patients. A recent law (GKV-Versorgungsstrukturgesetz, GKV-VStG, 1 January 2012) was passed that specifies and extends the delegation options of medical tasks beyond the restrictions defined in previous German legislation (§ 63, SGB V in 2008). In this article, we present a three-stage model for qualifying nonphysician medical professionals for defined ranges of medical tasks. PMID:23337914

  2. K20 Model: Creating Networks, Professional Learning Communities, and Communities of Practice That Increase Science Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Janis Slater

    2009-04-02

    The K20 Model develops professional learning communities (PLCs) and has been successful in district-wide and school initiatives across Oklahoma. It is based on four interrelated structures for engaging people in communities: networks, PLCS, communities of

  3. 31 CFR 10.1 - Director of the Office of Professional Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Revenue Service. The Director of the Office of Professional...or delegate. (b) Duties. The Director of the Office of Professional...to matters under the Director's jurisdiction...and performs other duties as are necessary...

  4. Beyond Climate Focus and Disciplinary Myopia. The Roles and Responsibilities of Hospitals and Healthcare Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Ulhøi, John P.; Ulhøi, Benedicte P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper calls for the need to address climate change within the concept of sustainable development, in recognition of the interrelationships between environmental, economic and social systems. So far, health- providing organizations such as hospitals have paid surprisingly little attention to the relationships between environmental change (e.g. climate change) and human health, or between hospitals (as professional organizations) and their impact on sustainable development. Although it is usually such industries as the chemical, extractive and metal industries, etc., that are associated with environmentally harmful activities, there is also an urgent need to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and their embeddedness in a wider ecological, economic and social context. The key objective here is to discuss the relevance of sustainability and environmental management issues in a sector that until now has conveniently ignored its roles and responsibilities in relation to sustainability issues. The paper concludes that arguments based on systems theory, environment, medicine, economics and innovation strongly urge hospitals to reconsider their present roles and environmental responsibilities. PMID:19440441

  5. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  6. Professional Development for Professional Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Ann

    2004-01-01

    During the last year, SETDA tackled the question, "How do you provide professional development to those who typically develop and/or provide the opportunities to others?" Although providing professional development opportunities for administrators and teachers is a primary responsibility of many SETDA members, many state educational technology…

  7. Model refinement using transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

  8. Models of professional preparation: Pharmacy, nursing and teacher education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Barnett; R. A. Becher; N. M. Cork

    1987-01-01

    The study focuses on three areas of initial professional education at degree level—pharmacy, nursing and teacher education. All three are associated with professions where individual clients' needs are significant—the so-called caring professions. The project was conducted largely through interviews with teaching staff in both university and public sector institutions. The interviews focused on the interests, activities and values of the

  9. The professionalization of Western herbalists: response to new product regulations in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moss, Karen; Boon, Heather; Ballantyne, Peri; Kachan, Natasha

    2007-12-01

    New Canadian Natural Health Products regulations (NHP regulations) came into law January 1st, 2004 and will be implemented over 6 years. These regulations have the potential to impact a variety of stakeholders, in particular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. In this article, we document Canadian Western herbalist leaders' responses to the new regulations, so as to provide insight into how new healthcare policy serves as a stimulus for the organization of an emerging healthcare profession. The data are derived from key informant interviews with Western herbalist leaders in Canada (n=9). The NHP regulations include "good manufacturing practices" and Western herbalist leaders are concerned that many small companies, often owned and run by Western herbalists, will find the regulations too costly to implement, causing them to reduce the number and diversity of products they manufacture, or go out of business all together. Furthermore, lack of availability of whole plant products could severely restrict the practice of Canadian Western herbalists. In response to this challenge, herbalists are attempting to (i) organize as a more cohesive group, (ii) define their unique body of knowledge and (iii) increase the perceived legitimacy of their practices in the eyes of the public, conventional healthcare practitioners, and regulators, in an attempt to protect their unique practices. An examination of the findings reveals the extent to which external factors (i.e., the new NHP regulations) both provoke and shape the professionalization of this group of healthcare practitioners. PMID:18054728

  10. The Physical Education Profession and Its Professional Responsibility... or... Why "12 Weeks Paid Holiday" Will Never Be Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper critically reviews the concept of "professional responsibility" in physical education. The paper is rooted in the belief that the physical education profession has, by virtue of its expertise in young people and physical activity, the potential to deliver a broad range of desirable educational and health-related outcomes.…

  11. The physical education profession and its professional responsibility … or … why ‘12 weeks paid holiday’ will never be enough

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen M. Armour

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper critically reviews the concept of ‘professional responsibility’ in physical education. The paper is rooted in the belief that the physical education profession has, by virtue of its expertise in young people and physical activity, the potential to deliver a broad range of desirable educational and health-related outcomes. Yet, if the physical education profession is just that –

  12. Body image concerns in professional fashion models: are they really an at-risk group?

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Szmigielska, Emilia

    2013-05-15

    Although professional models are thought to be a high-risk group for body image concerns, only a handful of studies have empirically investigated this possibility. The present study sought to overcome this dearth of information by comparing professional models and a matched sample on key indices of body image and appeared-related concerns. A group of 52 professional fashion models was compared with a matched sample of 51 non-models from London, England, on indices of weight discrepancy, body appreciation, social physique anxiety, body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, internalization of sociocultural messages about appearance, and dysfunctional investment in appearance. Results indicated that professional models only evidenced significantly higher drive for thinness and dysfunctional investment in appearance than the control group. Greater duration of engagement as a professional model was associated with more positive body appreciation but also greater drive for thinness. These results indicate that models, who are already underweight, have a strong desire to maintain their low body mass or become thinner. Taken together, the present results suggest that interventions aimed at promoting healthy body image among fashion models may require different strategies than those aimed at the general population. PMID:23017651

  13. Tools for tomorrow's health care system: a systems-informed mental model, moral imagination, and physicians' professionalism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Donna T; Mills, Ann E; Werhane, Patricia H

    2008-08-01

    Physician educators have been charged with incorporating systems-based approaches into medical education and residency training to help future physicians understand how their ability to provide high-quality health care depends on other individual and organizational stakeholders with whom and, in some cases, for whom they work. In part, this also requires that physicians accept that they have responsibilities to various system stakeholders. These changes are controversial because some fear they might distract physicians from their primary ethical obligation to their patients. However, systems theories and their applications in organizational management and business ethics support the notions that individuals can maintain primary professional ethical obligations while working within complex systems and that organizational systems can be constructed to support individual professional practice. If physicians are to commit to working within and, ultimately, improving systems of care as part of their ethical practice of medicine, then they will need a new mental model. Leading thinkers have used various models of systems and have highlighted different aspects of systems theories in describing organizations, groups of organizations, and organizational processes. This essay draws from these models some basic concepts and elements and introduces a simple but comprehensive mental model of systems for physicians. If it is used with professionalism and moral imagination, physicians might have a tool that they can use to understand, work with, and, ultimately, improve the systems of care that they rely on in their practice of medicine and that critically affect the welfare of their patients. PMID:18667882

  14. Enhancing Teachers’ Application of Inquiry?Based Strategies Using a Constructivist Sociocultural Professional Development Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda R. Brand; Sandra J. Moore

    2011-01-01

    This two?year school?wide initiative to improve teachers’ pedagogical skills in inquiry?based science instruction using a constructivist sociocultural professional development model involved 30 elementary teachers from one school, three university faculty, and two central office content supervisors. Research was conducted for investigating the impact of the professional development activities on teachers’ practices, documenting changes in their philosophies, instruction, and the learning

  15. Trust Model Based on M-CRGs in Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shasha; Zhang, Pengzhu; Jia, Zhaoqing

    Many research results demonstrate that government itself cannot handle all the requests from residents in emergency response. Some scholars proposed that building community response grids which utilized pre-existing communities to support citizen request. Unfortunately, little attention has been given to achieve effective and trustworthy collaboration between professional emergency responders and residents. In this paper, the authors modify the architecture of CRGs to provide a valid organizational pattern in emergency response. Based on the modified CRGs (M-CRGs), the trust modeling framework is discussed in detail. Through recording the total behaviors and evaluation of all agents in the systems, the society network is built and the global trustworthiness which reflects the agents' true synthetical ability is gained in the model. An application of this model to Snow Disasters in Southern China is illustrated. Analysis shows that the model contributes to developing efficiency in emergency response.

  16. Responses of mental health professionals to man-made trauma: the Israeli experience.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Z

    1996-09-01

    The reactions and responses of mental health professionals in the area of armed conflict is the focus of this paper. It examines the way the therapeutic community has dealt with the survivors of two catastrophes-the Holocaust and warfare. A parallel process of a gradual change of attitudes towards the survivors was observed: emotional detachment, lack of recognition in the early stages and, eventually, social acceptance and empathy. The origins of these attitudes will be discussed, and three explanations will be offered. Israel is a small, stress-ridden country that has known seven full-scale wars and countless hostilities during its 47 years of existence. Our national history over 2000 years has been beset with persecution, programs and deportations, culminating in the Nazi Holocaust. The establishment of the State of Israel brought with it the hope of a secure existence. Unfortunately, this has not been achieved, and Israel is a natural laboratory of war stress. The reactions and responses of mental health professionals in areas of armed conflict is the focus of this paper. Presented here will be this author's analysis of the way the Israeli society and the helping professions in Israel have dealt with two kinds of man-made catastrophic events: the Nazi Holocaust and seven Arab-Israeli wars. In these different events of human violence, a parallel process of a gradual change of attitude towards the survivors was observed. This remarkable parallel presents emotional detachment, lack of recognition and at times blaming the victims in the early stages and, eventually, social acceptance and empathy. The process of social change becomes complex when the agents of change are themselves members of the social entity undergoing the change. This paper shall demonstrate that therapists and mental health planners had considerable difficulties in transcending public attitudes toward survivors of the Holocaust and psychiatric casualties of the Israeli-Arab conflict. As a result, they were unable to treat properly those injured by trauma until certain social changes took place. This paper submits that the Israeli experience is not isolated and limited to our part of the globe. It represents a general, universal process, from which parallel processes in other countries and in other man-made trauma can be drawn. PMID:8870141

  17. An Ethnographic Case Study of the Professional Development Model in a Successful Elementary School within a Suburban Southeast Texas School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrzelka, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study was designed to investigate a successful professional development model, perceived effective professional learning and process for determining professional development for teachers. With eighty years of research on professional development, limited research was available on the process for determining professional

  18. Challenges to Professional Psychology Education in the 21st Century: Response to Peterson

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Beth Kenkel; Patrick H. DeLeon; Judith E. N. Albino; Natalie Porter

    2003-01-01

    Professional psychology education faces many critical challenges brought about by the major changes occurring in the health care arena. This article shows that professional schools and programs have a good record of responding to these challenges and of taking proactive steps to prepare their graduates for new health care roles and delivery systems. Data on admissions to psychology doctoral training

  19. The Congruence between Industry Demand and Professional School Response in Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Ronald

    This study sought insight into the congruence between knowledge, skills and attitudes required by architecture practitioners and the benefits of professional school education. Twenty-four senior architects from Los Angeles architecture firms and 11 professional school deans and faculty members from the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban…

  20. Professionals in a cold climate: responses to economic transformation in Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Ashwin; Irina Popova

    2006-01-01

    Russia's attempted economic transformation has had dramatic consequences for all classes of employees, from cleaners to nuclear physicists. This paper considers the adaptation of Russia's committed professionals to their new environment. Using data from longitudinal qualitative research, it explores how far the ability of professionals to adjust to Russia's new labour market can be explained by reference to their flexibility

  1. How Professionally Relevant Can Language Tests Be?: A Response to Wette (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, John; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The recently published article "English Proficiency Tests and Communication Skills Training for Overseas-Qualified Health Professionals in Australia and New Zealand" (Wette, 2011) aims to address perceived problems and misconceptions associated with the testing of English language skills and professional communicative competence of…

  2. [ASO-TSO, emergency interventions: has anything changed? Old and new psychiatrist's professional responsibilities].

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Taratufolo, Rosa; Candelli, Chiara; Grattagliano, Ignazio; La Tegola, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    The Law 833 of 1978 on the subject of psychiatric emergency treatments in absence of consensus has contributed to grant mental patients equal guaranties and equal constitutional rights which, until that moment, they had been denied. This standpoint includes TSO in favor of mental patients. Ordered by the constitutional laws which guarantee a person's inviolable rights, TSO finds itself positioned between individual freedom and the freedom of treatment on the one hand, and the right to safeguard health on the other hand. The procedure of TSO is noticeable in its various phases so as to provide for the various levels of safeguarding a person who is temporarily deprived of the capacity to express valid consensus. On the other side it also has a certain amount of flexibility in its application, which guarantees adaptability of the norm in various contexts and various incidental situations. Nevertheless, the complexity of the law on TSO, as well as the interpretation margins of the procedure have contributed to the creation of an application frame which is not free of criticism. In this context, the recommendations of the Conference of Regions and Autonomous Provinces have particular importance. These recommendations deserve careful analysis, both for the presence of elements of novelty (in the very particular cases of TSO for children under 18 and TSO for decisionally impaired subjects) and for the reminder of the full application of "non-hospitalized TSO". The latter was provided for in Law 833/78 but has never been adequately and completely adopted because it has never been explained in its concrete applicability. Therefore, bearing in mind the already known responsibility of a psychiatrist in an emergency case, and with renewed interest in new medical performance a psychiatrist of public service has to guarantee, we are preparing to give our contribution on the subject of professional obligations at a historical moment in which known trials seem to assign the responsibility for the "dangerousness" of a mental patient to the psychiatrist. PMID:23023079

  3. Professionalism in Policing: Assessing the Professionalization Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip E. Carlan; John A. Lewis

    2009-01-01

    This study examines police professionalism by using Hall's professionalism scale. Questionnaires (N = 1,953) were mailed to all municipal police depart- ments with 50 or more sworn personnel in one southern state, producing 1,114 responses (57% response rate) from 16 participating departments. Analysis revealed that professionalism attitudes did not differ significantly among agencies. Findings also revealed above-average professionalism attitudes on

  4. A Professional Development Model: Building Word Knowledge for Middle Level Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Kathryn L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a professional development model to support the implementation of word study in the middle school grades. The first section provides a rationale and considerations for the model. The following section discusses the theory and instructional methods of word study focusing on word sorting and word hunts. To confirm the…

  5. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model

  6. The Effect of a Professional Development Classroom Management Model on At-Risk Elementary Students' Misbehaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglin, Gary; Akpo-Sanni, Joretta; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2012-01-01

    The problem in the study was that at-risk elementary school students had too many classroom disruptive behaviors. The purpose was to investigate the effect a Professional Development Classroom Management Model would have on reducing these students' misbehaviors. The study implemented a classroom management model to improve the classroom management…

  7. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school…

  8. Level Models of Continuing Professional Development Evaluation: A Grounded Review and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldwell, Mike; Simkins, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) evaluation in education has been heavily influenced by "level models", deriving from the work of Kirkpatrick and Guskey in particular, which attempt to trace the processes through which CPD interventions achieve outcomes. This paper considers the strengths and limitations of such models, and in particular…

  9. Modelling hormonal response and development?

    PubMed Central

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin–cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges. PMID:24630843

  10. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  11. A Race Model for Responses and Response Times in Tests.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Gaviria, José-Luis

    2014-11-01

    Latent trait models for responses and response times in tests are often pure statistical models without a close connection to features of the assumed response process. In the present paper, a new model is presented that is more closely related to assumptions about the response process. The model is based on two increasing stochastic processes. Each stochastic process represents the accumulation of knowledge with respect to one of two response options, the correct and incorrect response. Both accumulators compete and the accumulator that first exceeds a critical level determines the response. General assumptions about the accumulators result in a race between two response times that follow a bivariate Birnbaum Saunders distribution. The model can be calibrated with marginal maximum likelihood estimation. Feasibility of the estimation approach is demonstrated in a simulation study. Additionally, a test of model fit is proposed. Finally, the model will be used for the analysis of an empirical data set. PMID:25381198

  12. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. PMID:25301826

  13. Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob Duffield; Allan McCall; Aaron James Coutts; Jeremiah John Peiffer

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intensity of training and changes in hydration status, core temperature, sweat rate and composition and fluid balance in professional football players training in the heat. Thirteen professional football players completed three training sessions; “higher-intensity” (140 min; HI140), “lower-intensity” (120 min; LI120) and “game-simulation” (100 min; GS100). Movement demands were measured by Global Positioning System,

  14. Supporting mental health in South African HIV-affected communities: primary health care professionals' understandings and responses.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rochelle Ann

    2014-08-26

    How do practitioners respond to the mental distress of HIV-affected women and communities? And do their understandings of patients' distress matter? The World Health Organization (WHO) along with advocates from the Movement for Global Mental Health (MGMH) champion a primary mental health care model to address burgeoning mental health needs in resource-poor HIV-affected settings. Whilst a minority of studies have begun to explore interventions to target this group of women, there is a dearth of studies that explore the broader contexts that will likely shape service outcomes, such as health sector dynamics and competing definitions of mental ill-health. This study reports on an in-depth case study of primary mental health services in a rural HIV-affected community in Northern KwaZulu-Natal. Health professionals identified as the frontline staff working within the primary mental health care model (n = 14) were interviewed. Grounded thematic analysis of interview data highlighted that practitioners employed a critical and socially anchored framework for understanding their patients' needs. Poverty, gender and family relationships were identified as intersecting factors driving HIV-affected patients' mental distress. In a divergence from existing evidence, practitioner efforts to act on their understandings of patient needs prioritized social responses over biomedical ones. To achieve this whilst working within a primary mental health care model, practitioners employed a series of modifications to services to increase their ability to target the sociostructural realities facing HIV-affected women with mental health issues. This article suggests that beyond attention to the crucial issues of funding and human resources that face primary mental health care, attention must also be paid to promoting the development of policies that provide practitioners with increased and more consistent opportunities to address the complex social realities that frame the mental distress of HIV-affected women. PMID:25161270

  15. Respecting the dual sided identity of clinical pastoral education and professional chaplaincy: the phenomenological research model.

    PubMed

    Morin, Marie-Line

    2002-01-01

    The question discussed in this volume opens a debate on what kind of scientific research model should be used by professional chaplaincy and Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The problem begins with the assumption that "becoming more scientific" means using the natural sciences approach employed by psychology; an approach unsuitable to account for factors relative to faith, spiritual and religious issues. I argue that CPE and professional chaplaincy need to be more scientific but not necessarily under the natural sciences model. Considering the predominance of that model in psychology, I believe pastors and chaplains should resist pressures to rely on the natural science model and adopt instead models that respect their dual sided identity. I conclude by suggesting that the phenomenological research model best allows investigation of patients' spiritual as well as psychological issues. PMID:14682100

  16. An Evaluation of Professional Development on Using Student Response Systems and Interactive Whiteboards for Formative Assessment in the Middle Schools of a Southeastern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Julia Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The purchase of 21st-century technologies for each middle school teacher in my school system coinciding with a historic lack of significant professional development in technology integration provided the impetus for the study. To address the problem, professional development focused on helping teachers use student response systems and mobile…

  17. Measuring the Impact of Student Interaction with Student Affairs Professionals on Socially Responsible Leadership Development in the First Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Georgianna L.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study on Liberal Arts Education, this research explored the impact of students' interactions with student affairs professionals on socially responsible leadership development during the first year of college. Overall, students' interactions with student affairs professionals were…

  18. Using an Empowerment Professional Development Model to Support Beginning Primary Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Len; Frid, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    This is a case study report from a larger study that focused on how an empowerment professional development model influenced the mathematics pedagogical practices and beliefs of Australian primary school teachers during their first year of teaching. The research used an interpretive approach for analysis of data from interviews, observations,…

  19. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aldrin E. Sweeney; Jeffrey A. Paradis

    2004-01-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based model for the professional preparation of secondary level science teachers. Findings from the

  20. Models of Professional Development in the Education and Practice of New Teachers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws upon research undertaken in nine higher education institutions for a doctoral thesis. The qualitative study used repertory grids and semi-structured interviews with nine course leaders to investigate models of professional development that underpin courses for new teachers in higher education. While evidence of good levels of…

  1. National Urban Alliance Professional Development Model for Improving Achievement in the Context of Effective Schools Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.; Cooper, Eric J.; Hilliard, Asa, III

    2000-01-01

    Describes implementation of the National Urban Alliance for Effective Education's (NUA's) Professional Development Model in several locations, which is designed to help improve students' comprehension, content performance, thinking skills, and literacy by improving teaching and educational quality. Discusses NUA activities and approaches in the…

  2. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. Bertram

    2009-01-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for

  3. A Strong Core of Qualities--A Model of the Professional Educator that Moves beyond Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Karen; Coutts, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Consideration of the qualities of good teaching leads to a new model that emphasizes the importance of sense making to professional development. A strong core of qualities that assist teachers in using sense making includes strength, confidence, balance, ballast, and value maturity. (Contains 27 references.) (SK)

  4. Peer Partnerships in Teaching: Evaluation of a Voluntary Model of Professional Development in Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes work over a three-year period to develop a peer partnership approach to professional development at a dual sector university. The aim of the program, arising initially in one school and then piloted in 5 schools, was to support staff in their teaching practice. Emphasis was on the development of a sustainable model of…

  5. National Models for Continuing Professional Development: The Challenges of Twenty-First-Century Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Marilyn; Younie, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    If teacher quality is the most critical factor in improving educational outcomes, then why is so little attention drawn to the knowledge and evidence base available to support teachers in improving the quality of their professional knowledge? This paper draws together findings from a range of sources to propose national models for continuing…

  6. Embedded Teacher Leadership: Support for a Site-Based Model of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Deborah S.; Vogel, Robert; Liang, Ling L.

    2009-01-01

    Project Achieve is a professional development (PD) project that utilizes teacher leaders (TLs), former teachers who have been reassigned to provide school-based mentoring, instruction, lesson plan assistance and modelling of lessons for urban middle school teachers. A primary goal of Project Achieve is to evaluate the extent to which TLs were able…

  7. The SIOP Model: A Professional Development Framework for a Comprehensive School-Wide Intervention. CREATE Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echevarría, Jana; Short, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief first describes individual interventions that CREATE researchers tested in middle school science, social studies, and language arts classrooms with English language learners over the course of the 2005-2009 school years. The brief then explains how the SIOP Model was used as a professional development framework to unite the separate…

  8. An Innovative Model of Professional Development to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Primary Science in Irish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Greg

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of a two-year professional development programme on primary teachers' attitudes towards primary science, their confidence and competence in teaching science, and pupils' attitudes towards school science. Unlike the traditional "one-size-fits all" model of professional development, the model

  9. Teaching and Teaming More Responsively: Case Studies in Professional Growth at the Middle Level

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Strahan

    2009-01-01

    This case study examined the experiences of two middle level teachers as they worked with a literacy coach and university partners in an instructional improvement initiative. Robert and Janice worked together as a two-teacher team. Across the three years of the study, they collaborated with Melissa, the literacy coach, to integrate reading and writing across the curriculum and to create connections with reluctant students. Analysis of observations, interviews, and archival documents showed that professional growth accelerated with discussions of instructional practices and student performance, guided by informal assessments of student achievement. Patterns of professional growth and student accomplishment document the power of collaboration and suggest possibilities for supporting professional development more productively through interdisciplinary teamwork.

  10. University/School District Partnership in Professional Development: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Madlyn Levine; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the formal partnership between the Ann Arbor (Michigan) School District and the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, for the planning and implementation of an inservice training program that has evolved into a model for flexible staff development. (Author/WD)

  11. Resolution of Service Learning and Professional Responsibility Illinois Institute of Technology Mission Statement: To educate people who aspire to leadership roles

    E-print Network

    Saniie, Jafar

    and Professional Responsibility was formed by the students leaders of the Student Government Association, Catholic of Architecture faculty and students are working on a design-build project to benefit the victims of Hurricane

  12. The Systemic Impact of the Implementation of the Response to Intervention Model in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Annette R.

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this study was to examine three factors regarding the implementation of the Response to Intervention (RtI) model. First, the study discovered what professional development opportunities were afforded to administrators and certified faculty to support the implementation of the RtI model within schools that make AYP and those that…

  13. Ethics for the New Political Economy: What Can it Mean to be Professionally Responsible? Presidential Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this address, the author builds the case that a new political economy of education, dominated by what Pauline Lipman calls the "neo-liberal social imaginary," is changing the moral context in which educators imagine their professional roles. The author argues that educators are placed in relation to others in rather complicated…

  14. Tensions across Federalism, Localism, and Professional Autonomy: Social Media and Stakeholder Response to Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kimberly Scriven; Herrington, Carolyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing upon research on federalism, localism, and professional autonomy, this article explores how educational stakeholders used social media to discuss and organize against the implementation of Differentiated Accountability in a large Florida school district. The results showed that the stakeholders used social media to engage in sense making…

  15. Social Work Values and Pacifism: Opposition to War as a Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, if social workers behave professionally according to their prescribed values and ethics, it will follow that they are working from an active pacifist perspective. Presents definition of pacifism and examines pacifism and social work values (importance of individual, respect for differences, commitment to social justice, persistence…

  16. Are health professionals responsible for the shortage of organs from deceased donors in Malaysia?

    PubMed

    Abidin, Zada L Zainal; Ming, Wee Tong; Loch, Alexander; Hilmi, Ida; Hautmann, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    The rate of organ donations from deceased donors in Malaysia is among the lowest in the world. This may be because of the passivity among health professionals in approaching families of potential donors. A questionnaire-based study was conducted amongst health professionals in two tertiary hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Four hundred and sixty-two questionnaires were completed. 93.3% of health professionals acknowledged a need for organ transplantation in Malaysia. 47.8% were willing to donate their organs (with ethnic and religious differences). Factors which may be influencing the shortage of organs from deceased donors include: nonrecognition of brainstem death (38.5%), no knowledge on how to contact the Organ Transplant Coordinator (82.3%), and never approaching families of a potential donor (63.9%). There was a general attitude of passivity in approaching families of potential donors and activating transplant teams among many of the health professionals. A misunderstanding of brainstem death and its definition hinder identification of a potential donor. Continuing medical education and highlighting the role of the Organ Transplant Coordinator, as well as increasing awareness of the public through religion and the media were identified as essential in improving the rate of organ donations from deceased donors in Malaysia. PMID:23199156

  17. An Occupation's Responsibility: The Role of Social Foundations in the Cultivation of Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the author argues that inquiry and engagement in the social foundations of education is fundamental to cultivating professionalism in education. As many commentators on the subject have noted, teaching does not meet many of the criteria of a profession derived from the sociological study of fields of work. As Joseph Newman observes,…

  18. Shaping Our Future: What Are Our Professional Responsibilities to Art Therapy Students?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth Gonzalez-Dolginko

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a workshop with two groups representing a total of 25 art therapists who met to gain a better understanding of the knowledge base of art therapy and professional identity, and the importance of including prescribed content area in curricula. Although recognizing the limited scope of the survey, the paper attempts to offer valuable perspectives

  19. SURVEY RESPONSE RATE REPORTING IN THE PROFESSIONAL LITERATURE Timothy Johnson and Linda Owens

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Policies, Professional Standards. "Men whose research is based on shared paradigms are committed Revolution. 1962 1. INTRODUCTION Full disclosure of research methods and procedures is one of the basic tenets of scientific research. It is only via this mechanism that knowledge can be accumulated

  20. Professional Experience in New Times: Issues and Responses to a Changing Education Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Simone; Bloomfield, Di; Le Cornu, Rosie

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses policy and practice relevant to teacher education and professional experience programs in Australia, aiming to assist not only reading our past and present, but also offering strategic direction with respect to the challenges and opportunities that are emerging within the Australian context. A meta-analysis of current major…

  1. Design of a case management model for people with chronic disease (Heart Failure and COPD). Phase I: modeling and identification of the main components of the intervention through their actors: patients and professionals (DELTA-icE-PRO Study)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose M Morales-Asencio; Francisco J Martin-Santos; Juan C Morilla-Herrera; Magdalena Cuevas Fernández-Gallego; Miriam Celdrán-Mañas; Francisco J Navarro-Moya; Maria M Rodríguez-Salvador; Francisco J Muñoz-Ronda; Elena Gonzalo-Jiménez; Almudena Millán Carrasco

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic diseases account for nearly 60% of deaths around the world. The extent of this silent epidemic has not met determined responses in governments, policies or professionals in order to transform old Health Care Systems, configured for acute diseases. There is a large list of research about alternative models for people with chronic conditions, many of them with an

  2. Response rates in postal surveys of healthcare professionals between 1996 and 2005: An observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia V Cook; Heather O Dickinson; Martin P Eccles

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postal surveys are a frequently used method of data collection in health services research. Low response rates increase the potential for bias and threaten study validity. The objectives of this study were to estimate current response rates, to assess whether response rates are falling, to explore factors that might enhance response rates and to examine the potential for non-response

  3. Compensating the transplant professional: time for a model change.

    PubMed

    Abouljoud, M; Whitehouse, S; Langnas, A; Brown, K

    2015-03-01

    Compensation models for physicians are currently based primarily on the work relative value unit (wRVU) that rewards productivity by work volume. The value-based payment structure soon to be ushered in by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rewards clinical quality and outcomes. This has prompted changes in wRVU value for certain services that will result in reduced payment for specialty procedures such as transplantation. To maintain a stable and competent workforce and achieve alignment between clinical activity, growth imperatives, and cost effectiveness, compensation of transplant physicians must evolve toward a matrix of measures beyond the procedure-based activity. This personal viewpoint proposes a redesign of transplant physician compensation plans to include the "virtual RVU" to recognize and reward meaningful clinical integration defined as hospital-physician commitment to specified and measurable metrics for current non-RVU-producing activities. Transplantation has been a leader in public outcomes reporting and is well suited to meet the challenges ahead that can only be overcome with a tight collaboration and alignment between surgeons, other physicians, support staff, and their respective institution and leadership. PMID:25693472

  4. Beyond altruistic and commercial contract motherhood: the professional model.

    PubMed

    Van Zyl, Liezl; Walker, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    It has become common to distinguish between altruistic and commercial contract motherhood (or 'surrogacy'). Altruistic arrangements are based on the 'gift relationship': a woman is motivated by altruism to have a baby for an infertile couple, who are free to reciprocate as they see fit. By contrast, in commercial arrangements both parties are motivated by personal gain to enter a legally enforceable agreement, which stipulates that the contract mother or 'surrogate' is to bear a child for the intending parents in exchange for a fee. She is required to undergo medical examinations and to refrain from behaviour that could harm the foetus. The intending parents are the child's legal parents from the outset. The parties to the contract can, but are not expected to, maintain contact after the transaction is completed. We argue that contract motherhood should not be organized according to the norms of the gift relationship, and that contract mothers should be compensated for their labour. However, we accept that there are good reasons for rejecting the commercial model as a suitable framework for contract pregnancy, and argue, instead, in favour of viewing it as a profession. PMID:22500585

  5. From Learning to Research: Developing a Hybrid Teacher Professional Development Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J. S.; Odell, M. R.; Hoadley, C.; Sumner, T.; Maull, K.; Dibie, O.; Sundberg, C.; Kennedy, T.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Wegner, K.

    2012-12-01

    In conjunction with The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign, the From Learning to Research (L2R) project seeks to develop a successful model for student-teacher-scientist interaction and collaboration using 21st century technologies. The culminating event for each year of the project is the GLOBE Virtual Student Conference, which is held in May. At the conference, students present their locally relevant climate projects. To get to this final event, teachers participate in hybrid professional development including a weeklong summer professional development institute followed by twice monthly webinars. The weeklong professional development institute focused on project-based learning, Next Generation Science Standards, climate and climate change education, dealing with climate change misconceptions and controversies, and 21st century skills. Webinars included career talks by professionals in a variety of STEM careers, teacher updates on the climate projects, and science, technology, or education information. Now over halfway into the second year of the project, this presentation will highlight strategies and successes in developing this professional development model. 75 GLOBE-trained teachers (30 the first year, 45 the second year) from 22 US states and Puerto Rico have participated in the From Learning to Research project. The teachers represent a wide diversity of populations, including schools ranging from extremely rural to inner city and low-income public schools to Ivy League prep private schools. Regardless of the location, students and teachers were able to collaborate with other schools and scientists to study their local climates. The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) is an international K-12 science and education program, engaging teachers and their students in an exploration of the environment. Using scientific protocols, students collect environmental data in their community, asking questions, developing scientific projects, and ultimately gaining a better understanding of their world. GLOBE has been implemented at over 25,000 schools in over 110 countries since 1995.

  6. Monitoring Physiology Trainee Needs to Focus Professional Society Responses: The APS Trainee Needs Surveys

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Marsha L Matyas (American Physiological Society Education)

    2011-06-01

    This article presents results from the 2004 and 2007 American Physiological Society (APS) Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) surveys of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and new investigators in physiology to identify topics and issues important to those trainees. Two major trends emerged from the data. First, trainees in 2007 expressed somewhat greater interest in professional development information than did those in 2004. Second, needs expressed by trainees in both years were closely related to their specific career development stage.

  7. Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners in Inclusive Pre-Kindergartens: An Evaluation of a Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Lower, Joanna K.; Smallwood, Gretchen Robinson; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Li, Linlin; Jordan, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the "Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners" (TFC) project was to implement and evaluate a sustainable model of high-quality professional development focused on improving inclusive pre-kindergarten services for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families. The professional development program…

  8. The Impact of Professional Development: A Theoretical Model for Empirical Research, Evaluation, Planning and Conducting Training and Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Stephan Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers several trends in professional development programmes found internationally. The use of multiple learning approaches and of different modes and types of learning in PD is described. Various theories and models of evaluation are discussed in the light of common professional development activities. Several recommendations are…

  9. Core Temperature and Sweat Responses in Professional Women's Tennis Players During Tournament Play in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Tippet, Melissa L.; Stofan, John R.; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. Objective: To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Women's Tennis Association Tour–sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Patients or Other Participants: Seven professional tennis players. Main Outcome Measure(s): Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Results: Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of ?0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P ?=? .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Conclusions: Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight. PMID:21214351

  10. A Room with a View of Integrity and Professionalism: Personal Reflections on Teaching Responsible Conduct of Research in the Neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emily

    2014-04-24

    Neuroscientists are increasingly put into situations which demand critical reflection about the ethical and appropriate use of research tools and scientific knowledge. Students or trainees also have to know how to navigate the ethical domains of this context. At a time when neuroscience is expected to advance policy and practice outcomes, in the face of academic pressures and complex environments, the importance of scientific integrity comes into focus and with it the need for training at the graduate level in the responsible conduct of research (RCR). I describe my experience teaching RCR in a graduate neuroscience program and identify three personal reflections where further dialogue could be warranted: (1) mobilizing a common set of competencies and virtues standing for professionalism in the neurosciences; (2) tailoring RCR for the neurosciences and empowering students through the active engagement of mentors; (3) soliciting shared responsibility for RCR training between disciplines, institutions and governmental or funding agencies. PMID:24760542

  11. ePMV Embeds Molecular Modeling into Professional Animation Software Environments

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham T.; Autin, Ludovic; Goodsell, David S.; Sanner, Michel F.; Olson, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Increasingly complex research has made it more difficult to prepare data for publication, education, and outreach. Many scientists must also wade through black-box code to interface computational algorithms from diverse sources to supplement their bench work. To reduce these barriers, we have developed an open-source plug-in, embedded Python Molecular Viewer (ePMV), that runs molecular modeling software directly inside of professional 3D animation applications (hosts) to provide simultaneous access to the capabilities of these newly connected systems. Uniting host and scientific algorithms into a single interface allows users from varied backgrounds to assemble professional quality visuals and to perform computational experiments with relative ease. By enabling easy exchange of algorithms, ePMV can facilitate interdisciplinary research, smooth communication between broadly diverse specialties and provide a common platform to frame and visualize the increasingly detailed intersection(s) of cellular and molecular biology. PMID:21397181

  12. ePMV embeds molecular modeling into professional animation software environments.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Graham T; Autin, Ludovic; Goodsell, David S; Sanner, Michel F; Olson, Arthur J

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly complex research has made it more difficult to prepare data for publication, education, and outreach. Many scientists must also wade through black-box code to interface computational algorithms from diverse sources to supplement their bench work. To reduce these barriers we have developed an open-source plug-in, embedded Python Molecular Viewer (ePMV), that runs molecular modeling software directly inside of professional 3D animation applications (hosts) to provide simultaneous access to the capabilities of these newly connected systems. Uniting host and scientific algorithms into a single interface allows users from varied backgrounds to assemble professional quality visuals and to perform computational experiments with relative ease. By enabling easy exchange of algorithms, ePMV can facilitate interdisciplinary research, smooth communication between broadly diverse specialties, and provide a common platform to frame and visualize the increasingly detailed intersection(s) of cellular and molecular biology. PMID:21397181

  13. School Psychologists as Instructional Consultants in a Response-to-Intervention Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristin; Hagans, Kristi; Busse, R. T.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 authorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act affords an opportunity to shift the classification of Learning Disabilities (LD) from a "refer-test-place" to a Response-to-Intervention (RtI) service delivery model. As a result, there are implications for the professional activities of school psychologists.…

  14. Analysis of the Response Speed of Musculature of the Knee in Professional Male and Female Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, D.; Diez-Vega, I.; Rodríguez-Matoso, D.; Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Sagastume, R.; Molina, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the normalized response speed (Vrn) of the knee musculature (flexor and extensor) in high competitive level volleyball players using tensiomyography (TMG) and to analyze the muscular response of the vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) in accordance with the specific position they play in their teams. One hundred and sixty-six players (83 women and 83 men) were evaluated. They belonged to eight teams in the Spanish women's superleague and eight in the Spanish men's superleague. The use of Vrn allows avoiding possible sample imbalances due to anatomical and functional differences and demands. We found differences between Vrn in each of the muscles responsible for extension (VM, RF, and VL) and flexion (BF) regardless of the sex. Normalized response speed differences seem to be larger in setters, liberos and outside players compared to middle blockers and larger in males when compared to females. These results of Vrn might respond to the differences in the physical and technical demands of each specific position, showing an improved balance response of the knee extensor and flexor musculature in male professional volleyball players. PMID:25003109

  15. Reissued as S99-8 & S99-11 Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility **Reissued as S99-8 and S99-11

    E-print Network

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -8 and S99-11 S93-12 ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY; ETHICS; CONFLICT OF INTEREST. Supersedes F67-17, S88-9. S94-3 added appendix A and made slight changes. S95-9 added appendix B on Professional Ethics adopted by San José State University in 1988 is a useful core document, but in need of more

  16. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  17. An investigation of a professional development model in science education: A systems approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Glenda Love

    The Mathematics and Science Cooperative (MSEC), a four year longevity model of professional development education for in-service teachers, is closely aligned with the spirit and tenets of science for all. This partnership of a university, a school district, and a higher education coordinating board, seeks to promote and improve science and mathematics achievement for underserved and underrepresented populations. This study sought to explore how this model affects elementary in-service teachers' feelings of self-efficacy toward science and science teaching. Interactive Qualitative Research (IQR), a systems approach of natural inquiry, was used for this study. Theory is grounded in the data collected and analyzed through group processes. A core group of teachers, key teachers representing grades one through six and lead teachers the campus contact representatives, received professional development education from university professors in semi-monthly after school workshops and in a three week summer science institute held on-site. In this study, (N = 18) key and lead teachers participated in a focus group, a picture board exercise (a projective type exercise), interviews, and classroom observations. Within the system of the MSEC professional development model, cause and effect relationships among eleven phenomena were identified which had the greatest impact on the teachers' feelings of self-efficacy and science teaching practices. Changed teaching practices were indicated by inquiry-based science lessons with students as active learners. Five principles of self-efficacy: (1) efficacy; (2) goals setting; (3) values; (4) expectancy; and, (5) control beliefs were used to evaluate efficacy beliefs. Findings from the data collection and analysis identified two phenomena, the university instructional leadership role and teacher time commitments and time constraints, both internally and externally imposed, which seemed to have the greatest impact on elementary teachers' efficacy and science teaching practices. Provision of science materials and equipment and college level science content, process skills, and pedagogical skills knowledge facilitated by the university and the amount of time teachers chose to commit to professional development education work sessions and to the preparation and implementation of inquiry-based instruction in contrast to other professional and personal commitments were significant factors.

  18. Taking Professional Learning to Isolated Schools: Perceptions of Providers and Principals, and Lessons for Effective Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Kim; Jones, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and outcomes, as perceived by the professional learning providers and school principals, of a professional learning (PL) model devised in response to recognition that models of PL that are effective in urban settings are not effective in rural and remote areas. Rather than expecting the teachers to travel…

  19. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for the Bering Strait School District, a geographically isolated area with low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poverty. Scientists from around the globe have converged in this region and other areas of the Arctic to observe and measure changes in climate that are significant, accelerating, and unlike any in recorded history. Climate literacy (the ability to understand Earth system science and to make scientifically informed decisions about climate changes) has become essential for this population. Program resources were designed in collaboration with scientists to mimic the processes used to study Arctic climate. Because the Bering Strait School District serves a 98 percent Alaska Native student population, ACMP focused on best practices shown to increase the success of minority students. Significant research indicates that Alaska Native students succeed academically at higher rates when instruction addresses topics of local interest, links education to the students’ physical and cultural environment, uses local knowledge and culture in the curriculum, and incorporates hands-on, inquiry-based lessons in the classroom. A seven-partner consortium of research institutes and Alaska Native corporations created ACMP to help teachers understand their role in nurturing STM talent and motivating students to explore geoscience careers. Research underscores the importance of increasing school emphasis in content areas, such as climate, that facilitate global awareness and civic responsibility, and that foster critical thinking and other 21st century learning skills. Climate studies offer insight into a broad cross-section of STM careers, and provide a natural forum for helping students develop problem-solving skills inherent in STM research. Climate research involves sophisticated technology, a complex set of 21st century skills, and the ability to collaborate with an international community. Professional development that trains teachers in these skills is essential considering that recent research shows 90 percent of U.S. secondary students are taught Earth and physical science by a teacher lacking STM certification. ACMP summative evaluation posed three questions: 1) Did ACMP training meet teachers’ needs? 2) Did ACMP involvement result in more effective teachers and teaching? 3) Did participation in ACMP result in higher Bering Strait School District student achievement? Teachers and students were evaluated using a mixed method design incorporating descriptive components with a before/after design to measure what teachers and students learned. Community members, 165 teachers, and 1,738 individual students participated in the program, which was successful in its goals overall.

  20. Effect of the science teaching advancement through modeling physical science professional development workshop on teachers' attitudes, beliefs and content knowledge and students' content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Laura

    The Science Teaching Advancement through Modeling Physical Science (STAMPS) professional development workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in improving teachers' and students' content knowledge. Previous research has shown modeling to be an effective method of instruction for improving student and teacher content knowledge, evidenced by assessment scores. Data includes teacher scores on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI; Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhamer, 1992) and the Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI; Jenkins, Birk, Bauer, Krause, & Pavelich, 2004), as well as student scores on a physics and chemistry assessment. Quantitative data is supported by teacher responses to a post workshop survey and classroom observations. Evaluation of the data shows that the STAMPS professional development workshop was successful in improving both student and teacher content knowledge. Conclusions and suggestions for future study are also included.

  1. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  2. Neuromuscular function, hormonal, and mood responses to a professional rugby union match.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Finn, Charlotte V; Cunningham, Daniel J; Shearer, David A; Jones, Marc R; Harrington, Bradley J; Crewther, Blair T; Cook, Christian J; Kilduff, Liam P

    2014-01-01

    We examined the recovery time-course of neuromuscular function (NMF), the testosterone and cortisol hormonal milieu, and mood for 60 hours after a competitive match in professional rugby union players (n = 14). Thirty-six hours prematch (19:30 hours kick-off), baseline saliva samples (testosterone, cortisol, and testosterone to cortisol [T/C] ratio), countermovement jump performances (peak power output [PPO]), and mood disruption (Brief Assessment of Mood Questionnaire) were collected and was repeated at 12, 36, and 60 hours postmatch. Peak power output decreased below baseline at 12 hours (baseline 6,100 ± 565 W vs. 12 h 5,680 ± 589 W; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (5,761 ± 639 W; p < 0.001) but had recovered at 60 hours (5,950 ± 505 W; p = 0.151). Cortisol concentrations increased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 0.40 ± 0.09 µg·dl-1 vs. 12 h 0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.027) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. Testosterone concentrations decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 214 ± 84 pg·ml-1 vs. 12 h 151 ± 56 pg·ml-1; p = 0.023) and 36 hours (173 ± 71 pg·ml-1; p = 0.016) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. The T/C ratio decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 551 ± 219 vs. 12 h 266 ± 123; p = 0.001) and 36 hours (310 ± 148; p = 0.027) before returning to baseline at 60 hours postmatch. Mood disturbance increased at 12 hours (p = 0.031) before returning to baseline at 36 and 60 hours postmatch. There were no relationships between changes in PPO, testosterone, cortisol, T/C ratio, and mood. In conclusion, postmatch changes in NMF, salivary hormones, and mood disturbance were identified in professional rugby union players. Players and coaches can expect reduced NMF and hormonal disruption for 36 hours before recovering at 60 hours postmatch, with mood recovered by 36 hours postmatch. Knowledge of these recovery time-courses may prove useful for player training program design and postmatch recovery strategies. PMID:23539085

  3. Health Information on the Web and Consumers’ Perspectives on Health ProfessionalsResponses to Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health information technology, which is sometimes referred to as informaticization of medicine, is changing the extent to which patients become competent producers of their own health by enabling them access to health information anytime and anywhere. Objective This research provides preliminary information on users' perceptions of the extent to which use of the Internet for health information impacts medical encounters. We specifically explored the following questions: (1) To what extent perceptions of positive or negative changes in medical encounters are associated with sociodemographic background of online health information seekers, and how often the Internet information is discussed with providers? (2) To what extent is there an association between perceived changes in medical encounters and frequency of referring to the Internet during medical encounters? (3) To what extent is there an association between sociodemographic background of online health information users and frequency of discussing of the Internet information with providers? Methods The data for this study was derived from a national sampling of online health and medical information users who participated in the Study of Health and Medical Information in Cyberspace—Survey of User Perceptions (N=710). This study used a nationally representative online research panel of the US adults maintained by the Knowledge Networks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square, and t tests were performed to examine the data. Results Although Internet sources allow people the opportunity to gather health or medical information, discussion of this information was not a very common activity. It is noteworthy that half of the sample never or rarely discussed health/medical information obtained from Internet sources with health professionals. Chi-square analyses revealed that discussion of online health information with providers were associated with education, income, and marital status. We also found that discussion of the Internet information mostly promotes better physician-patient interactions. Analyses with post-hoc tests identified that perceived changes in medical encounters were associated with age, education, and income. However, 9.1% (64/703) of our respondents strongly agreed that the interactions with their providers have been strained. T test analyses showed that marital status, race, and gender were not significant. Conclusions Embracing new technologies, and adapting to changing roles and relationships in delivery of medical care are critical to effective delivery of patient-centered care. Health professionals could also guide patients on how to evaluate information and where to access to reliable and accurate information. PMID:25075248

  4. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ ( N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed lessons to advance thinking from macroscopic to abstract models. Middle/secondary teachers gained PSTE, PCK, and introduced macroscopic models to develop understanding of previously taught abstract models. All implemented representational thinking and conceptual change strategies. Results suggest that: (1) constructivist PD meets the needs of teachers of varying CK, and (2) instruction should connect representational models with alternative conceptions, integrating radical and social constructivism.

  5. Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

  6. Air Quality Response Modeling for Decision Support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality management relies on photochemical models to predict the responses of pollutant concentrations to changes in emissions. Such modeling is especially important for secondary pollutants such as ozone and fine particulate matter which vary nonlinearly with changes in emis...

  7. Mentor Modeling: The Internalization of Modeled Professional Thinking in an Epistemic Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Padraig; Shaffer, David Williamson

    2011-01-01

    Players of epistemic games--computer games that simulate professional practica--have been shown to develop epistemic frames: a profession's particular way of seeing and solving problems. This study examined the interactions between players and mentors in one epistemic game, Urban Science. Using a new method called epistemic network analysis, we…

  8. Regulatory models for human embryo cloning: the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions.

    PubMed

    Annas, George J

    1994-09-01

    Both experimental and therapeutic uses of the new reproductive technologies have been governed not by the medical ideology of the best interests of patients and their children, but by the market ideology of profit maximization under the guise of "reproductive liberty." Government in our constitutional, democratic society has the authority and obligation to make and enforce reasonable regulations to manage the new reproductive market in order to protect the interests of the public, prospective parents, and their future children. The "cloning" debate provides a useful opportunity to compare and contrast the competing regulatory models of the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions. PMID:11645280

  9. International Trade Professional Curriculum System Innovation and Personnel Training Model Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang

    With the rapid development of China's foreign trade, now many universities have set up the International Trade major one after another; The University must be based on our own resources superiority to have the scientific orientation of personnel training objectives, which can make trained students meet needs of society and enterprises better. This paper based on the characteristics of International Trade major in University proposes to take the personnel training model combining with "Work, Certificate and Learning" as the objective, proceeding the orientation of professional personnel and settings of certificate testing module and teaching module, to construct the curriculum system from the innovation of theoretical and practical teaching.

  10. Personal Beliefs and Professional Responsibilities: Ethiopian Midwives' Attitudes toward Providing Abortion Services after Legal Reform.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Sarah Jane; Berhe, Aster; Cherie, Amsale

    2015-03-01

    In 2005, Ethiopia liberalized its abortion law and subsequently authorized midwives to offer abortion services. Using a 2013 survey of 188 midwives and 12 interviews with third-year midwifery students, this cross-sectional research examines midwives' attitudes toward abortion to understand their decisions about service provision. Most midwives were willing to provide abortion services. This willingness was positively and significantly related to clinical experience with abortion, but negatively and significantly related to religiosity, belief that providers have the right to refuse to provide services, and care of patients from periurban as opposed to rural areas. No significant relationship was found with perceptions of abortion stigma, years of work as a midwife, or knowledge of the law. Interview data suggest complex dynamics underlying midwives' willingness to offer services, including conflicts between professional norms and religious beliefs. Findings can inform Ethiopia's efforts to reduce maternal mortality through task-shifting to midwives and can aid other countries that are confronting provider shortages and high levels of maternal mortality and morbidity, particularly due to unsafe abortion. PMID:25753060

  11. Can instruction in engineering ethics change students' feelings about professional responsibility?

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Golnaz; Loui, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student's feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of two short cases that posed moral problems. For each case, the role of the engineer was successively changed and the student was asked how each change altered his or her decisions about the case. Students who had completed the ethics course considered more options before making a decision, and they responded consistently despite changes in the cases. For both cases, even when they were not directly involved, they were more likely to feel responsible and take corrective action. Students who were less successful in the ethics course gave answers similar to students who had not taken the course. This latter group of students seemed to have weaker feelings of responsibility: they would say that a problem was "not my business." It appears that instruction in ethics can increase awareness of responsibility, knowledge about how to handle a difficult situation, and confidence in taking action. PMID:20146104

  12. Addressing the Gap between Case Law and Professional Practice: A Response to Zirkel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this article, authors Carl Smith, Antonis Katsiyannis, and Joseph Ryan respond to Zirkel's most recent article, "The Law in the Special Education Literature: A Brief Legal Critique," published in this issue of "Behavioral Disorders." Smith, Katsiyannis, and Ryan begin their response by saying that "The Law in the…

  13. The Professional Development Needs of Teachers with Responsibility for Pupil Attendance: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses upon an evaluation of attendance issues within a local education authority (LEA) following two critical Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) reports. After the publication of these reports, the contract and responsibility for managing schools, and the former LEA's remit, was awarded to a private company. As part of the…

  14. An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Georgi Anne

    The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in the implementation of curriculum. Data on student learning outcomes implied that both content knowledge and inquiry skills were critical bases for curriculum in terms of teacher efficacy and student achievement. Teachers needed to examine student work as a professional development strategy to also promote reflection on teaching and learning. Further research and professional development in the area of science assessment, in terms of scientific content and processes, was suggested.

  15. Professional responsibilities versus familial responsibilities: an examination of role conflict among first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Adams, Terri; Turner, Mila

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a human-caused or natural disaster, the police are essential front-line first responders. The ability of police departments to provide adequate services is contingent upon critical response personnel working and functioning in an efficient manner. Currently, it is assumed that first responders will continue to work in the event of a disaster, even if they are personally impacted by the disaster to which they are expected to respond. This study examines role conflict among police officers who served as first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. PMID:24691915

  16. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further. PMID:23802650

  17. Development and evaluation of an innovative model of inter-professional education focused on asthma medication use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inter-professional learning has been promoted as the solution to many clinical management issues. One such issue is the correct use of asthma inhaler devices. Up to 80% of people with asthma use their inhaler device incorrectly. The implications of this are poor asthma control and quality of life. Correct inhaler technique can be taught, however these educational instructions need to be repeated if correct technique is to be maintained. It is important to maximise the opportunities to deliver this education in primary care. In light of this, it is important to explore how health care providers, in particular pharmacists and general medical practitioners, can work together in delivering inhaler technique education to patients, over time. Therefore, there is a need to develop and evaluate effective inter-professional education, which will address the need to educate patients in the correct use of their inhalers as well as equip health care professionals with skills to engage in collaborative relationships with each other. Methods This mixed methods study involves the development and evaluation of three modules of continuing education, Model 1, Model 2 and Model 3. A fourth group, Model 4, acting as a control. Model 1 consists of face-to-face continuing professional education on asthma inhaler technique, aimed at pharmacists, general medical practitioners and their practice nurses. Model 2 is an electronic online continuing education module based on Model 1 principles. Model 3 is also based on asthma inhaler technique education but employs a learning intervention targeting health care professional relationships and is based on sociocultural theory. This study took the form of a parallel group, repeated measure design. Following the completion of continuing professional education, health care professionals recruited people with asthma and followed them up for 6 months. During this period, inhaler device technique training was delivered and data on patient inhaler technique, clinical and humanistic outcomes were collected. Outcomes related to professional collaborative relationships were also measured. Discussion Challenges presented included the requirement of significant financial resources for development of study materials and limited availability of validated tools to measure health care professional collaboration over time. PMID:24708800

  18. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school students. To evaluate usability, we analyzed students' task performance and task completion time as they worked on an activity with the repurposed modeling technology. In stage 1, we conducted remote testing of an early modeling prototype with urban middle school students (n = 84). In stages 2 and 3, we used screencasting software to record students' mouse and keyboard movements during collaborative think-alouds (n = 22) and conducted a qualitative analysis of their peer discussions. Taken together, the study findings revealed two kinds of usability issues that interfered with students' productive use of the tool: issues related to the use of data and information, and issues related to the use of the modeling technology. The study findings resulted in design improvements that led to stronger usability outcomes and higher task performance among students. In this paper, we describe our methods for usability testing, our research findings, and our design solutions for supporting students' use of the modeling technology and use of data. The paper concludes with implications for the design and study of modeling technologies for science learning.

  19. Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

    2006-01-01

    Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a “reverse science fair” in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study focuses on results of assessments conducted with neuroscientist presenters during Expositions at two sites, Atlanta, Georgia and Corpus Christi, Texas. The effects of participating in the Expositions on presenters' perceptions of their own presentation and communication skills were evaluated, as was the potential for increased active participation by neuroscientists in future outreach programs. In four of the five Expositions studied, pre- versus post-event surveys demonstrated significant changes in presenters' perceptions of their own abilities to explain neuroscience concepts to children. Over the course of an Exposition, presenters learned to fit their approaches to conveying neuroscience concepts to fifth through eighth graders and learned to link information they presented about the brain and nervous system to children's past experiences to improve comprehension. The present data suggest that Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions are effective in improving communication and teaching skills among neuroscience professionals and contribute to professional stewardship by increasing motivation to participate in future informal education programs. PMID:17012206

  20. Mixed MNL models for discrete response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel McFadden; Kenneth Train

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers mixed, or random coefficients, multinomial logit (MMNL) models for discrete response, and establishes the following results. Under mild regularity conditions, any discrete choice model derived from random utility maximization has choice probabilities that can be approximated as closely as one pleases by a MMNL model. Practical estimation of a parametric mixing family can be carried out by

  1. Statewide and District Professional Development in Standards: Addressing Teacher Equity. Models of Inservice. National Writing Project at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Richard; Roop, Laura; Setter, Gail

    2006-01-01

    The National Writing Project at Work (NWP) monograph series documents how the National Writing Project model is implemented and developed at local sites across the country. These monographs describe NWP work, which is often shared informally or in workshops. Richard Koch and Laura Roop present a model of standards-based professional development…

  2. Teaching Science Using Guided Inquiry as the Central Theme: A Professional Development Model for High School Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Anil

    2010-01-01

    The author describes a professional development model for high school science teachers based on the framework of inquiry and science standards. The "Learn-Teach-Assess Inquiry" model focuses on guided inquiry labs as the central theme and builds on these labs to reinforce science concepts and abilities to understand and engage in inquiry in…

  3. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This specific…

  4. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  5. A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Responses From a Graded Disagree-Agree Response Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James S. Roberts; James E. Laughlin

    1996-01-01

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to atti tude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes ana lyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent studies suggest that unfolding models are more appro priate (Roberts, 1995; van Schuur & Kiers, 1994). Ad vances in item response theory (IRT) have led to the development of several

  6. Program evaluation of a model to integrate internationally educated health professionals into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for health professionals continues to increase, partially due to the aging population and the high proportion of practitioners nearing retirement. The University of British Columbia (UBC) has developed a program to address this demand, by providing support for internationally trained Physiotherapists in their preparation for taking the National Physiotherapy competency examinations. The aim was to create a program comprised of the educational tools and infrastructure to support internationally educated physiotherapists (IEPs) in their preparation for entry to practice in Canada and, to improve their pass rate on the national competency examination. Methods The program was developed using a logic model and evaluated using program evaluation methodology. Program tools and resources included educational modules and curricular packages which were developed and refined based on feedback from clinical experts, IEPs and clinical physical therapy mentors. An examination bank was created and used to include test-enhanced education. Clinical mentors were recruited and trained to provide clinical and cultural support for participants. Results The IEP program has recruited 124 IEPs, with 69 now integrated into the Canadian physiotherapy workforce, and more IEPs continuing to apply to the program. International graduates who participated in the program had an improved pass rate on the national Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE); participation in the program resulted in them having a 28% (95% CI, 2% to 59%) greater possibility of passing the written section than their counterparts who did not take the program. In 2010, 81% of all IEP candidates who completed the UBC program passed the written component, and 82% passed the clinical component. Conclusion The program has proven to be successful and sustainable. This program model could be replicated to support the successful integration of other international health professionals into the workforce. PMID:24119470

  7. 1 Professional Psychology PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Professional Psychology PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Offered through the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences' social and behavioral sciences discipline, the professional psychology program teaches students that combines extensive practical experience with classes on scientific foundations of psychology taught

  8. Te Kotahitanga: A Case Study of a Repositioning Approach to Teacher Professional Development for Culturally Responsive Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynds, Anne; Sleeter, Christine; Hindle, Rawiri; Savage, Catherine; Penetito, Wally; Meyer, Luanna H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a unique New Zealand professional development programme, Te Kotahitanga, for mainstream secondary school teachers. Findings discussed are drawn from an independent evaluation of the programme across 22 secondary schools. The professional development approach attempted to reposition the relationship between…

  9. Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who Is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Andrew; Coggshall, Jane G.; Dolan, Megan; Powers, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Featured prominently in recent federal education regulations, the term "job-embedded professional development" has come into increasingly common usage for more than a decade, yet rarely is it explicitly defined. But what exactly is job-embedded professional development? What types of teacher learning opportunities count as being job embedded? How…

  10. An entrustable professional activity (EPA) for handoffs as a model for EPA assessment development.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Michael; Nixon, James; Gladding, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    Medical education is moving toward assessment of educational outcomes rather than educational processes. The American Board of Internal Medicine and American Board of Pediatrics milestones and the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPA)--skills essential to the practice of medicine that educators progressively entrust learners to perform--provide new approaches to assessing outcomes. Although some defined EPAs exist for internal medicine and pediatrics, the continued development and implementation of EPAs remains challenging. As residency programs are expected to begin reporting milestone-based performance, however, they will need examples of how to overcome these challenges. The authors describe a model for the development and implementation of an EPA using the resident handoff as an example. The model includes nine steps: selecting the EPA, determining where skills are practiced and assessed, addressing barriers to assessment, determining components of the EPA, determining needed assessment tools, developing new assessments if needed, determining criteria for advancement through entrustment levels, mapping milestones to the EPA, and faculty development. Following implementation, 78% of interns at the University of Minnesota Medical School were observed giving handoffs and provided feedback. The authors suggest that this model of EPA development--which includes engaging stakeholders, an iterative process to describing the behavioral characteristics of each domain at each level of entrustment, and the development of specific assessment tools that support both formative feedback and summative decisions about entrustment--can serve as a model for EPA development for other clinical skills and specialty areas. PMID:24892402

  11. MODEL VALIDATION VIA UNCERTAINTY PROPAGATION USING RESPONSE SURFACE MODELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lusine Baghdasaryan; Wei Chen; Thaweepat Buranathiti; Jian Cao

    Model validation has become a primary means to evaluate accuracy and reliability of computational simulations in engineering design. Mathematical models enable engineers to establish what the most likely response of a system is. However, despite the enormous power of computational models, uncertainty is inevitable in all model-based engineering design problems, due to the variation in the physical system itself, or

  12. Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers. PMID:23101486

  13. BLACK-BOX MODELLING Response surface modelling

    E-print Network

    Steels, Luc

    Post-processing Scaling / normalizing the data helps both for ANN & SVM's Otherwise there is a risk Neural Networks Support-Vector Machines Importance of Data Post-processing Feature Selection Algorithm of the first tools of machine learning Many publications of ANN- based models in electronics Known issues

  14. Health communication and professional preparation: health educator credibility, message learning, and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Scott, L A; Black, D R

    1999-10-01

    Health education graduate students were surveyed to assess perceptions of their professional responsibility to be role models of healthy behaviors, characteristics of a professional role model, and related socializing experiences during professional preparation. A total of 233 randomly selected health education graduate students participated in this study nationwide. Significant inverse associations were found between students' year in graduate school and sense of excellence as a role model, graduate program satisfaction, and professional commitment (all ps < 0.05). Students' sense of professional marketability and competence to role model were statistically significant in predicting their perception that role modeling healthy behaviors is a professional responsibility, F(2, 215) = 110.25, p = 0.00001. Positive associations also were found between students' desire to improve fitness behavior, nutrition, and weight and/or body fat ratio with self-ratings as role models (all ps < 0.05). Implications for the profession and preparation are provided. PMID:10533166

  15. The influence of personal and environmental factors on professionalism in medical education

    PubMed Central

    West, Colin P; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2007-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a critical quality for physicians to possess. Physician professionalism has received increased attention in recent years, with many authorities suggesting that professionalism is in decline. An understanding of the factors contributing to professionalism may allow the development of more effective approaches to promoting this quality in medical education. Discussion We propose a model of personal and environmental factors that contribute to physician professionalism. Personal factors include distress/well-being, individual characteristics, and interpersonal qualities. Environmental factors include institutional culture, formal and informal curricula, and practice characteristics. Promotion of professionalism requires efforts directed at each of these elements. Summary One responsibility of medical education is to foster the development of professionalism among its learners. Both personal and environmental factors play a role in physician professionalism. Accordingly, institutions should consider these factors as efforts to promote physician professionalism evolve. PMID:17760986

  16. Simplified Warfarin Dose-response Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Gaweda, Adam E.; Wu, Dongfeng; Li, Lang; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is a frequently used oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Due to its narrow therapeutic range and large inter-individual dose-response variability, it is highly desirable to personalize warfarin dosing. However, the complexity of the conventional kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) models hampers the development of the personalized dose management. To avert this challenge, we propose simplified PD models for warfarin dose-response relationship, which is motivated by ideas from control theory. The simplified models were further applied to longitudinal data of 37 patients undergoing anticoagulation treatment using the standard two-stage approach and then compared with the conventional K-PD models. Data analysis shows that all models have a similar predictive ability, but the simplified models are most parsimonious.

  17. Factor Copula Models for Item Response Data.

    PubMed

    Nikoloulopoulos, Aristidis K; Joe, Harry

    2013-12-01

    Factor or conditional independence models based on copulas are proposed for multivariate discrete data such as item responses. The factor copula models have interpretations of latent maxima/minima (in comparison with latent means) and can lead to more probability in the joint upper or lower tail compared with factor models based on the discretized multivariate normal distribution (or multidimensional normal ogive model). Details on maximum likelihood estimation of parameters for the factor copula model are given, as well as analysis of the behavior of the log-likelihood. Our general methodology is illustrated with several item response data sets, and it is shown that there is a substantial improvement on existing models both conceptually and in fit to data. PMID:24297437

  18. Exploring a Community of Practice Model for Professional Development to Address Challenges to Classroom Practices in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Tanya; Wang, X. Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study explored whether or not, and how, an on-site and research-teacher community of practice model for professional development addressed the challenges to classroom practices in a Head Start program. Data sources included interviews with teachers, videos of planning and teaching sessions, and the researchers' fieldwork log and…

  19. Quantitative Models for Retirement Risk in Professional Tennis A.C.J. Cutmore* and W.J. Knottenbelt**

    E-print Network

    Knottenbelt, William J.

    62 Quantitative Models for Retirement Risk in Professional Tennis A.C.J. Cutmore* and W.knottenbelt@imperial.ac.uk Abstract. Tennis attracts both spectators and speculators. Indeed, every on-court development impacts on in.1. The Tennis Betting Industry Tennis is one of the world's most popular individual sports and thus is also one

  20. Design of a Model for a Professional Development Programme for a Multidisciplinary Science Subject in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Talitha C.; Coenders, Fer G. M.; Terlouw, Cees; Pieters, Jules M.

    2012-01-01

    Schools are increasingly integrating multidisciplinary education into their programmes. The Minister of Education, Culture and Science has introduced a new, integrated science subject in secondary education in the Netherlands, called Nature, Life and Technology (NLT). This research note describes the design of a generic model for a professional

  1. Turning the Corner: Towards a Model of Sustainable Collaborative Partnerships in Master's-Level Postgraduate Professional Development in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibbotson, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the approach of one higher education institution in England to the research dialogue involved in designing an M.A. Education programme that focuses on partnership collaborations in postgraduate professional development with school-based staff groups as a catalyst to sustainable school improvement. The paper draws on the model

  2. Texas 4-H Agents' Perceptions of Selected Competencies in the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Amy; Wingenbach, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    There are many competencies necessary for success as a 4-H agent. The 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies (PRKC) Model organizes competencies into six domains: (a) Youth Development, (b) Youth Program Development, (c) Volunteerism, (d) Partnerships, (e) Organizational Systems, and (f) Equity, Access and Opportunity (National 4-H…

  3. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  4. Developing a Model of Practice: Designing a Framework for the Professional Development of School Leaders and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Jenny; Forde, Christine; Casteel, Viv; Lynas, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Describes the origins and evolution of a framework for leadership and management development in Scottish schools. The design of this competence framework is underpinned by a professional-development model supporting experiential learning and critical reflection. Calls for a synthesis of various approaches to management development based on a…

  5. IMPACT (Interactive Model for Professional Action and Change for Teachers): A Summary Report, September 1, 1979 to August 30, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Burlington School District, VT.

    Activities and outcomes of a project to assist South Burlington High School (Vermont) special education students in mastering state-mandated basic competencies are described. The Interactive Model for Professional Action and Change for Teachers (IMPACT), which was conducted in cooperation with the University of Vermont, was designed to provide…

  6. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. O. Weiss; E. V. Lapham

    1996-01-01

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  7. Pre-Professional Training for Serving Children with ASD: An Apprenticeship Model of Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with varied skill profiles and levels of severity making development and implementation of specialized school services challenging. Research indicates that school professionals require and desire additional ASD-specific professional development, both at the pre-and in-service levels.…

  8. EDU 526 Experiential Science Learning I: A Collaborative Model for Professional Development. 1997 Summative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckerhoff, Charles; Bruckerhoff, Theresa

    This document provides a summative evaluation of an ongoing collaborative professional development project that focuses on a course in experimental science learning. Project goals include: (1) providing elementary school teachers with a professional development program for science education that is grounded in the National Science Education…

  9. Supporting Teachers as Researchers (STAR): A Model for Sustainable Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackley, Josephine; Wells, Muriel

    2009-01-01

    Supporting Teachers as Action Researchers (STAR) explores how school improvement initiatives may be sustained over time. It represents stage one of a broader investigation into how teachers' professional learning may be enhanced by positioning teachers as practitioner researchers and professionals who are capable of generating change from within…

  10. Modeling and Measuring the Structure of Professional Vision in Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Tina; Stürmer, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Professional vision has been identified as an important element of teacher expertise that can be developed in teacher education. It describes the use of knowledge to notice and interpret significant features of classroom situations. Three aspects of professional vision have been described by qualitative research: describe, explain, and predict…

  11. Instructional Rounds as a Professional Learning Model for Systemic Implementation of Assessment for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; Klinger, Don; Pyper, Jamie; Woods, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the implementation of a professional learning project aimed at building educators' knowledge and skills in assessment for learning (AfL) within two school districts in Ontario, Canada. Specifically, the research examined the value of a two-tier "Instructional Rounds" (IR) professional

  12. Case Study -Hypothetical Immunological Response Model Graph Transformation Rules

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    Case Study - Hypothetical Immunological Response Model Graph Transformation Rules Mayur Bapodra of a hypothetical model of cellular viral infection and subsequent immunological response for some imagined multi

  13. Distinguishing Models of Professional Development: The Case of an Adaptive Model's Impact on Teachers' Knowledge, Instruction, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koellner, Karen; Jacobs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We posit that professional development (PD) models fall on a continuum from highly adaptive to highly specified, and that these constructs provide a productive way to characterize and distinguish among models. The study reported here examines the impact of an adaptive mathematics PD model on teachers' knowledge and instructional practices as…

  14. Professional Responsibility in Crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas L. Colbert

    2008-01-01

    Some rare, often catastrophic, events present in stark terms a need for careful reflection over the role of attorneys in our society and their ethical duties as members of the legal profession. The devastation caused by both Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 certainly falls within this category. Professor Colbert uses these events as

  15. An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

  16. Log-Multiplicative Association Models as Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Yu, Hsiu-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Log-multiplicative association (LMA) models, which are special cases of log-linear models, have interpretations in terms of latent continuous variables. Two theoretical derivations of LMA models based on item response theory (IRT) arguments are presented. First, we show that Anderson and colleagues (Anderson & Vermunt, 2000; Anderson & Bockenholt,…

  17. Restoring medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

  18. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  19. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  20. Models for institutional and professional accreditation of haemophilia centres in Italy.

    PubMed

    Calizzani, G; Vaglio, S; Arcieri, R; Menichini, I; Tagliaferri, A; Antoncecchi, S; Carloni, M T; Breda, A; Santagostino, E; Ghirardini, A; Tamburrini, M R; Morfini, M; Mannucci, P M; Grazzini, G

    2013-07-01

    The Health Commission of the Conference between the Italian State and Regions recognized the need to establish an institutional accreditation model for Haemophilia Centres (HCs) to be implemented by 21 Regions in order to provide patients with haemophilia and allied inherited coagulations disorders with high and uniform standards of care. The Italian National Blood Centre, on behalf of the Commission, convened a panel of clinicians, patients, experts, representatives from Regions and Ministry of Health. The agreed methodology included: systematic literature review and best practice collection, analysis of provisions and regulations of currently available services, priority setting, definition of principles and criteria for the development of recommendations on the optimal requirements for HCs. The result was the formulation of two recommendations sets. Two sets of recommendations were produced. The first concerns regional policy planning, in which the following aspects of comprehensive haemophilia care should be considered for implementation: monitoring and auditing, multidisciplinary approach to clinical care, protocols for emergency management, home treatment and its monitoring, patient registries, drug availability and procurement, recruitment and training of health care professionals. The second set concerns the accreditation process and lists 23 organizational requirements for level 1 HCs and 4 additional requirements for level 2 HCs. These recommendations help to provide Italian Regional Health Authorities with an organizational framework for the provision of comprehensive care to patients with inherited coagulation disorders based on current scientific evidence. PMID:23556420

  1. Organizational and media stress among professional football players: testing an achievement goal theory model.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, E; Halvari, H; Roberts, G C

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate media and coach-athlete stress experienced by professional football players and their relationship to motivational variables by testing an achievement goal theory (AGT) stress model. In order to do so, we developed scales specifically designed to assess media and coach-athlete stress. Eighty-two elite football players (M(age) =25.17 years, SD=5.19) completed a series of questionnaires. Correlations and bootstrapping were used as primary statistical analyses, supplemented by LISREL, to test the hypotheses. Results revealed that a mastery climate was directly and negatively associated with coach-athlete stress, while a performance climate was directly and positively associated with coach-athlete stress. In addition, an indirect positive path between the performance climate and media stress was revealed through ego orientation. These findings support some of the key postulates of AGT; a mastery climate reduces the perception of stress among athletes, and the converse is true for a performance climate. Coaches of elite footballers are advised to try to reduce the emphasis on performance criteria because of its stress-reducing effects. PMID:21210857

  2. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Robert D.

    Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia Robert D. Stewart, Ph.D.Robert D. Stewart, Ph

  4. Evaluation of Online, On-Demand Science Professional Development Material Involving Two Different Implementation Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Sherman; Al Byers; Steve Rapp

    2008-01-01

    This report presents pilot-test results for a science professional development program featuring online, on-demand materials\\u000a developed by the National Science Teachers Association. During the spring 2006 semester, 45 middle school teachers from three\\u000a different school districts across the United States participated in a professional development program designed to facilitate\\u000a content knowledge and skills in the area of Newtonian force and

  5. Modelling differential catchment response to environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulthard, T. J.; Lewin, J.; Macklin, M. G.

    2005-07-01

    The CAESAR (Cellular Automaton Evolutionary Slope And River) model is used to demonstrate significant differences in coarse sediment transfer and alluviation in medium sized catchments when responding to identical Holocene environmental changes. Simulations for four U.K. basins (the Rivers Swale, Ure, Nidd and Wharfe) shows that catchment response, driven by climate and conditioned by land cover changes, is synchronous but varies in magnitude. There are bursts of sediment transfer activity, generally of rapid removal but with some sediment accumulation 'spikes', with longer periods of slow removal or accumulation of sediment in different valley reaches. Within catchments, reach sensitivity to environmental change varies considerably: some periods are only recorded in some reaches, whilst higher potential sensitivity typically occurs in the piedmont areas of the catchments modelled here. These differential responses appear to be highly non-linear and may relate to the passage of sediment waves, by variable local sediment storage and availability, and by large- and small-scale thresholds for sediment transfer within each catchment. Differential response has major implications for modelling fluvial systems and the interpretation of field data. Model results are compared with the record of dated alluvial deposits in the modelled catchments.

  6. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  7. Modeling heterogeneous responsiveness of intrinsic apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a cell suicide mechanism that enables multicellular organisms to maintain homeostasis and to eliminate individual cells that threaten the organism’s survival. Dependent on the type of stimulus, apoptosis can be propagated by extrinsic pathway or intrinsic pathway. The comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanism of apoptotic signaling allows for development of mathematical models, aiming to elucidate dynamical and systems properties of apoptotic signaling networks. There have been extensive efforts in modeling deterministic apoptosis network accounting for average behavior of a population of cells. Cellular networks, however, are inherently stochastic and significant cell-to-cell variability in apoptosis response has been observed at single cell level. Results To address the inevitable randomness in the intrinsic apoptosis mechanism, we develop a theoretical and computational modeling framework of intrinsic apoptosis pathway at single-cell level, accounting for both deterministic and stochastic behavior. Our deterministic model, adapted from the well-accepted Fussenegger model, shows that an additional positive feedback between the executioner caspase and the initiator caspase plays a fundamental role in yielding the desired property of bistability. We then examine the impact of intrinsic fluctuations of biochemical reactions, viewed as intrinsic noise, and natural variation of protein concentrations, viewed as extrinsic noise, on behavior of the intrinsic apoptosis network. Histograms of the steady-state output at varying input levels show that the intrinsic noise could elicit a wider region of bistability over that of the deterministic model. However, the system stochasticity due to intrinsic fluctuations, such as the noise of steady-state response and the randomness of response delay, shows that the intrinsic noise in general is insufficient to produce significant cell-to-cell variations at physiologically relevant level of molecular numbers. Furthermore, the extrinsic noise represented by random variations of two key apoptotic proteins, namely Cytochrome C and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP), is modeled separately or in combination with intrinsic noise. The resultant stochasticity in the timing of intrinsic apoptosis response shows that the fluctuating protein variations can induce cell-to-cell stochastic variability at a quantitative level agreeing with experiments. Finally, simulations illustrate that the mean abundance of fluctuating IAP protein is positively correlated with the degree of cellular stochasticity of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Conclusions Our theoretical and computational study shows that the pronounced non-genetic heterogeneity in intrinsic apoptosis responses among individual cells plausibly arises from extrinsic rather than intrinsic origin of fluctuations. In addition, it predicts that the IAP protein could serve as a potential therapeutic target for suppression of the cell-to-cell variation in the intrinsic apoptosis responsiveness. PMID:23875784

  8. Modelling the superparamagnetic response of AEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattel, Daniel; Mutton, Oaul

    2015-09-01

    Several lines of VTEM data flown at different system elevations across a known sulphide body and surface cover with elevated superparamagnetic (SPM) properties were analysed with MAXWELL, layered-earth inversions (LEI), LEROIAIR and LEROI. The SPM material was modelled with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibilities at shallow depth. Due to their slow late-time decay, SPM responses can be confused with responses of deep conductors and vice versa. Depending on the parameter weighting used, 1D inversions model all late-time responses as deep conductive material or as surficial SPM material. However, the joint 1D inversion of data acquired at different system elevations manages to recover a deep conductor from the sulphide anomaly and elevated SPM values at the location of the SPM response. For the modelled parameters, the VTEM datasets from two elevations (at 70 and 80 m) require a vertical separation of ~10 m to allow for the discrimination between the SPM and sulphide responses. For lower system elevations, less sensor separation is necessary due to the strong gradient of the SPM response. Following the determination of SPM parameters from VTEM survey data, these values were used to hypothesise the SPM response for a range of system geometries, showing that larger transmitter loops and larger offsets between transmitter and receiver loops reduce SPM effects. We suggest that two vertically separated receivers could be used to measure the airborne electromagnetic (AEM) gradient and depending on the flying height of the transmitter, the vertical offset of the receivers should be between 2 and 40 m. If gradient data are not collected, then EM responses measured during the transmitter on-time and x-component data, if available, might offer some model discrimination. Whereas synthetic data of the examined helicopter TEM systems VTEM, AEROTEM and HELITEM indicate a fairly high sensitivity to SPM effects, fixed-wing MEGATEM data are much less affected, due to the higher transmitter elevation and large transmitter loop - receiver separation. SPM effects on data of frequency-domain systems such as the RESOLVE system are also small.

  9. On Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, William

    The relationship between professionalism and professional organizations is examined in this paper. Standards of professionalism for speech communication personnel vary according to the specialization in this diverse field. Since guidelines can not prescribe accurately what a person trained in speech communication should know or perform in many…

  10. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum likelihood framework. They are explicitly formulated…

  11. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations to determine performance coefficients. These coefficients represent the decrease in time required for various basic motions in emergency situations and were used to model an emergency response. This approach will make hazardous operations requiring operator response, alarm management, and evacuation processes easier to design and predict. An application of this methodology is included in the article. The time required for an emergency response was roughly a one-third faster than for a normal response time. PMID:25530564

  12. Australia's model work health and safety regulations and medical fitness requirements for professional divers.

    PubMed

    Smart, David

    2014-12-01

    In my recent roles as Education Officer for SPUMS and also SPUMS representative on Standards Australia, there were frequent queries regarding the requirements for professional diving medicals in Australia. The requirements for Australia have been set by Australian Federal Government Legislation: Australian model work health and safety regulations (4 November 2011). The legislation requires the medical practitioner providing certification of divers to be registered in Australia. In keeping with this legislation, the 2014 version of Australian/New Zealand Standard 2299.1 will separate the medical requirements for divers depending in which country they are working. New Zealand has a centralised registry and health review system for its professional diver medicals, whereas this is not the case in Australia. In the new Australian model work, health and safety regulations, the section on Diving work commences on page 177, section 4.8. The legislation requires that all occupational divers receive a "current certificate of medical fitness to dive by a doctor with appropriate training in underwater medicine". By the legislated reference to AS2299.1:2007,2 the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society is referred to as the appropriate body to provide information on training courses in diving medicine for medical practitioners. The following is offered for guidance, and the linkages for this mandate are as follows: (The page numbers referred to are in the model work, health and safety regulations) Definition of "appropriate training in underwater medicine" (Page 4): Appropriate training in underwater medicine means training that results in knowledge of the matters specified in clause M3 of Appendix M to AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 (Occupational diving operations-Standard operational practice). The requirement for workers to hold a "current certificate of medical fitness" (Page 177, clause 168) Division 2 General diving work - Fitness and competence of worker 168 Person conducting business or undertaking must ensure fitness of workers. A person conducting a business or undertaking at a workplace must not direct or allow a worker to carry out general diving work or undergo training for general diving work unless the worker holds a current certificate of medical fitness. Definition of "fitness criteria" (Page 19): Fitness criteria, in relation to diving work, means the fitness criteria specified in clause M4 of Appendix M to AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 (Occupational diving operations- standard operational practice) M 4.1 General: The following bodily systems Paragraphs M 4.2 to M 4.14) should be evaluated from the diver's history and the medical examination. Where relevant, numerical values are given for certain medical fitness requirements. The paragraphs M 4.2 to M 4.14 then cover a comprehensive assessment of body systems that can only be carried out with a medical assessment which includes a physical examination. Definition of "current" (Page 15): Current certificate of medical fitness means a certificate of medical fitness that: (a) was issued within the past 12 months; and (b) has not expired or been revoked. Requirement that the certificate is issued by a registered medical practitioner with "appropriate training in underwater medicine" (Page 178, clause 169); 169 Certificate of medical fitness. A certificate of medical fitness must: be issued by a registered medical practitioner with appropriate training in underwater medicine. and (E) Definition of "registered medical practitioner" (Page 39): Registered medical practitioner means a person registered under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law to practise in the medical profession (other than as a student). PMID:25596840

  13. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based…

  14. Forming and developing your professional identity: easy as PI.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Heather Honoré; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2014-11-01

    Health education and promotion specialists and professional organizations have worked hard to successfully establish and maintain the status of health education/promotion (HE/P) as a unique and essential profession and to solidify practitioners' sense of professional identity. A professional identity is critical to a person's sense of self: It is about connecting with roles, responsibilities, values, and ethical standards unique to a specific profession. Professional identity is a complex issue in the HE/P profession; the distinction between personal and professional identities has been debated repeatedly over the years (e.g., should HE/P professionals be role models for clients?). The purpose of this Tool is to explain the concept of professional identity; provide new, emerging, and experienced HE/P with a greater understanding of what it means to have a professional identity; present processes and benchmarks of professional identity development; and offer specific tips and strategies for developing and enhancing an HE/P professional identity. PMID:25015568

  15. Let's Begin with Ourselves: Attempting Resonance Responses in the Exchange of Researchers' Professional Autobiographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Petry, Paulo; Hernández-Hernández, Fernando; Creus, Amalia

    2014-01-01

    The economic, social, cultural, technological and labour changes experienced by Spanish universities in the last 40?years have had their impact on the professional lives of the university teachers. Our methodological decision to study, through the construction of life histories, how scholars cope with social and institutional changes in their…

  16. Studying Teachers' Sensemaking to Investigate Teachers' Responses to Professional Development Focused on New Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Carrie D.; Penuel, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on teacher professional development (PD) underscores the importance of the coherence of PD with standards, curriculum, and assessment. Teachers' judgments of the coherence of PD with larger system goals influence their decisions about what ideas and resources they appropriate from PD. Little research, however, has examined how…

  17. Population-expression models of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Antia, Rustom; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    The immune response to a pathogen has two basic features. The first is the expansion of a few pathogen-specific cells to form a population large enough to control the pathogen. The second is the process of differentiation of cells from an initial naive phenotype to an effector phenotype which controls the pathogen, and subsequently to a memory phenotype that is maintained and responsible for long-term protection. The expansion and the differentiation have been considered largely independently. Changes in cell populations are typically described using ecologically based ordinary differential equation models. In contrast, differentiation of single cells is studied within systems biology and is frequently modeled by considering changes in gene and protein expression in individual cells. Recent advances in experimental systems biology make available for the first time data to allow the coupling of population and high dimensional expression data of immune cells during infections. Here we describe and develop population-expression models which integrate these two processes into systems biology on the multicellular level. When translated into mathematical equations, these models result in non-conservative, non-local advection-diffusion equations. We describe situations where the population-expression approach can make correct inference from data while previous modeling approaches based on common simplifying assumptions would fail. We also explore how model reduction techniques can be used to build population-expression models, minimizing the complexity of the model while keeping the essential features of the system. While we consider problems in immunology in this paper, we expect population-expression models to be more broadly applicable.

  18. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2014-04-15

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants. PMID:24500434

  19. Modelling the human response to saltiness.

    PubMed

    Le Révérend, Benjamin J D; Norton, Ian T; Bakalis, Serafim

    2013-06-01

    Eating is a complex process with a range of phenomena occurring simultaneously, including fracture, temperature changes, mixing with saliva, flavour and aroma release. Sensory perception as experienced in the oral cavity has a strong effect on the overall acceptability of the food. Thus in an engineering sense one would want to be able to understand and predict phenomena for different food matrices in order to design more palatable foods through understanding food oral processing without the health concerns of adding salt, fat and sugar. In this work we seek to obtain such an understanding for salt release from food matrices and perception viewing the oral processing as a physical/chemical reactor. A set of equations was developed to account for mass balance and transfer. Data required for the model such as effective diffusivity and mixing times were obtained from the chemical engineering literature. The model predictions compared favourably with published TI data, managing to capture key phenomena including response to pulsed salt release. The model was used to predict response to a range of food matrices and indicated that for solids and thickened liquid food products there is the potential to modulate consumer response by pulsing the release of sodium. PMID:23639956

  20. Modeling the constitutive response of bimodal metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, S. P.; Ramesh, K. T.; Han, B. Q.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2006-08-01

    The mechanical response of metals with a bimodal grain-size distribution is modeled using the secant Mori-Tanaka (M-T) mean-field approach. The actual microstructure of bimodal metals involves a grain size distribution in the ultrafine and coarse regimes; the model approximates this in terms of two phases with distinct grain sizes and with specific volume fractions. The model is applied to two bimodal materials: the Al-5083 alloys of Lavernia et al. and the Cu of Wang et al. In both the materials, the predictions agree well with the experiments. In the bimodal Al alloy, the effect of extrusion on the anisotropy in yield strength and flow behavior is also addressed. Finally, based on the model predictions, an empirical expression of the Voce form is proposed to describe the overall flow behavior of both bimodal metals.

  1. RRAWFLOW: Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (v1.11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.

    2014-09-01

    The Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (RRAWFLOW) is a lumped-parameter model that simulates streamflow, springflow, groundwater level, solute transport, or cave drip for a measurement point in response to a system input of precipitation, recharge, or solute injection. The RRAWFLOW open-source code is written in the R language and is included in the Supplement to this article along with an example model of springflow. RRAWFLOW includes a time-series process to estimate recharge from precipitation and simulates the response to recharge by convolution; i.e., the unit hydrograph approach. Gamma functions are used for estimation of parametric impulse-response functions (IRFs); a combination of two gamma functions results in a double-peaked IRF. A spline fit to a set of control points is introduced as a new method for estimation of nonparametric IRFs. Other options include the use of user-defined IRFs and different methods to simulate time-variant systems. For many applications, lumped models simulate the system response with equal accuracy to that of distributed models, but moreover, the ease of model construction and calibration of lumped models makes them a good choice for many applications. RRAWFLOW provides professional hydrologists and students with an accessible and versatile tool for lumped-parameter modeling.

  2. Case Study -Hypothetical Immunological Response Model Graph Transformation Rules

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    Case Study - Hypothetical Immunological Response Model Graph Transformation Rules Mayur Bapodra immunological response for some imagined multi- cellular organism. Section 2 presents the graph transformation

  3. Modelling electromagnetic responses from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werthmüller, Dieter; Ziolkowski, Anton; Wright, David

    2013-04-01

    The paper considers the problem of recovering subsurface resistivities from controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. CSEM data obey a diffusion equation in a conducting earth. Methods used in the processing of seismic data, which obey the wave equation, do not apply to CSEM data and there is no theory that allows resistivities to be extracted directly from CSEM data. The conventional approach is to perform iterative forward modelling, or inversion. Synthetic data are created using the data acquisition configuration and a subsurface resistivity model. The model is adjusted until the synthetic data fit the measured data. However, there are many different models that fit the data equally well and it is a problem to select the range of most likely models. Constraints are required. Seismic data yield complementary information, which can constrain the range of possible resistivity models that fit the data. We present a methodology to estimate resistivities from seismic velocities. We apply known methods, including rock physics to transform velocities into resistivities, depth trends to account for depth-dependent rock parameters, structural information to include lithology variations, and uncertainty analysis to estimate the error of the data, the physical parameters, and the model itself. The result of applying this methodology to data in the neighbourhood of the CSEM data is a range of background resistivity models that is consistent with the known seismic velocities. We successfully apply our methodology to real data from the North Sea. We use a well log from a well in a field nearby to calibrate our model, and well logs from our study field to verify our transform. The transform proves robust at depths where we have well control, but uncertainty remains in the shallower and deeper sections. We use these background resistivity models to calculate synthetic electromagnetic responses, and compare them with measured multi-transient electromagnetic data. Our initial resistivity model represents the horizontal resistivities, as we calibrate our transform with resistivity measurements from (almost) vertical well logs, which measure horizontal resistivity. Since the study area contains horizontally-layered sediments in the shallow part, this allows the shallow section to be approximated by a one-dimensional (1D) model. CSEM data at short source-receiver offsets are sensitive to the shallow layers. Allowing the shallow layers to be anisotropic in 1D inversions of the measured CSEM data improves the agreement of the synthetic and real data. The shallow section of the background resistivity model is improved and an estimate of the anisotropy is obtained. Separate step response and impulse response anisotropic inversions are used to determine the most accurate anisotropy factor. This approach yields a detailed background resistivity model from seismic velocities. We believe this is far better than the usual approach of a uniform resistivity background, or a resistivity background from fast, unconstrained 1D inversions. The next step is to create in this way a three-dimensional resistivity background model, and compare the resulting CSEM responses to the measured CSEM data.

  4. BridgeGreen : bridging the disconnect between design professionals and resources fro environmentally, socially, and economically responsive architecture

    E-print Network

    Elbaum, Meredith Sue, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Sustainable design, whether referred to as green, high performing, responsible, or environmentally, socially, and economically responsive architecture, is influencing the global building industry. Most major firms of ...

  5. The Graded Unfolding Model: A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Graded Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to attitude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes analyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent investigations suggest that unfolding models are more appropriate (J. S. Roberts, 1995; W. H. Van Schuur and H. A. L. Kiers, 1994). Advances in…

  6. Chemistry Teachers' Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers' beliefs and practice. The data indicated that the teachers developed more complete conceptions of classroom inquiry, valued a "phenomena first" approach to scientific investigations, and viewed inquiry approaches as helpful for facilitating improved student thinking. Analysis of classroom observations with the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol indicated that features of the PD were observed in the teachers' practice during the academic year follow-up. Implications for effective science teacher professional development models are discussed.

  7. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors Toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-02-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based curricula was employed to determine how science teacher's attitudes and efficacy where impacted while designing science-based video games. The study's mixed-method design ascertained teacher efficacy on five factors (General computer use, Science Learning, Inquiry Teaching and Learning, Synchronous chat/text, and Playing Video Games) related to technology and gaming using a web-based survey). Qualitative data in the form of online blog posts was gathered during the project to assist in the triangulation and assessment of teacher efficacy. Data analyses consisted of an Analysis of Variance and serial coding of teacher reflective responses. Results indicated participants who used computers daily have higher efficacy while using inquiry-based teaching methods and science teaching and learning. Additional emergent findings revealed possible motivating factors for efficacy. This professional development project was focused on inquiry as a pedagogical strategy, standard-based science learning as means to develop content knowledge, and creating video games as technological knowledge. The project was consistent with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework where overlapping circles of the three components indicates development of an integrated understanding of the suggested relationships. Findings provide suggestions for development of standards-based science education software, its integration into the curriculum and, strategies for implementing technology into teaching practices.

  8. Undergraduates' Intentions to Take Examinations for Professional Certification: Examinations of Four Competing Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Hsu, Ping-Kun; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on professional certification has primarily focused on graduate certificates in intensive care nursing, writing certificates for practitioners, maintenance of certification in radiation oncology, and the certification of teachers and surgeons. Research on certification in the domain of business and management from an…

  9. Navigating Past and Present Accountability Measures in Search of an Effective Principal Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the perceived experiences encountered by principals in the state of Illinois regarding professional development sessions offered through the Illinois Administrator Academy. The fundamental value of the Illinois Administrator Academy was designed as one of 169 specific initiatives in association with the…

  10. A Co-Teaching Model: Committed Professionals, High Expectations, and the Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Karen Wise; Magiera, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article relates the story of a first grade teacher and a child who was the only deaf student in the entire school. Because he had no one who could communicate with him--not teachers, not students, no one, this situation tugged at the hearts of a committed team of professionals. A teacher of the deaf, a first grade general education teacher, a…

  11. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers' (N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed…

  12. A Year-Round Professional Development Model for World Language Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Tracy M.; Peterson, Margaret D.; Silva, Duarte M.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2009-01-01

    The Bay Area Foreign Language Program (BAFLP), one of nine regional sites of the California Foreign Language Project, offers ongoing, year-round professional development programs for world language educators. In addition, its leadership program prepares selected educators to assume leadership positions at their school sites, building capacity for…

  13. Models for Effective and Scalable Teacher Professional Development. Research Report. ETS RR-09-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Marnie; Goe, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The minute-to-minute and day-by-day use of assessment for learning holds great potential to change the trajectory of student learning in U.S. classrooms. But without effective and scalable systems of professional development that actually lead teachers to adopt these practices, the utility and impact of assessment for learning will be quite…

  14. Telementoring in Community Nursing: A shift from dyadic to communal models of learning and professional development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Russell; Kirk Perris

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on a six-month telementoring initiative in a Canadian community nursing organization. The way in which Internet technologies may support and augment face-to-face mentorship of health care professionals is a relatively unexplored area of research and was the focus of this project. Participants ( N =22) were all employees of Saint Elizabeth Health Care (SEHC), a community nursing

  15. Differential Effects of Three Professional Development Models on Teacher Knowledge and Student Achievement in Elementary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Joan I.; Daehler, Kirsten R.; Wong, Nicole; Shinohara, Mayumi; Miratrix, Luke W.

    2012-01-01

    To identify links among professional development, teacher knowledge, practice, and student achievement, researchers have called for study designs that allow causal inferences and that examine relationships among features of interventions and multiple outcomes. In a randomized experiment implemented in six states with over 270 elementary teachers…

  16. An Integrative Psychological Developmental Model of Supervision for Professional School Counselors-in-Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Sias, Shari M.

    2009-01-01

    Professional school counselors (PSCs) at higher levels of psychological development negotiate complex situations and perform counselor-related tasks with empathy, flexibility, tolerance for ambiguity, boundary setting, personal and interpersonal awareness, and self-care more effectively than do individuals at lower levels of development. This…

  17. "Drama for Schools": Teacher Change in an Applied Theatre Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kathryn; Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Baker, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Applied theatre often draws upon critical pedagogy and constructivist methodology as a way to bring participants into direct engagement with their own learning experiences. As learners, adults bring a wealth of perspectives that further affect how they interact with an applied theatre experience. "Drama for Schools" (DFS) is a professional

  18. Professional Development as Collaborative Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harada, Violet H.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of effective professional development for educators focuses on a description of how three organizations in Hawaii cooperatively designed and implemented a professional development model that considered paradigm shifts in professional development practices. Highlights include an inquiry approach; creating authentic learning experiences;…

  19. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  20. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response

  1. Biological Event Modeling for Response Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Clement; Cecere, Fred; Darneille, Robert; Laverdure, Nate

    People worldwide continue to fear a naturally occurring or terrorist-initiated biological event. Responsible decision makers have begun to prepare for such a biological event, but critical policy and system questions remain: What are the best courses of action to prepare for and react to such an outbreak? Where resources should be stockpiled? How many hospital resources—doctors, nurses, intensive-care beds—will be required? Will quarantine be necessary? Decision analysis tools, particularly modeling and simulation, offer ways to address and help answer these questions.

  2. Towards a Structural Model Connecting Hard Skills, Soft Skills and Job Conditions and the IS Professional: The Student Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney Turner

    The IS professional is a person endowed with certain professional skills and attributes usually formally obtained through an education process. The IS professional may also have formal skills in peripheral, non technical areas that may too be obtained through a formal education process. This is typical now in the education of IS students who are aspiring IS professional. In addition

  3. Social and professional support needs of families after perinatal loss.

    PubMed

    Hutti, Marianne H

    2005-01-01

    Perinatal loss has been associated with depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, suicide, marital conflict, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Nurses may provide professional support through teaching, role modeling, encouragement, counseling, problem solving, and other interventions. Nurses also may encourage more effective social support by helping significant others to provide willing, well-intentioned action that will produce a positive response in the bereaved couple. Interventions to increase professional and social support after perinatal loss are described. PMID:16227519

  4. Professional Development

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Professional Development An Introduction to Social Media: Networking on the Web Basics New New New #12;2 Professional Development AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL MEDIA: NETWORKING ON THE WEB People Workplace Bullying Career Development Developing Your Career at the University of Pittsburgh

  5. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  6. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  7. A Nonlinear Mixed Model Framework for Item Response Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Rijmen; Francis Tuerlinckx; Paul De Boeck; Peter Kuppens

    2003-01-01

    Mixed models take the dependency between observations based on the same cluster into account by introducing 1 or more random effects. Common item response theory (IRT) models introduce latent person variables to model the dependence between responses of the same participant. Assuming a distribution for the latent variables, these IRT models are formally equivalent with nonlinear mixed models. It is

  8. Women and Minority Faculty Job Satisfaction: A Structural Model Examining the Effect of Professional Role Interests, Professional Satisfactions, and Institutional Fit. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Deborah; And Others

    This study examined the professional role interests and satisfactions of tenure track women and minority faculty (N=146) at a Research I university from three schools on campus: Arts and Sciences, Business, and Education. The sample was comprised of 42 white male faculty, 47 minority faculty, and 57 white female faculty. Subjects were interviewed…

  9. Reissued as S99-8 & S99-11 Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility Page 1 of 8 **Reissued as S99-8 and S99-11

    E-print Network

    Gleixner, Stacy

    as S99-8 and S99-11 S93-12 ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY; ETHICS; CONFLICT Committee. Supersedes F67-17, S88-9. S94-3 added appendix A and made slight changes. S95-9 added appendix, The current statement on Professional Ethics adopted by San José State University in 1988 is a useful core

  10. NASPA Programs & Initiatives Standards of Professional Practice

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    . Student Behavior Members demonstrate and promote responsible behavior and support actions that enhanceNASPA Programs & Initiatives Standards of Professional Practice NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education is an organization of colleges, universities, agencies, and professional

  11. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in contrast possessed no adhesion to the pure component C11EG6OH SAM at both temperatures examined, 25 and 40°C. The protein adhesion data to the mixed SAM also supports the hypothesis that the mixed SAM displays a non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it displays a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. Advancing contact angles obtained through tensiometry were used to find the surface free energy of the mixed SAM before and after the thermal response using the van Oss-Good-Chaudhury method. The surface tension values obtained, 42 and 38 mN/m for 22 and 40°C, respectively, are not dissimilar enough with regard to error to make conclusions. In a similar manner, the surface free energy of another mixed SAM composed of alkyl and trimethylamine thiolates was also calculated. PNIPAAm brushes grown on a silicon substrate by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were imaged by AFM and characterized by XPS. The height of the resulting brushes could be controlled from ˜5 to 55 nm by reaction time. A thermal response was observed for polymer brushes with a length greater than 20 nm. For polymer brush lengths greater than 20 nm, the static contact angle at 22°C was 35° and varied from 60 to 80° at 40°C. The thermal response was also observed using the captive bubble method. Force-distance curves of the PNIPAAm brushes were taken with an unmodified silicon nitride AFM cantilever at incremental temperature steps. At room temperature the force-distance data was fit to the Alexander-de Gennes model resulting in a hydrated polymer length of 235 nm. The Young's modulus was calculated using the Hertz model and changed from ˜80 MPa at 26°C to ˜350 MPa at 40°C. The solvent condition of the Alexander-de Gennes model was set to the case of good solvent and showed close match to the force-distance data at 26°C. The match was not as close when the solvent condition was set to theta solvent condition and compared to the force-distance data at 40°C. Finally, the effective diffusion coefficients of a dye were obtained for the uptake, encapsulation, a

  12. Human responses to augmented virtual scaffolding models.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter; Dotson, Brian; Ammons, Douglas; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Chiou, Sharon

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of adding real planks, in virtual scaffolding models of elevation, on human performance in a surround-screen virtual reality (SSVR) system. Twenty-four construction workers and 24 inexperienced controls performed walking tasks on real and virtual planks at three virtual heights (0, 6 m, 12 m) and two scaffolding-platform-width conditions (30, 60 cm). Gait patterns, walking instability measurements and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. The results showed differences in human responses to real vs. virtual planks in walking patterns, instability score and heart-rate inter-beat intervals; it appeared that adding real planks in the SSVR virtual scaffolding model enhanced the quality of SSVR as a human - environment interface research tool. In addition, there were significant differences in performance between construction workers and the control group. The inexperienced participants were more unstable as compared to construction workers. Both groups increased their stride length with repetitions of the task, indicating a possibly confidence- or habit-related learning effect. The practical implications of this study are in the adoption of augmented virtual models of elevated construction environments for injury prevention research, and the development of programme for balance-control training to reduce the risk of falls at elevation before workers enter a construction job. PMID:16253942

  13. Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reanyansky, Anatoly D [DSTO, AUSTRALIA; Bourne, Neil K [AWE, UK; Millett, Jeremy C F [AWE, UK

    2009-01-01

    The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

  14. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  15. Discrete Latent Markov Models for Normally Distributed Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittmann, Verena D.; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Van de Pol and Langeheine (1990) presented a general framework for Markov modeling of repeatedly measured discrete data. We discuss analogical single indicator models for normally distributed responses. In contrast to discrete models, which have been studied extensively, analogical continuous response models have hardly been considered. These…

  16. Nested Logit Models for Multiple-Choice Item Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Youngsuk; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Nested logit item response models for multiple-choice data are presented. Relative to previous models, the new models are suggested to provide a better approximation to multiple-choice items where the application of a solution strategy precedes consideration of response options. In practice, the models also accommodate collapsibility across all…

  17. A Laboratory Model for Studying Response-Class Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Daniel B; Carr, James E; Petursdottir, Anna Ingeborg

    2009-01-01

    If the members of a functional response class occur in a predictable order, a response-class hierarchy is said to exist. Although this topic has received some attention in the applied literature, it remains relatively understudied. The purpose of the current investigation was to develop an analogue model of a response-class hierarchy. Children with and without developmental disabilities were first taught three responses in an attempt to develop a functional response class ordered along the dimension of response effort (Experiment 1). Following response-class development, an extinction analysis was used to determine whether the responses were hierarchically related (Experiment 2). Results of Experiment 1 indicated that a functional response class was developed, and that there was a relation between response rate and effort for the established response class. Results of Experiment 2 indicated that a response-class hierarchy existed within the previously developed response classes for 3 of 4 participants. PMID:19721733

  18. Professional Development

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Professional Development Advanced Public Speaking in a Nutshell An Introduction to Social Media Presentation Identifying Opportunities for Using Social Media for Business Purposes Public Speaking! Is That Really Harassment? Please Respect My Generation Workplace Bullying Career Development Developing Your

  19. Professional Development in Corporate Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Susan R.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational and workplace changes are altering the work of trainers and consequently their professional development needs. Training and development professionals need a foundation in training design and delivery with the ability to incorporate multiple perspectives, delivery systems, and locations and to be responsive to change. (SK)

  20. Revisiting Professional Dispositions: Research Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gail; Jones, Jami L.

    2011-01-01

    As the authors progressed through their research agenda last year, they contributed an article to "School Library Monthly" entitled "Forecasting Professional Dispositions of School Librarians" (January 2011, 54-56) wherein they described a Delphi study they conducted in the fall of 2009 that identified professional dispositions based on responses

  1. Tidally Heated Terrestrial Exoplanets: Viscoelastic Response Models

    E-print Network

    Henning, Wade G; Sasselov, Dimitar D; 10.1088/0004-637X/707/2/1000

    2009-01-01

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a Hot Earth and Hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid, and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale parti...

  2. Sustainability of Future Professionals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Selma Alliex

    2010-01-01

    As educators it is our responsibility that we not only teach our students sustainability strategies but also practices to sustain them in a world that is ever changing. This study addresses the theme of this conference because it deals with teaching students strategies to equip themselves with practices that will impact on their role as professionals. This pilot study aimed

  3. A School-University Partnership's Involvement in State Mandated Reform: The Impact of a Teacher-Based Professional Development Model on Teachers, or, "Caught in the Headlights!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laguardia, Armando; Grisham, Dana; Gallucci, Chrysan; Jamison, Shelli; Brink, Beverly; Peck, Cap

    This study examined teachers' experiences in the Washington state-mandated educational reform process, their pedagogical responses to the reform initiatives, and the way in which these were mediated by professional development activities such as those initiated by the Goals 2000 project. Five Washington teachers participated in this case study.…

  4. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: III. STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of dose-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. Recently, statistical models appropriate for developmental toxicity testing have been developed and applied (Rai...

  5. A model to systematically employ professional judgment in the Bayesian Decision Analysis for a semiconductor industry exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Torres, Craig; Jones, Rachael; Boelter, Fred; Poole, James; Dell, Linda; Harper, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA) uses Bayesian statistics to integrate multiple types of exposure information and classify exposures within the exposure rating categorization scheme promoted in American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) publications. Prior distributions for BDA may be developed from existing monitoring data, mathematical models, or professional judgment. Professional judgments may misclassify exposures. We suggest that a structured qualitative risk assessment (QLRA) method can provide consistency and transparency in professional judgments. In this analysis, we use a structured QLRA method to define prior distributions (priors) for BDA. We applied this approach at three semiconductor facilities in South Korea, and present an evaluation of the performance of structured QLRA for determination of priors, and an evaluation of occupational exposures using BDA. Specifically, the structured QLRA was applied to chemical agents in similar exposure groups to identify provisional risk ratings. Standard priors were developed for each risk rating before review of historical monitoring data. Newly collected monitoring data were used to update priors informed by QLRA or historical monitoring data, and determine the posterior distribution. Exposure ratings were defined by the rating category with the highest probability--i.e., the most likely. We found the most likely exposure rating in the QLRA-informed priors to be consistent with historical and newly collected monitoring data, and the posterior exposure ratings developed with QLRA-informed priors to be equal to or greater than those developed with data-informed priors in 94% of comparisons. Overall, exposures at these facilities are consistent with well-controlled work environments. That is, the 95th percentile of exposure distributions are ?50% of the occupational exposure limit (OEL) for all chemical-SEG combinations evaluated; and are ?10% of the limit for 94% of chemical-SEG combinations evaluated. PMID:24274915

  6. EXPLANATORY MODELS FOR ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is often spatial patterns in environmental and ecological variables that arouse interest and demand explanation. or environmental response variables, the causal influences of interacting environmental factors produce the patterns of interest. cological response variables by de...

  7. Examining the Relationship between Teachers' Attitudes and Motivation toward Web-Based Professional Development: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Hui-Min; Kao, Chia-Pin; Yeh, I-Jan; Lin, Kuen-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate elementary school teachers' attitudes and motivation toward web-based professional development. The relationship between teachers' attitudes and motivation was explored using the AWPD (Attitudes toward Web-based Professional Development) and MWPD (Motivation toward Web-based Professional Development)…

  8. Modeling mechanical response of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Siladitya

    Heterogeneous materials are ubiquitous in nature and as synthetic materials. These materials provide unique combination of desirable mechanical properties emerging from its heterogeneities at different length scales. Future structural and technological applications will require the development of advanced light weight materials with superior strength and toughness. Cost effective design of the advanced high performance synthetic materials by tailoring their microstructure is the challenge facing the materials design community. Prior knowledge of structure-property relationships for these materials is imperative for optimal design. Thus, understanding such relationships for heterogeneous materials is of primary interest. Furthermore, computational burden is becoming critical concern in several areas of heterogeneous materials design. Therefore, computationally efficient and accurate predictive tools are highly essential. In the present study, we mainly focus on mechanical behavior of soft cellular materials and tough biological material such as mussel byssus thread. Cellular materials exhibit microstructural heterogeneity by interconnected network of same material phase. However, mussel byssus thread comprises of two distinct material phases. A robust numerical framework is developed to investigate the micromechanisms behind the macroscopic response of both of these materials. Using this framework, effect of microstuctural parameters has been addressed on the stress state of cellular specimens during split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A voronoi tessellation based algorithm has been developed to simulate the cellular microstructure. Micromechanisms (microinertia, microbuckling and microbending) governing macroscopic behavior of cellular solids are investigated thoroughly with respect to various microstructural and loading parameters. To understand the origin of high toughness of mussel byssus thread, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based optimization framework has been developed. It is found that two different material phases (collagens) of mussel byssus thread are optimally distributed along the thread. These applications demonstrate that the presence of heterogeneity in the system demands high computational resources for simulation and modeling. Thus, Higher Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) based surrogate modeling concept has been proposed to reduce computational complexity. The applicability of such methodology has been demonstrated in failure envelope construction and in multiscale finite element techniques. It is observed that surrogate based model can capture the behavior of complex material systems with sufficient accuracy. The computational algorithms presented in this thesis will further pave the way for accurate prediction of macroscopic deformation behavior of various class of advanced materials from their measurable microstructural features at a reasonable computational cost.

  9. Estimating the Nominal Response Model under Nonnormal Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kathleen Suzanne Johnson; Reise, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    The nominal response model (NRM), a much understudied polytomous item response theory (IRT) model, provides researchers the unique opportunity to evaluate within-item category distinctions. Polytomous IRT models, such as the NRM, are frequently applied to psychological assessments representing constructs that are unlikely to be normally…

  10. New Model for Europa's Tidal Response Based after Laboratory Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Castillo; C. McCarthy; M. Choukroun; N. Rambaux

    2009-01-01

    We explore the application of the Andrade model to the modeling of Europa's tidal response at the orbital period and for different librations. Previous models have generally assumed that the satellite behaves as a Maxwell body. However, at the frequencies exciting Europa's tides and librations, material anelasticity tends to dominate the satellite's response for a wide range of temperatures, a

  11. Hierarchical Diffusion Models for Two-Choice Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandekerckhove, Joachim; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Lee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-choice response times are a common type of data, and much research has been devoted to the development of process models for such data. However, the practical application of these models is notoriously complicated, and flexible methods are largely nonexistent. We combine a popular model for choice response times--the Wiener diffusion…

  12. Multidimensional Vector Model of Stimulus-Response Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Proctor, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposes and examines the multidimensional vector (MDV) model framework as a modeling schema for choice response times. MDV extends the Thurstonian model, as well as signal detection theory, to classification tasks by taking into account the influence of response properties on stimulus discrimination. It is capable of accounting…

  13. The Gradual Increase of Responsibility Model: Coaching for Teacher Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collet, Vicki S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the gradual increase of responsibility (GIR) model for teacher coaching (Collet, 2008), an adaptation of Pearson and Gallagher's (1983) Gradual Release of Responsibility model. In GIR, instructional coaches model, make recommendations, ask probing questions, affirm teachers' appropriate decisions, and praise in order to provide…

  14. Formation of medical student professional identity: categorizing lapses of professionalism, and the learning environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquiring the values of medical professionalism has become a critical issue in medical education. The purpose of this study was to identify lapses in professionalism witnessed by medical students during their four year MD curriculum, and to categorize, from the students’ perspective, who was responsible and the settings in which these occurred. Methods An electronic survey, developed by faculty and medical students, was sent to all students with two email reminders. It included quantitative responses and some open-ended opportunities for comments. All analyses were performed with SAS version 9.1. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the medical school curriculum. Thirty six percent of students had witnessed or been part of an exemplary demonstration of professionalism; 64% responded that they had witnessed a lapse of professionalism. At the pre-clerkship level, the most frequent lapses involved students: arrogance (42.2%), impairment (24.2%), followed by cultural or religious insensitivity (20.5%). At the clerkship level of training, where students are exposed to real clinical situations, the lapses involved primarily faculty (including preceptor and clinician) or other staff; these included arrogance (55.3%), breach of confidentiality (28.3%), and cultural or religious insensitivity (26.6%); impairment involved mostly students (25.5%). These findings are analyzed from the perspective of role modeling by faculty and in the context of the learning environment. Conclusions Medical students witnessed a lapse of professionalism involving both fellow students as well as faculty and administrative staff, in several domains. Results from this study emphasize the importance of role modeling and the need for faculty development, to improve the learning environment. This study adds to the limited emerging literature on the forces that influence medical student professional identity formation. PMID:25004924

  15. Emotional response modeling in financial markets : Boston Stock Exchange data analysis

    E-print Network

    McCaney, Patrick Michael, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, physiological data is analyzed in the context of financial risk processing, specifically investigating the effects of financial trading decisions and situations on the physiological responses of professional ...

  16. Mentor teachers' perceptions of their own professional development within a secondary science professional development school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreamer, Sherry Maureen

    Mentor teachers' perceptions of their professional development within a secondary science professional development school were studied using grounded theory within a postmodern lens. The driving questions which framed this study were: How do mentor teachers' perceive their own professional development in the context of an emerging secondary science Professional Development School? How is mentor professional development supported or inhibited in this secondary science PDS? How do mentor teachers' perceive teaching science through inquiry in the context of this secondary science Professional Development School? In what ways do mentor teachers view themselves as participants in a community of learners within the PDS context? Seven secondary science mentor teachers were purposefully selected as participants based on their commitment to mentor a pre-service science education intern for one school year. The primary sources of data were two semi-structured interviews, one taken early in the school year, and the other taken near or at the end of the school year. Other sources of data were participant mentor journal entries, focus group notes, written mentor responses to an inquiry prompt and professional development prompt, and the Secondary Science Professional Development Handbook which the participant/focus group generated. These additional data sources were used to help reach consensus as well as add richness to the study. Data were analyzed initially using the grounded theory qualitative software ATLASti (1997), to discover codes and patterns of connectivity. Results of initial analysis were compared with subsequent data analysis, and member check for clarification and consensus. Mentors in this study identified six dimensions which influenced their professional development. Five of these enhanced their practice. These were: benefits, roles, goals, preparation, and support. Participants also identified barriers which inhibited their professional growth. The most significant of these was isolation. In addition, multiple and diverse patterns of connectivity which cut across all six of the previous dimensions and changed with time were identified. These were: (1) Mentors' reflection on their practice, and (2) Mentors' focus and self-view which connected them to their interns and their practice. The theory generated from this study is: Mentor teachers' professional development is mediated by interns in the context of a science PDS. The three supporting assertions for this theory are: (1) Mentors' reflection, focus and self-view influenced the extent of their professional development, (2) The PDS partnership mentor/intern pair successfully negotiated and collaborated, but in isolation, and (3) Mentor/intern pairs developed models of teaching science through inquiry. This study's finding were used as a basis of recommendations for research and practice.

  17. Ethical Principles and Information Professionals: Theory, Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacovino, Livio

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on ethical concepts and thinking processes and their application to professional issues, particularly to information professionals. Topics include conflicts between professional and organizational ethics; regulatory mechanisms and the professions; the practice skills model and the professional-client model for information professionals;…

  18. EvalPartners: Facilitating the Development of a New Model of Voluntary Organization for Professional Evaluation to Support the Development of National Evaluation Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosheleva, Natalia; Segone, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In many less developed democracies Voluntary Organizations for Professional Evaluation (VOPEs) face the challenges of low demand for evaluation and the resulting low economic capacity of national evaluation communities. The VOPE model that evolved in well-developed democracies is not directly applicable under these circumstances, so a new model

  19. Collective Commitment and Collective Efficacy: A Theoretical Model for Understanding the Motivational Dynamics of Dilemma Resolution in Inter-Professional Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jo; Norwich, Brahm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model which conceptualizes inter-professional and multi-agency collaborative working, at the level of the individual within a group. This arises from a review of the literature around joint working, and is based on social psychological theories which refer to shared goals. The model assumes that collective…

  20. District professional development models as a way to introduce primary?school teachers to natural science curriculum reforms in one district in South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bongani D. Bantwini

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated whether district continued professional development (CPD) sufficiently prepared teachers for their classroom practice. Analysis of CPD models used with primary?school natural science teachers in a district in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa was conducted. Findings indicated that the district CPD models used with the teachers did not address the various

  1. THE QUALIFICATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF VOCATIONAL DIRECTORS AT THE LOCAL DISTRICT LEVEL IN THE STATE OF UTAH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDMUNDS, NIEL A.

    BECAUSE UTAH REQUIRES LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS TO EMPLOY VOCATIONAL DIRECTORS, A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DETERMINE THEIR QUALIFICATIONS, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DUTIES. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM PERSONNEL IN 37 OF THE 40 SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN UTAH, 37 OF 50 STATE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORS, 48 TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS IN THE NATION, THE U.S.…

  2. Professional Development for Culturally Responsive and Relationship-Based Pedagogy. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented here is a large-scale evaluation of a theory-driven school reform project in New Zealand, which focuses on improving the educational achievement of Maori students in public secondary schools. The project's conceptual underpinnings are based on Kaupapa Maori research, culturally responsive teaching, student voice, and…

  3. Communities of Practice as a Professional and Organizational Development Strategy in Local Public Health Organizations in Quebec, Canada: An Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Lucie; Chiocchio, François; Essiembre, Hélène; Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Lamy, Geneviève; Champagne, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Communities of practice (CoPs) are among the professional development strategies most widely used in such fields as management and education. Though the approach has elicited keen interest, knowledge pertaining to its conceptual underpinnings is still limited, thus hindering proper assessment of CoPs' effects and the processes generating the latter. To address this shortcoming, this paper presents a conceptual model that was developed to evaluate an initiative based on a CoP strategy: Health Promotion Laboratories are a professional development intervention that was implemented in local public health organizations in Montreal (Quebec, Canada). The model is based on latest theories on work-group effectiveness and organizational learning and can be usefully adopted by evaluators who are increasingly called upon to illuminate decision-making about CoPs. Ultimately, validation of this conceptual model will help advance knowledge and practice pertaining to CoPs as well as professional and organizational development strategies in public health. PMID:24726072

  4. Modelling climate change responses in tropical forests: similar productivity estimates across five models, but different mechanisms and responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, L.; Harper, A.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Galbraith, D. R.; Imbuzeiro, H. M. A.; Powell, T. L.; Doughty, C.; Levine, N. M.; Malhi, Y.; Saleska, S. R.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Meir, P.; Williams, M.

    2014-11-01

    Accurately predicting the response of Amazonia to climate change is important for predicting changes across the globe. However, changes in multiple climatic factors simultaneously may result in complex non-linear responses, which are difficult to predict using vegetation models. Using leaf and canopy scale observations, this study evaluated the capability of five vegetation models (CLM3.5, ED2, JULES, SiB3, and SPA) to simulate the responses of canopy and leaf scale productivity to changes in temperature and drought in an Amazonian forest. The models did not agree as to whether gross primary productivity (GPP) was more sensitive to changes in temperature or precipitation. There was greater model-data consistency in the response of net ecosystem exchange to changes in temperature, than in the response to temperature of leaf area index (LAI), net photosynthesis (An) and stomatal conductance (gs). Modelled canopy scale fluxes are calculated by scaling leaf scale fluxes to LAI, and therefore in this study similarities in modelled ecosystem scale responses to drought and temperature were the result of inconsistent leaf scale and LAI responses among models. Across the models, the response of An to temperature was more closely linked to stomatal behaviour than biochemical processes. Consequently all the models predicted that GPP would be higher if tropical forests were 5 °C colder, closer to the model optima for gs. There was however no model consistency in the response of the An-gs relationship when temperature changes and drought were introduced simultaneously. The inconsistencies in the An-gs relationships amongst models were caused by to non-linear model responses induced by simultaneous drought and temperature change. To improve the reliability of simulations of the response of Amazonian rainforest to climate change the mechanistic underpinnings of vegetation models need more complete validation to improve accuracy and consistency in the scaling of processes from leaf to canopy.

  5. A Laboratory Model for Studying Response-Class Hierarchies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabani, Daniel B.; Carr, James E.; Petursdottir, Anna Ingeborg

    2009-01-01

    If the members of a functional response class occur in a predictable order, a response-class hierarchy is said to exist. Although this topic has received some attention in the applied literature, it remains relatively understudied. The purpose of the current investigation was to develop an analogue model of a response-class hierarchy. Children…

  6. Item Response Models for Local Dependence among Multiple Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Su, Chi-Ming; Qiu, Xue-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Ratings given to the same item response may have a stronger correlation than those given to different item responses, especially when raters interact with one another before giving ratings. The rater bundle model was developed to account for such local dependence by forming multiple ratings given to an item response as a bundle and assigning…

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF A DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY DOSE-RESPONSE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model (1) proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling developmental toxicity data. odifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biol...

  8. Professional Development

    E-print Network

    Carnegie Mellon University 15 Google 14 National Institute of Health 11 Bank of America/Merrill Lynch 10 or alumni 5518 EVENTS Total Number of events (workshops, class presentations, job fairs, professional skills Program Nominees from Carnegie Mellon 16 nominees Lunch Attendees 300 attended JOB FAIRS Total Student

  9. Professional Technician

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center explains various aspects of being a professional technician such as tool controls, security and safety, team qualifications, equipment care and calibration, certifications and job qualifications, systems thinking and troubleshooting, and personal integrity and ethics. This one minute video is one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

  10. Professional Bookshelf

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    Exemplary professional development publications in the areas of general instruction, science education, and literacy instruction in the elementary grades are described in each issue of Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle. This free, online magazine is structured around the seven essential principles of climate literacy and emphasizes integrating science and literacy skills in grades K-5.

  11. Developing a Professional Competence Model for Nursing Education. Final Report, Research Report Number Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentkowski, Marcia; And Others

    A generic competence model for effective nursing performance was developed and compared with nurses' perceptions of job elements that discriminate outstanding nursing performance and that are critical in the selection and education of nurses. The model is to be used to validate the nursing faculty's existing competence model for nursing education…

  12. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Henfield, Malik S.; Booker, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model, which is designed to help school counselors integrate students' academic and personal-social development into their group work. We first describe this group model in detail and then offer one case example of a middle school counselor using the ASE model to…

  13. Public High School Assistant Principals' Reports of Self-Efficacy in Performing Their Professional Job Responsibilities in Accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe public high school assistant principals' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) in performing their professional job responsibilities in accordance with the Educational Leadership Constituency Council's (ELCC) Standards for Advanced Programs in Educational Leadership (National Policy Board…

  14. A New Mathematical Model for the Heat Shock Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Ion; Mizera, Andrzej; Hyder, Claire L.; Mikhailov, Andrey; Eriksson, John E.; Sistonen, Lea; Back, Ralph-Johan

    We present in this paper a novel molecular model for the gene regulatory network responsible for the eukaryotic heat shock response. Our model includes the temperature-induced protein misfolding, the chaperone activity of the heat shock proteins, and the backregulation of their gene transcription. We then build a mathematical model for it, based on ordinary differential equations. Finally, we discuss the parameter fit and the implications of the sensitivity analysis for our model.

  15. HERBIVORE FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE IN HETEROGENEOUS ENVIRONMENTS: A CONTEST AMONG MODELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Thompson Hobbs; John E. Gross; Lisa A. Shipley; Donald E. Spalinger; Bruce A. Wunder

    2003-01-01

    Variation in the spatial arrangement of plant tissue modifies the functional response of herbivores. In heterogeneous environments, this variation can occur at multiple spatial scales. We used likelihood-based approaches to examine the strength of evidence in data for models of herbivore functional response to spatial variation in plants. These models represented different hypotheses about plant characteristics controlling intake rate, including

  16. Modeling the Thermal Response of Porcine Cartilage to Laser Irradiation

    E-print Network

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    Modeling the Thermal Response of Porcine Cartilage to Laser Irradiation Sergio H. Díaz characterization of the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation (Nd:YAG). The surface the temperature distribution in a slab of porcine nasal cartilage during laser irradiation. This model

  17. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  18. Impulse Response Modeling of Indoor Radio Propagation Channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Homayoun Hashemi

    1993-01-01

    If indoor radio propagation channels are modeled as linear filters, they can be characterized by reporting the parameters of their equivalent impulse response functions. The measurement and modeling of estimates for such functions in two different office buildings are reported. The resulting data base consists of 12000 impulse response estimates of the channel that were obtained by inverse Fourier transforming

  19. "Guessing" Parameter Estimates for Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2007-01-01

    Two software packages commonly used for multidimensional item response theory (IRT) models require the user to input values for the lower asymptotes of the item response functions. One way of selecting these values is to estimate lower asymptotes with a one-dimensional IRT model and use those estimates as fixed values in the multidimensional…

  20. A Mixture Item Response Model for Multiple-Choice Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolt, Daniel M.; Cohen, Allan S.; Wollack, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a mixture item response model for investigating individual differences in the selection of response categories in multiple choice items. A real data example illustrates how the model can be used to distinguish examinees disproportionately attracted to different types of distractors, and a simulation study evaluates item parameter recovery…

  1. Optimal Randomized Response Models and Methods for Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, John W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Several randomized response models for gathering self-report data when persons are asked sensitive questions are reviewed. A new general model for reducing error by asking questions conditional upon earlier answers is introduced. Hypothesis testing and confidence-interval procedures are demonstrated for data collected by the randomized response

  2. Fear responses of Japanese monkeys to scale models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chizuko Murai; Masaki Tomonaga

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated fear responses of Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) to scale models. Fear responses of participants were assessed using rating scores assigned by judges. In Experiment 1, participants\\u000a were presented with scale models of objects in furniture, vehicle, and mammal categories. Overall, the participants expressed\\u000a stronger fear responses to mammal objects as compared to the other two kinds. In

  3. Crop response to climate: ecophysical models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecophysiological models were the dominant tools used to estimate the potential impact of climate change in agroecosystems in the Third and Fourth Assessment Reports of the IPCC and are widely used elsewhere in climate change research. These models, also known as “crop models” or “simulation models”,...

  4. The Collier Chautauqua program: A formative evaluation of the implementation of the Iowa Chautauqua model of professional development and its effectiveness in improving science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Pradeep Maxwell

    1997-11-01

    A formative evaluation of the implementation of the Iowa Chautauqua model of professional development in Collier County, Florida, was conducted during 1995-97, focusing on implementation issues and teacher enhancement. Major findings are as follows: Implementation issues. (1) Development of a shared vision through collaborative interaction between teachers, school administrators, and district administrators is critical to successful program implementation. (2) When a new program is implemented on a district-wide basis, the success of implementation depends upon how well the program matches local goals and needs and how ready the district and teachers are to make changes necessary for implementing the tenets of the program. (3) Development of proper understanding of desired pedagogical approaches requires modeling of these approaches in program activities, with explicit attention drawn to the modeling. (4) Successful implementation of desired pedagogical approaches in the classroom is critically influenced by the support and continual feedback teachers receive from district administrators, building administrators, and their peers. (5) Unwavering commitment of district and school administrators is essential for encouraging more teachers to participate in the program, leading to district-wide implementation without making it mandatory. Teacher Enhancement. (1) Participants developed leadership skills in mentorship, teamwork, presenting at professional meetings, and assuming responsibility within the program. (2) Participants learned to focus more on student questions and concerns, value prior conceptions of students, and develop instructional activities accordingly. They grew in their understanding and use of the constructivist pedagogy. (3) Participants attitude toward teaching in general and science in particular improved markedly, leading to new excitement and enthusiasm toward their profession. (4) Participants became more confident about teaching science. Elementary teachers reported spending more time on science activities and integrating science topics more with other curricular areas. (5) Participants collaborated more with their peers, administrators, and local community resources in improving instructional activities, providing more meaningful learning experiences for their students. (6) Participants integrated more technological resources than they did formerly, helping students explore avenues otherwise inaccessible. This investigation reveals that teacher enhancement is closely related to changed practice, which is critically influenced by implementation issues at broader levels.

  5. Clinical Supervision for MSWs in Child Welfare: A Professional Development Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha M. Giddings; Peggy Cleveland; Carol H. Smith; Crystal Collins-Camargo; Regina G. Russell

    2008-01-01

    A collaborative project between a state child welfare agency and a master of social work program was developed for the purpose of providing clinical supervision for master of social work employees in public child welfare. The integrative supervision model (ISM) was implemented in the pilot project, and initial efforts were begun to test the effectiveness of the model. The ISM

  6. The Research Dynamic: A Professional Development Model for Secondary School Science Teachers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip M. Silverman

    2009-01-01

    This essay summarizes the author's 10 years of experience at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation mentoring secondary school science teachers during 8-wk Summer Research Insti- tutes. The summary is presented as a learning model, which we call the research dynamic. This model consists of three interlocked components: specified ignorance, peer interactions, and gateway experiments. Specified ignorance is based on the

  7. A Framework for Scheduling Professional Sports Leagues

    E-print Network

    Bonomo, Flavia

    A Framework for Scheduling Professional Sports Leagues Kimmo Nurmia , Dries Goossensb , Thomas constrained sports scheduling problem which is modeled from the requirements of various professional sports leagues. We define a sports scheduling problem, introduce the necessary terminology and detail

  8. Posterior Predictive Model Checking for Multidimensionality in Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Mislevy, Robert J.; Sinharay, Sandip

    2009-01-01

    If data exhibit multidimensionality, key conditional independence assumptions of unidimensional models do not hold. The current work pursues posterior predictive model checking, a flexible family of model-checking procedures, as a tool for criticizing models due to unaccounted for dimensions in the context of item response theory. Factors…

  9. The need for dental ethicists and the promise of universal patient acceptance: response to Richard Masella's "Renewing professionalism in dental education".

    PubMed

    Patthoff, Donald E

    2007-02-01

    Richard Masella's "Renewing Professionalism in Dental Education: Overcoming the Market Environment" reveals why professionalism is nearly dead in America; it also shows the good of commerce and the excesses of commercialism in the market. More importantly, it collects and summarizes most of the relevant forms of education currently available to teach professionalism and professional ethics in dentistry; it then briefly examines whether those forms of education are used and if they are effective. Masella also asks some key challenging questions. His select and limited references lead to deeper studies about the nature and definition of professionalism and how it might be learned and presented. His suggestions for renewing professionalism are minimal; this sets the stage for proposing and selecting other ideas that need attention and development. Some of those ideas and suggestions, such as competition and collaboration, four types of dentistry, understanding two conflicting meanings of desire and need, and universal patient acceptance were recently explored in a workshop, "Professional Promises: Hopes and Gaps in Access to Oral Health Care" (procedings published in the November 2006 Journal of Dental Education), and were not yet available to Masella when his article was authored. His article, though, stimulates good discussion and action. Its data and substance show why, for example, dentistry needs to develop a core cadre of full-time practicing professional dental ethicists. Currently, there is only a small but very dedicated group of volunteers trying to meet our society's need to bring new life to professionalism in dentistry and our market. PMID:17314383

  10. Before it is too late: professional responsibilities in late-onset Alzheimer’s research and pre-symptomatic prediction

    PubMed Central

    Schicktanz, Silke; Schweda, Mark; Ballenger, Jesse F.; Fox, Patrick J.; Halpern, Jodi; Kramer, Joel H.; Micco, Guy; Post, Stephen G.; Thompson, Charis; Knight, Robert T.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of a wide array of molecular and neuroscientific biomarkers can provide the possibility to visualize the course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) at early stages. Many of these biomarkers are aimed at detecting not only a preclinical, but also a pre-symptomatic state. They are supposed to facilitate clinical trials aiming at treatments that attack the disease at its earliest stage or even prevent it. The increasing number of such biomarkers currently tested and now partly proposed for clinical implementation calls for critical reflection on their aims, social benefits, and risks. This position paper summarizes major challenges and responsibilities. Its focus is on the ethical and social problems involved in the organization and application of dementia research, as well as in healthcare provision from a cross-national point of view. The paper is based on a discussion of leading dementia experts from neuroscience, neurology, social sciences, and bioethics in the United States and Europe. It thus reflects a notable consensus across various disciplines and national backgrounds. We intend to initiate a debate on the need for actions within the researchers’ national and international communities. PMID:25477802

  11. The Reflective (and Competent) Practitioner: A Model of Professional Competence which Seeks to Harmonise the Reflective Practitioner and Competence-Based Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheetham, Graham; Chivers, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    Based on reader feedback and practitioner interviews, a model of reflective/competent practice was revised to include meta-competencies, four components of professional competence (knowledge/cognitive, functional, personal/behavioral, values/ethical), and reflection itself as a super-meta-competence. (SK)

  12. District Professional Development Models as a Way to Introduce Primary-School Teachers to Natural Science Curriculum Reforms in One District in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantwini, Bongani D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated whether district continued professional development (CPD) sufficiently prepared teachers for their classroom practice. Analysis of CPD models used with primary-school natural science teachers in a district in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa was conducted. Findings indicated that the…

  13. Educational Process Reflection (EPR): An Evaluation of a Model for Professional Development Concerning Social Interaction and Educational Climate in the Swedish Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bygdeson-Larsson, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Educational process reflection (EPR) is a professional development model aimed at supporting preschool teachers reflecting on and changing their practice. A particular focus is on interaction between practitioners and children, and between the children themselves. In this article, I first describe the theoretical frameworks that helped shape EPR,…

  14. Older women's responses to current fashion models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joy M. Kozar; Mary Lynn Damhorst

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine if older female consumers prefer apparel advertising models more closely resembling their age. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The sample for this study consisted of 163 women between the ages of 60 and 80. Full-color photographs of fashion models were presented as stimuli. A questionnaire measuring participants' beliefs about the models, purchase intentions,

  15. Multicategorical Spline Model for Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamowicz, Michal; Ramsay, James O.

    1992-01-01

    A nonparametric multicategorical model for multiple-choice data is proposed as an extension of the binary spline model of J. O. Ramsay and M. Abrahamowicz (1989). Results of two Monte Carlo studies illustrate the model, which approximates probability functions by rational splines. (SLD)

  16. Malaysian registered nurses' professional learning.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Lee H

    2006-01-01

    Findings of a study of the impact of professional learning on Malaysian registered nurses are reported. The offshore delivery post-registration nursing degree programme is a formal aspect of professional learning, which enables Malaysian registered nurses to upgrade their hospital-based training or diploma of nursing qualification to a degree. Using a qualitative case study approach, data were collected from twelve programme graduates, through individual and focus group interviews. The programme promoted their personal professional growth and enhanced their professional development. It increased self-confidence, knowledge, self-fulfillment, critical thinking ability, interpersonal skills, interest in research and research utilisation, and life-long learning. There was evidence of career mobility and a raised awareness of their professional role and responsibility. PMID:16646943

  17. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  18. Toward a Model of Collaborative Action Research as a Form of Professional Development for Elementary School Teachers: An Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delkeskamp, Rita Mendoza

    2012-01-01

    Although research suggests that professional development for teachers should be contained within a coherent system, recent research indicates that professional development for teachers continues to be provided through workshops of short duration with little or no follow-up and sustained support (Guskey & Yoon, 2009; Kose, 2007). Instead,…

  19. Enhancing Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Knowledge and Practices: A Professional Development Model for Technology Teachers in Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikasanda, Vanwyk Khobidi Mbubzi; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Williams, John; Jones, Alister

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a professional development that was designed and implemented in an attempt to broaden teachers' knowledge of the nature of technology and also enhance their technological pedagogical practices. The professional development was organised in four phases with each phase providing themes for reflection and teacher learning…

  20. Adding heat to the live-high train-low altitude model: a practical insight from professional football

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, M; Racinais, S; Bilsborough, J; Hocking, J; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Bourdon, P C; Voss, S; Livingston, S; Christian, R; Périard, J; Cordy, J; Coutts, A J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine with a parallel group study design the performance and physiological responses to a 14-day off-season ‘live high-train low in the heat’ training camp in elite football players. Methods Seventeen professional Australian Rules Football players participated in outdoor football-specific skills (32±1°C, 11.5?h) and indoor strength (23±1°C, 9.3?h) sessions and slept (12 nights) and cycled indoors (4.3?h) in either normal air (NORM, n=8) or normobaric hypoxia (14±1?h/day, FiO2 15.2–14.3%, corresponding to a simulated altitude of 2500–3000?m, hypoxic (HYP), n=9). They completed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 2 (Yo-YoIR2) in temperate conditions (23±1°C, normal air) precamp (Pre) and postcamp (Post). Plasma volume (PV) and haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured at similar times and 4?weeks postcamp (4WPost). Sweat sodium concentration ((Na+)sweat) was measured Pre and Post during a heat-response test (44°C). Results Both groups showed very large improvements in Yo-YoIR2 at Post (+44%; 90% CL 38, 50), with no between-group differences in the changes (?1%; ?9, 9). Postcamp, large changes in PV (+5.6%; ?1.8, 5.6) and (Na+)sweat (?29%; ?37, ?19) were observed in both groups, while Hbmass only moderately increased in HYP (+2.6%; 0.5, 4.5). At 4WPost, there was a likely slightly greater increase in Hbmass (+4.6%; 0.0, 9.3) and PV (+6%; ?5, 18, unclear) in HYP than in NORM. Conclusions The combination of heat and hypoxic exposure during sleep/training might offer a promising ‘conditioning cocktail’ in team sports. PMID:24282209

  1. Cultural Considerations with Response to Intervention Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Edwards, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Now that the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004) has been reauthorized, states have the option of discontinuing the use of IQ-achievement discrepancy formulas and using Response to Intervention (RTI) criteria as part of the special education identification process. This change has dramatic implications for…

  2. Hierarchical Bayes Models for Response Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craigmile, Peter F.; Peruggia, Mario; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2010-01-01

    Human response time (RT) data are widely used in experimental psychology to evaluate theories of mental processing. Typically, the data constitute the times taken by a subject to react to a succession of stimuli under varying experimental conditions. Because of the sequential nature of the experiments there are trends (due to learning, fatigue,…

  3. Response to Intervention and the Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lise; Carta, Judith; Strain, Phillip S.; Dunlap, Glen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2010-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is a systematic decision-making process that has gained widespread popularity as a problem-solving framework for organizing hierarchies of evidence-based interventions in the context of ongoing progress monitoring. Initially applied to literacy instruction, RtI is being incorporated into an expanding breadth of…

  4. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011). PMID:25799868

  5. [Study of response styles and a causal model of depression].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Naomi; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the link between response styles and depression in university students. Ninety-two university students participated in a questionnaire survey, withi a follows-up survey administered 4 weeks later. Structural equation modeling was conducted with analysis of moment structures. The model describing the causal relation from response style to depression fit the data best. These results indicate that the likelihood of future depression is increased by negative rumination response and decreased by distraction response for mood changing. PMID:25486846

  6. [Study of response styles and a causal model of depression].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Naomi; Koshikawa, Fusako

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the link between response styles and depression in university students. Ninety-two university students participated in a questionnaire survey, withi a follows-up survey administered 4 weeks later. Structural equation modeling was conducted with analysis of moment structures. The model describing the causal relation from response style to depression fit the data best. These results indicate that the likelihood of future depression is increased by negative rumination response and decreased by distraction response for mood changing. PMID:25508977

  7. A mediation model of professional psychological help seeking for suicide ideation among Asian American and white American college students.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joel; Brownson, Chris; Rutkowski, Leslie; Nguyen, Chi P; Becker, Marty Swanbrow

    2014-01-01

    This study examined professional psychological help seeking among 1,045 white American and Asian American students from 70 U.S. colleges and universities who had seriously considered attempting suicide. The authors found that Asian American college students had lower rates of professional psychological help seeking for their suicide ideation than White American college students. Guided by social network perspectives on professional psychological help seeking, the authors also tested mediators of this racial disparity. Relative to white Americans, Asian Americans were advised by fewer people (especially fewer family members) to seek professional help, which was, in turn, associated with lower rates of professional psychological help seeking for suicide ideation. These findings underscore the importance of gatekeeping as a suicide prevention strategy for Asian American college students. PMID:24620900

  8. Facilitating Lewin's change model with collaborative evaluation in promoting evidence based practices of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Julianne; Gray-Miceli, Deanna L; Metcalf, Judith A; Paolini, Charlotte A; Napier, Anne H; Coogle, Constance L; Owens, Myra G

    2014-12-01

    Evidence based practices (EBPs) in clinical settings interact with and adapt to host organizational characteristics. The contextual factors themselves, surrounding health professions' practices, also adapt as practices become sustained. The authors assert the need for better planning models toward these contextual factors, the influence of which undergird a well-documented science to practice gap in literature on EBPs. The mechanism for EBP planners to anticipate contextual effects as programs Unfreeze their host settings, create Movement, and become Refrozen (Lewin, 1951) is present in Lewin's 3-step change model. Planning for contextual change appears equally important as planning for the actual practice outcomes among providers and patients. Two case studies from a Geriatric Education Center network will illustrate the synthesis of Lewin's three steps with collaborative evaluation principles. The use of the model may become an important tool for continuing education evaluators or organizations beginning a journey toward EBP demonstration projects in clinical settings. PMID:25192609

  9. Professional Roles and Responsibilities in Meeting the Needs of Children with Speech, Language and Communication Needs: Joint Working between Educational Psychologists and Speech and Language Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnellogue, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    There is a large population of children with speech, language and communication needs who have additional special educational needs (SEN). Whilst professional collaboration between education and health professionals is recommended to ensure an integrated delivery of statutory services for this population of children, formal frameworks should be…

  10. Using the 360° multisource feedback model to evaluate teaching and professionalism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald A. Berk

    2009-01-01

    Background: Student ratings have dominated as the primary and, frequently, only measure of teaching performance at colleges and universities for the past 50 years. Recently, there has been a trend toward augmenting those ratings with other data sources to broaden and deepen the evidence base. The 360? multisource feedback (MSF) model used in management and industry for half a century

  11. Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

    2006-01-01

    Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a "reverse science fair" in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study…

  12. Lesson Study: An Effective School-Based Teacher Professional Learning Model for Teachers of Mathematics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Sanders

    This paper reports on ongoing research in a cluster of schools in the outer south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne which is utilising Lesson Study as a peer observation model for mathematics teaching. The findings from nine initial Lesson Study sessions undertaken by cluster teachers to develop a Fractions Teaching Program are presented. The results indicate the success of the fractions tasks

  13. Professional Development with the Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute Model: Impact, Lessons, and Future Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslam, M. Bruce; Rouk, Ullik

    2006-01-01

    The Yale-New Haven Teachers' Institute was founded in 1978 on the belief that "university and school teachers across the country have a strong, mutual interest in the improvement of teaching and learning in the schools." The core goal of the model is to establish a sustainable partnership between districts and universities in order to provide…

  14. Prediction of Participation in Continuing Professional Education: A Test of Two Behavioral Intention Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Baiyn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 551 Alberta veterinarians' intention to participate in continuing education revealed that the Triandis model of behavioral intention had greater predictive utility than the Fishbein-Azjen. Participation was largely determined by behavioral intention, which was influenced by attitude toward the program. (SK)

  15. A New Conceptual Model for Principal Involvement and Professional Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varrati, Anita M.; Lavine, Mary E.; Turner, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Beginning teachers often identify the school principal as a key figure for support and guidance. Few teacher education conceptual models exist that significantly integrate the building principal into the clinical experiences of teacher candidates. The rationale behind initiating discourse on principal involvement grows out of…

  16. Explore Elementary Teachers' Professional Knowledge of Guiding Science Fair Product by Using Different Instruction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This research is about using two different instruction models, "theory course combined with sample introduction" and "theory course combined with case method teaching", to instruct elementary teachers on how to guide the science fair product in two courses (16 and 12 teachers in each class) and observe their guiding tactics after the instructed…

  17. MODEL OF TOXICANT RESPONSE IN ENGINEERED LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project proposes to: engineer a tissue to mimic liver behavior (a so-called 3-Dimensional or 3D liver model); simulate liver toxicity by exposing the 3D liver model to two known toxicants ( carbon tetrachloride and 1,2 dichloroethylene); and ...

  18. Latent Growth Modeling for Logistic Response Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jaehwa; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout much of the social and behavioral sciences, latent growth modeling (latent curve analysis) has become an important tool for understanding individuals' longitudinal change. Although nonlinear variations of latent growth models appear in the methodological and applied literature, a notable exclusion is the treatment of growth following…

  19. Detecting Answer Copying when the Regular Response Process Follows a Known Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Sotaridona, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    A statistical test for detecting answer copying on multiple-choice items is presented. The test is based on the exact null distribution of the number of random matches between two test takers under the assumption that the response process follows a known response model. The null distribution can easily be generalized to the family of distributions…

  20. Modeling human response errors in synthetic flight simulator domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a control theoretic approach to modeling human response errors (HRE) in the flight simulation domain. The human pilot is modeled as a supervisor of a highly automated system. The synthesis uses the theory of optimal control pilot modeling for integrating the pilot's observation error and the error due to the simulation model (experimental error). Methods for solving the HRE problem are suggested. Experimental verification of the models will be tested in a flight quality handling simulation.

  1. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  2. Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The article provides an overview of goodness-of-fit assessment methods for item response theory (IRT) models. It is now possible to obtain accurate "p"-values of the overall fit of the model if bivariate information statistics are used. Several alternative approaches are described. As the validity of inferences drawn on the fitted model

  3. A Bayesian Semiparametric Latent Variable Model for Mixed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrmeir, Ludwig; Raach, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a latent variable model (LVM) for mixed ordinal and continuous responses, where covariate effects on the continuous latent variables are modelled through a flexible semiparametric Gaussian regression model. We extend existing LVMs with the usual linear covariate effects by including nonparametric components for nonlinear…

  4. Numerical modeling for emergency response of nuclear accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianguo Sang; Guanming Lin; Boyin Zhang

    1999-01-01

    A numerical model system was established for the emergency response of a nuclear accident over complex terrain. In order to evaluate and calibrate the model a series of tracer experiments and towing tank experiments were carried out. The flow and concentration fields simulated by the model and observed in those experiments are compared. Finally the advantage and limitation of the

  5. A Bayesian Semiparametric Item Response Model with Dirichlet Process Priors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyazaki, Kei; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    In Item Response Theory (IRT), item characteristic curves (ICCs) are illustrated through logistic models or normal ogive models, and the probability that examinees give the correct answer is usually a monotonically increasing function of their ability parameters. However, since only limited patterns of shapes can be obtained from logistic models

  6. Medical Professionalism and the Social Contract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynette Reid

    2011-01-01

    Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical

  7. Medical Professionalism and the Social Contract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynette Reid

    2011-01-01

    :Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical

  8. Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39%) completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1) nested in 34 teams (level 2). Results Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members’ social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams’ performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals’ interpersonal skills and interprofessional education. PMID:23390409

  9. Professional Guideline Series: Guidelines for Professional Employment

    E-print Network

    Professional Guideline Series: Guidelines for Professional Employment A Framework For Communication Prepared by IEEE-USA's Career and Employment Services Committee #12;IEEE-USA Professional Guideline Series TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 3 I. CAREER OUTLOOK 4 II. RECRUITMENT 6 III. PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT 8

  10. Professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  11. An Architecture for Integrated Modeling and Simulation for Emergency Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanjay Jain; Charles R. McLean

    2004-01-01

    A number of modeling and simulation applications exist for studying individual aspects of emergency response scenarios. The value of these applications can be significantly increased if they can be used in an integrated manner to study all aspects of a scenario. This paper presents an architecture for integration and distributed execution of such applications for analyzing an emergency response scenario.

  12. A model of employee responses to drug-testing programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Michael Crant; Thomas S. Bateman

    1989-01-01

    Testing employees for drug use is an increasingly widespread organizational response to the problem of employee drug abuse. Despite this, little attention has been given to its effects on employee attitudes and behavior. This paper reviews the issue of drug testing in industry, provides a theoretical model of employee perceptions of and responses to drug-testing programs, and offers an agenda

  13. A spatial diffusion model for police emergency response system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuefei Li; Peihong Fu

    2011-01-01

    Police emergency response system plays a nuclear and key role in the emergency management system. The spatial range of emergency event spread area is usually dynamic diffused through time. This problem will make emergency response difficult to assess emergency event and dispatch emergency resources. Therefore, it is imperative to design and implement a spatial diffusion model to solve this problem.

  14. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  15. Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting

    E-print Network

    Hartke, Stephen

    38 Chapter 3 Response Strategies in Deterministic Models of Spread: Vaccination and Firefighting 3 are occurring. This is particularly relevant in disease spread processes, where vaccinations and quarantines. The response allowed is only a limited number of vaccinations of non-infected vertices. Specifically, let G

  16. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  17. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID:22438929

  18. Model of short-range correlations in the charge response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, J. E.; Lallena, A. M.; Co', G.; Fabrocini, A.

    1998-06-01

    The validity of a model treating the short-range correlations up to the first order is studied by calculating the charge response of an infinite system and comparing the obtained results with those of a Fermi Hypernetted Chain calculation.

  19. Centrifuge modeling of seismic response of layered soft clay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. T. Rayhani; M. H. El Naggar

    2007-01-01

    Centrifuge modeling is a valuable tool used to study the response of geotechnical structures to infrequent or extreme events\\u000a such as earthquakes. A series of centrifuge model tests was conducted at 80g using an electro-hydraulic earthquake simulator mounted on the C-CORE geotechnical centrifuge to study the dynamic response\\u000a of soft soils and seismic soil–structure interaction (SSI). The acceleration records at

  20. Finding a fractional model from frequency and time responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, Duarte; Sá da Costa, José

    2010-04-01

    An existing method for identifying an integer model from frequency data, developed to be used when synthesising second-generation Crone controllers, is adapted to identify fractional order plants. The modification only allows models with poles but no zeros or zeros but no poles. Two application examples are given, one of them showing how the method can also be used when a time response, rather than a frequency response, is available.

  1. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: A methematical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Magosso; M. Ursino

    2002-01-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating\\u000a heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic\\u000a vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides\\u000a a description of the ventilatory response

  2. Professional Learning Communities Impact on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the Professional Learning Community model on student achievement in the state of California. Specifically, the study compared student achievement between two school types: Professional Learning Community schools and Non Professional Learning schools. The research utilized existing API scores for California schools…

  3. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  4. A model of plant canopy polarization response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    Sensors to remotely measure the linear polarization of ground scenes have been proposed for the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS), a satellite sensor system proposed to complement the Thematic Mapper. At present justification for a sensor on MRS to measure scene polarization is limited. This paper discusses a model for the amount of linearly polarized light reflected by the shiny leaves of such crops as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The theory demonstrates that, potentially, measurements of the linearly polarized light from a crop canopy may be used as an additional feature to discriminate between crops. Examination of the model suggests that, potentially, satellite polarization measurements may be used to monitor crop development stage, leaf water content, leaf area index, hail damage, and certain plant diseases. The model adds to the understanding of the potential information content of scene polarization measurements acquired by future satellite sensor systems such as MRS.

  5. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  6. Predictive models of employee voluntary turnover in a North American professional sales force using data-mining analysis

    E-print Network

    Kane-Sellers, Marjorie Laura

    2009-05-15

    influencing employee voluntary turnover. The results suggest that training and development participation contributes more significantly to employee retention than salary and job title promotions to the firm’s ability to retain sales professionals...

  7. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program as a model for effective professional development experience in Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, S. L.; Kudela, R. M.; Clinton, N. E.; Atkins, N.; Austerberry, D.; Johnson, M.; McGonigle, J.; McIntosh, K.; O'Shea, J. J.; Shirshikova, Z.; Singer, N.; Snow, A.; Woods, R.; Schaller, E.; Shetter, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    With over half of the current earth and space science workforce expected to retire within the next 15 years, NASA has responded by cultivating young minds through programs such as the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). SARP is a competitive internship that introduces upper-level undergraduates and early graduate students to Earth System Science research and NASA's Airborne Science Program. The program serves as a model for recruitment of very high caliber students into the scientific workforce. Its uniqueness derives from total vertical integration of hands-on experience at every stage of airborne science: aircraft instrumentation, flight planning, mission participation, field-work, analysis, and reporting of results in a competitive environment. At the conclusion of the program, students presented their work to NASA administrators, faculty, mentors, and the other participants with the incentive of being selected as best talk and earning a trip to the fall AGU meeting to present their work at the NASA booth. We hope lessons learned can inform the decisions of scientists at the highest levels seeking to broaden the appeal of research. In 2011, SARP was divided into three disciplinary themes: Oceanography, Land Use, and Atmospheric Chemistry. Each research group was mentored by an upper-level graduate student who was supervised by an expert faculty member. A coordinator managed the program and was supervised by a senior research scientist/administrator. The program is a model of knowledge transfer among the several levels of research: agency administration to the program coordinator, established scientific experts to the research mentors, and the research mentors to the pre-career student participants. The outcomes from this program include mission planning and institutional knowledge transfer from administrators and expert scientists to the coordinator and research mentors; personnel and project management from the coordinator and expert scientists to the research mentors; and scholarship and training in specific analytical techniques for Earth Science research from the mentors to the student participants. Across every level, the program allowed for networking and career advice to help students gain entry to future job or graduate school opportunities. This poster details "engaging the next generation" by highlighting specific research questions proposed and developed by the students in the Oceanography group.

  8. Modeling V1 neuronal responses to orientation disparity.

    PubMed

    Bridge, H; Cumming, B G; Parker, A J

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of interocular orientation differences to depth perception, at either the neuronal or the psychophysical level, is unclear. To understand the responses of binocular neurons to orientation disparity, we extended the energy model of Ohzawa et al. (1990) to incorporate binocular differences in receptive-field orientation. The responses of the model to grating stimuli with interocular orientation differences were examined, along with the responses to random dot stereograms (RDS) depicting slanted surfaces. The responses to combinations of stimulus orientations in the two eyes were left-right separable, which means there was no consistent response to the binocular orientation difference. All existing neuronal data concerning orientation disparity can be well described by this type of model (even a version with no disparity selectivity). The disparity sensitive model is nonetheless sensitive to changes in RDS slant, although it requires narrow orientation bandwidth to produce substantial modulation. The disparity-insensitive model shows no selectivity to slant in this stimulus. Several modifications to the model were attempted to improve its selectivity for orientation disparity and/or slant. A model built by summing several disparity-sensitive models showed left-right inseparable responses, responding maximally to a consistent orientation difference. Despite this property, the selectivity for slant in RDS stimuli was no better than the simple disparity-selective model. The range of models evaluated here demonstrate that interocular orientation differences are neither necessary nor sufficient for signaling slant. In contrast, within the framework of the energy model, positional disparity sensitivity appears to be both necessary and sufficient. PMID:12020078

  9. Ground-penetrating radar responses of dispersive models

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Z.; Tripp, A.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1997-07-01

    Using a three-layer 1-D model and a 3-D model the authors have demonstrated that GPR (ground penetrating radar) waves are greatly attenuated in dispersive media because dispersion results in increased effective conductivities and reduced effective permittivities. This can be further illustrated by using equivalent conductivities and equivalent permittivities that are the effective conductivities and effective permittivities of dispersive models at the principal GPR frequency. Dispersive model responses are very similar to their nondispersive equivalents.

  10. Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

  11. The Professional Responsibilities of Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode, Deborah L.

    2001-01-01

    Explores why, as trustees of legal traditions, legal educators have an obligation to inspire and equip future lawyers to address issues such as access to justice, the regulation of lawyers' conduct, the pressures of legal workplaces, and the erosion of support for pro bono contributions. (EV)

  12. Modeling of concrete response at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.; Marchertas, A.

    1984-01-01

    A rate-type creep law is implemented into the computer code TEMP-STRESS for high temperature concrete analysis. The disposition of temperature, pore pressure and moisture for the particular structure in question is provided as input for the thermo-mechanical code. The loss of moisture from concrete also induces material shrinkage which is accounted for in the analytical model. Examples are given to illustrate the numerical results.

  13. Reflections on reciprocity in professional development: Learning partners as professional learning teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret A Fletcher

    Professional development that is effective in promoting changed practice remains an ideal in many workplace contexts where individuals have a range of experience, expertise and needs. A shift is required from traditional 'top-down' models of professional development to a situated work-embedded model that is based on reciprocity in professional learning. An innovative approach where all learning partners work collaboratively as

  14. Bridging Scientific Model Outputs with Emergency Response Needs in Catastrophic Earthquake Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannes, Tay W.

    2010-01-01

    In emergency management, scientific models are widely used for running hazard simulations and estimating losses often in support of planning and mitigation efforts. This work expands utility of the scientific model into the response phase of emergency management. The focus is on the common operating picture as it gives context to emergency…

  15. Modelling and validation of magnetorheological brake responses using parametric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, Zainordin A.; A, Abdullah M.; K, Hudha

    2013-12-01

    Magnetorheological brake (MR Brake) is one x-by-wire systems which performs better than conventional brake systems. MR brake consists of a rotating disc that is immersed with Magnetorheological Fluid (MR Fluid) in an enclosure of an electromagnetic coil. The applied magnetic field will increase the yield strength of the MR fluid where this fluid was used to decrease the speed of the rotating shaft. The purpose of this paper is to develop a mathematical model to represent MR brake with a test rig. The MR brake model is developed based on actual torque characteristic which is coupled with motion of a test rig. Next, the experimental are performed using MR brake test rig and obtained three output responses known as angular velocity response, torque response and load displacement response. Furthermore, the MR brake was subjected to various current. Finally, the simulation results of MR brake model are then verified with experimental results.

  16. Concept analysis of professional commitment in Iranian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Jafaragaee, Fateme; Parvizy, Soroor; Mehrdad, Neda; Rafii, Forough

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Professional commitment has been widely discussed during the last decade. There is no comprehensive definition about “professional commitment in Iranian nurses.” Hence, this study was conducted with the aim of analyzing the concept of professional commitment in Iranian nurses. Materials and Methods: Hybrid model was used in three phases. Firstly, in the theoretical phase, data were retrieved from the CINHAl, MEDLINE, PubMed, OVID, Google scholar, and SID databases. The literature search used the keywords “professional commitment” and “nursing.” The final sample included 27 papers published in English between 2001 and 2011.Secondly, in the fieldwork phase, deep interviews with five clinical nurses were carried out, and thirdly, in the final analytical phase, the obtained data from theoretical and fieldwork phases were combined and a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Results: Loyalty and tendency to remain in the profession and responsibility to the professional issues were extracted in theoretical phase. Commitment to promote caring abilities, satisfying of being a nurse, and belonging to the nursing profession were obtained in fieldwork phase. Finally, two main themes including “commitment to offering the best nursing care” and “commitment to promotion of the nursing profession” were extracted. Conclusion: Nursing is a humanistic profession; it has some particular characteristics due to the profession’s nature. In this paper, a definition composed of two main dimensions of professional commitment in nursing has been introduced. PMID:23922592

  17. Frequency response modeling and control of flexible structures: Computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William H.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of vibrations in flexible structures can be conventiently modeled in terms of frequency response models. For structural control such models capture the distributed parameter dynamics of the elastic structural response as an irrational transfer function. For most flexible structures arising in aerospace applications the irrational transfer functions which arise are of a special class of pseudo-meromorphic functions which have only a finite number of right half place poles. Computational algorithms are demonstrated for design of multiloop control laws for such models based on optimal Wiener-Hopf control of the frequency responses. The algorithms employ a sampled-data representation of irrational transfer functions which is particularly attractive for numerical computation. One key algorithm for the solution of the optimal control problem is the spectral factorization of an irrational transfer function. The basis for the spectral factorization algorithm is highlighted together with associated computational issues arising in optimal regulator design. Options for implementation of wide band vibration control for flexible structures based on the sampled-data frequency response models is also highlighted. A simple flexible structure control example is considered to demonstrate the combined frequency response modeling and control algorithms.

  18. Predicting Aquifer Response Time for Application in Catchment Modeling.

    PubMed

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2014-05-19

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. PMID:24842053

  19. The human body's response to glucose and three physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1987-07-01

    Three physical models of the human body's response to a glucose challenge are presented from the medical literature. Glucose tolerance is evaluated using kinematical techniques, an exponential-decay analysis, and a damped harmonic-oscillator model. Each treatment contains material suitable as supplementary topics in physics courses, both introductory and intermediate.

  20. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY III. STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of do@e-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. he benchmark dose (BMD) approach has been proposed for use with developmental (as well as other noncancer) endpo...

  1. Technical Note Dynamic causal modelling of distributed electromagnetic responses

    E-print Network

    Daunizeau, Jean

    Technical Note Dynamic causal modelling of distributed electromagnetic responses Jean Daunizeau 12 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG UK a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 5- waves that are coupled though their temporal dynamics. The ensuing distributed DCM models source

  2. An Alternative Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pashley, Peter J.

    Birnbaum's three-parameter logistic function has become a common basis for item response theory modeling, especially within situations where significant guessing behavior is evident. This model is formed through a linear transformation of the two-parameter logistic function in order to facilitate a lower asymptote. This paper discusses an…

  3. Site response analysis using a non-linear hysteretic model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grigori Muravskii; Sam Frydman

    1998-01-01

    A non-linear model for the description of soil response to earthquake loading is presented, and applied to the prediction of surface vibration for a given soil profile. The model is developed on the basis of well-established experimental trends with regard to the strain dependence of shear modulus and damping ratio, as well as cyclic degradation of stiffness. A constitutive equation

  4. Updated model for dielectric response function of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A modified and updated version of the model of the dielectric response function of liquid water as currently implemented in the PARTRAC code is presented. The updated version takes advantage of the newer experimental information from the Sendai group and implements some improvements in modeling and usability. PMID:23415106

  5. A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Magosso; A. Felicani; M. Ursino

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. The model includes the pulsating heart, the systemic and pulmonary circulation, a functional description of muscle exercise hyperemia, the mechanical effects of muscle contractions on hemodynamics, and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on systemic resistance, venous unstressed volume, heart rate and ventricle contractility. These mechanisms comprehend the direct effect

  6. CANCER DOSE-RESPONSE MODELS INCORPORATING CLONAL EXPANSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the assumption that a malignant tumor develops through a sequence of steps (normal cells - initiated cells/foci - nodules - tumors) two classes of mathematical models of carcinogenesis that have a potential to be used for cancer dose-response modeling are discussed. The two...

  7. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  8. Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data

    E-print Network

    Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data H. T. Banksa,1 , M. Davidiana,2 equations is formulated to describe the pathogenesis of HIV infection, wherein certain important features, and stimulation by antigens other than HIV. A stability analysis illustrates the capability of this model

  9. Separability of Item and Person Parameters in Response Time Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses two forms of separability of item and person parameters in the context of response time models. The first is "separate sufficiency," and the second is "ranking independence." For each form a theorem stating sufficient conditions is proved. The two forms are shown to include several cases of models from psychometric and biometric…

  10. STELLOPT Modeling of the 3D Diagnostic Response in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel A

    2013-05-07

    The ITER three dimensional diagnostic response to an n=3 resonant magnetic perturbation is modeled using the STELLOPT code. The in-vessel coils apply a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fi eld which generates a 4 cm edge displacement from axisymmetry as modeled by the VMEC 3D equilibrium code. Forward modeling of flux loop and magnetic probe response with the DIAGNO code indicates up to 20 % changes in measured plasma signals. Simulated LIDAR measurements of electron temperature indicate 2 cm shifts on the low field side of the plasma. This suggests that the ITER diagnostic will be able to diagnose the 3D structure of the equilibria.

  11. Effective elements of science teacher professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Amy

    Educational reform efforts to improve students' learning outcomes are often present in teacher professional development opportunities; however, the structure and design of these opportunities vary and often focus on a homogenous student population; that is, White students in suburban schools. Reform efforts in teacher professional development that aim to educate teachers not only about science content and pedagogy, but also about practices that aim to reach a diverse student population is needed. This study examines three, science teacher summer professional development (PD) programs [SUN, SEPA, and CLA], and explores how programs affect teacher learning outcome(s) and any subsequent translation into classroom practice(s). The design and delivery, alignment to Ladson-Billings (1994) tenets of culturally responsive practices, and measurement(s) of teachers' learning outcome(s) are evaluated. Fliers were sent to science teachers who participated in SUN, SEPA, and CLA in an effort to recruit volunteers for this study. Program document analysis and teacher post-survey data from each program, focus groups, evidence of program integration, and a culturally responsive practice survey were collected and analyzed. Results show SEPA to include content knowledge (CK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), culturally responsive practices (CRP), and some elements of the conceptual change model (CCM) (Larkin, 2012) in program design, structure, and delivery along with translation into classroom practice. SUN and CLA both show incorporation of CK and PCK, with SUN also showing some evidence of CRP. The findings indicate that when teachers are modeled a practice they are able to translate that practice in their classroom. The potential impact of modeling CRP during science teacher PD may address the achievement gap still present among students of color. Program designers must consider the inclusion of CRP alongside CK and PCK during the development of science teacher PD.

  12. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  13. In Vitro Models of Biological Responses to Implant Microbiological Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Mombelli

    1999-01-01

    To study the etiology and explore possibilities for the therapy of implant-associated infections, investigators have developed and utilized various in vitro models. Major contributions have come from the non-oral medical field, where device-related infections can create life-threatening situations. Microbiological models may include (i) models to study the reaction of micro-organisms to the presence of implants, (ii) models to study the

  14. Theoretical and Empirical Comparisons between Two Models for Continuous Item Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzed the relations between two continuous response models intended for typical response items: the linear congeneric model and Samejima's continuous response model (CRM). Illustrated the relations described using an empirical example and assessed the relations through a simulation study. (SLD)

  15. Comparison of stream invertebrate response models for bioassessment metric

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, Ian R.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Jones, Kimberly A.; Orlando, James L.

    2012-01-01

    We aggregated invertebrate data from various sources to assemble data for modeling in two ecoregions in Oregon and one in California. Our goal was to compare the performance of models developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques with models developed using three relatively new techniques: classification and regression trees (CART), random forest (RF), and boosted regression trees (BRT). We used tolerance of taxa based on richness (RICHTOL) and ratio of observed to expected taxa (O/E) as response variables and land use/land cover as explanatory variables. Responses were generally linear; therefore, there was little improvement to the MLR models when compared to models using CART and RF. In general, the four modeling techniques (MLR, CART, RF, and BRT) consistently selected the same primary explanatory variables for each region. However, results from the BRT models showed significant improvement over the MLR models for each region; increases in R2 from 0.09 to 0.20. The O/E metric that was derived from models specifically calibrated for Oregon consistently had lower R2 values than RICHTOL for the two regions tested. Modeled O/E R2 values were between 0.06 and 0.10 lower for each of the four modeling methods applied in the Willamette Valley and were between 0.19 and 0.36 points lower for the Blue Mountains. As a result, BRT models may indeed represent a good alternative to MLR for modeling species distribution relative to environmental variables.

  16. Modelling tropical forests response to logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzolla Gatti, Roberto; Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems by large-scale fragmentation due to human activity such as heavy logging and agricultural clearance. Although, they provide crucial ecosystem goods and services, such as sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity. In several countries forest resource extraction has experienced a shift from clearcutting to selective logging to maintain a significant forest cover and understock of living biomass. However the knowledge on the short and long-term effects of removing selected species in tropical rainforest are scarce and need to be further investigated. One of the main effects of selective logging on forest dynamics seems to be the local disturbance which involve the invasion of open space by weed, vines and climbers at the expense of the late-successional state cenosis. We present a simple deterministic model that describes the dynamics of tropical rainforest subject to selective logging to understand how and why weeds displace native species. We argue that the selective removal of tallest tropical trees carries out gaps of light that allow weeds, vines and climbers to prevail on native species, inhibiting the possibility of recovery of the original vegetation. Our results show that different regime shifts may occur depending on the type of forest management adopted. This hypothesis is supported by a dataset of trees height and weed/vines cover that we collected from 9 plots located in Central and West Africa both in untouched and managed areas.

  17. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  18. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  19. Radiation Storm vs. The Magnetic Shield: Superheroes of Magnetism & Space Weather Education - A Model for Teacher Professional Development Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic and electric fields and phenomena play important roles in various situations in astronomy, planetary science, and Earth science. Students often lack an intuitive sense of electromagnetic phenomena, and therefore struggle with the complexities of planetary and stellar magnetic fields. Hands-on magnetism activities can provide students with an intuitive grasp of the basics of magnetism, preparing them for more challenging conceptual studies of magnetic phenomena. For the past six years, we have been presenting a professional development workshop for teachers covering the topics of magnetism and space weather. The workshop, which has been conducted more than 20 times for a range of audiences, blends together several simple hands-on activities, background information on space weather and geomagnetism, a collection of images, animations, and interactives that illustrate important concepts, and guidance about specific links between these topics and national science education standards. These workshops have been very well-received, and have consistently been rated highly by participants in surveys. We believe the methods used in these workshops can be applied to other topics in science education and to astronomy and Earth science education specifically. In this presentation, we will describe our magnetism and space weather workshop, including some of the hands-on activities. We will describe successful aspects of the workshop and comment on ways we think this approach could be replicated for other topics. We will also display some of the interactives, graphics, and animations shown during the workshops. Resources have been added to the workshop over the years in response to recurring questions from teachers; we will comment on this process and how it might be applied to other topics. The activities and extensive background content used or referenced in the workshop are available for free on the Windows to the Universe web site (www.windows2universe.org). Hands on activities can help students gain an intuitive grasp for natural phenomena. Iron filings and a horseshoe magnet help learners comprehend the magnetic fields above sunspot pairs.

  20. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez [Depto. de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Ap. Post. 14-740, Mexico, D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Cadena, S. Reyes [Lab. de Bioquimica Muscular, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, C.P.14389, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sierra, L. C. Gaitan [Centro Gestalt, C.P. 11590, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-11

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  1. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitán

    2008-08-01

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  2. 2013-2014 DGS Manual Page 100 Professional Development

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Pei

    for International Students program, Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training, and a new Professional participation in a disciplinary or professional community. Faculty advisors provide critical academic training development opportunities that complement their research training and augment their skill sets. Training

  3. Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model

    E-print Network

    Richardson, John

    Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model E. C; accepted 10 February 2006; published 17 June 2006. [1] We present a model of Saturn's global auroral in the intensity of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). Our model, referred to as the centrifugal instability model

  4. Propensity score-based diagnostics for categorical response regression models.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Philip S; Bondarenko, Irina; Park, Sung Kyun; Vokonas, Pantel S; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2014-02-10

    For binary or categorical response models, most goodness-of-fit statistics are based on the notion of partitioning the subjects into groups or regions and comparing the observed and predicted responses in these regions by a suitable chi-squared distribution. Existing strategies create this partition based on the predicted response probabilities, or propensity scores, from the fitted model. In this paper, we follow a retrospective approach, borrowing the notion of balancing scores used in causal inference to inspect the conditional distribution of the predictors, given the propensity scores, in each category of the response to assess model adequacy. We can use this diagnostic under both prospective and retrospective sampling designs, and it may ascertain general forms of misspecification. We first present simple graphical and numerical summaries that can be used in a binary logistic model. We then generalize the tools to propose model diagnostics for the proportional odds model. We illustrate the methods with simulation studies and two data examples: (i) a case-control study of the association between cumulative lead exposure and Parkinson's disease in the Boston, Massachusetts, area and (ii) and a cohort study of biomarkers possibly associated with diabetes, from the VA Normative Aging Study. PMID:23934948

  5. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    E-print Network

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  6. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  7. Finite element cochlear models and their steady state response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Y.; Yamabuchi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Mizoguchi, T.

    1987-12-01

    Numerical cochlear models are constructed by means of a finite element approach and their frequency and spatial responses are calculated. The cochlea is modelled as a coupled fluid-membrane system, for which both two- and three-dimensional models are considered. The fluid in the scala canals is assumed to be incompressible and the basilar membrane is assumed to be a locally reactive impedance wall or a lossy elastic membrane. With the three-dimensional models, the effects are examined of the spiral configuration of the cochlea, of the presence of the lamina and the ligament that narrows the coupling area between the two fluid canals (scala vestibuli and scala tympani), and of the extended reaction of the basilar membrane which cannot be included in case of the two-dimensional models. The conclusion is that these effects on the cochlear response and the inherent mechanism governing the cochlear behaviour are found to be rather secondary.

  8. PROFESSIONALISM IN MEDICINE PROFESSIONALISM IN MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Behavior 4. Professional Ethics · Training programs must demonstrate a high standard of moral and ethical behavior within the clinical setting as expected by the medical profession · "Professional environment Knowledge 3. Clinical Skills - Medical interviewing 4. Humanistic Qualities 5. Professionalism 6. Medical

  9. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional

  10. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  11. Theory of thermoluminescence gamma dose response: The unified interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.

    2001-09-01

    We describe the development of a comprehensive theory of thermoluminescence (TL) dose response, the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is based on both radiation absorption stage and recombination stage mechanisms and can describe dose response for heavy charged particles (in the framework of the extended track interaction model - ETIM) as well as for isotropically ionising gamma rays and electrons (in the framework of the TC/LC geminate recombination model) in a unified and self-consistent conceptual and mathematical formalism. A theory of optical absorption dose response is also incorporated in the UNIM to describe the radiation absorption stage. The UNIM is applied to the dose response supralinearity characteristics of LiF:Mg,Ti and is especially and uniquely successful in explaining the ionisation density dependence of the supralinearity of composite peak 5 in TLD-100. The UNIM is demonstrated to be capable of explaining either qualitatively or quantitatively all of the major features of TL dose response with many of the variable parameters of the model strongly constrained by ancilliary optical absorption and sensitisation measurements.

  12. Visual Attention Model Based on Statistical Properties of Neuron Responses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  13. Parameter variability estimation using stochastic response surface model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2014-12-01

    From a practical point of view, uncertainties existing in structural parameters and measurements must be handled in order to provide reliable structural condition evaluations. At this moment, deterministic model updating loses its practicability and a stochastic updating procedure should be employed seeking for statistical properties of parameters and responses. Presently this topic has not been well investigated on account of its greater complexity in theoretical configuration and difficulty in inverse problem solutions after involving uncertainty analyses. Due to it, this paper attempts to develop a stochastic model updating method for parameter variability estimation. Uncertain parameters and responses are correlated through stochastic response surface models, which are actually explicit polynomial chaos expansions based on Hermite polynomials. Then by establishing a stochastic inverse problem, parameter means and standard deviations are updated in a separate and successive way. For the purposes of problem simplification and optimization efficiency, in each updating iteration stochastic response surface models are reconstructed to avoid the construction and analysis of sensitivity matrices. Meanwhile, in the interest of investigating the effects of parameter variability on responses, a parameter sensitivity analysis method has been developed based on the derivation of polynomial chaos expansions. Lastly the feasibility and reliability of the proposed methods have been validated using a numerical beam and then a set of nominally identical metal plates. After comparing with a perturbation method, it is found that the proposed method can estimate parameter variability with satisfactory accuracy and the complexity of the inverse problem can be highly reduced resulting in cost-efficient optimization.

  14. Visual attention model based on statistical properties of neuron responses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  15. Unit response water quality modelling for cumulative impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlf, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    The 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (P.L. 95-87) requires that an assessment of the probable cumulative impact of all anticipated mining be made prior to the issuance of a coal mining permit and that the proposed operation be designed to prevent material damage to the hydrologic balance outside the permit area. In response to these P.L. 95-87 requirements, a water quality unit response cumulative impact assessment model was developed (SQURM - Stream Quality Unit Response Model) for large drainage areas to predict long-term time variant concentrations for conservative substances. The model uses a four parameter unit response function to simulate water quality variation which results from surface and underground coal mining disturbance. The unit response function is convoluted with projected rates of coal mining within a river basin to predict water quality concentrations over the period of time required to extract all minable reserves. The resulting simulated concentrations can be compared with water quality stream standards to predict if and when the stream standard will be exceeded in the basin. For this study, the model was used to predict total dissolved solids and sulfate concentrations for the Licking and Levisa Fork drainage basins in Eastern Kentucky.

  16. From lecture to learning tasks: use of the 4C/ID model in a communication skills course in a continuing professional education context.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Astrid Pratidina; van Merriënboer, Jeroen; van Dalen, Jan; Claramita, Mora; Scherpbier, Albert

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the use of four-component instructional design (4C/ID), a model to plan educational interventions for complex learning. This model was used to design a continuing education course on communication skills for health professionals in a context that is hierarchical and communal. The authors describe the 4C/ID model and provide an example of its application in designing the course. In the 4C/ID model, learning tasks serve as the backbone of the course, with lectures and other supportive information organized around them. The 4C/ID model is different from traditional models that base the course on lectures on different topics and connect part-task assignments to these topics. The use of the 4C/ID model to develop the educational intervention moves the paradigm from lectures to learning tasks to better prepare learners for real practice. PMID:23654295

  17. Modeling the Observed Atmospheric OH Response to the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Sander, S. P.; Li, K.; Yung, Y. L.; Liang, M.; Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Observations from both satellite instrument (Microwave Limb Sounder on Aura) and ground-based (FTUVS at Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Table Mountain Facility) instruments have shown that the variation in solar UV irradiance during the 11-year cycle is responsible for the long-term variability in atmospheric OH, which is a key species for middle atmospheric ozone destruction. Modeling these variations is expected to help improve understanding of the mechanisms through which the change in solar forcing governs the natural variability in middle atmospheric chemical composition. The Whole Atmospheric Community Climate Model (WACCM), a time-dependent global 3-D model, is used to simulate the observed long-term OH variability and its spatial distribution. The observed long-term OH column variability associated with the solar cycle is about 10% from peak to valley. Although the modeled OH variability shows a similar trend, the magnitudes of the modeled and observed variabilities are different. For the vertical profiles of such variability, both modeling results and observations suggest a positive OH response to the solar UV irradiance variation at about 40 - 80 km altitude. Above 80 km, a negative OH response is suggested. However, the detailed comparisons reveal different features between observations and model calculations. The comparison will be presented and the implications of the differences between modeling and measurements will be discussed. Using accurate input information in the model, in particular the solar spectral irradiance variability during the solar cycle, is believed to be a key factor determining whether the model can better simulate the observed atmospheric response to such solar forcing.

  18. Changing the attitudes and practices of professional developers through a constructivist model: The Technical Assistance Academy for Mathematics and Science Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Karen Jungblut

    For much of this century, mathematics and science have been taught in a didactic manner that is characterized by a passive student and a lecturing teacher. Since the late eighties national standards have encouraged professional developers specializing in mathematics and science education to deliver the messages of inquiry-based learning, active student engagement, and learner-constructed knowledge to the teachers they support. Follow-up studies of professional development programs, however, found that telling teachers was no more effective than telling students. Information transmitted in a passive setting was not transferring into effective classroom practices. This phenomenological case study was conducted to determine the effects of a constructivist-oriented professional development experience, the Technical Assistance Academy, in changing the practices and attitudes of mathematics and science professional developers regarding the use of constructivist strategies in workshop design. This study focused on 45 professional developers who participated in the Technical Assistance Academy. Data from a 2 1/2 year period were collected from session evaluations, journal reflections, a follow-up interview, and site visits that included observations and collaborative planning. Content analysis procedures were used to find common themes among the data. Use of new skills developed as a result of participation in the Technical Assistance Academy was determined using the Concerns-Based Adoption Model Levels of Use framework (Hall & Hord, 1987). Changes in attitude were determined by examining participants' journal reflections related to common constructivist themes such as those discussed by Fosnot (1996c): learning is developmental, disequilibrium and reflection facilitate learning, and the construction of "big ideas" results from the opportunity to struggle with new information. Results verified that all 45 participants demonstrated some level of use, and that most were in the 3 highest of 5 levels of use: mechanical (11%), routine (16%), refinement (27%), integration (24%), and renewal (22%). Participants reported valuing (a) active engagement necessary for the developmental progression of learning to occur, (b) their own disequilibrium, (c) opportunity to reflect, and they acknowledged a clearer understanding and appreciation of the big ideas in workshop design such as networking, collaboration, content and staff development standards, equity, and community building. Results support the conclusion that learning about constructivist instructional strategies in a long-term program that models them positively affects participants' attitudes and enhances their use of similar strategies in the design of professional development experiences for others. Knowledge developed in a constructivist setting transferred into effective facilitator practices.

  19. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  20. "Educators Modeling Self-Esteem to At-Risk Students": The Practice of Personal and Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieb, James Philip

    A description is given of the training and inservice plan for Westmoreland County Public Schools (Virginia) which focused on the personal and professional needs of teachers and the issues of the at-risk student population with which they work. A staff self-esteem workshop was developed which focused on the need for persons to care for themselves…

  1. Preparing the Early Childhood Educator for the Real World: A Model for Professional Teamwork. Issues in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetlin, Andrea G.; Bingham-Newman, Ann; Campbell, Bruce; LaCour, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Describes plan to integrate collaborative and interprofessional competencies into core curricula of human service professional preparation programs at California State University, focusing on a joint seminar incorporating self-assessment and case analysis. Compares case discussions of nursing, criminal justice, and child development students.…

  2. A Model for Using a Concept Inventory as a Tool for Students' Assessment and Faculty Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McAdams, Katherine C.; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W.; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S.; Mosser, David; Quimby, B. Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V.; Smith, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in…

  3. Implications of the Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity for Education and Training in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grus, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Quality education and training is a commitment made to future generations of psychologists by those assuming the role of a faculty member or supervisor. One widely recognized hallmark of quality in professional psychology education and training is accreditation of doctoral programs by the American Psychological Association's Commission on…

  4. The human genome project: A public forum. Report on a model conference for genetics professionals and consumers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah L. Eunpu; Joan O. Weiss

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on the rationale, objectives, and outcome of a conference titled “The Human Genome Project: A Public Forum.” One of the distinguishing features of this conference was that it included both genetics professionals and consumers of genetics services in a dialogue about the potential ethical, legal, and social implications of learning more about one's genes. The conference was

  5. A Qualitative Case Study Analysis for a Potential Model for a K-12 Professional Development Using Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santacroce-Tejedor, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three e-learning technologies based on a pedagogical framework for virtual learning environments, and to explore how these technologies could be used to facilitate extended professional learning opportunities whereby K-12 educators could communicate, collaborate, and reflect on their practice. This…

  6. Velocity response curves demonstrate the complexity of modeling entrainable clocks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Cheever, Allyson; Harmon, Sarah M

    2014-12-21

    Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate daily behaviors in organisms across the kingdoms of life. Their rhythms are generated by complex systems, generally involving interlocked regulatory feedback loops. These rhythms are entrained by the daily light/dark cycle, ensuring that the internal clock time is coordinated with the environment. Mathematical models play an important role in understanding how the components work together to function as a clock which can be entrained by light. For a clock to entrain, it must be possible for it to be sped up or slowed down at appropriate times. To understand how biophysical processes affect the speed of the clock, one can compute velocity response curves (VRCs). Here, in a case study involving the fruit fly clock, we demonstrate that VRC analysis provides insight into a clock?s response to light. We also show that biochemical mechanisms and parameters together determine a model?s ability to respond realistically to light. The implication is that, if one is developing a model and its current form has an unrealistic response to light, then one must reexamine one?s model structure, because searching for better parameter values is unlikely to lead to a realistic response to light. PMID:25193284

  7. Evaluating Cognitive Theory: A Joint Modeling Approach Using Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein Entink, Rinke H.; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias; Hornke, Lutz F.; Fox, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    In current psychological research, the analysis of data from computer-based assessments or experiments is often confined to accuracy scores. Response times, although being an important source of additional information, are either neglected or analyzed separately. In this article, a new model is developed that allows the simultaneous analysis of…

  8. Model-Based Collaborative Filtering Analysis of Student Response Data: Machine-Learning Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergner, Yoav; Droschler, Stefan; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Rayyan, Saif; Seaton, Daniel; Pritchard, David E.

    2012-01-01

    We apply collaborative filtering (CF) to dichotomously scored student response data (right, wrong, or no interaction), finding optimal parameters for each student and item based on cross-validated prediction accuracy. The approach is naturally suited to comparing different models, both unidimensional and multidimensional in ability, including a…

  9. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J (Decision and Information Sciences); (Auburn Univ.)

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  10. Additive and Subtractive Scrambling in Optional Randomized Response Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zawar; Al-Sobhi, Mashail M.; Al-Zahrani, Bander

    2014-01-01

    This article considers unbiased estimation of mean, variance and sensitivity level of a sensitive variable via scrambled response modeling. In particular, we focus on estimation of the mean. The idea of using additive and subtractive scrambling has been suggested under a recent scrambled response model. Whether it is estimation of mean, variance or sensitivity level, the proposed scheme of estimation is shown relatively more efficient than that recent model. As far as the estimation of mean is concerned, the proposed estimators perform relatively better than the estimators based on recent additive scrambling models. Relative efficiency comparisons are also made in order to highlight the performance of proposed estimators under suggested scrambling technique. PMID:24421893

  11. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  12. The Genesis of a Faculty Professional Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schecter, Rose L.; Conway, Kathleen; Neylon, Mary Pat; Pemberton, Freida

    1999-01-01

    Details the development of the Molloy College (New York) Faculty Professional Center (FPC), which fosters faculty development and enhances professional expertise. Appended is a faculty-development survey, survey results, chart of FPC, and description of the qualifications, duties, and responsibilities of an FPC Director. (VWC)

  13. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  14. PDR Reviewee Guide Professional Services

    E-print Network

    Mumby, Peter J.

    Performance is a chance to discuss the work you have done, what you plan to do and responsibilities you have the training courses, professional development, 1-1 support and other learning you may have undertaken what you your progress and employ the learning you have identified. This will also save you time when you come

  15. Professional Review Program for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    The faculty review program at Triton College fulfills responsibilities to accrediting and/or approving agencies while helping to maintain teaching effectiveness and to promote instructional improvement. The professional review consists of a comprehensive assessment of the instructor's total job performance as indicated through student, peer,…

  16. A Two-Decision Model for Responses to Likert-Type Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen-Roe, Anne; Thissen, David

    2013-01-01

    Extreme response set, the tendency to prefer the lowest or highest response option when confronted with a Likert-type response scale, can lead to misfit of item response models such as the generalized partial credit model. Recently, a series of intrinsically multidimensional item response models have been hypothesized, wherein tendency toward…

  17. Style guide for oil and gas professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, T.R.; Freeman, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tailored for oil and gas professionals, this book addresses the writing and editing problems professionals encounter daily. Contains cross-referenced Glossary of Style and Model Documents sections. The glossary's alphabetized entries cover language, style, grammar, punctuation techniques, spelling, visual aids, and writing techniques. The model documents section illustrates letters, memos, reports, and other documents typically written by professionals to cover principles of effective business and technical writing.

  18. A Response to Anastas and Coffey: The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Education and Professional Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Wong, Marleen; Samuels, Gina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Relationships are central to the profession of social work; relationships with allied disciplines, among professional social work organizations, and between classroom and field education. However, embedded within these relationships are historical tensions, and contemporary opportunities that can advance both the science of social work and the…

  19. Shaping the Responsible, Successful and Contributing Citizen of the Future: "Values" in the New Zealand Curriculum and Its Challenge to the Development of Ethical Teacher Professionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benade, Leon

    2011-01-01

    The revised New Zealand Curriculum became mandatory for use in New Zealand schools in February 2010. The ongoing reform agenda in education in New Zealand since 1989 and elsewhere internationally has had corrosive effects on teacher professionality. State-driven neo-liberal policy and education reforms are deeply damaging to the mental and moral…

  20. Response to Section IV: What's Needed Now--Issues of Professional Development School Accountability and Sustainability in Today's Complex Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Donna L.

    2011-01-01

    The two chapters in this section (Basile & Gutierrez, 2011; Yendol-Hoppey & Smith, 2011) contribute to the understandings about how to maintain resources and develop accountability necessary for successful partnerships. The authors discuss important themes related to the sustainability and maintenance of professional development schools, including…

  1. Using Survey Responses to Determine the Value-Added Features of a Webinar Portal System for Adoption by Natural Resource Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharis, Laurie; Bardon, Robert E.; Hubbard, William; Taylor, Eric; Gonzalez-Jeuck, Grizel

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a recent survey of natural resource webinar providers. Respondents were asked a range of questions regarding their webinar services. Findings showed that respondents most commonly marketed their webinars through email or websites and targeted an audience of professionals. Respondents noted that the greatest…

  2. Agricultural Education Teacher Leaders' Development of Ownership and Responsibility for the Profession through Participation in Continuing Professional Education Program Planning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall-Rudd, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, planning and delivery of professional development for public school teachers was centralized in state departments of education and universities, with teachers having little input or control over the content. For many years the literature in adult and continuing education has reflected an emphasis on learner participation in program…

  3. GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Graduate Student Professional

    E-print Network

    opportunities across campus Professional Development Portal *ogaps.tamu.edu/profdev-portal #12;GRADUATEGRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 1 Graduate Student Professional Development Joelle Muenich Graduate Student Specialist IV Office of Graduate and Professional Studies #12;GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL

  4. A micromechanical constitutive model for the dynamic response of brittle materials "Dynamic response of marble"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Keith

    2001-07-01

    A micromechanically based constitutive model for the dynamic inelastic behavior of brittle materials, specifically "Dionysus-Pentelicon marble" with distributed microcracking is presented. Dionysus-Pentelicon marble was used in the construction of the Parthenon, in Athens, Greece. The constitutive model is a key component in the ability to simulate this historic explosion and the preceding bombardment form cannon fire that occurred at the Parthenon in 1678. Experiments were performed by Rosakis (1999) that characterized the static and dynamic response of this unique material. A micromechanical constitutive model that was previously successfully used to model the dynamic response of granular brittle materials is presented. The constitutive model was fitted to the experimental data for marble and reproduced the experimentally observed basic uniaxial dynamic behavior quite well. This micromechanical constitutive model was then implemented into the three dimensional nonlinear lagrangain finite element code Dyna3d(1998). Implementing this methodology into the three dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element code allowed the model to be exercised on several preliminary impact experiments. During future simulations, the model is to be used in conjunction with other numerical techniques to simulate projectile impact and blast loading on the Dionysus-Pentelicon marble and on the structure of the Parthenon.

  5. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply. PMID:24943884

  6. Multilevel Higher-Order Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In the social sciences, latent traits often have a hierarchical structure, and data can be sampled from multiple levels. Both hierarchical latent traits and multilevel data can occur simultaneously. In this study, we developed a general class of item response theory models to accommodate both hierarchical latent traits and multilevel data. The…

  7. A Probabilistic Model for Simulating Magnetoacoustic Emission Responses in Ferromagnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) is a phenomenon where acoustic noise is generated due to the motion of non-180 magnetic domain walls in a ferromagnet with non-zero magnetostrictive constants. MAE has been studied extensively for many years and has even been applied as an NDE tool for characterizing the heat treatment of high-yield low carbon steels. A complete theory which fully accounts for the magnetoacoustic response, however, has not yet emerged. The motion of the domain walls appears to be a totally random process, however, it does exhibit features of regularity which have been identified by studying phenomena such as 1/f flicker noise and self-organized criticality (SOC). In this paper, a probabilistic model incorporating the effects of SOC has been developed to help explain the MAE response. The model uses many simplifying assumptions yet yields good qualitative agreement with observed experimental results and also provides some insight into the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for MAE. We begin by providing a brief overview of magnetoacoustic emission and the experimental set-up used to obtain the MAE signal. We then describe a pseudo-probabilistic model used to predict the MAE response and give an example of the predicted result. Finally, the model is modified to account for SOC and the new predictions are shown and compared with experiment.

  8. A Framework for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    A framework is introduced for considering dimensionality assessment procedures for multidimensional item response models. The framework characterizes procedures in terms of their confirmatory or exploratory approach, parametric or nonparametric assumptions, and applicability to dichotomous, polytomous, and missing data. Popular and emerging…

  9. A model for structuring efficient consumer response measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesper Aastrup; Herbert Kotzab; David B. Grant; Christoph Teller; Mogens Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a model which structures and links different types of efficient consumer response (ECR) measures; it does so by considering the use of both quantitative or “hard” and qualitative or “soft” measures in ECR, emphasizing the importance and causal role of “soft” measures throughout the ECR process. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper

  10. Modeling Responses to Respiratory House Dust Mite Exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Cates; R. Fattouh; J. Johnson; A. Llop-Guevara; M. Jordana

    2007-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is the most pervasive indoor aeroallergen source worldwide. Allergens derived from HDM are associated with sensitization and allergic asthma. Allergic asthma is an immunologically driven disease characterized by a Th2-polarized immune response, eosinophilic inflammation, airway hyperreactivity, and remodeling. Animal models of asthma utilizing ovalbumin (OVA) exposure have afforded us considerable insight with respect to the mediators

  11. Special Education Eligibility Decision Making in Response to Intervention Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Hoover

    2010-01-01

    The response to intervention model (RTI) represents a promising framework for the early identification and prevention of learning and behavior problems for students struggling in school. If RTI is properly implemented, it should reduce unnecessary referrals and placements into special education, and increase the accuracy of special education eligibility decisions. This article examines the strengths of RTI practices, as compared

  12. Learning and evaluating response prediction models using parallel listener consensus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iwan de Kok; Derya Ozkan; Dirk Heylen; Louis-Philippe Morency

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally listener response prediction models are learned from pre-recorded dyadic interactions. Because of individual differences in behavior, these recordings do not capture the complete ground truth. Where the recorded listener did not respond to an opportunity provided by the speaker, another listener would have responded or vice versa. In this paper, we introduce the concept of parallel listener consensus where

  13. Type II functional response for continuous, physiologically structured models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. David Logan; Glenn Ledder; William Wolesensky

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to formulate a general Holling-type functional, or behavioral, response for continuous physiologically structured populations, where both the predator and the prey have physiological densities and certain rules apply to their interactions. The physiological variable can be, for example, a development stage, weight, age, or a characteristic length. The model leads to a Fredholm integral

  14. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  15. Special Education Eligibility Decision Making in Response to Intervention Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The response to intervention model (RTI) represents a promising framework for the early identification and prevention of learning and behavior problems for students struggling in school. If RTI is properly implemented, it should reduce unnecessary referrals and placements into special education, and increase the accuracy of special education…

  16. Fitting a response model for n dichotomously scored items

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Darrell Bock; Marcus Lieberman

    1970-01-01

    A method of estimating the parameters of the normal ogive model for dichotomously scored item-responses by maximum likelihood is demonstrated. Although the procedure requires numerical integration in order to evaluate the likelihood equations, a computer implemented Newton-Raphson solution is shown to be straightforward in other respects. Empirical tests of the procedure show that the resulting estimates are very similar to

  17. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a model of \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorenzo Sacconi

    2004-01-01

    This paper first sets a definition of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an extended model of corporate governance and then accounts for a voluntary approach to CSR, meant as voluntary compliance with CSR strategic management standards, in terms of an economic theory of self-regulation based on the concepts of social contract, reputation and reciprocal conformism. The paper argues that extended

  18. A Hybridization Model for the Plasmon Response of Complex Nanostructures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Prodan; C. Radloff; N. J. Halas; P. Nordlander

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple and intuitive picture, an electromagnetic analog of molecular orbital theory, that describes the plasmon response of complex nanostructures of arbitrary shape. Our model can be understood as the interaction or ``hybridization'' of elementary plasmons supported by nanostructures of elementary geometries. As an example, the approach is applied to the important case of a four-layer concentric nanoshell,

  19. Item Response Theory Models for Performance Decline during Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Sometimes, test-takers may not be able to attempt all items to the best of their ability (with full effort) due to personal factors (e.g., low motivation) or testing conditions (e.g., time limit), resulting in poor performances on certain items, especially those located toward the end of a test. Standard item response theory (IRT) models fail to…

  20. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-print Network

    Low, Steven H.

    the supply. As the proportion of renewable sources such as solar and wind power steadily rises, power supplyTwo Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C. Doyle Engineering & Applied Science Division, California Institute of Technology, USA Abstract