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Sample records for professional responsibility model

  1. The professional responsibility model of physician leadership.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    The challenges physician leaders confront today call to mind Odysseus' challenge to steer his fragile ship successfully between Scylla and Charybdis. The modern Scylla takes the form of ever-increasing pressures to provide more resources for professional liability, compliance, patient satisfaction, central administration, and a host of other demands. The modern Charybdis takes the form of ever-increasing pressures to procure resources when fewer are available and competition is continuously increasing the need for resources, including managed care, hospital administration, payers, employers, patients who are uninsured or underinsured, research funding, and philanthropy. This publication provides physician leaders with guidance for identifying and managing common leadership challenges on the basis of the professional responsibility model of physician leadership. This model is based on Plato's concept of leadership as a life of service and the professional medical ethics of Drs John Gregory and Thomas Percival. Four professional virtues should guide physician leaders: self-effacement, self-sacrifice, compassion, and integrity. These professional virtues direct physician leaders to treat colleagues as ends in themselves, to provide justice-based resource management, to use power constrained by medical professionalism, and to prevent and respond effectively to organizational dysfunction. The professional responsibility model guides physician leaders by proving an explicit "tool kit" to complement managerial skills. PMID:22483086

  2. Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs) relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills"). The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90). In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006) though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1). Likewise, students with high peer

  3. First-Grade Teachers' Response to Three Models of Professional Development in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Joanne F.; Cortina, Kai Schnabel; Katz, Lauren A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 1st-grade teachers' responses to professional development (PD) programs in reading that differed in means and degree of support for teachers' learning and efforts to improve their reading instruction. We compared 3 models of PD: the 1st model provided only seminars for the teachers, the 2nd model provided…

  4. The Influence of Professional Development on Teachers' Implementation of the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Okseon; Choi, Euichang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a professional development (PD) program on teachers' implementation of the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) model, and to identify the characteristics of PD that influence teaching practice. The participants were six elementary school teachers and 12 students, and the data…

  5. Professional Development in Implementing and Sustaining Multitier Prevention Models: Implications for Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Volpiansky, Paula; Clements, Melissa; Ball, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the role professional development plays in multitiered prevention and intervention models. Specifically, professional development is discussed within the context of establishing sustainable improvement in schools as professionals implement multitiered models of prevention and intervention services, programs, and practices…

  6. The professional responsibility model of obstetrical ethics: avoiding the perils of clashing rights.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    Obstetric ethics is sometimes represented by polarized views. One extreme asserts the rights of the fetus as the overwhelming ethical consideration. Another extreme asserts the pregnant woman as the overwhelming ethical consideration. Both assertions are overly simplistic. Such oversimplification is called reductionism. This article explains the fallacy of rights-based reductionism and 2 models of obstetric ethics based on it and explains why the fetal rights reductionism model and the pregnant woman's rights reductionism model result in conceptual and clinical failure and therefore should be abandoned. The article argues for the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, which emphasizes the importance of medical science and compassionate clinical care of both the pregnant and fetal patient. The result is that responsible medical care overrides the extremes of clashing rights. PMID:21831353

  7. The Professional Will: An Ethical Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret; Kabell, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is directed to the ethical responsibility for the counselor to develop a professional will. Essentially the professional will is a roadmap for what the counselor directs to happen in the event that the counselor becomes incapacitated due to sudden death or illness. A model of a professional will is provided.

  8. Bringing Professional Responsibility Back in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Research on how higher education institutions work with professional formation indicates that insufficient attention is currently paid to issues of professional responsibility and ethics. In the light of such findings, there is increasing concern about issues related to learning professional responsibility. This article concentrates on different…

  9. Social Need, Public Response: The Volunteer Professional Model for Human Services Agencies and Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenihan, Genie O.; Jackson, Louise

    1984-01-01

    Describes a model process of assessment and integration that allows community agencies and professional counselors to engage in more effective volunteer activity. Outlines agency development by stages, using the experiences of agencies providing domestic violence services. (JAC)

  10. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 2. Professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-06-01

    Although dentists have well recognised legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, the definition of their role and the corresponding responsibilities broaden further as the profession evolves, the demands from dentistry increase and the context of professionalism changes. Thus, continuous evaluation of the role and responsibilities of dentists is vital for provision of quality care, improvement of professional standards and maintaining professional status. In addition, efforts must be made to uphold the credibility of the profession and the associated public trust as well as meeting the increasing expectations from the profession and individual dentists. PMID:16826884

  11. Leadership Responsibilities of Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitstifer, Dorothy I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a leadership development model that raises the question "Leadership for what?" Leadership is about going somewhere-personally and in concert with others-in an organization. Although leadership, especially position (elected or appointed) leadership, often is discussed in terms of leader qualities and skills, the…

  12. Determining Possible Professionals and Respective Roles and Responsibilities for a Model Comprehensive Elder Abuse Intervention: A Delphi Consensus Survey

    PubMed Central

    Du Mont, Janice; Kosa, Daisy; Macdonald, Sheila; Elliot, Shannon; Yaffe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have undertaken a multi-phase, multi-method program of research to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive hospital-based nurse examiner elder abuse intervention that addresses the complex functional, social, forensic, and medical needs of older women and men. In this study, we determined the importance of possible participating professionals and respective roles and responsibilities within the intervention. Methods Using a modified Delphi methodology, recommended professionals and their associated roles and responsibilities were generated from a systematic scoping review of relevant scholarly and grey literatures. These items were reviewed, new items added for review, and rated/re-rated for their importance to the intervention on a 5-point Likert scale by an expert panel during a one day in-person meeting. Items that did not achieve consensus were subsequently re-rated in an online survey. Analysis Those items that achieved a mean Likert rating of 4+ (rated important to very important), and an interquartile range<1 in the first or second round, and/or for which 80% of ratings were 4+ in the second round were retained for the model elder abuse intervention. Results Twenty-two of 31 recommended professionals and 192 of 229 recommended roles and responsibilities rated were retained for our model elder abuse intervention. Retained professionals were: public guardian and trustee (mean rating = 4.88), geriatrician (4.87), police officer (4.87), GEM (geriatric emergency management) nurse (4.80), GEM social worker (4.78), community health worker (4.76), social worker/counsellor (4.74), family physician in community (4.71), paramedic (4.65), financial worker (4.59), lawyer (4.59), pharmacist (4.59), emergency physician (4.57), geriatric psychiatrist (4.33), occupational therapist (4.29), family physician in hospital (4.28), Crown prosecutor (4.24), neuropsychologist (4.24), bioethicist (4.18), caregiver advocate (4.18), victim support worker (4

  13. Developing Culturally Responsive Teaching through Professional Noticing within Teacher Educator Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averill, Robin; Anderson, Dayle; Drake, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Much evidence exists that culturally responsive and equitable teaching practices are challenging to develop. Evidence exists that in-the-moment coaching of "rehearsals" of practice can help foster mathematics teaching strategies, but how such coaching can assist the development of culturally responsive practice is less clear. Drawn from…

  14. Ethics and professional responsibility: Essential dimensions of planned home birth.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B; Grünebaum, Amos; Arabin, Birgit; Brent, Robert L; Levene, Malcolm I; Chervenak, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    Planned home birth is a paradigmatic case study of the importance of ethics and professionalism in contemporary perinatology. In this article we provide a summary of recent analyses of the Centers for Disease Control database on attendants and birth outcomes in the United States. This summary documents the increased risks of neonatal mortality and morbidity of planned home birth as well as bias in Apgar scoring. We then describe the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, which is based on the professional medical ethics of two major figures in the history of medical ethics, Drs. John Gregory of Scotland and Thomas Percival of England. This model emphasizes the identification and careful balancing of the perinatologist's ethical obligations to pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. This model stands in sharp contrast to one-dimensional maternal-rights-based reductionist model of obstetric ethics, which is based solely on the pregnant woman's rights. We then identify the implications of the professional responsibility model for the perinatologist's role in directive counseling of women who express an interest in or ask about planned home birth. Perinatologists should explain the evidence of the increased, preventable perinatal risks of planned home birth, recommend against it, and recommend planned hospital birth. Perinatologists have the professional responsibility to create and sustain a strong culture of safety committed to a home-birth-like experience in the hospital. By routinely fulfilling these professional responsibilities perinatologists can help to prevent the documented, increased risks planned home birth. PMID:26804379

  15. Constructing an Integrated Model for Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, W. Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for a model of professional education based on an interdisciplinary approach developed at the University of Calgary. Highlights include professional growth; experts' behavior; mentorship; professional knowledge base; elaboration theory; and fuzzy logic. (Contains 21 references.) (LRW)

  16. Professional Development for the New Millennium. Professional Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    In 1998, the Mississippi Legislature amended Mississippi Code Section 37-17 concerning the requirements for local school district professional development programs. The Department of Education then revised this portion of the model to reflect the statutory changes. This handbook contains the definition and purpose of professional development and…

  17. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients. PMID:21366145

  18. 28 CFR 0.39 - Office of Professional Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office of Professional Responsibility. 0.39 Section 0.39 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 2-Office of Professional Responsibility § 0.39 Office of Professional Responsibility. The...

  19. 28 CFR 0.129 - Professional Responsibility Advisory Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... functions or overriding the authority of the Office of Legal Counsel as established by 28 CFR 0.25. ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Professional Responsibility Advisory... OF JUSTICE 2-Professional Responsibility Advisory Office § 0.129 Professional Responsibility...

  20. Transformative Professional Development: A Model for Urban Science Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Marx, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a model of Transformative Professional Development (TPD) for use in sustained, collaborative, professional development of teachers in urban middle school science. TPD focuses on urban science teacher change and is responsive to school climate, teacher needs, and teacher beliefs with the intention of promoting change in…

  1. 32 CFR 776.8 - Professional Responsibility Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RULES PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT OF ATTORNEYS PRACTICING UNDER THE COGNIZANCE AND SUPERVISION OF THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL General § 776.8 Professional Responsibility Committee. (a) Composition. This standing... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Professional Responsibility Committee....

  2. [Medical professionalism-on social responsibilities viewed from historical perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-01

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society. PMID:25797380

  3. Professional Responsibility--An Issue for Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal; Karseth, Berit

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on some aspects of professional responsibility by investigating students' visions of future work and notions of professional responsibility. The data is based on interviews with samples of freshmen in three educational programmes at the University of Oslo in Norway. The data has been analysed in relation to…

  4. From the Teachers Professional Ethics to the Personal Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seghedin, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Following the idea of civic responsibility of all adults for the new generation, we have tried, in different previous studies, to demonstrate that teaching is involving a lot of moral principles and values. Our present article aim is to present a part of our research about the teaching ethics under the idea of being a stable dimension of teaching…

  5. Professionals: their problems, their fears, and their social responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Perl, M L

    1973-01-01

    Professional societies have been reluctant to enter actively into the public processes by which decisions are made on economic, social, and political issues. This reluctance comes from (1) fears about the status of the profession and the professional society, (2) fears about economic reprisal, (3) potential conflicts between the goals of a philosophy of trade unionism and the goals of a philosophy of professional social responsibility, and (4) domination of some professional societies by nonprofessional business, industrial, or administrative groups. This reluctance has been justified by the development of a myth that the professional can exercise individual social responsibility while maintaining the neutrality of his institutions and societies. This myth must be ignored because our public decision-making processes can only function properly if groups, such as professional societies, actively enter that decision-making process. PMID:4691329

  6. The Professional Context as a Predictor for Response Distortion in the Adaption-Innovation Inventory--An Investigation Using Mixture Distribution Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Sebastian; Freund, Philipp Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Adaption-Innovation Inventory (AII), originally developed by Kirton (1976), is a widely used self-report instrument for measuring problem-solving styles at work. The present study investigates how scores on the AII are affected by different response styles. Data are collected from a combined sample (N = 738) of students, employees, and…

  7. Quality improvement in nursing: Administrative mandate or professional responsibility?

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Shigeko

    2012-01-01

    For professionals, providing quality service and striving for excellence are ethical responsibilities. In many hospitals in the U.S., however, there is evidence indicating current quality improvement (QI) involving nurses is not always driven by their professional accountability and professional values. QI has become more an administrative mandate than an ethical standard for nurses. In this paper, the tension between QI as nurses’ professional ethics and an administrative mandate will be described, and the implicit ideal-reality gap of QI will be examined. The threat to professional nursing posed by the current approach to QI will be examined, and ways to incorporate nursing professional values in a practical QI effort will be explored. PMID:23127240

  8. The Indiana Principal Leadership Academy: A Model for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellsberry, James; And Others

    In response to the need for professional growth opportunities for principals, the Indiana Principal Leadership Academy (IPLA) was founded in 1985. The IPLA was created to be a national training model for principals, as leaders of instructors, empowered with effective behaviors and practices. The academy's focus is on four proficiencies: (1)…

  9. Professional Learning Communities: A Middle School Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, David N.

    2010-01-01

    This research project explored the transition from a traditional model to a Professional Learning Community model in a NJ Middle School. The administration overcame obstacles during the transition such as scheduling conflicts, teacher apathy, and resistance. This action research study gathered data to determine how to best structure the…

  10. Mathematical Modelling as a Professional Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frejd, Peter; Bergsten, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Educational research literature on mathematical modelling is extensive. However, not much attention has been paid to empirical investigations of its scholarly knowledge from the perspective of didactic transposition processes. This paper reports from an interview study of mathematical modelling activities involving nine professional model…

  11. Analysis of Reflective Professional Development Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filby, Nikola N.

    This paper reviews the background of and compares three particular approaches to reflective professional development, specifically as used by Far West Laboratory: case methods, the Peer Assisted Leadership process, in which peer partners observe each other, conduct reflective interviews, construct leadership models, and explore alternate ways to…

  12. Model Professional Development Programs Win Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kathleen C., Ed.; Quinn, Peggy, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This bulletin is designed to illustrate the broad range of research and improvement activities supported by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Contents include: "Model Professional Development Programs Win Recognition,""Are Our Schools Safe?,""Charter Schools on the Rise,""What to Expect Your First Year of Teaching,""Evaluating…

  13. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 1. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-04-01

    Dentists have well-defined legal, professional and ethical duties to their patients, the public and the profession. However, regular evaluations are necessary because their role and responsibilities are continually changing under the influence of a variety of internal and external forces and they further broaden as the profession evolves. Although a significant emphasis is placed on their responsibilities, professional rights of dentists also deserve particular interest because they are intimately related with these responsibilities. Furthermore, these rights enable dentists to serve and protect their patients and the community, provide quality care and comply with their broad responsibilities. In the first part of this series of three articles the responsibilities of dentists are analysed, while the second part focuses on the dentists' professional rights. PMID:16620040

  14. Post-Perruche: what responsibilities for professionals?

    PubMed

    Clement, R; Rodat, O

    2006-03-01

    Damage compensation relating to handicapped new-borns, the wrongful life law, was put in place after a great controversy in France by the Perruche ruling of November 13th 2000. The French parliaments have voted a special law against wrongful life action. But questions about medical liability are not answered by the new law. For wrongful life, what are now the medical errors likely to directly provoke a handicap or aggravate it or obstruct measures to alleviate it? For a wrongful birth claim it limits parental damages to psychological damages only, due to a lack of mental preparation, whilst denying economic losses, thus preventing complete compensation arising from medical malpractice for all the other types of difficulty suffered by the parents. Why does it give a new definition of medical malpractice as a "characterized fault" and insist upon the qualification 'blatant" in the field of medical liability? For health professionals, it is a question of knowing and being acquainted with the errors that fall under their liability with regard to handicapped persons and a "characterized fault" with regard to parents. It is through a review of past and present case law that we will try to answer these medical questions. All court rulings that awarded monetary damages to the child were reviewed. We include only three decisions after the new law, which do not allow damage compensation in respect of a handicapped new-born. The rulings incorporate decisions taken by the French Supreme Court, of the council of state as well as by courts of appeal. Failure of voluntary termination of pregnancy, missing rubella immune antibody, omission of mandatory tests during pregnancy, typical medical fetal malpractice, were and are professional faults. PMID:16681112

  15. Fitting New Measurement Models to GRE General Test Constructed-Response Item Data. GRE Board Professional Report No. 89-11P.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot; And Others

    This exploratory study applied two new cognitively sensitive measurement models to constructed-response quantitative data. The models, intended to produce qualitative characteristics of examinee performance, were fitted to algebra word problem solutions produced by 285 examinees taking the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test. The two…

  16. An Integrated Professional Development Model for Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuijpers, J. M.; Houtveen, A. A. M.; Wubbels, Th.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the design of a professional development model that aims to improve student achievement. This model has been designed by combining and supplementing elements from school-improvement literature and existing professional development models. Existing models from two largely independent approaches to professional development of…

  17. Faculty as Professionals: Responsibilities, Standards and Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    This paper addresses the issue of faculty ethics and begins with a summary of ethical principles previously adopted by the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The 12 faculty responsibilities outlined in this statement relate to: (1) discipline; (2) students; (3) colleagues; (4) academic institution; (5) community; (6) development of…

  18. Nonprofit Board Membership for Health Care Professionals: Honor or Responsibility?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce M; Calderwood, James A

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and other health care professionals are often invited to serve on nonprofit boards. Although service on a nonprofit board is an honor, it carries a large responsibility. Many health care professionals are unaware of the level of commitment and involvement board service requires, particularly fiduciary boards, which have accompanying risks and legal functions. In the present article, the authors describe the activities and responsibilities of a fiduciary board member. They also provide a checklist of questions to ask before agreeing to serve on a board and discuss how to decide whether one is the right fit for a specific board position. PMID:27571299

  19. Developing a Professional Development Program Model Based on Teachers' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hea-Jin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a teacher needs-based (TNB) professional development program. The TNB model formed the foundation of three externally funded professional development programs. The objectives of this model are to maximize the effects of a professional development program, and to help participants sustain their learning over the long…

  20. Inhibitors to Responsibility-Based Professional Development with In-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers of continuing professional development (CPD) in physical education have called for new models that move beyond the traditional CPD model. The outcomes of CPD protocols are hard to predict even when they align with the best practices. Responsibility-based CPD has become the focus of recent attention to assist physical educators in…

  1. Designing for Culturally Responsive Science Education through Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well…

  2. Cultivating professional responsibility in a dental hygiene curriculum.

    PubMed

    Blue, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    To prepare dental hygienists for future roles in the health care system, dental hygiene education must prepare graduates with skills, ethics, and values that align with professional responsibility. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of curricular changes designed to develop professional identity and responsibility over the entire span of the dental hygiene curriculum. Twenty-four dental hygiene students at the University of Minnesota were surveyed about their attitudes toward access to dental care, society's and health professionals' responsibility to care for the underserved, and their personal efficacy to provide care for the underserved. Surveys were conducted at three time points in the curriculum. The Attitudes Toward Health Care instrument adapted by Holtzman for dental use was used to survey the students. The findings indicate that this institution's curricular changes were effective in cultivating professional responsibility among these students. Their attitude scores increased across the six-semester curriculum, and students in their last semester of the program believed that all individuals have a right to dental care and that society has an obligation to provide dental care. These students' sense of obligation to care for the needy became stronger and their perceptions of their own ability to impact the community and act as an agent of change also increased. PMID:23929574

  3. From Performativity to Professionalism: Lecturers' Responses to Student Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Linet

    2009-01-01

    Student evaluation questionnaires are used to measure academics' performance in most English universities. Academics are assumed to respond professionally to student feedback, making appropriate improvements to their teaching. This paper describes a small-scale study into lecturers' responses to student feedback. The evidence from semi-structured…

  4. The Role of Science Professionals in Teaching Responsible Research Conduct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Stephanie J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the reaction of the scientific community to the issue of responsible conduct in research. Cites the importance of professional standards and ethical values in scientific disciplines and explains that these are not readily learned from observation alone but must be addressed consciously. (DDR)

  5. Environmental geology: Our professional public responsibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhard, L.C.; Brady, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    Conflicts between different interest groups for use of natural resources is one area where state geological surveys can provide assistance. A state geological survey working within the scientific constraints of specific issues can remain objective in its presentations and maintain the faith of both the conflicting interest groups and the public. One cannot vary from the objective view or you will quickly be criticized. Criticism can still occur from one side of a natural resource issue as your data might counter their views. However, the final decisions are almost always made in some legislators, or regulators, area of responsibility. The responsibility of the state geological survey is to provide the important data that will assist in making correct decisions. Should one party in the conflict become extreme in their demands, a potential compromise that is beneficial to both sides can be lost. In Kansas, the classical natural resource problem of resource/recreation in a populated area is presented as a case study. The state geological survey presented data on sand resources in the Kansas River and its valley in northeast Kansas. That information was important to both recreation and dredging interests where the political problem is a conflict of sand use as a construction material resource versus use of the alluvial river as an important recreation area, especially for canoeing. However, when a reasonable compromise was near completion in the Kansas Legislature one side, in a bold move to develop an advantage, ruined that potential for compromise.Conflicts between different interest groups for use of natural resources is one area where state geological surveys can provide assistance. A state geological survey working within the scientific constraints of specific issues can remain objective in its presentations and maintain the faith of both the conflicting interest groups and the public. In Kansas, the classical natural resource problem of resource/recreation in a

  6. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  7. [Responsibility of universities in the scientific education of our professionals].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H

    1995-06-01

    The universities have a leading role and responsibility in the scientific education of future professionals. Scientific research training should be considered essential in the teaching of professionals in areas such as biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics and in medicine. During the recent years, Chilean universities seem to have focused their undergraduate curricular activities into pragmatic aspects of professional practice and the relevance of involving undergraduate students in high-level scientific research receives little consideration. While resources provided by the government to scientific and technological research in Chile are slowly but gradually increasing, the participation of undergraduate students in specific research projects conducted by faculty members is minimal. The author proposes that this situation could be modified if the students are stimulated to participate in these research projects by receiving preferential scores when their elective activities are devoted to it. PMID:8525233

  8. Designing for culturally responsive science education through professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-02-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well identified. This study examined associations between specific Science Teachers are Responsive to Students (STARTS) program activities and United States high school life science teachers' understanding and enactment of culturally responsive science teaching. Findings suggest: (a) critically examining their practices while learning of students' needs and experiences enabled teachers to identify responsive instructional strategies and relevant science topics for culturally responsive teaching; (b) evaluating culturally responsive exemplars while identifying classroom-based needs allowed teachers to identify contextually appropriate instruction, thereby yielding a robust understanding of the purpose and feasibility of culturally responsive science teaching; and (c) by justifying the use of responsive and reform-based instructional strategies for their classrooms, teachers made purposeful connections between students' experiences and science instruction. We propose a set of empirically based design conjectures and theoretical conjectures to generate adaptable knowledge about preparing culturally responsive science teachers through professional development.

  9. Professional practice model: strategies for translating models into practice.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Ditomassi, Marianne

    2011-03-01

    In the current health care climate, economic and cultural conditions have created an optimal opportunity to envision a new direction for nursing as a profession. Nurses find themselves at the formative stages of charting this new direction. The articulation of a professional practice model provides a framework for setting this new direction and thus the achievement of exemplary clinical outcomes. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of the professional practice model at the Massachusetts General Hospital and how the model continues to be evaluated and modified over time by the nurses within the system. PMID:21320659

  10. Rural Professionals: A Tertiary Preparation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krynowsky, Bernie

    An outline is proposed for a tertiary course in rural studies for professionals such as teachers, nurses, and social workers that would better prepare them for rural service. The course could be an elective in general studies or give credit toward professional certification. Key components for effective rural preparation of professionals should be…

  11. Response to Intervention in Illinois: An Exploration of School Professionals' Attitudes and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Amy Feiker; Patrikakou, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines school professionals' self-reported perceptions of readiness in relation to the implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) following a mandated deadline across the state of Illinois, as well their beliefs about the framework. A survey was developed to measure variables in the model related to school…

  12. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. PMID:26432465

  13. A marketing model: applications for dietetic professionals.

    PubMed

    Parks, S C; Moody, D L

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally, dietitians have communicated the availability of their services to the "public at large." The expectation was that the public would respond favorably to nutrition programs simply because there was a consumer need for them. Recently, however, both societal and consumer needs have changed dramatically, making old communication strategies ineffective and obsolete. The marketing discipline has provided a new model and new decision-making tools for many health professionals to use to more effectively make their services known to multiple consumer groups. This article provides one such model as applied to the dietetic profession. The model explores a definition of the business of dietetics, how to conduct an analysis of the environment, and, finally, the use of both in the choice of new target markets. Further, the model discusses the major components of developing a marketing strategy that will help the practitioner to be competitive in the marketplace. Presented are strategies for defining and re-evaluating the mission of the profession, for using future trends to identify new markets and roles for the profession, and for developing services that make the profession more competitive by better meeting the needs of the consumer. PMID:3079782

  14. Professional identity acquisition process model in interprofessional education using structural equation modelling: 10-year initiative survey.

    PubMed

    Kururi, Nana; Tozato, Fusae; Lee, Bumsuk; Kazama, Hiroko; Katsuyama, Shiori; Takahashi, Maiko; Abe, Yumiko; Matsui, Hiroki; Tokita, Yoshiharu; Saitoh, Takayuki; Kanaizumi, Shiomi; Makino, Takatoshi; Shinozaki, Hiromitsu; Yamaji, Takehiko; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2016-01-01

    The mandatory interprofessional education (IPE) programme at Gunma University, Japan, was initiated in 1999. A questionnaire of 10 items to assess the students' understanding of the IPE training programme has been distributed since then, and the factor analysis of the responses revealed that it was categorised into four subscales, i.e. "professional identity", "structure and function of training facilities", "teamwork and collaboration", and "role and responsibilities", and suggested that these may take into account the development of IPE programme with clinical training. The purpose of this study was to examine the professional identity acquisition process (PIAP) model in IPE using structural equation modelling (SEM). Overall, 1,581 respondents of a possible 1,809 students from the departments of nursing, laboratory sciences, physical therapy, and occupational therapy completed the questionnaire. The SEM technique was utilised to construct a PIAP model on the relationships among four factors. The original PIAP model showed that "professional identity" was predicted by two factors, namely "role and responsibilities" and "teamwork and collaboration". These two factors were predicted by the factor "structure and function of training facilities". The same structure was observed in nursing and physical therapy students' PIAP models, but it was not completely the same in laboratory sciences and occupational therapy students' PIAP models. A parallel but not isolated curriculum on expertise unique to the profession, which may help to understand their professional identity in combination with learning the collaboration, may be necessary. PMID:26930464

  15. 31 CFR 10.1 - Director of the Office of Professional Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Professional Responsibility. 10.1 Section 10.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... of the Office of Professional Responsibility. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 32300, June 3, 2011. (a) Establishment of office. The Office of Professional Responsibility is established in...

  16. Exploring Professional Identity in Response to Curriculum Reform and Professional Development: The Teaching Life Stories of Chemistry Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Gayle D.

    This study contributes to the existing literature in teacher education on teacher professional identity (Beijaard, Meijer & Verloop, 2004; Lamote & Engels, 2010; Rots, 2007), particularly in response to curriculum change and professional development. It proposes to offer a much better understanding of how chemistry teachers’ professional identities have evolved through their school and work experiences, and the tensions they experience associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their actual practice. Specifically, this study aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following the introduction of the latest chemistry curricula in Manitoba. These latest chemistry curricula advocate for a more learner focused 'tetrahedral orientation' (Mahaffy, 2004) teaching practice that supports chemistry learning through the use of Johnstone's (1991) three modes of representation - the symbolic, macroscopic and molecular levels - as well as a human element dimension. This study also aims to identify how teachers' professional identities have evolved following their participation in long-term professional development offered by teacher educators at the University of Manitoba. Additionally, this study aims to determine whether teachers feel they have experienced tensions associated with their beliefs about teaching and learning and their current teaching practices as a result of sustained professional development. Finally, this study aims to determine whether the curriculum changes and associated professional development have led teachers to think about and reflect more on their teaching practice and whether this has led to a change in their beliefs about teaching and learning and their teaching practice. Urie Bronfenbrenner's (1979) Model of the Ecology of Human Development was used as a theoretical framework for this study. This study was informed by semi-structured interviews involving 32 teachers of chemistry that were conducted

  17. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, L.; Jones, A. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  18. A Model for Effective Professional Development of Formal Science Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWE) series was developed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) education team in 2010 to provide professional development on lunar science and exploration concepts for grades 6-9 science teachers. Over 300 educators have been trained to date. The LWE model incorporates best practices from pedagogical research of science education, thoughtful integration of scientists and engineer subject matter experts for both content presentations and informal networking with educators, access to NASA-unique facilities, hands-on and data-rich activities aligned with education standards, exposure to the practice of science, tools for addressing common misconceptions, follow-up with participants, and extensive evaluation. Evaluation of the LWE model via pre- and post-assessments, daily workshop surveys, and follow-up surveys at 6-month and 1-year intervals indicate that the LWE are extremely effective in increasing educators' content knowledge, confidence in incorporating content into the classroom, understanding of the practice of science, and ability to address common student misconceptions. In order to address the efficacy of the LWE model for other science content areas, the Dynamic Response of Environments at Asteroids, the Moon, and moons of Mars (DREAM2) education team, funded by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, developed and ran a pilot workshop called Dream2Explore at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June, 2015. Dream2Explore utilized the LWE model, but incorporated content related to the science and exploration of asteroids and the moons of Mars. Evaluation results indicate that the LWE model was effectively used for educator professional development on non-lunar content. We will present more detail on the LWE model, evaluation results from the Dream2Explore pilot workshop, and suggestions for the application of the model with other science content for robust educator professional development.

  19. Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A systematic analysis of professional responsibilities in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Jennifer; Ries, Nola M.; Boon, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Natural health products such as herbs, vitamins and homeopathic medicines are widely available in Canadian pharmacies. Purpose to conduct a systematic analysis of Canadian pharmacy policies and guidelines to explore pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products. Methods Legislation, codes of ethics, standards of practice and guidance documents that apply to the practice of pharmacy in each Canadian jurisdiction were systematically collected and examined to identify if, and how, these instruments establish professional duties in regard to natural health products. Results The majority of Canadian jurisdictions now include some explicit reference to natural health products in standards of practice policy or guideline documents. Often natural health products are simply assumed to be included in the over-the-counter (OTC) product category and thus professional responsibilities for OTCs are relevant for natural health products. A minority of provinces have specific policies on natural health products, herbals or homeopathy. In addition, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities’ Model Standards of Practice specifically refers to natural health products. Most policy documents indicate that pharmacists should inquire about natural health product use when counselling patients and, when asked, should provide accurate information regarding the efficacy, toxicity, side effects or interactions of natural health products. Public messaging also indicates that pharmacists are knowledgeable professionals who can provide evidence-based information about natural health products. Conclusions Explicit policies or guidelines regarding pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products currently exist in the majority of Canadian jurisdictions. PMID:22282720

  20. Expanding the Responsibility of Architectural Education: Civic Professionalism in Two Schools of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the purposes of professional education and the teaching of civic professionalism, whereby future professionals are exposed to their responsibility to use their specialized skills and knowledge to serve the public good. Recent studies on civic purposes in professional education, however, have largely ignored the…

  1. Professional privilege, driving and epilepsy, the doctor's responsibility.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    1997-03-01

    Privacy and professional privilege between doctor and patient were reviewed at the 21st International Epilepsy Congress and at the First Academic Seminar of the Australian College of Legal Medicine (ACLM). A survey was conducted at the ACLM to review the attitudes of a group of doctors who were also trained within the law, regarding professional privilege in general and the responsibilities and liabilities of doctors when dealing with non-compliant patients who have uncontrolled epilepsy and continue to drive motor vehicles. Most responders (17/19) felt that there should be professional privilege between doctor and patient, although only one respondent felt that such privilege should be absolute. Fourteen out of 19 respondents felt that doctors had a duty to report those patients who posed a risk, with 4/19 denying such duty and one respondent being undecided. Inconsistencies emerged when all respondents felt that a doctor should report a non-compliant, dangerous patient, as presented within the scenario and 4/19 of respondents attributed legal liability to the doctor for loss of income by the family of the victim of a traffic accident, resultant from failure to disclose. The study concluded that it was safer for the doctor to report patients seen as posing a foreseeable risk, unless such reporting contravened legislative restriction as may exist in such jurisdictions as in France. PMID:9127722

  2. The Collaborative Apprenticeship Model: Situated Professional Development within School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Evan M.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Professional learning is a social enterprise where peers rely on the expertise and support of one another to adopt innovative practices. Reciprocal interactions in a community of practice, where teachers take responsibility for each other's learning and development, may provide an effective means of supporting situated professional learning. We…

  3. Our Professional Responsibilities Relative to Human-Animal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bustad, L. K.; Hines, L.

    1984-01-01

    An interesting area with great potential for benefiting and enriching the lives and conditions of people and animals is opening to us in research, service and teaching. By working with colleagues in other disciplines, we can develop new and creative ways to realize the great promise inherent in people-animal interactions properly studied and utilized. Veterinarians who understand that a strong human-companion animal bond can augment people's mental and physical states will help develop sound and effective companion animal programs for individuals who are lonely or handicapped and for persons in the school systems of the community, as well as its hospices, nursing and convalescent homes, prisons and other institutions. Children experiencing the deep satisfaction of interacting with animals while young will more likely become responsible pet owners and advocates as adults. The image of the profession is enhanced when children and adults see veterinarians as concerned teachers and compassionate health professionals. We as professionals will be required not only to update our knowledge and skills, but to acquire new knowledge in fields of animal and human behavior, psychology and sociology. We are needed on interdisciplinary research teams to study human-animal interactions. We will also be asked to commit time and personal energies in community programs, sometimes with no remuneration. But if skilled health professionals like veterinarians do not take the lead in establishing sound, long-term companion animal programs in their own communities, everyone will suffer including the animals. How we, as individual professionals, respond will be an important reflection of our compassion and our humanity. PMID:17422458

  4. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  5. An Embedded Professional Paired Placement Model: "I Know I Am Not an Expert, but I Am at a Point Now Where I Could Step into the Classroom and Be Responsible for the Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine; Neal, Deborah; Karvouni, Maria; Chandler, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    We present a sustainable and innovative model for pre-service teacher paired professional placements called the Teaching School model. The Teaching School model was piloted initially in partnership with a Metropolitan University and a P-12 College located in Melbourne's northern suburbs in 2013. It was expanded in 2014 to capitalise on an existing…

  6. Harmonizing professional, personal, and social responsibilities: Indian women dentists' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nagda, Suhasini Jayantilal

    2015-05-01

    Women in Indian culture have a paradoxical status: on the one hand, goddesses are worshipped for power and prosperity; on the other hand, working women face challenges due to age-old beliefs and sociocultural norms. With 60% of the students enrolled in undergraduate dental education currently being women, there is a need to study the challenges these women are facing and how they tackle them. The aim of this survey study was to assess the barriers women dentists face in career advancement and how successfully they balance the personal, professional, and social aspects of their lives. Questionnaires, consisting of four qualitative and 24 quantitative items, were distributed to 500 women dentists: postgraduate residents and faculty members in dental colleges of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, as well as private dental practitioners. Of the 500 women, 210 returned the survey, for an overall response rate of 42%. The results showed that 95% of the respondents believed they successfully balance the various spheres of their lives, but the most common challenges they faced continued to be traditional gender bias, dual professional and home responsibilities, and preconceived ideas about women. PMID:25941237

  7. Promoting professional nursing practice: linking a professional practice model to performance expectations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Marcia; Hinch, Barbara; Llewellyn, Jane; Dillon, Paula J; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Professional practice models (PPMs) provide the conceptual framework for establishing professional nursing practice. Integrating a PPM requires complex organizational change. One strategy for integrating a PPM is to directly link the PPM with performance expectations to ensure that underlying beliefs are integrated into everyday practice. This article describes the development, implementation, and successful outcomes of a clinical advancement system that was aligned with a PPM. PMID:21320662

  8. Response to Section II: What's Needed Now--Professional Development Schools and the Professionalization of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, A. Lin

    2011-01-01

    The professional development schools (PDS) effort, which grew out of the groundbreaking work of the Holmes Group (1986), was deliberately focused on the support and advancement of teachers as professionals and the professionalization of teaching, so the author argues that it is ironic that a volume about PDS might be seen as voicing an opinion…

  9. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: Professional Development for Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Kathryn Berry

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) offered yearlong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professional development to teachers in rural Alaska. Teacher training focused on introducing youth to workforce technologies used in Arctic research. Due to challenges in making professional development accessible to rural teachers, ACMP…

  10. Institutional leadership and faculty response: fostering professionalism at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wasserstein, Alan G; Brennan, Patrick J; Rubenstein, Arthur H

    2007-11-01

    Fostering professionalism requires institutional leadership and faculty buy-in. At the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, policies and educational programs were developed to enhance professionalism in three areas: conduct of clinical trials, relations with pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the clinical and teaching environment. Responsible conduct of clinical trials has been addressed with mandatory online education and certification for clinical investigators, but some still fail to recognize conflicts of interest. Activity of pharmaceutical representatives has been strictly regulated, meals and gifts from pharmaceutical companies prohibited, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the formulary process and in continuing medical education curtailed. Some faculty members have resented such restrictions, particularly in regard to their opportunity to give paid lectures. Professionalism in the clinical and teaching environment has been addressed with interdisciplinary rounding, experiential learning for medical students and residents in small groups, increased recognition of role models of professionalism, and active management of disruptive physicians. Leadership has been exerted through policy development, open communications, and moral suasion and example. Faculty members have expressed both their support and their reservations. Development of communication strategies continues, including town hall meetings, small groups and critical incident narratives, and individual feedback. The understanding and endorsement of faculty, staff, and trainees are an essential element of the professionalism effort. PMID:17971690

  11. [Continuous responsibility for professionalism and informatics literacy of nurses].

    PubMed

    Marinković, Martina Fruk

    2014-03-01

    Nurses should be aware of their responsibilities and standards that are expected from their work. They are aware of their need of continuous professional development. Their choice of profession has confirmed their readiness for lifelong training and acquiring new knowledge and skills to transfer them to others. Witnessing an explosion of information on the Internet and opportunity to approach them, there is a must to go for them. For searching the Internet, some new abilities and skills are required from nurses. They should not only be able to access the information but also to evaluate it. The leading role in such activities belongs to nurse-educators--they should practice Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy and insist on ICT literacy standards. All other nurses should follow them and implement ICT in their daily practice. PMID:24979894

  12. Physicians' Professionally Responsible Power: A Core Concept of Clinical Ethics.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-02-01

    The gathering of power unto themselves by physicians, a process supported by evidence-based practice, clinical guidelines, licensure, organizational culture, and other social factors, makes the ethics of power--the legitimation of physicians' power--a core concept of clinical ethics. In the absence of legitimation, the physician's power over patients becomes problematic, even predatory. As has occurred in previous issues of the Journal, the papers in the 2016 clinical ethics issue bear on the professionally responsible deployment of power by physicians. This introduction explores themes of physicians' power in papers from an international group of authors who address autonomy and trust, the virtues of perinatal hospice, conjoined twins in ethics and law, addiction and autonomy in clinical research on addicting substances, euthanasia of patients with dementia in Belgium, and a pragmatic approach to clinical futility. PMID:26671961

  13. Professional versus Occupational Models of Work Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Stan

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the familiar occupational standards that underpin National Vocational Qualifications, the UK has a parallel if less complete system of competence or practice standards that are developed and controlled by professional bodies. While there is a certain amount of overlap between the two types of standard, recent research points to a…

  14. Project ProCEED: A Model for Developing Professional Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marilyn; Waddell, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Project ProCEED is a staff development model for promoting the type of professional excellence recommended in national educational reports. A six-month program designed and implemented by teachers and principals is examined. (DF)

  15. Professional navigation: a comparative study of two Canadian models.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Lise; Cook, Sandra; Veillette, Anne-Marie; de Serres, Marie; Aubin, Michèle; Rainville, François; Fitch, Margaret; Doll, Richard

    2012-01-01

    For many cancer control programs, cancer navigation has emerged as a specific strategy to improve access to supportive care and the patients' experience of cancer care. This study contributes to a better understanding of professional navigation by comparing two Canadian models: Quebec's Pivot Nurse in Oncology (PNO) and Nova Scotia's Cancer Patient Navigator (CPN). Qualitative interviews were conducted with professional navigators, patients and family members, front-line staff, physicians and health administrators (interviews: n = 49; focus groups: n = 10). The two models were analyzed using the professional navigation framework (Fillion et al., 2012). Although the models are different, results show that professional navigators in both programs perform similar functions and face similar challenges. This study highlights the complexity and the value of cancer navigation and recommends relevant actions to optimize its management within the health care system. PMID:23362659

  16. Modeling Teacher Professional Development Through a Telescope Making Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, J. T.; Schleigh, S. P.; Lee, T. D.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) provides a springboard to develop innovative enduring educational programming directed toward astronomy education. We examine current professional development models focusing on astronomy and discuss the need for improvement. We propose a professional development design that follows the medical field philosophy using a low cost telescope making workshop as a vehicle to test and modify the model. The workshop promotes teacher content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and develops skills and confidence in an inquiry, integrative lesson. This model can be shared with professional development leaders, coordinators and teachers in any topic or level of education. Professional development designs such as the proposed promote excitement and interest in astronomy and makes it possible for underserved and economically depressed regions to have opportunities to promote the values of scientific investigation, STEM education, and public awareness of astronomy.

  17. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  18. General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an individual's degree…

  19. The corporate organization of hospital work: balancing professional and administrative responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Stoeckle, J D; Reiser, S J

    1992-03-01

    The development of the hospital into a corporation has influenced the care of patients and the work of the professional staff. As a corporate enterprise, the modern hospital has a private agenda aimed at increasing growth and efficiency with an emphasis on technical services, professionals as employees, and patients as customers. These changes have resulted in a decrease in trustee and professional authority and an increase in administrative control. This shift in the control structure has continued in response to the need for accounting and regulation of services and in response to demands for increased growth and efficiency made by an increasingly competitive market environment. Strategies for the reorganization of hospital staff aimed at improving both inpatient and outpatient care are reviewed. The reorganization of the institution and staff, using either a staff group-practice corporation or an administrative staff model, is proposed. Clinicians have new responsibilities for developing collective arrangements for institutional governance, for allocating institutional resources, for providing public accountability regarding the use of these resources, and for defining the missions of care. PMID:1736774

  20. A renal nursing professional practice model: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Downing, Linda; Ridley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Professional practice models provide a structure for excellence in nursing practice. Our centre has had a long tradition of working with a professional practice model with proven nursing outcomes such as job satisfaction, empowerment and perceptions of improved patient care. Our model, in place since 1999, has provided an opportunity to discuss and articulate a vision for nursing practice based on the values of accountability, evidence-informed care and empowerment. In order for the model to effectively guide nursing practice, a revision was necessary to keep pace with the changes in the renal program and the health care environment. The revised model needed to address the enhancements in nursing roles, practice environment, corporate requirements and patient care needs. This paper describes a revised professional practice model unique to nephrology nursing. PMID:24344518

  1. Addressing the marketplace mentality and improving professionalism in dental education: response to Richard Masella's "Renewing professionalism in dental education".

    PubMed

    Botto, Ronald W

    2007-02-01

    Richard Masella has written a very thought-provoking article that makes many excellent arguments regarding critical issues about professionalism in dental education. Rather than focus on minor points of contention, this response to his article highlights two main areas for further discussion. The first is the impact of the "marketplace" mentality and how there needs to be a balance between fiscal responsibility and ethical and professional responsibility. Changes in language are suggested as a starting point. Instead of using the term "productivity" to describe the goal, we need to focus on the process of behaving ethically, effectively, and efficiently in the provision of care to patients as well as in general professional behavior. The second major emphasis is on recommendations for improving the ethical climate of the dental college community and the teaching, exhibition, and celebration of professionalism. Included in this area are discussions of white coat ceremonies and honor codes, as well as the importance of recognizing the impact of the hidden curriculum in dental ethical education. Masella has made a major contribution by bringing forth strong arguments for discussing whether dental education truly is committed to teaching professionalism in a way that has meaning and impact rather than simply complying with accreditation standards. While there are certainly several points that appear to be speculative and could be debated in Masella's article, he has provided a valuable catalyst for discussion and introspection by identifying critical issues for both dental education and organized dentistry to address. PMID:17314382

  2. Modeling Instruction: The Impact of Professional Development on Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Angela T.; Frick, Tasha M.; Barker, Heather L.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling Instruction holds the potential for transforming science instruction and improving student achievement. Key to the success of Modeling Instruction, however, is the fidelity of implementation of its curriculum. This qualitative study examined the impact of Modeling Instruction professional development on participating teachers'…

  3. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations. PMID:17061473

  4. Press Responsibility Based on Professionalism--A Typology of Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beer, Arnold S.

    Arguing that professionalism constitutes a method according to which journalism is able to consolidate its position in society and gain the confidence of governments and the public, this paper discusses some theoretical parameters that can serve as a conceptual basis for journalistic professionalization. Noting that according to the sociology of…

  5. Responsibility Attribution for Violence against Women: A Study of Chinese Public Service Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-kum; Pun, Shuk Han; Cheung, Fanny Mui-ching

    2002-01-01

    This study examined how Chinese public service professionals attributed responsibility to victims and perpetrators of violence against women (VAW). A total of 2,308 Chinese public service professionals in Hong Kong completed questionnaires on attitudes toward women, VAW-related perceptions, and assignment of responsibility to actors in written VAW…

  6. Pikes Peak Model for Training in Professional Geropsychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Bob G.; Karel, Michele J.; Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; Qualls, Sara H.; Duffy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The aging of the population will increase demand for psychological services for older adults, which challenges the profession of psychology to provide those services. In response to that challenge, professional geropsychology has been developing over the past few decades to meet current and prepare for anticipated future demand. The development of…

  7. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  8. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  9. The Practitioner's Model: Designing a Professional Development Program for Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debbi; Robbie, Diane; Borland, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of staff responsible for developing and delivering professional development (PD) in online teaching in three universities in the same Australian state. Each university draws on a similar pool of staff and students, and operates under the same government regulations, but has used different models of policy and…

  10. Professional Education in Expert Search: A Content Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine L.; Roseberry, Martha I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive model of the subject matter taught in courses on expert search in ALA-accredited programs, answering the question: What is taught in formal professional education on search expertise? The model emerged from a grounded content analysis of 44 course descriptions and 16 syllabi, and was validated via a review of…

  11. The Professional Development School Model: Unpacking Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Lisa J.

    2004-01-01

    In response to Cochran-Smith and Lytle's (1998) call for Other ways of researching and thinking about educational research and the recent call by the US Secretary of Education to reform "teacher-training" programs (Schoicet 2002), this article presents a research study focusing on a reform effort in teacher education. The study moved beyond the…

  12. Professional responsibility in elder law: a synthesis of preventive law and therapeutic jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Stolle, D P

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the professional responsibilities that a lawyer owes to older clients. Specifically, this article proposes that when working with older clients, lawyers have a responsibility to ensure that their clients have the capacity to manage their own affairs and to ensure their clients' legal, financial, and personal interests are protected in case of sudden future incapacity. Furthermore, a lawyer working with older clients has a responsibility to remain cognizant of the realities of ageing without giving in to the falsities of senior citizen stereotypes. Through an integration of Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Preventive Law, a proactive, client-centered, four-stage framework for advancing therapeutic goals through preventive lawyering is developed. The framework is then applied to a model lawyer/client interaction typical of elder practice. The advantages and limitations of the four-stage framework are discussed. PMID:9156423

  13. Plato's Protagoras: Professional Models, Ethical Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Marshall W.

    1983-01-01

    In Plato's model his clear criticism of Protagorean careerism and his negotiation with Socratic radicalism shows he is a centrist cultivating criticism and open discourse. In an age when academe seems to have lost a sense of its identify and function in society, its most enduring contributions are criticism and discourse. (MLW)

  14. Perceived Responsibility in Decision-Making in Ethical Death Issues: The Professional Socialization of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulz, Alfred; Cox, Scott C.

    1978-01-01

    The educational socialization process into the professional role of nurse is examined in light of two related processes: first, the hierarchy of responsibility in decision making in salient ethical issues concerning death and dying, and second, the attitude structure of nursing students and professionals toward these same ethical issues. (Author)

  15. Flipped Professional Development: An Innovation in Response to Teacher Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Brooke L.; Koppenhaver, David A.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study of K-12 teachers' responses to an innovative flipped professional development series focused on literacy instruction. Thirty-six participants voluntarily enrolled in one or more of three professional development courses. Findings address teacher evaluation of the efficacy of both the structure and the content of the…

  16. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  17. Professional Development Schools: A Model for Preparing School Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Michael; Steen, Sam; Williams, Franklyn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a training model, based on The Education Trust, The American School Counselor Association, and The Holmes Partnership, consisting of school counselor trainees completing their clinical experiences in a Professional Development School. A case study demonstrating the role of the school counselor is presented along with…

  18. Developing a Model for Continuous Professional Development by Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Susan; Rainford, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the work of two teacher educators with an in-service science teacher. This case study forms one cycle of a larger action research study that will eventually lead to a model of how the third-space concept for teacher professional development can be realized in natural school settings. The case study took place in…

  19. Action Research: A Developmental Model of Professional Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a developmental model to socialize teachers at all levels (preservice, novice, and experienced) and in all positions (general education, special education, elementary school, middle school, and high school) in the methodology of action research. A process for advancing professional understanding is theorized to include the…

  20. Professional Learning: A Fuzzy Logic-Based Modelling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravani, M. N.; Hadjileontiadou, S. J.; Nikolaidou, G. N.; Hadjileontiadis, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have suggested that professional learning is influenced by two key parameters, i.e., climate and planning, and their associated variables (mutual respect, collaboration, mutual trust, supportiveness, openness). In this paper, we applied analysis of the relationships between the proposed quantitative, fuzzy logic-based model and a series of…

  1. Lesson Study: A Professional Development Model for Mathematics Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann R.; Anderson, Shari; Meyer, Karen; Wagner, Mary Kay; West, Christine

    2005-01-01

    In this action research report 4 teachers and 1 teacher educator use the Japanese lesson study model of professional development for 15 months in rural Carlinville, Illinois. In March 2001, 4 teachers identified a goal to improve their students' understanding of two step word problems in 2nd grade elementary mathematics. Teachers completed three…

  2. The Highly Engaged School: A Successful Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Author Bob Meyer, head of the Fay School (Texas) compares professional development strategies in his school to programs in other schools, which he feels are mostly prescriptive in nature, and are based on a deficit model--focused on fixing, rather than developing--and, thus, are not always inspiring. Here Meyer describes the professional…

  3. Inclusion Professional Development Model and Regular Middle School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royster, Otelia; Reglin, Gary L.; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a professional development model on regular education middle school teachers' knowledge of best practices for teaching inclusive classes and attitudes toward teaching these classes. There were 19 regular education teachers who taught the core subjects. Findings for Research Question 1…

  4. Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

  5. Te Kotahitanga: Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Russell; Berryman, Mere

    2010-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is a research and professional development project that aims to support teachers to raise the achievement of New Zealand's indigenous Maori students in public/mainstream classrooms. An Effective Teaching Profile, developed from the voices of Maori students, their families, principals and some of their teachers, provides direction…

  6. A call for responsibility in ethical issues for IS professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of persons in the business world. Public abhorrence of questionable behavior of politicians, the savings and loan scandal and insider trading violations are just a few examples of many problems in business and professional life. A 1992 study by the Josephson Institute of Ethics involving 9,000 young people and adults revealed alarmingly low ethical characteristics in American institutions. Ferrell and Fraedrick have concluded that {open_quotes}business ethics is one of the most important concerns in today`s business world.{close_quote} A few professional organizations have tried to comprehend the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of their constituents. Vittrell has studied the frequency of ethical behavior for management information specialists. Martin and Peterson have examined the ethical issues of insider trading. Fimbel and Burstein have investigated the ethical values of technology professionals. Thornburg made use of a survey concerning the ethical beliefs and practices of human resources professionals. On a preliminary basis, these studies indicate the various ethical issues and uncertainties which are problematic for members of the various professions. Most business people are ethical segregationists, that is they tend to segregate their ethical values into one type of behavior for business and another type of behavior away from business. Managers accused of unethical behavior respond with, III am not that type of person. I am active in my church, in community affairs, a good family man, and so on.

  7. Safety, Celebration, and Risk: Educator Responses to LGBTQ Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elizabethe C.; Smith, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has explored multicultural teacher education from multiple, sometimes divergent perspectives; yet, these studies agree that what passes for multicultural education fails to address issues of educational inequity. This paper is part of a larger evaluation study of Reduction of Stigma in Schools (RSIS)--a professional development program…

  8. Assessing the IRIS Professional Development Model: Impact Beyond the Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Taber, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Education and Outreach (E&O) Program has developed a highly effective, one-day professional development experience for formal educators. Leveraging the expertise of its consortium, IRIS delivers content including: plate tectonics, propagation of seismic waves, seismographs, Earth's interior structure. At the core of the IRIS professional development model is the philosophy that changes in teacher behavior can be affected by increasing teacher comfort in the classroom. Science and research organizations such as IRIS are able to increase teachers' comfort in the classroom by providing professional development which: increases an educator's knowledge of scientific content, provides educators with a variety of high-quality, scientifically accurate activities to deliver content to students, and provides educators with experiences involving both the content and the educational activities as the primary means of knowledge transfer. As reflected in a 2002-2003 academic year assessment program, this model has proven to be effective at reaching beyond participants and extending into the educators' classrooms. 76% of respondents report increasing the amount of time they spend teaching seismology or related topics in their classroom as a result of participating in IRIS professional development experience. This increase can be directly attributed to the workshop as 90% of participants report using at least one activity modeled during the workshop upon returning to their classrooms. The reported mean activity usage by teachers upon was 4.5 activities per teacher. Since the inception of the professional development model in 1999, IRIS E&O has been committed to evaluation. Data derived from assessment is utilized as a key decision making tool, driving a continuous improvement process. As a result, both the model and the assessment methods have become increasingly refined and sophisticated. The alignment of the professional development model within the IRIS E&O Program

  9. Modeling Response Signal and Response Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) and the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA, Usher & McClelland, 2001) were tested against two-choice data collected from the same subjects with the standard response time procedure and the response signal procedure. In the response signal procedure, a stimulus is presented and then, at one of a number of…

  10. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  11. A model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy.

    PubMed

    Wade, Gail Holland

    2004-03-01

    This model-testing correlational study was designed to predict a causal model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy in female baccalaureate nursing students by testing three carative factors embedded in Watson's Theory of Transpersonal Caring. Proportional quota and convenience sampling were used to collect data from 317 senior nursing students enrolled in 20 National League for Nursing-accredited baccalaureate nursing programs. Path analysis revealed that the hypothesized model was not testable. With removal of nonsignificant paths, 19.1% of the variance in perceived clinical competence was explained by self-esteem and perceptions of instructor caring behaviors. Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem, and perceived clinical competence contributed 11.1% to the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. These findings provide a baseline for understanding the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. A large percentage of the variance in the model was unexplained, suggesting the need for further study of other contributing variables. PMID:15072338

  12. Pacific CRYSTAL Teacher Professional Development Models: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Flier-Keller, E.; Yore, L.

    2010-12-01

    From 2005 to 2010 Pacific CRYSTAL (Centre for Research in Youth Science Teaching and Learning) has been engaged in community-based research fostering teacher leadership in innovative science education through a variety of approaches to teacher professional development. Pacific CRYSTAL is a University of Victoria based, NSERC funded project founded on a collaborative research model involving scentists, science educators and community members including schools, teachers, community groups and government. Pacific CRYSTAL professional development approaches embrace both in-service teachers and pre-service teachers, and include Lighthouse schools, workshops (ongoing as well as one-time), community-based partnerships in Pacific CRYSTAL research projects, teachers as researchers, and university science courses and workshops for pre-education and education students. A number of common themes, identified through these approaches, should be considered in the development and implementation of future science professional development initiatives. They include; teacher turnover, expanding and adding schools and participating teachers, teacher apprehension, building leadership capacity, further engagement of 'tourist' teachers, continuing professional support for teachers, as well as on-going mentoring.

  13. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but "blocking out time" and "time shifting" suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  14. Response to Intervention: Perspectives of General and Special Education Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bineham, Susan C.; Shelby, Liz; Pazey, Barbara L.; Yates, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Federal legislation allows local education agencies to use a student's response to scientific research-based interventions as a method of identifying specific learning disabilities. As a result, educational leadership is challenged to implement response to intervention (RTI). Despite increased literature addressing RTI, no consensus on…

  15. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index (JUSTICE/OPR-001... from 5 U.S.C. 552a(d). (1) Freedom of Information/Privacy Act (FOI/PA) Records (JUSTICE/OPR-002)....

  16. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index (JUSTICE/OPR-001... from 5 U.S.C. 552a(d). (1) Freedom of Information/Privacy Act (FOI/PA) Records (JUSTICE/OPR-002)....

  17. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index (JUSTICE/OPR-001... from 5 U.S.C. 552a(d). (1) Freedom of Information/Privacy Act (FOI/PA) Records (JUSTICE/OPR-002)....

  18. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index (JUSTICE/OPR-001... from 5 U.S.C. 552a(d). (1) Freedom of Information/Privacy Act (FOI/PA) Records (JUSTICE/OPR-002)....

  19. 28 CFR 16.80 - Exemption of Office of Professional Responsibility System-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Responsibility System-limited access. 16.80 Section 16.80 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...), (e)(5) and (8), (f) and (g): (1) Office of Professional Responsibility Record Index (JUSTICE/OPR-001... from 5 U.S.C. 552a(d). (1) Freedom of Information/Privacy Act (FOI/PA) Records (JUSTICE/OPR-002)....

  20. Responsibility-Based Continuing Professional Development for In-Service Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the National Standards for Physical Education have endorsed the notion that physical educators should teach personal and social responsibility. Continuing professional development (CPD) programs, based on teaching personal and social responsibility, are needed to support teacher's adherence to the national standards. The purpose…

  1. Paraeducator Professional Development Curriculum. Module I: Building an Effective Instructional Team Part One: Paraeducator Roles, Responsibilities, and Professional Ethics. Trainer's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory NWREL, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Module I provides paraeducators an opportunity to increase what they know about professional ethics and the appropriate roles and responsibilities of paraeducators. The module has been designed to address two goals: to develop an understanding of paraeducator professional and ethical standards; to develop a basic understanding of paraeducator…

  2. A Hybrid Evaluation Model for Evaluating Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie; Zygouris-Coe, Vicky; Fiedler, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Online professional development is multidimensional. It encompasses: a) an online, web-based format; b) professional development; and most likely c) specific objectives tailored to and created for the respective online professional development course. Evaluating online professional development is therefore also multidimensional and as such both…

  3. Professionalism, scientific freedom and dissent: individual and institutional roles and responsibilities in geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Debate and dissent are at the heart of scientific endeavour. A diversity of perspectives, alternative interpretations of evidence and the robust defence of competing theories and models drive the advancement of scientific knowledge. Just as importantly, legitimate dissent and diversity of views should not be covered up when offering scientific advice to policy-makers and providing evidence to inform public debate - indeed, they should be valued. We should offer what Andy Stirling has termed 'plural and conditional' scientific advice, not just for the sake of democratic legitimacy, but because it supports better informed and more effective policy-making. 'Monocultures' of scientific advice may have a superficial appeal to policy-makers, but they devalue the contribution of scientists, undermine the resilience of regulatory structures, are often misleading, and can lead to catastrophic policy failure. Furthermore, many of the great societal challenges now facing us require interdisciplinary approaches, across the natural sciences and more widely still, which bring to the fore the need for humility, recognition that we do not have all the answers, and mutual respect for the views of others. In contentious areas such as climate change, extraction of shale gas and radioactive waste disposal, however, such open dialogue may make researchers and practitioners vulnerable to advocates and campaigners who cherry-pick the evidence, misinterpret it, or seek to present scientific uncertainty and debate as mere ignorance. Nor are scientists themselves always above such unethical tactics. The apparent authority conferred on unscrupulous 'campaigning scientists' by their academic and professional credentials may make it all but impossible to distinguish them from those who legitimately make the case for a minority scientific view (and may be marginalised by the mainstream of their discipline in doing so). There is a risk that real scientific debate may be thwarted. Individual

  4. Using Blogs to Promote Literary Response during Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Jamie; Hutchison, Amy; Reinking, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that studied 15 preservice teachers' perceptions of and reactions to responding to children's and young adult literature using a Ning blog. These perceptions and reactions provided insight into various practical aspects of using a social networking blog to facilitate literature response in a teacher education…

  5. The Entrepreneurial Response of Public Universities. Professional File, Summer 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    To complete in the increasingly competitive marketplace, public universities need to become more flexible and more focused in reactions to expanding and changing demands. As the case study of five European universities by B. Clark (1998) demonstrates, an entrepreneurial response on the part of universities results in diversified income, a…

  6. PHOTON2: A web-based professional development model for photonics technology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Nicholas M.; Washburn, Barbara A.; Kehrhahn, Marijke; Donnelly, Judith F.; Hanes, Fenna D.

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we present a web-based teacher professional development model for photonics technology education funded by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (ATE) program. In response to the rapidly growing demand for skilled photonics technicians, the PHOTON2 project will increase the number of high school teachers and community college faculty across the US proficient in teaching photonics technology at their own institutions. The project will also focus on building the capacity of educators to engage in lifelong learning through web-based professional development. Unlike the traditional professional development model whereby educators receive training through intensive short-term workshops, the PHOTON2 project team has developed a pedagogical framework designed specifically for adult learners in which technical content, curriculum development, and learner self-regulatory development are integrated into an active, collaborative, and sustained online learning environment. In Spring 2004, two cohorts of science and technology educators, career/guidance counselors, and industry mentors from eleven states including California, Pennsylvania, Texas, Arizona, Hawaii, and the six New England states commenced participation in the three-year project. Qualitative and quantitative research, focused on individual and environmental factors related to web-based learning, will examine the viability of web-based teacher/faculty professional development in engineering technology education.

  7. A Practice-Based Theory of Professional Education: Teach For America's Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, Ball and Cohen proposed a practice-based theory of professional education, which would end inadequate professional development efforts with a more comprehensive approach. Their work has been referenced over the past decade, yet there have been limited attempts to actualize their ideals and research their implications. In this article, I…

  8. A Model of Professional Development: Teachers' Perceptions of Their Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avidov-Ungar, Orit

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to evaluate the manner in which teachers perceive their professional development process. Forty-three teachers from Israeli schools participated in the study. I used a semi-structured interview to understand the teachers' perceptions about their professional development. The qualitative analysis identified two dimensions that…

  9. Population, professional, and client support for different models of managing addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Koski-Jännes, Anja; Hirschovits-Gerz, Tanja; Pennonen, Marjo

    2012-02-01

    This study, funded by the Academy of Finland, explores how different stakeholder groups in Finland attribute responsibility for various addictions. A random general population survey and surveys with addiction treatment professionals and clients (n = 1,338) were conducted in 2007-2008. The data were analyzed with analyses of variance and logistic regression analysis. Individual responsibility was emphasized by all groups. The Moral model dominated in behavioral and the Enlightenment model in hard drug addictions, views on other substance addictions varied more. Some signs of the actor-observer asymmetry were observed. Personal addiction experiences and sex were the major predictors of the average response tendencies. The heavy emphasis on individual responsibility may prevent help-seeking. PMID:22217128

  10. Engaging learners across generations: the Progressive Professional Development Model.

    PubMed

    Notarianni, Mary Ann; Curry-Lourenco, Kimberly; Barham, Phyllis; Palmer, Kay

    2009-06-01

    The Progressive Professional Development Model (PPDM) is a framework to guide educators in planning learning experiences that promote development in the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. The model marries the use of standardized patients and virtual and simulated practice environments with traditional clinical practice and offers the opportunity to address learning styles of a multigenerational work force. Proposed is the application of technology in designing both instructional and evaluative experiences for new nurse orientation and continuing education. Outcome measures include learning of increasingly complex knowledge, values, skills, and demonstration of competency-based behaviors. Examples of application are provided, including a discussion of considerations for operationalizing the model in the health care setting. PMID:19639915

  11. The Importance of the Medical Record: A Critical Professional Responsibility.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Elizabeth; Patel, Nachiket; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Tajik, A Jamil; Paterick, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, detailed documentation in the medical record is critical to patient care and to a physician when allegations of negligence arise. Physicians, therefore, would be prudent to have a clear understanding of this documentation. It is important to understand who is responsible for documentation, what is important to document, when to document, and how to document. Additionally, it should be understood who owns the medical record, the significance of the transition to the electronic medical record, problems and pitfalls when using the electronic medical record, and how the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act affects healthcare providers and health information technology. PMID:27249883

  12. Models of professional regulation: institutionalizing an agency relationship

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of medical practice can historically be understood as a second-level agency relationship whereby the state delegated authority to professional bodies to police the primary agency relationship between the individual physician and the patient. Borow, Levi and Glekin show how different national systems vary in the degree to which they insist on institutionally insulating the agency function from the promotion of private professional interests, and relate these variations to different models of the health care state. In fact these differences have even deeper roots in different “liberal” or “coordinated” varieties of capitalist political economies. Neither model is inherently more efficient than the other: what matters is the internal coherence or logic of these systems that conditions the expectations of actors in responding to particular challenges. The territory that Borow, Levi and Glekin have usefully mapped invites further exploration in this regard. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/8. PMID:23537144

  13. Authoring Professional Teacher Identities: A Journey from Understanding Culturally Responsive Teaching to Identifying as Culturally Responsive Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschida, Christina Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which four elementary preservice teachers came to understand culturally responsive teaching and began authoring their professional teacher identities. It examined the influence of course work and internship at a culturally and linguistically diverse school on their understandings and…

  14. Transplant ethics under scrutiny - responsibilities of all medical professionals.

    PubMed

    Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L; Lavee, Jacob

    2013-02-01

    In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices. PMID:23444249

  15. Transplant ethics under scrutiny – responsibilities of all medical professionals

    PubMed Central

    Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L.; Lavee, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices. PMID:23444249

  16. Impact of Professional Development on Preschool Teachers' Conversational Responsivity and Children's Linguistic Productivity and Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Wiggins, Alice K.; Turnbull, Khara Pence; Curenton, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of professional development (PD) on preschool teachers' conversational responsivity in the classroom, defined as teachers' use of strategies to promote children's participation in extended conversational exchanges (communication-facilitating strategies) and exposure to advanced linguistic models…

  17. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities. 120.113 Section 120.113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  18. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Awareness and Professional Growth through a School-University Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Theresa M.; Eick, Charles J.; Womack, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing in-service and pre-service teachers to effectively work with culturally diverse students is an ongoing challenge for schools and universities alike. This article reports on a University-Professional Development School (PDS) initiative designed to enhance an awareness of culturally responsive pedagogy. This article describes a yearlong…

  19. Learning Agreements and Socially Responsible Approaches to Professional and Human Resource Development in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon original qualitative data to present an initial assessment of the significance of learning agreements for the development of socially responsible approaches to professional and human resource development within the workplace. The article suggests that the adoption of a partnership-based approach to learning is more…

  20. Implementation and Outcomes of a Responsibility-Based Continuing Professional Development Protocol in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.; Templin, Thomas J.; Wright, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Research in education and physical education has emphasized the need for continuing professional development (CPD) programs that are aligned with best practices. More specifically, scholars interested in teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) have emphasized the need to examine teachers' CPD. The purpose of this study was to…

  1. Diversity Profile Report of the AEJMC Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lowndes F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the diversity profile of the Standing Committee on Professional Freedom and Responsibility of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) membership. Focuses on the gender and ethnic identity of members. Finds that women are overrepresented in 11 of 31 subgroups; males are overrepresented in 3 subgroups;…

  2. Literacy Instruction in Rural Elementary Schools in Jamaica: Response to Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stacy A. S.; Staulters, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    Rural educators from several elementary schools in southwest Jamaica completed pre- and post-literacy surveys. Professional training was developed and provided in response to the pre-assessment results. Literacy training combined two essential skills: (a) ongoing assessment of literacy achievement and (b) evidenced-based intervention strategies.…

  3. Understanding Teacher Candidates' Engagement with Inquiry-Based Professional Development: A Continuum of Responses and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Audra; Bush, Amanda; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Teacher educators recognize that teacher candidates must have authentic, scaffolded opportunities to transform knowledge into practice. This study explores teacher candidates' engagement with teacher inquiry as a method for supporting professional development. Findings suggest teacher candidates differ tremendously in their responses to the…

  4. Interventions to Improve Responses of Helping Professionals to Intimate Partner Violence: A Quick Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Y. Joon; An, Soonok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the response of various helping professionals who come into contact with female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Methods: Several databases were searched, and N = 38 studies met the inclusion criteria…

  5. Reading Coaches as an In-Class Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Marcia V.

    2007-01-01

    Professional development should be a career-long process in which teachers tweak their teaching methodology, practices, and style to meet student needs. Is there a better place to offer professional development opportunities than at "ground zero"? This paper outlines one school's attempt to bring quality professional development to the…

  6. Building a Model of Early Years Professionalism from Practitioners’ Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Avril

    2013-01-01

    Practitioner voice has been absent from debates regarding what constitutes professional behaviour and practice in the early years. This research identifies and uses the professional knowledge of a group of early years educators to create a typology of professionalism. The typology comprises seven inter-related dimensions of early years…

  7. The PKRC's Value as a Professional Development Model Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Dale

    2013-01-01

    After a brief review of the 4-H professional development standards, a new model for determining the value of continuing professional development is introduced and applied to the 4-H standards. The validity of the 4-H standards is affirmed. 4-H Extension professionals are encouraged to celebrate the strength of their standards and to engage the…

  8. Coaching in Special Education: Toward a Model of Differentiated Professional Development for Elementary School Paraeducators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk-Martinez, Jacqueline Faith

    2011-01-01

    Although there is a considerable amount of research studies about effective professional development, a literature review revealed that educators are not receiving effective professional development in order to improve instruction. What is paramount in the studies of professional development is that the traditional one-shot model does not meet the…

  9. [Some specific aspects of dentistry's professional responsibility: tooth extraction surgery, prosthodontics, implantology and HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Montalto, B; Grandini, S; Magheri, P; Grandini, R

    1998-05-01

    In the last decades the problem of professional responsibility of the doctors went through deep conceptual re-examination. Some criteria, both general and more technically legal, are presented in order to correctly evaluate the professional liability. Then some specific aspects of the object are examined, such as the damaging of the inferior alveolar nerve after dental extraction, the problems concerning dental prosthetics and implants as well as the questions about HIV infection, acquired by patients or collaborators of the dentist, in his office. PMID:9677818

  10. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so. PMID:21079222

  11. [Planned non-hospital births in industrialized countries: bureaucratic dream vs. professional responsibility].

    PubMed

    Arabin, B; Chervenak, F A; McCullough, L B

    2013-02-01

    This article addresses in how far planned non-hospital births should be an alternative to planned hospital births. Advocates of planned non-hospital deliveries have emphasised patient safety, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and respect for women's rights. We provide a critical evaluation of each of these claims and have doubts that the information available for the pregnant women and the public is in accord with professional responsibility. We understand that the increasing rates of interventions and operative deliveries in hospital births demand an answer, but we doubt that planned home birth is the appropriate professional solution. Complications during non-hospital births inevitably demand a transport of mother and child to a perinatal centre. The time delay by itself is an unnecessary risk for both and this cannot be abolished by bureaucratic quality criteria as introduced for non-hospital births in Germany. Evidence-based studies have shown that modern knowledge of the course of delivery including ultrasound as well as intensive care during the delivery all reduce the rate of operative deliveries. Unfortunately, this is not well-known and only rarely considered during any delivery. All these facts, however, are the best arguments to find a cooperative model within perinatal centres to combine the art of midwifery with modern science, reduction of pain and perinatal care of the pregnant women before, during and after birth. We therefore call on obstetricians, midwifes and health-care providers as well as health politicians to carefully analyse the studies from Western countries showing increasing risks if the model of intention-to-treat is considered and accoordingly not to support planned non-hospital births nor to include these models into prospective trials. Alternatively, we recommend the introduction of a home-like climate within hospitals and perinatal centres, to avoid unnecessary invasive measures and to really care for the pregnant mother

  12. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  13. Randomized Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The randomized response (RR) technique is often used to obtain answers on sensitive questions. A new method is developed to measure latent variables using the RR technique because direct questioning leads to biased results. Within the RR technique is the probability of the true response modeled by an item response theory (IRT) model. The RR…

  14. Acute response and chronic stimulus for cardiac structural and functional adaptation in a professional boxer.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, David; George, Keith; Utomi, Victor; Lord, Rachel; Morton, James; Jones, Nigel; Somauroo, John

    2014-06-01

    The individual response to acute and chronic changes in cardiac structure and function to intense exercise training is not fully understood and therefore evidence in this setting may help to improve the timing and interpretation of pre-participation cardiac screening. The following case report highlights an acute increase in right ventricular (RV) size and a reduction in left ventricular (LV) basal radial function with concomitant increase at the mid-level in response to a week's increase in training volume in a professional boxer. These adaptations settle by the second week; however, chronic physiological adaptation occurs over a 12-week period. Electrocardiographic findings demonstrate an acute lateral T-wave inversion at 1 week, which revert to baseline for the duration of training. It appears that a change in training intensity and volume generates an acute response within the RV that acts as a stimulus for chronic adaptation in this professional boxer. PMID:25988031

  15. Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, W R

    1982-01-01

    Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

  16. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  17. Rehabilitation of Cleft Palate: Parents and Professionals, A Unifying Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary; Schneiderman, Carl

    1977-01-01

    Described are commonalities and differences between parents of children with cleft palate and rehabilitation professionals, and offered are suggestions to increase communication and joint effectiveness. (DB)

  18. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  19. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key

  20. A Professional Development School Innovation: A University's Response to Special Education Teacher Shortages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Mary C.; Lal, Shirley; Berlin, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the application of the Professional Development School (PDS) Model (Holmes Group, 1986), to an alternative special education (SPED) credential program designed to prepare SPED teachers (for culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse urban K-12 schools and to ease SPED teachers shortages within our…

  1. Idea Sharing: Professionalizing ESP Teaching to University Students through Modeling Professional Interaction in ESP Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the implementation of the "constructivist approach" in ESP teaching to university students. This approach creates opportunities for students to "construct" their own target language communication skills meant for use in their professional intercourse. The way of achieving such an effect can be seen in…

  2. Plague Doctors in the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Mental Health Professionals and the "San Francisco Model," 1981-1990.

    PubMed

    Blair, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health professionals were among the first and most crucial responders to HIV/AIDS. Given an epidemic in which behavior and identity played fundamental roles, mental health professionals were uniquely positioned to conduct social research to explain the existence and spread of disease; to develop clinical understanding of psychological aspects of HIV/AIDS as they emerged; and to collaborate with affected communities to promote education and behavioral change. This study examines the roles of mental health professionals as "plague doctors" in San Francisco's response to HIV/AIDS, in the early years of the epidemic. Among the many collaborations and projects that distinguished the "San Francisco model" of response to this plague, bathhouse-based epidemiology, consult-liaison psychiatry, and community partnerships for counseling and education are examined in detail as illustrations of the epidemic-changing engagement of the mental health community. PMID:27374849

  3. The Role of Positive Emotion towards Work as a Mediator in the Relationship between Organizational Responsiveness towards Teachers and Isolation in Professional Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostanci, Aynur B.

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed for the purpose of determining the mediator role of positive emotion towards work within the relationship between organizational responsiveness towards teachers in schools and social isolation in professional life, based on teacher opinions. The study was designed using a relational survey model. The study group was made…

  4. Teacher Study Groups: Toward a Model of Differentiated Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox-Mallory, Michelle Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    While there is extensive research related to the study of high-quality professional development, the research shows that there is limited evidence to indicate that teachers are provided with this type of professional development on a consistent, ongoing basis. The research also suggests that there is a lack of adequate evidence to show that…

  5. Instructional Technology Professional Development Evaluation: Developing a High Quality Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge A.; McEwen, Beryl C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The literature contains very few studies that focused on evaluating the impact of professional development activities on student learning. And, many of these studies failed to determine whether the professional development activities met their primary goal--to improve the learning process. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use…

  6. Professional Practice Schools: Building a Model. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Marsha, Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses three important aspects of professional practice schools: student learning, teacher development, and implementation issues related to collaboration among institutions and state policy environment. The first paper, "The Child as Meaning Maker: The Organizing Theme of Professional Practice Schools" (Ellen M.…

  7. The Medical Model and the Preparation of Education Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    1993-01-01

    By reviewing the training of medical professionals, one can identify similarities to the preparation of education professionals (teachers). On a basic level, the medicine and education fields are both practice-oriented; require individuals with problem-solving, decision-making, and interpersonal skills; depend on information bases that multiply…

  8. Teachers' Continuing Professional Development: Contested Concepts, Understandings and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Christine; Kennedy, Aileen; Reid, Lesley; Mckinney, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) is being given increasing importance in countries throughout the world. In Scotland, the changing professional and political context has resulted in unprecedented investment in CPD. However, analysis and evaluation of CPD policies, practice and impact is complex. In seeking to understand some of…

  9. Responsive medical professionalism: integrating education, practice, and community in a market-driven era.

    PubMed

    Frankford, D M; Konrad, T R

    1998-02-01

    Revolutionary changes in the nature and form of medical practice institutions are likely to reverberate backward into medical education as leaders of the new practice organizations demand that the educational mission be responsive to their needs, and as these demands are increasingly backed by market power. In the face of this pressure, medical education's traditional response--that it should have autonomy in defining its mission--is no longer viable. Instead, more explicit, formal, and systemic linkages between practice and educational institutions are inevitable. The crucial question is whether these linkages will reflect the values of the market, oriented by economic self-interest, or the values of medical professionalism, oriented by the obligation to sacrifice economic self-interest in the service of patients. The authors maintain that the realization of the normative ideal of professionalism in medical education within the emerging market environment requires that a vision be articulated that is distinct from that of either autonomy or the market, and that combined lay-professional institutions be established to integrate--and perhaps merge--education and practice, and to foster responsiveness to lay values and community needs. The authors conclude by briefly describing examples of current efforts in this direction. PMID:9484186

  10. A professional response to demands for accountability: practical recommendations regarding ethical aspects of patient care. Working Group on Accountability.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, L L

    1996-01-15

    Forceful new demands for accountability in medicine are arising from many interested parties. To maintain professional standards, physicians need to establish which demands are desirable and which are not. We adopt a model of stratified accountability that includes three major components: the accountable parties, the subject matter, and the processes for accountability. To begin describing the model, we focus on physicians and health care institutions. We focus on the ethical dimensions of medical practice, both because the difficulty of measuring such behaviors makes this a test case for accountability and because of the importance of ethical standards in maintaining patient trust. We first identify eight widely endorsed content areas for accountability in ethical conduct: medical decision making, confidentiality, fiduciary obligations (including conflicts of interest), responsibilities arising from patient vulnerability, personal standards, equity among patients, cultural representation, and procedures for resolving dilemmas. We then identify the currently most valid and reliable methods for assessing conduct: surveys among all involved parties, testing methods used for accreditation, limited audits, publication of policy, and careful use of report cards. A prototypical survey and report card are illustrated. However, we also note the need for improved accountability assessment methods. We next identify mechanisms for taking responsibility: sharing information, exchanging perspectives, making adjustments, and enforcing standards when necessary. Finally, because this report only begins to describe a small part of the accountability model, we urge explicit identification and development of professional standards for accountability in the many other areas of medicine. PMID:8534000

  11. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings. PMID:22733680

  12. Institutional Response to the Swedish Model of Quality Assurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Karl-Axel; Wahlen, Staffan

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the Swedish model of quality assurance of higher education by examining the response of institutions to 27 quality audits and 19 follow-up interviews. Discusses the relationship between top-down and bottom-up approaches to internal quality assurance and suggests that, with growing professionalization, more limited result-oriented audits…

  13. A Review of Contemporary Ethical Decision-Making Models for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Perry C.

    2015-01-01

    Mental health professionals are faced with increasingly complex ethical decisions that are impacted by culture, personal and professional values, and the contexts in which they and their clients inhabit. This article presents the reasons for developing and implementing multiple ethical decision making models and reviews four models that address…

  14. Expanding the Professional Development School Model: Developing Collaborative Partnerships with School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Gretchen E.; Goslee, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The Professional Development School (PDS) model, a successful collaborative partnership model between university teacher education programs and P-12 schools, focuses on ''preparing future educators, providing current educators with ongoing professional development, encouraging joint school-university faculty investigation of…

  15. A Model for Optimum Professional Preparation and Development in a Field Called Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Earle F.

    This paper describes a model for optimum professional preparation and development in the field of physical education. Five internal problems within the physical education profession are listed, and a disciplinary approach to physical education is discussed. The author's model for optimum professional development is then described. The model…

  16. Social and health care professionals' views on responsible agency in the process of ending intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Virkki, Tuija

    2015-06-01

    This article examines social and health care professionals' views, based on their encounters with both victims and perpetrators, on the division of responsibility in the process of ending intimate partner violence. Applying discourse analysis to focus group discussions with a total of 45 professionals on solutions to the problem, several positions of responsible agency in which professionals place themselves and their clients are identified. The results suggest that one key to understanding the complexities involved in violence intervention lies in a more adequate theorization of the temporal and intersubjective dimensions of the process of assigning responsibility for the problem. PMID:25827611

  17. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  18. Towards Modeling a Collaborative Environment for Extension of Professional Active Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsarmanesh, Hamideh; Camarinha-Matos, Luis

    Progress on computer networks is offering new conditions for individuals to remain active after their retirement. Furthermore, the scarcity of human resources and the increasing percentage of elder professionals in Europe have catalyzed the formation of a new type of collaborative community referred to as community of active senior professionals (CASP). These new networks aim to support retired professionals with their participation in socio-economic activities and thus remaining professionally active. As such, identification of their specificities as well as developing a descriptive model of CASPs is challenging. This paper characterizes the CASP environments and performs a first attempt towards identifying and modeling their constituent elements.

  19. European Religious Education Teachers' Perceptions of and Responses to Classroom Diversity and Their Relationship to Personal and Professional Biographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everington, Judith; ter Avest, Ina; Bakker, Cok; van der Want, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on teachers of secondary level religious education in England, Estonia, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Norway. It presents a study of the teachers' perceptions of and responses to the diversity within their classes, in relation to their professional role and their personal and professional biographies. The study employed…

  20. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  1. Linking Item Response Model Parameters.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Wim J; Barrett, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    With a few exceptions, the problem of linking item response model parameters from different item calibrations has been conceptualized as an instance of the problem of test equating scores on different test forms. This paper argues, however, that the use of item response models does not require any test score equating. Instead, it involves the necessity of parameter linking due to a fundamental problem inherent in the formal nature of these models-their general lack of identifiability. More specifically, item response model parameters need to be linked to adjust for the different effects of the identifiability restrictions used in separate item calibrations. Our main theorems characterize the formal nature of these linking functions for monotone, continuous response models, derive their specific shapes for different parameterizations of the 3PL model, and show how to identify them from the parameter values of the common items or persons in different linking designs. PMID:26155754

  2. A Comprehensive Supervision Model for Promoting Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhartz, Judy; Beach, Don M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the salient attributes of adult cognitive functioning and supervisory styles and integrates them within the systems of developmental and clinical supervision to create an individualized professional development plan. (FL)

  3. Student perceptions of a community engagement experience: exploration of reflections on social responsibility and professional formation.

    PubMed

    Furze, Jennifer; Black, Lisa; Peck, Kirk; Jensen, Gail M

    2011-08-01

    Physical therapy educators are challenged to emphasize the importance of social responsibility as a vital curricular element of professional development. Through reflection, students are able to identify core values, beliefs, and attitudes as part of the professional development process. The purpose of this study was to explore student perceptions and values of a community engagement experience based upon frequency of participation. This qualitative research report investigated student perceptions of the community experience following participation. Data collection tools included an open-ended questionnaire and focus group interviews. Comparisons were made across data for participants who engaged in the activity one time versus multiple times. Data analysis revealed participation in the community engagement experience had a positive impact on most participants. One time only participants demonstrated increased self-awareness, contemplating change, and capacity to serve while more than one time participants described a deeper understanding of community, impact on others, and professional transformation. Student involvement in community engagement activities combined with structured reflection provided meaningful insight into participants' personal beliefs. The results suggest incorporation of community-based learning experiences into academic curriculum may be beneficial in the students' preliminary understanding of social responsibility. PMID:20946070

  4. Police and mental health professionals. Collaborative responses to the impact of violence on children and families.

    PubMed

    Marans, S; Berkowitz, S J; Cohen, D J

    1998-07-01

    Coordinating responses through the Child Development-Community Policing Program has led to multiple changes in the delivery of clinical and police services. Mental health clinicians and police officers have developed a common language for assessing and responding to the needs of children and families who have been exposed to or involved in violence. Learning from each other, these unlikely partners have established close working relationships that improve and expand the range of interventions they are able to provide while preserving the areas of expertise and responsibilities of each professional group. The immediate access to witnesses, victims, and perpetrators of violent crimes through the consultation service provides a unique opportunity to expand the understanding of clinical phenomena from the acute traumatic moment to longer-term adaptation, symptom formation, and recovery. In turn, the initiative introduces the systematic study of basic psychological and neurobiologic functions involved in traumatization as well as the investigation of psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic therapies. Similarly, program involvement with juvenile offenders has led to a coordinated response from the police, mental health, and juvenile justice systems. This project provides an opportunity to develop detailed psychological profiles and typologies of children engaged in different levels of antisocial behavior as well as to determine the characteristics that might predict with whom community-based interventions might be most successful. A recent survey of New Haven public school students has yielded promising evidence that community policing and the program are having a positive impact on the quality of life. In a survey of sixth-, eighth-, and tenth-grade students there were substantial improvements in students' sense of safety and experience of violence between 1992 and 1996. When asked if they felt safe in their neighborhood, there was an increase in the percentage of positive

  5. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  6. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency. PMID:25419290

  7. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism. PMID:12525406

  8. Model refinement using transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

  9. Implementing a K-12 Train the Trainer Professional Development Model through the School Improvement Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnow, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Effective professional development has been shown to improve instruction and increase student academic achievement. The Train the Trainer professional development model is often chosen by the state Department of Education for its efficiency and cost effectiveness of delivering training to schools and districts widely distributed throughout the…

  10. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  11. Professional Development for Music Educators: A Proposed Model and Sample Program Relative to Teacher Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Dominick J., IV

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for professional development based upon the views of in-service (practicing) music educators regarding their own professional development experiences and preferences. Toward this end, a survey was developed that gathered data from in-service music educators who were all members of the North Jersey…

  12. A Primer on Responsibility Centre Budgeting and Responsibility Centre Management. Professional File, Winter 1999, Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Daniel W.

    This monograph is a "how-to" manual on responsibility center budgeting (RCB) and responsibility center management (RCM) in the context of Canadian and U.S. institutions. It explains how RCB/RCM works in practice and discusses some of the problems encountered in implementing this strategy at a number of Canadian and U.S. universities. The paper…

  13. A Project-Based Model for Professional Environmental Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    The projects described in this article were designed to provide a real world situation akin to the work of environmental professionals. The projects were conducted with Australian students working on environmental issues in Vietnam. The projects demonstrated that multi-disciplinary teamwork fits well into environmental projects, and importantly…

  14. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  15. The Identification of Effective Models for Developing Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy Herard, Berretta

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive study was to determine whether significant differences existed in the perceptions of elementary school teachers regarding the presence of the 5 dimensions of professional learning communities (PLCs) in Title I schools scoring above versus Title I schools scoring below the 55th percentile on state…

  16. Preschool Literacy and the Common Core: A Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Donna G.; Benson, Tammy Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Many states have adopted the Common Core Standards for literacy and math and have begun enacting these standards in school curriculum. In states where these standards have been adopted, professional educators working in K-12 contexts have been working to create transition plans from existing state-based standards to the Common Core standards. A…

  17. Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in Science Education Faculty, and Future and Current Science Teachers: Providing Professional Learning, Instructional Materials, and a Model for Locally-Relevant and Culturally-Responsive Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halversen, C.; Apple, J. K.; McDonnell, J. D.; Weiss, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for 5th grade students to "obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth's resources and environment". Achieving this, and other objectives in NGSS, will require changes in the educational system for both students and teachers. Teachers need access to high quality instructional materials and continuous professional learning opportunities starting in pre-service education. Students need highly engaging and authentic learning experiences focused on content that is strategically interwoven with science practices. Pre-service and early career teachers, even at the secondary level, often have relatively weak understandings of the complex Earth systems science required for understanding climate change and hold alternative ideas and naïve beliefs about the nature of science. These naïve understandings cause difficulties in portraying and teaching science, especially considering what is being called for in NGSS. The ACLIPSE program focuses on middle school pre-service science teachers and education faculty because: (1) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the disciplinary core ideas and practices in NGSS for middle grades; and (2) middle school is a critical time for capturing students interest in science as student engagement by eighth grade is the most effective predictor of student pursuit of science in high school and college. Capturing student attention at this age is critical for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. THE ACLIPSE program uses cutting edge research and technology in ocean observing systems to provide educators with new tools to engage students that will lead to deeper understanding of the interactions between the ocean and climate systems. Establishing authentic, meaningful connections between indigenous and place-based, and technological climate observations will help generate a more holistic perspective

  18. Using a High-Performance Planning Model to Increase Levels of Functional Effectiveness Within Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Winter, Peggi

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional practice models continue to shape how we practice nursing by putting families and members at the heart of everything we do. Faced with enormous challenges around healthcare reform, models create frameworks for practice by unifying, uniting, and guiding our nurses. The Kaiser Permanente Practice model was developed to ensure consistency for nursing practice across the continuum. Four key pillars support this practice model and the work of nursing: quality and safety, leadership, professional development, and research/evidence-based practice. These four pillars form the foundation that makes transformational practice possible and aligns nursing with Kaiser Permanente's mission. The purpose of this article is to discuss the pillar of professional development and the components of the Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice model (American Nurses Association & National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 2010) and place them in a five-level development framework. This process allowed us to identify the current organizational level of practice, prioritize each nursing professional development component, and design an operational strategy to move nursing professional development toward a level of high performance. This process is suggested for nursing professional development specialists. PMID:26457816

  19. Responsive Professional Education: Balancing Outcomes and Opportunities. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Joan S.; And Others

    Goals and outcomes in various fields of professional education are considered. Attention is directed to generic outcomes of professional preparation, the emphasis these outcomes receive among professional educators, some problems that concern professional educators, and recommendations for future action and study. The generic outcomes, which were…

  20. A Model to Build Collaborative Research or Educational Teams of Health Professionals in Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A model of academic faculty/health professional collaboration includes assessment/goal setting, determining collaborative fit, resource identification, refinement/implementation, and evaluation. It is based on concepts of social exchange, negotiation, role differentiation, and trust. (SK)

  1. Implementation of a nursing professional practice model of care in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jodi E; Asher, Lucinda M

    2007-01-01

    Professional nursing practice models provide a theoretical and conceptual framework that nurses can use as a foundation for practice. The utilization of a practice model helps establish professional identity and improves quality outcomes. A freestanding children's hospital sought to identify and adopt a professional practice model to optimize outcomes for patients and families, the nursing staff, and the organization. Once a model was selected, two subgroups formed and focused on revising job descriptions and educating the nursing staff. Various strategies were used to implement the model and sustain the culture change. Examples include providing periodic education, incorporating the model into nursing procedures, and assisting nurses in using the model at the bedside. The model of care has been successfully implemented in both the inpatient and outpatient areas of this pediatric hospital. PMID:18196713

  2. Teacher Preferences for Professional Development Delivery Models and Delivery Model Influence on Teacher Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Eve R.

    2011-01-01

    Current trends and research in education indicated that teacher learning is a crucial link to student achievement. There is a void in the research regarding teacher preferences for delivery models in professional development. Determining teacher preferences is an important component in professional development planning and the driving inquiry for…

  3. Functional Competency Development Model for Academic Personnel Based on International Professional Qualification Standards in Computing Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumthong, Suwut; Piriyasurawong, Pullop; Jeerangsuwan, Namon

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes a functional competency development model for academic personnel based on international professional qualification standards in computing field and examines the appropriateness of the model. Specifically, the model consists of three key components which are: 1) functional competency development model, 2) blended training…

  4. Legal Implications of Models of Individual and Group Treatment by Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patrick D.

    Although medical malpractice suits are based on a model of treatment of an individual by a professional, educational malpractice suits are based on a group treatment model. When the medical model and the teaching model are compared, the contrasts are so great that medical malpractice principles are not a reliable guide to the emerging law of…

  5. Promoting the development of professional identity of gerontologists: an academic/experiential learning model.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tracey L; Myers, Barbara J; Pelco, Lynn E; Welleford, E Ayn

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in gerontology has an essential role in providing the foundational knowledge required to work with a diverse aging population. It can also play an essential role in promoting best-practice approaches for the development of professional identity as a gerontologist. The primary goal of this study was to determine what factors predict the professional identity and career path of gerontologists. In addition, the study explored how experiential learning influenced professional identity for newcomers to the field and for those experienced in an aging-related field ("professional incumbents"). Graduates (N = 146) of Association for Gerontology in Higher Education-affiliated graduate programs participated. Professional identity as a gerontologist was predicted by length of time in the field, age, satisfaction with coworkers, and satisfaction with opportunities for advancement. Experiential learning contributed to professional identity in important but different ways for newcomers to the field and for professional incumbents. The inclusion of an academic/experiential learning model within graduate gerontology programs promotes the development of professional identity and career path for all graduate students. PMID:23383630

  6. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator. PMID:9894749

  7. A Beta Item Response Model for Continuous Bounded Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Yvonnick; Dauvier, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    An item response model is proposed for the analysis of continuous response formats in an item response theory (IRT) framework. With such formats, respondents are asked to report their response as a mark on a fixed-length graphical segment whose ends are labeled with extreme responses. An interpolation process is proposed as the response mechanism…

  8. Overview of Responsive Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimnicht, Glen P.

    The Responsive Model program assumes that the school environment should be designed to respond to the learner, and that school activities should be autotelic, or self-rewarding, not dependent upon rewards or punishment unrelated to the activity. Developmental theory, certain ideas of operant conditioning, and flexible learning sequences are used…

  9. A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

  10. Trust Model Based on M-CRGs in Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shasha; Zhang, Pengzhu; Jia, Zhaoqing

    Many research results demonstrate that government itself cannot handle all the requests from residents in emergency response. Some scholars proposed that building community response grids which utilized pre-existing communities to support citizen request. Unfortunately, little attention has been given to achieve effective and trustworthy collaboration between professional emergency responders and residents. In this paper, the authors modify the architecture of CRGs to provide a valid organizational pattern in emergency response. Based on the modified CRGs (M-CRGs), the trust modeling framework is discussed in detail. Through recording the total behaviors and evaluation of all agents in the systems, the society network is built and the global trustworthiness which reflects the agents' true synthetical ability is gained in the model. An application of this model to Snow Disasters in Southern China is illustrated. Analysis shows that the model contributes to developing efficiency in emergency response.

  11. An exploration of role model influence on adult nursing students' professional development: A phenomenological research study.

    PubMed

    Felstead, Ian S; Springett, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Patients' expectations of being cared for by a nurse who is caring, competent, and professional are particularly pertinent in current health and social care practice. The current drive for NHS values-based recruitment serves to strengthen this. How nursing students' development of professionalism is shaped is not fully known, though it is acknowledged that their practice experience strongly shapes behaviour. This study (in 2013-14) explored twelve adult nursing students' lived experiences of role modelling through an interpretive phenomenological analysis approach, aiming to understand the impact on their development as professional practitioners. Clinical nurses influenced student development consistently. Some students reported that their experiences allowed them to learn how not to behave in practice; a productive learning experience despite content. Students also felt senior staff influence on their development to be strong, citing 'leading by example.' The impact of patients on student professional development was also a key finding. Through analysing information gained, identifying and educating practice-based mentors who are ready, willing, and able to role model professional attributes appear crucial to developing professionalism in nursing students. Those involved in nurse education, whether service providers or universities, may wish to acknowledge the influence of clinical nurse behaviour observed by students both independent of and in direct relation to care delivery and the impact on student nurse professional development. A corollary relates to how students should be guided and briefed/debriefed to work with a staff to ensure their exposure to a variety of practice behaviours. PMID:26673614

  12. Professional Practice for the Extended Care Environment: Learning from One Model and Its Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Meridean L.

    1989-01-01

    A model of professional nursing governance in an 800-bed long-term care facility is described, and the model's implications for nursing education are discussed. The governance model includes a registered nurse organization determining all standards for practice, policies governing practice, and nursing clinical programing. (Author/MSE)

  13. Improving Instruction through Schoolwide Professional Development: Effects of the Data-on-Enacted-Curriculum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Rolf K.; Smithson, John; Porter, Andrew; Nunnaley, Diana; Osthoff, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The instructional improvement model Data on Enacted Curriculum was tested with an experimental design using randomized place-based trials. The improvement model is based on using data on instructional practices and achievement to guide professional development and decisions to refocus on instruction. The model was tested in 50 U.S. middle schools…

  14. Beyond Climate Focus and Disciplinary Myopia. The Roles and Responsibilities of Hospitals and Healthcare Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Ulhøi, John P.; Ulhøi, Benedicte P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper calls for the need to address climate change within the concept of sustainable development, in recognition of the interrelationships between environmental, economic and social systems. So far, health- providing organizations such as hospitals have paid surprisingly little attention to the relationships between environmental change (e.g. climate change) and human health, or between hospitals (as professional organizations) and their impact on sustainable development. Although it is usually such industries as the chemical, extractive and metal industries, etc., that are associated with environmentally harmful activities, there is also an urgent need to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and their embeddedness in a wider ecological, economic and social context. The key objective here is to discuss the relevance of sustainability and environmental management issues in a sector that until now has conveniently ignored its roles and responsibilities in relation to sustainability issues. The paper concludes that arguments based on systems theory, environment, medicine, economics and innovation strongly urge hospitals to reconsider their present roles and environmental responsibilities. PMID:19440441

  15. Beyond climate focus and disciplinary myopia. The roles and responsibilities of hospitals and healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Ulhøi, John P; Ulhøi, Benedicte P

    2009-03-01

    This paper calls for the need to address climate change within the concept of sustainable development, in recognition of the interrelationships between environmental, economic and social systems. So far, health- providing organizations such as hospitals have paid surprisingly little attention to the relationships between environmental change (e.g. climate change) and human health, or between hospitals (as professional organizations) and their impact on sustainable development. Although it is usually such industries as the chemical, extractive and metal industries, etc., that are associated with environmentally harmful activities, there is also an urgent need to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and their embeddedness in a wider ecological, economic and social context. The key objective here is to discuss the relevance of sustainability and environmental management issues in a sector that until now has conveniently ignored its roles and responsibilities in relation to sustainability issues. The paper concludes that arguments based on systems theory, environment, medicine, economics and innovation strongly urge hospitals to reconsider their present roles and environmental responsibilities. PMID:19440441

  16. Tools for tomorrow's health care system: a systems-informed mental model, moral imagination, and physicians' professionalism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Donna T; Mills, Ann E; Werhane, Patricia H

    2008-08-01

    Physician educators have been charged with incorporating systems-based approaches into medical education and residency training to help future physicians understand how their ability to provide high-quality health care depends on other individual and organizational stakeholders with whom and, in some cases, for whom they work. In part, this also requires that physicians accept that they have responsibilities to various system stakeholders. These changes are controversial because some fear they might distract physicians from their primary ethical obligation to their patients. However, systems theories and their applications in organizational management and business ethics support the notions that individuals can maintain primary professional ethical obligations while working within complex systems and that organizational systems can be constructed to support individual professional practice. If physicians are to commit to working within and, ultimately, improving systems of care as part of their ethical practice of medicine, then they will need a new mental model. Leading thinkers have used various models of systems and have highlighted different aspects of systems theories in describing organizations, groups of organizations, and organizational processes. This essay draws from these models some basic concepts and elements and introduces a simple but comprehensive mental model of systems for physicians. If it is used with professionalism and moral imagination, physicians might have a tool that they can use to understand, work with, and, ultimately, improve the systems of care that they rely on in their practice of medicine and that critically affect the welfare of their patients. PMID:18667882

  17. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  18. The University of Wyoming Early Childhood Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development that Leads to Changes in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Michelle L.; Morgan, Michael; Cooney, Margaret; Gerharter, Mitch

    2006-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges we face as an early childhood professional community is providing short-term, affordable professional development that results in depth of understanding and change of practice. The University of Wyoming Early Childhood Summer Institute is a model for professional development that fosters reflection, inquiry, and…

  19. Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring: Mentoring for Professional Development in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant-Shanklin, Mona; Brumage, Norma W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the refocusing of traditional pre-service/post-graduate education programs using the Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring Model (CREMM). This mentoring model is particularly relevant as serviced-focused and less research intensive universities shift their mission and purpose of teaching to a…

  20. Application of a Psychosocial Model of Alienation: Sex Differences in Locus of Control, Fear of Success and Affective Hostility With a Professional Career Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffe, Michael; Fraser, Kathleen

    An empirical test of a contemporary model of psychosocial stress was conducted to evaluate expected differences in cognitive and affective functioning for males and females in a professional career sample. Perceived powerlessness and affective hostility were viewed as constituting a cluster of adaptive responses to personal/social conditions…

  1. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school…

  2. Implementing a New Model for Teachers' Professional Learning in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honan, Eileen; Evans, Terry; Muspratt, Sandy; Paraide, Patricia; Reta, Medi; Baroutsis, Aspa

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study that investigates the possibilities of developing a professional learning model based on action research that could lead to sustained improvements in teaching and learning in schools in remote areas of Papua New Guinea. The issues related to the implementation of this model are discussed using a critical lens that…

  3. Why Models Matter: An Alternate View on Professional Growth in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Pamela L.

    1992-01-01

    D. M. Kagan's (1992) developmental learning-to-teach model reflects her emphasis on mastery of procedural routines and highlights only one sector of the teacher education community. Kagan's claim that research supports a developmental model misrepresents the full body of research on professional growth among preservice teachers. (RLC)

  4. Level Models of Continuing Professional Development Evaluation: A Grounded Review and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldwell, Mike; Simkins, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) evaluation in education has been heavily influenced by "level models", deriving from the work of Kirkpatrick and Guskey in particular, which attempt to trace the processes through which CPD interventions achieve outcomes. This paper considers the strengths and limitations of such models, and in particular…

  5. The Effect of a Professional Development Classroom Management Model on At-Risk Elementary Students' Misbehaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglin, Gary; Akpo-Sanni, Joretta; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2012-01-01

    The problem in the study was that at-risk elementary school students had too many classroom disruptive behaviors. The purpose was to investigate the effect a Professional Development Classroom Management Model would have on reducing these students' misbehaviors. The study implemented a classroom management model to improve the classroom management…

  6. The Physical Education Profession and Its Professional Responsibility... or... Why "12 Weeks Paid Holiday" Will Never Be Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper critically reviews the concept of "professional responsibility" in physical education. The paper is rooted in the belief that the physical education profession has, by virtue of its expertise in young people and physical activity, the potential to deliver a broad range of desirable educational and health-related outcomes.…

  7. Framing the work: development of a renal nursing professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Lawrence-Murphy, J A; Harwood, L; Reynolds, L; Ridley, J; Ryan, H; Workentin, L; Malek, P

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, a nursing care model task group was formed to develop a framework to guide the development of the nursing care delivery system in a newly merged hospital corporation. A collective group of experienced and motivated nurses in the renal program met to develop an integrated renal nursing professional practice model. In addition it was recognized that a city-wide model involving the two acute care renal centres would be advantageous. The challenge was to clearly articulate the professional roles and relationships of nurses and nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialists in a constantly changing environment. This process provided the opportunity to identify key trends influencing renal care and possibilities for changing practice. Networking across the corporations was enhanced, partnerships were formed, and a sense of value for the work that was being undertaken developed. The group's endeavours resulted in an integrated nursing professional practice model that emphasizes accountability and continuity and places value on therapeutic relationships. Another strength of the model is the acknowledgement of the collaborative nature of the multidisciplinary team. After two years of development, the model was implemented. A city-wide Renal Nursing Professional Practice Council has been established in order to provide leadership in evaluating the model. This will include assessing the success of implementation, impact on patient/family care, and collaborative rewards experienced by staff. Future planning will address the potential need for a multidisciplinary focus within the practice council. PMID:15709338

  8. A Parent-Professional Collaboration Model of Transitional Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittenstein, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    A transitional planning model implemented at St. Joseph's School for the Blind in Jersey City, New Jersey, incorporates a broad conceptualization of transition that includes social skills, independent living skills, and overall competence in adjustment to the community. The model considers parental involvement, advocacy, and leadership as…

  9. Features of Effective Professional Learning: A Case Study of the Implementation of a System-Based Professional Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labone, Elizabeth; Long, Janette

    2016-01-01

    The impact of quality teaching on student learning has led to an increased focus on professional learning to support and improve teacher practice. Review of the literature on effective professional learning suggests six elements that support sustained change in teacher practice; namely, focus, learning components, feedback, collaborative…

  10. The Brazilian Football Association (CBF) model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Runco, Jose Luiz; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to establish a national methodological model for epidemiological studies on professional soccer player injuries and to describe the numerous relevant studies previously published on this topic. INTRODUCTION: The risk of injury in professional soccer is high. However, previous studies of injury risk in Brazil and other countries have been characterized by large variations in study design and data collection methods as well as definitions of injury, standardized diagnostic criteria, and recovery times. METHODS: A system developed by the Union of European Football for epidemiological studies on professional soccer players is being used as a starting point to create a methodological model for the Brazilian Football Association. To describe the existing studies on professional soccer player injuries, we developed a search strategy to identify relevant epidemiological studies. We included the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and Medline databases in our study. RESULTS: We considered 60 studies from Medline and 16 studies from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences in the final analysis. Twelve studies were selected for final inclusion in this review: seven from the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences and five from Medline. We identified a lack of uniformity in the study design, data collection methods, injury definitions, standardized diagnostic criteria, and the definition of recovery time. Based on the information contained within these articles, we developed a model for epidemiological studies for the Brazilian Football Association. CONCLUSIONS: There is no uniform model for epidemiological studies of professional soccer injuries. Here, we propose a novel model to be applied for epidemiological studies of professional soccer player injuries in Brazil and throughout the world. PMID:22012041

  11. Salivary immunoglobulin A responses in professional top-level futsal players.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Alexandre; Arsati, Franco; de Oliveira Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco; de Freitas, Camila Gobo; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses of salivary immunoglobulin A (SIgA) in 10 professional top-level Brazilian futsal players after 2 highly competitive games separated by 7 days. Unstimulated saliva was collected over a 5-minute period at PRE- and POST-match. The SIgA was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressed as the absolute concentration (SIgAabs) and secretion rate of IgA (SIgArate). Rate of perceived exertion and heart rate were used to monitor the exercise intensity. A 2-way analysis of variance with repeated measures showed nonsignificant differences between matches to SIgAabs, SIgArate, and saliva flow rate (p > 0.05). However, significant time differences were observed for all these parameters. In summary, we showed that a competitive training match induced a decrease in SIgA levels in top-level futsal players, which suggests an increment of the vulnerability to infections meditated by the training stimulus. This decrease suggests that the athletes were at an increased risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection, and therefore, it could be necessary to take protective actions to minimize contact with cold viruses or even reduce the training load for athletes. PMID:21490511

  12. Social Inclusion, Responsible Citizenship, Social Justice, Equal Opportunities: Whatever Happened to Professional Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Gaby

    2001-01-01

    Introduces several articles on social inclusion written by individuals struggling to accommodate changing professional demands with their own understandings and practices, drawing on the dominant discourses surrounding them, which include old professional understandings of equal opportunities, social justice, race, gender, and class and new…

  13. Discerning Professional Identity and Becoming Bold, Socially Responsible Teacher-Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collay, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This essay reviews the powerful influence of professional identity in shaping how school leaders perceive their work. I review factors that mold teacher professional identity, implications for educational leadership pedagogy, and supports and barriers for teacher leaders to consider in their quest to more fully enact bold, socially responsible…

  14. How Professionally Relevant Can Language Tests Be?: A Response to Wette (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, John; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The recently published article "English Proficiency Tests and Communication Skills Training for Overseas-Qualified Health Professionals in Australia and New Zealand" (Wette, 2011) aims to address perceived problems and misconceptions associated with the testing of English language skills and professional communicative competence of…

  15. [ASO-TSO, emergency interventions: has anything changed? Old and new psychiatrist's professional responsibilities].

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Taratufolo, Rosa; Candelli, Chiara; Grattagliano, Ignazio; La Tegola, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    The Law 833 of 1978 on the subject of psychiatric emergency treatments in absence of consensus has contributed to grant mental patients equal guaranties and equal constitutional rights which, until that moment, they had been denied. This standpoint includes TSO in favor of mental patients. Ordered by the constitutional laws which guarantee a person's inviolable rights, TSO finds itself positioned between individual freedom and the freedom of treatment on the one hand, and the right to safeguard health on the other hand. The procedure of TSO is noticeable in its various phases so as to provide for the various levels of safeguarding a person who is temporarily deprived of the capacity to express valid consensus. On the other side it also has a certain amount of flexibility in its application, which guarantees adaptability of the norm in various contexts and various incidental situations. Nevertheless, the complexity of the law on TSO, as well as the interpretation margins of the procedure have contributed to the creation of an application frame which is not free of criticism. In this context, the recommendations of the Conference of Regions and Autonomous Provinces have particular importance. These recommendations deserve careful analysis, both for the presence of elements of novelty (in the very particular cases of TSO for children under 18 and TSO for decisionally impaired subjects) and for the reminder of the full application of "non-hospitalized TSO". The latter was provided for in Law 833/78 but has never been adequately and completely adopted because it has never been explained in its concrete applicability. Therefore, bearing in mind the already known responsibility of a psychiatrist in an emergency case, and with renewed interest in new medical performance a psychiatrist of public service has to guarantee, we are preparing to give our contribution on the subject of professional obligations at a historical moment in which known trials seem to assign the

  16. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974

  17. A Competency-Based Model for Developing Human Resource Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Glenn M.; Hayton, James C.; Warnick, Alan P.; Mumford, Troy V.; Hanks, Steven H.; Blahna, Mary Jo

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a framework for the design and implementation of a competency-based curriculum for graduate management education. The article also outlines how this model has been implemented at one university in the context of a graduate degree in human resource management. Among the significant challenges discussed are the identification…

  18. Teachers Helping Teachers: A Professional Development Model That Promotes Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study reports on the outcomes of a professional development model (PDM) developed by a K-12 private school in Beirut, Lebanon, after 3 years of its employment. Specifically, an evaluation of this PDM is provided with special emphasis on its potential of developing teacher leaders at school. The PDM embraces a constructivist…

  19. Professional Development for Secondary School Mathematics Teachers: A Peer Mentoring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Professional development is important for all teachers, and in low socio-economic schools where the challenges of teaching are greater this need is crucial. A model involving a combination of one-on-one peer mentoring integrated with group peer mentoring was piloted with experienced mathematics teachers of senior students in low socio-economic…

  20. Science Teaching Reform through Professional Development: Teachers' Use of a Scientific Classroom Discourse Community Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Baker, Dale R.; Helding, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines a 2-year investigation into how secondary science teachers used professional development (PD) to build scientific classroom discourse communities (SCDCs). Observation data, teacher, student, and school demographic information were used to build a hierarchical linear model. The length of time that teachers received PD was the…

  1. Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning at a Distance: A Model for Change in At-Risk Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Elizabeth A.; Quine, Janine; DeVries, Eva

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of a professional learning model developed to support early years teachers in rural and remote communities in Queensland as they began to implement the Australian Curriculum in Mathematics. The data are drawn from 35 teachers at the initial stage of a large, four year longitudinal study RoleM (Representations,…

  2. Flexible Programmes in Higher Professional Education: Expert Validation of a Flexible Educational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellekens, Ad; Paas, Fred; Verbraeck, Alexander; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    In a preceding case study, a process-focused demand-driven approach for organising flexible educational programmes in higher professional education (HPE) was developed. Operations management and instructional design contributed to designing a flexible educational model by means of discrete-event simulation. Educational experts validated the model…

  3. Embedded Teacher Leadership: Support for a Site-Based Model of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Deborah S.; Vogel, Robert; Liang, Ling L.

    2009-01-01

    Project Achieve is a professional development (PD) project that utilizes teacher leaders (TLs), former teachers who have been reassigned to provide school-based mentoring, instruction, lesson plan assistance and modelling of lessons for urban middle school teachers. A primary goal of Project Achieve is to evaluate the extent to which TLs were able…

  4. National Models for Continuing Professional Development: The Challenges of Twenty-First-Century Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Marilyn; Younie, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    If teacher quality is the most critical factor in improving educational outcomes, then why is so little attention drawn to the knowledge and evidence base available to support teachers in improving the quality of their professional knowledge? This paper draws together findings from a range of sources to propose national models for continuing…

  5. Peer Partnerships in Teaching: Evaluation of a Voluntary Model of Professional Development in Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes work over a three-year period to develop a peer partnership approach to professional development at a dual sector university. The aim of the program, arising initially in one school and then piloted in 5 schools, was to support staff in their teaching practice. Emphasis was on the development of a sustainable model of…

  6. Models of Professional Development in the Education and Practice of New Teachers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws upon research undertaken in nine higher education institutions for a doctoral thesis. The qualitative study used repertory grids and semi-structured interviews with nine course leaders to investigate models of professional development that underpin courses for new teachers in higher education. While evidence of good levels of…

  7. An Analysis of Academic Research Libraries Assessment Data: A Look at Professional Models and Benchmarking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Heather S.; Passonneau, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    This research provides the first review of publicly available assessment information found on Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members' websites. After providing an overarching review of benchmarking assessment data, and of professionally recommended assessment models, this paper examines if libraries contextualized their assessment…

  8. A Strong Core of Qualities--A Model of the Professional Educator that Moves beyond Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Karen; Coutts, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Consideration of the qualities of good teaching leads to a new model that emphasizes the importance of sense making to professional development. A strong core of qualities that assist teachers in using sense making includes strength, confidence, balance, ballast, and value maturity. (Contains 27 references.) (SK)

  9. All That You Can't Leave Behind: Professionalism as the Focus of Mentoring and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Roja S; Wood, Jeyhan S; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2015-11-01

    Mentoring serves a critical and necessary role not only in the advancement of plastic surgery, but also in maintaining the health of our specialty. In addition to providing a driving force for innovation--which remains the core competency of plastic surgery--mentoring is a powerful, educational tool that helps us teach the critical skills of communication and model the tenets of professionalism. Our identity as innovators, healers, and providers of hope is dependent on conferring what it means to be a professional, from those who are just beginning their journey as surgeons, to those who are still on that odyssey. PMID:26594964

  10. [The professional differentiation in medical practice. A theoretical model of the process of changing].

    PubMed

    Zerón-Gutiérrez, Lydia Estela; Lifshitz, Alberto; Ramiro H, Manuel; Abreu-Hernández, Luis Felipe; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the change process on medical professionalization has not being studied enough. The physicians are made aware of the necessity of changing their medical practice in ways that also affect their personal life. A change involves the need to plan, evaluate possibilities and resources with efficacy and outline competencies. The aim is to contribute in the design of educational strategies that promote professional change and an understanding of change, as an evolution; we describe a theoretical-schematic model based on five consecutive ordained scopes: background, intentions, planning and making decisions, carrying out decisions and achieving the goal. PMID:23331751

  11. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes. PMID:18358441

  12. Using the Communication in Science Inquiry Project Professional Development Model to Facilitate Learning Middle School Genetics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.; Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Uysal, Sibel; Purzer, Senay; Lang, Michael; Baker, Perry

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of embedding content in the Communication in Inquiry Science Project professional development model for science and language arts teachers. The model uses four components of successful professional development (content focus, active learning, extended duration, participation by teams of teachers from the same school…

  13. 'Train the trainer' model: implications for health professionals and farm family health in Australia.

    PubMed

    Brumby, Susan; Smith, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a large country with 60% of land used for agricultural production. Its interior is sparsely populated, with higher morbidity and mortality recorded in rural areas, particularly farmers, farm families, and agricultural workers. Rural health professionals in addressing health education gaps of farming groups have reported using behavioralist approaches. These approaches in isolation have been criticized as disempowering for participants who are identified as passive learners or 'empty vessels.' A major challenge in rural health practice is to develop more inclusive and innovative models in building improved health outcomes. The Sustainable Farm Families Train the Trainer (SFFTTT) model is a 5-day program developed by Western District Health Service designed to enhance practice among health professionals working with farm families in Australia. This innovative model of addressing farmer health asks health professionals to understand the context of the farm family and encourages them to value the experience and existing knowledge of the farmer, the family and the farm business. The SFFTTT program has engaged with health agencies, community, government, and industry groups across Australia and over 120 rural nurses have been trained since 2005. These trainers have successfully delivered programs to 1000 farm families, with high participant completion, positive evaluation, and improved health indicators. Rural professionals report changes in how they approach health education, clinical practice, and promotion with farm families and agricultural industries. This paper highlights the success of SFFTTT as an effective tool in enhancing primary health practice in rural and remote settings. The program is benefiting not only drought ravaged farmers but assisting rural nurses, health agencies, and health boards to engage with farm families at a level not identified previously. Furthermore, nurses and health professionals are now embracing a more 'farmer

  14. Compensating the transplant professional: time for a model change.

    PubMed

    Abouljoud, M; Whitehouse, S; Langnas, A; Brown, K

    2015-03-01

    Compensation models for physicians are currently based primarily on the work relative value unit (wRVU) that rewards productivity by work volume. The value-based payment structure soon to be ushered in by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rewards clinical quality and outcomes. This has prompted changes in wRVU value for certain services that will result in reduced payment for specialty procedures such as transplantation. To maintain a stable and competent workforce and achieve alignment between clinical activity, growth imperatives, and cost effectiveness, compensation of transplant physicians must evolve toward a matrix of measures beyond the procedure-based activity. This personal viewpoint proposes a redesign of transplant physician compensation plans to include the "virtual RVU" to recognize and reward meaningful clinical integration defined as hospital-physician commitment to specified and measurable metrics for current non-RVU-producing activities. Transplantation has been a leader in public outcomes reporting and is well suited to meet the challenges ahead that can only be overcome with a tight collaboration and alignment between surgeons, other physicians, support staff, and their respective institution and leadership. PMID:25693472

  15. Beyond altruistic and commercial contract motherhood: the professional model.

    PubMed

    Van Zyl, Liezl; Walker, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    It has become common to distinguish between altruistic and commercial contract motherhood (or 'surrogacy'). Altruistic arrangements are based on the 'gift relationship': a woman is motivated by altruism to have a baby for an infertile couple, who are free to reciprocate as they see fit. By contrast, in commercial arrangements both parties are motivated by personal gain to enter a legally enforceable agreement, which stipulates that the contract mother or 'surrogate' is to bear a child for the intending parents in exchange for a fee. She is required to undergo medical examinations and to refrain from behaviour that could harm the foetus. The intending parents are the child's legal parents from the outset. The parties to the contract can, but are not expected to, maintain contact after the transaction is completed. We argue that contract motherhood should not be organized according to the norms of the gift relationship, and that contract mothers should be compensated for their labour. However, we accept that there are good reasons for rejecting the commercial model as a suitable framework for contract pregnancy, and argue, instead, in favour of viewing it as a profession. PMID:22500585

  16. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. PMID:25301826

  17. Remote chemotherapy supervision model for rural cancer care: perspectives of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, D; Larkins, S; Kelly, J; Sabesan, S

    2016-01-01

    Townsville Cancer Centre (TCC), a tertiary cancer centre in North Queensland, Australia, provides chemotherapy services to surrounding small rural towns using the Queensland Remote Chemotherapy Supervision model (QReCS). Under this model, selected chemotherapy regimens are administered in rural hospitals by rural based generalist doctors and nurses, under the supervision of TCC-based medical oncologists and chemotherapy competent nurses through videoconferencing. We sought to explore the perspectives of health professionals participating in QReCS. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with 19 participants, including nine nurses, eight doctors, one rural pharmacist and one administration officer. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were examined using iterative thematic analysis. Four major themes were identified from the data: (1) benefits of the model, (2) enablers of implementation, (3) operational requirements for optimal functioning and (4) disadvantages of the model. The reported benefits of the model were patient convenience, inter-professional communication across health district borders, expanded scope of practice, continuity of care and maintenance of patient safety and compliance with guidelines while delivering chemotherapy. Further improvements in the quality of training for rural nurses, coordination between urban and rural sites and between health professionals and documentation of clinical encounters would optimise the operation of the model. QReCS appears to provide many benefits to patients and health professionals and a framework for safe administration of chemotherapy in rural areas. Coordination of care, the quality of training for rural nurses as well as clinical documentation needs to improve to optimise the operation of the model. PMID:25871852

  18. Exploring Climate Science with WV Educators: A Regional Model for Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberg, L. F.; Calinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Literacy reports that children reared in rural agricultural communities, who experience regular interactions with plants and animals, develop more sophisticated understanding of ecology and biological systems than do urban and suburban children of the same age. West Virginia (WV) is a rural state. The majority of its residents live in communities of fewer than 2,500 people. Based on the features of the population being served and their unique strengths, this presentation focuses on a regional model for teacher professional development that addresses agricultural and energy vulnerabilities and adaptations to climate change in WV. The professional development model outlined shows how to guide teachers to use a problem-based learning approach to introduce climate data and analysis techniques within a scenario context that is locally meaningful. This strategy engages student interest by focusing on regional and community concerns. Climate science standards are emphasized in the Next Generation Science Standards, but WV has not provided its teachers with appropriate instructional resources to meet those standards. The authors addressed this need by offering a series of climate science education workshops followed by online webinars offered to WV science educators free of charge with funding by the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium. The authors report on findings from this series of professional development workshops conducted in partnership with the West Virginia Science Teachers Association. The goal was to enhance grades 5-12 teaching and learning about climate change through problem-based learning. Prior to offering the climate workshops, all WV science educators were asked to complete a short questionnaire. As Figure 1 shows, over 40% of the teacher respondents reported being confident in teaching climate science content. For comparison post workshops surveys measure teacher confidence in climate science

  19. Professional advancement of women in health care management: a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M K; Blide, L A

    1992-11-01

    Ragins and Sundstrom suggest three major conclusions based on power and gender differences within organizations. The first is that power develops or detracts as individuals progress along their career track. HIM professionals who accept the challenges that changing roles bring can also develop a new sensitivity to the value of power as a tool. They can use their negotiating skills to avoid being placed in work roles that result in a decrease in power. The second difference between men and women within organizations is that obstacles often impede women's career paths more than men's. Perceptions by women and men of a woman as homemaker and mother create serious conflicts when jobs are demanding and time intensive. Lastly, Ragins and Sundstrom suggest that career progression is influenced by both intrinsic factors (personal and professional) and extrinsic factors (organizational and interpersonal). The interaction between these factors is often driven by gender differences allowing men to progress and succeed, whereas women remain beneath the glass ceiling. HIM professionals, like other women health professionals, are graduating from advanced programs in health care and business administration at a greater rate than ever before in the history of this country. Not all these graduates will be able to acquire top-level administrative positions in the traditional health care institutions (e.g., hospitals). Therefore, if they wish to advance, they may have to move to nontraditional work settings. This is especially true for HIM professionals. The expanding computerized environment in traditional and nontraditional health care settings presents great potential for the development of new roles and responsibilities that have not been identified as male roles. HIM professionals and women in other health care professions who aspire to advance to upper administrative positions in traditional and nontraditional settings must be willing to take the risks inherent in assuming

  20. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  1. Professionalism, honor, and respect on September 11th: a historical view of the Initial Response and Recovery Mortuary Team.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Mauhee W

    2002-09-01

    The author is an Army nurse who is assigned as the Assistant Director, Reserve and Medical Manpower in the Accession Policy Directorate of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Military Personnel Policy). She provided the leadership for the Initial Response and Recovery Mortuary Team. This team was responsible for retrieving the dead and wounded from the wreckage of the Pentagon in the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon during September 2001. The article is written as a personal account. The intent is to learn from this event and to assure families and friends their loved ones were taken care of with professionalism, honor, and respect. PMID:12363143

  2. From Learning to Research: Developing a Hybrid Teacher Professional Development Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J. S.; Odell, M. R.; Hoadley, C.; Sumner, T.; Maull, K.; Dibie, O.; Sundberg, C.; Kennedy, T.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Wegner, K.

    2012-12-01

    In conjunction with The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign, the From Learning to Research (L2R) project seeks to develop a successful model for student-teacher-scientist interaction and collaboration using 21st century technologies. The culminating event for each year of the project is the GLOBE Virtual Student Conference, which is held in May. At the conference, students present their locally relevant climate projects. To get to this final event, teachers participate in hybrid professional development including a weeklong summer professional development institute followed by twice monthly webinars. The weeklong professional development institute focused on project-based learning, Next Generation Science Standards, climate and climate change education, dealing with climate change misconceptions and controversies, and 21st century skills. Webinars included career talks by professionals in a variety of STEM careers, teacher updates on the climate projects, and science, technology, or education information. Now over halfway into the second year of the project, this presentation will highlight strategies and successes in developing this professional development model. 75 GLOBE-trained teachers (30 the first year, 45 the second year) from 22 US states and Puerto Rico have participated in the From Learning to Research project. The teachers represent a wide diversity of populations, including schools ranging from extremely rural to inner city and low-income public schools to Ivy League prep private schools. Regardless of the location, students and teachers were able to collaborate with other schools and scientists to study their local climates. The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) is an international K-12 science and education program, engaging teachers and their students in an exploration of the environment. Using scientific protocols, students collect environmental data in their community, asking questions, developing scientific projects, and ultimately

  3. Measuring the Impact of Student Interaction with Student Affairs Professionals on Socially Responsible Leadership Development in the First Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Georgianna L.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study on Liberal Arts Education, this research explored the impact of students' interactions with student affairs professionals on socially responsible leadership development during the first year of college. Overall, students' interactions with student affairs professionals were…

  4. An Evaluation of Professional Development on Using Student Response Systems and Interactive Whiteboards for Formative Assessment in the Middle Schools of a Southeastern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Julia Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The purchase of 21st-century technologies for each middle school teacher in my school system coinciding with a historic lack of significant professional development in technology integration provided the impetus for the study. To address the problem, professional development focused on helping teachers use student response systems and mobile…

  5. A Qualitative Study of the Perceptions and Beliefs of Elementary Teachers' Value of and Responses to Their Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlan-Price, Regina A.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge that professional development coordinators and instructional leaders face is designing and implementing professional development that is the most effective for improving teaching and learning in their school. To determine what is the perceptions and beliefs of elementary teachers' value of and responses to their professional…

  6. Health-care professionals' responsibility to patients' relatives in genetic medicine: a systematic review and synthesis of empirical research

    PubMed Central

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Shkedi-Rafid, Shiri; Crawford, Gillian; Lucassen, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The extent of the responsibility of health-care professionals (HCPs) to ensure that patients' relatives are told of their risk is unclear. Current international guidelines take confidentiality to the individual patient as the default position, but some suggest that disclosure could be default and genetic information could be conceptualized as familial. Genet Med 18 4, 290–301. Methods: Our systematic review and synthesis of 17 studies explored the attitudes of HCPs, patients, and the public regarding the extent of HCPs' responsibility to relatives with respect to disclosure. Genet Med 18 4, 290–301. Results: Health-care professionals generally felt a responsibility to patients' relatives but perceived a variety of reasons why it would be difficult to act on this responsibility. Public/patient views were more wide-ranging. Participants identified several competing and overlapping arguments for and against HCP disclosure: guidelines do not permit/mandate it, privacy, medical benefit, impact on family dynamics, quality of communication, and respecting autonomy. Genet Med 18 4, 290–301. Conclusion: We argue that HCPs can sometimes share genetic information without breaching confidentiality and that they could factor into their considerations the potential harm to family dynamics of nondisclosure. However, we need more nuanced research about their responsibilities to relatives, particularly as genomic tests are used more frequently in clinical practice. Genet Med 18 4, 290–301. PMID:26110233

  7. A model for rewarding professional growth in the diagnostic molecular oncology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lennon, P A; Deleon, E; Reynolds, A; Pulido, L; Lewing, C; Mehta, P; Biscanin, S; Hai, S; Bowman, C; Galbincea, J; Jakacky, J; Hu, P

    2011-01-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (UTMDACC), Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is committed to the endless pursuit of innovative research, education, training and administration for the prevention, diagnosis and clinical management of cancer and associated diseases. The molecular genetic technology professional development model promotes personal development, recognizes increased competencies, and sets high standards for all skills and services provided. There are four competency levels that comprise our Professional Development Model (PDM): Discovery, Application, Maturation, and Expert. The skill, knowledge, education, and certification requirements for each level are defined based on the business needs of each lab. When a genetic technologist successfully completes all skills, knowledge, proficiency, education and certification requirements within the appropriate time frame for a particular competency level, his/her salary would be adjusted to the entry point for the competency level he/she has completed. PMID:21654071

  8. An Ethnographic Case Study of the Professional Development Model in a Successful Elementary School within a Suburban Southeast Texas School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrzelka, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic case study was designed to investigate a successful professional development model, perceived effective professional learning and process for determining professional development for teachers. With eighty years of research on professional development, limited research was available on the process for determining professional…

  9. The opinion and response of health professionals associated with academics about the research design and methods: A study

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to survey the opinions and responses of health professionals in academics about their interest and experience in research, knowledge over study designs, and application of a common study design to find out the objectives behind any research study. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire containing three variables with 15 questions were sent to 300 health professionals associated with academics in the category of Bachelor/Master/Doctorate working at Al-Farabi Colleges campuses located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected manually, descriptive frequencies were generated and the variables were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. The knowledge scores between the qualification and gender were carried out using ANOVA and t-test. The final response rate was in conjuction to the statistician to exclude the uncompleted responses from the statistical analysis. Results: The results showed a discrepancy in the participation; of 95 health professionals, (40) were females and (55) were males. Bachelor (16), Masters (61) and Doctorate holders (18) gave their opinion. For the first variable (research experience), all the surveyed categories showed the same response. However, for the second variable (study design and research criteria) bachelor holders showed poor, but equal performance was reported to the master and doctorate holders. In the third variable (objectives and common designs), bachelor holders showed a poor response in contrast to the master and doctorate holders whose have mixed opinions. For knowledge scores, no significance was present between the master and doctorate holders. Conclusion: There is a lack of understanding of the research objectives and common designs frequently used in research studies particularly among the bachelor holders. Additional postgraduate education on research methods is recommended to improve the knowledge and practices of research. PMID:27114956

  10. The Impact of Professional Development: A Theoretical Model for Empirical Research, Evaluation, Planning and Conducting Training and Development Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Stephan Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers several trends in professional development programmes found internationally. The use of multiple learning approaches and of different modes and types of learning in PD is described. Various theories and models of evaluation are discussed in the light of common professional development activities. Several recommendations are…

  11. A Multi-Year Study of the Impact of the Rice Model Teacher Professional Development on Elementary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaconu, Dana Viorica; Radigan, Judy; Suskavcevic, Milijana; Nichol, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    A teacher professional development program for in-service elementary school science teachers, the Rice Elementary Model Science Lab (REMSL), was developed for urban school districts serving predominately high-poverty, high-minority students. Teachers with diverse skills and science capacities came together in Professional Learning Communities, one…

  12. Analysis of the Professional Choice Self-Efficacy Scale Using the Rasch-Andrich Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambiel, Rodolfo A. M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; de Francisco Carvalho, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the psychometrics properties of the professional choice self-efficacy scale (PCSES), using the Rasch-Andrich rating scale model. The PCSES assesses four factors: self-appraisal, gathering occupational information, practical professional information search and future planning. Participants were 883 Brazilian…

  13. A Model of Continuing Professional Competency Development by Using ICT (Study at Senior High School Teachers Padangsidimpuan, North Sumatera)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasibuan, Sarmadan

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve the weakness of current status of high school teachers' professional competency in Padangsidimpuan the researcher purposed this study to implement A Model of Continuing Professional Competency Development by using Information Communication Technology (ICT). This study was conducted by using a Research and Development (R&D).…

  14. Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners in Inclusive Pre-Kindergartens: An Evaluation of a Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Lower, Joanna K.; Smallwood, Gretchen Robinson; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Li, Linlin; Jordan, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the "Teachers, Families, and Communities Supporting English Language Learners" (TFC) project was to implement and evaluate a sustainable model of high-quality professional development focused on improving inclusive pre-kindergarten services for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families. The professional development program…

  15. Peer Coaching as a Model for Professional Development in the Elementary Mathematics Context: Challenges, Needs and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jao, Limin

    2013-01-01

    As our knowledge about education continues to change, educators must refine and redefine their beliefs and teaching practices through professional development. In the peer coaching model of professional development, both participants have a chance to reflect on what they observe and on their own teaching practices. This reciprocal gain is one of…

  16. Structural-Functional Model of Designing Individual Educational Path of Teacher's Professional Development in Conditions of Information Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharifzyanova, Kadriya Sh.; Shtreter, Juliya N.; Nauryzbayeva, Rahat N.

    2015-01-01

    Actuality of studied problem is due to constant modernization of teacher's professional development which depends on many factors and conditions aimed at identifying the reserve possibilities of professional qualified and competitive specialist. In this context, this article aims to develop structure the content of structural-functional model of…

  17. An Innovative Model of Professional Development to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Primary Science in Irish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Greg

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of a two-year professional development programme on primary teachers' attitudes towards primary science, their confidence and competence in teaching science, and pupils' attitudes towards school science. Unlike the traditional "one-size-fits all" model of professional development, the model…

  18. Situated Responses and Professional Development for Changing Student Demographics in the New Latino South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Paul H.; Portes, Pedro R.; Mellom, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the outcomes and key elements of collaborative professional development on K-12 educators working to improve education of Latino and English learning students in a state with rapidly changing demographics. Across four years (2003-04 through 2006-07), 37 teams from 16 urban, suburban, and rural school districts in the state of…

  19. Ethics for the New Political Economy: What Can it Mean to be Professionally Responsible? Presidential Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this address, the author builds the case that a new political economy of education, dominated by what Pauline Lipman calls the "neo-liberal social imaginary," is changing the moral context in which educators imagine their professional roles. The author argues that educators are placed in relation to others in rather complicated…

  20. An Occupation's Responsibility: The Role of Social Foundations in the Cultivation of Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the author argues that inquiry and engagement in the social foundations of education is fundamental to cultivating professionalism in education. As many commentators on the subject have noted, teaching does not meet many of the criteria of a profession derived from the sociological study of fields of work. As Joseph Newman observes,…

  1. Social Work Values and Pacifism: Opposition to War as a Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, if social workers behave professionally according to their prescribed values and ethics, it will follow that they are working from an active pacifist perspective. Presents definition of pacifism and examines pacifism and social work values (importance of individual, respect for differences, commitment to social justice, persistence…

  2. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  3. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  4. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  5. 14 CFR 120.113 - Medical Review Officer, Substance Abuse Professional, and Employer Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 40 and shall perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40 and this subpart. If the... must perform the functions set forth in subpart G of 49 CFR part 40, and subpart E of this part. The... Professional (SAP). The SAP must perform the functions set forth in 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. (d)...

  6. Exploring the Impact of Digital Technologies on Professional Responsibilities and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Tara; Edwards, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies in combination with "big" data and predictive analytics are having a significant impact upon professional practices at individual, organisational, national and international levels. The interplay of code, algorithms and big data are increasingly pervasive in the governing, leadership and practices of different…

  7. The Role of the Law School in the Teaching of Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Warren E.

    1980-01-01

    The Chief Justice of the United States outlines the duty and opportunity, besides relating legal theory to practice, regarding inculcating principles of professional ethics and standards in law students. This duty should permeate the entire educational experience from the first hour. Available from Dennis & Co., 251 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14203.…

  8. Up, Close and Personal: Teachers' Responses to an Individualised Professional Learning Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Tracey; Beswick, Kim; Williamson, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an account of professional learning in action through documenting the experiences of three upper primary teachers as they engaged in reflection-on-action with the assistance of an academic mentor. Video-stimulated recall was used as a mechanism to encourage productive reflective practice, using video footage of each teacher's…

  9. Tensions across Federalism, Localism, and Professional Autonomy: Social Media and Stakeholder Response to Increased Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kimberly Scriven; Herrington, Carolyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing upon research on federalism, localism, and professional autonomy, this article explores how educational stakeholders used social media to discuss and organize against the implementation of Differentiated Accountability in a large Florida school district. The results showed that the stakeholders used social media to engage in sense making…

  10. A Teacher Education Ethics Initiative: A Collaborative Response to a Professional Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungaretti, Toni; Dorsey, Anne G.; Freeman, Nancy K.; Bologna, Theresa M.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses professional ethics in teacher education, noting challenges for teacher educators (particularly those in early childhood education). Chronicles the development of the National Association for the Education of Young Children Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment, and describes the Early Childhood Teacher Education Ethics…

  11. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  12. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  13. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations. PMID:26228796

  14. Strategies for Teaching Regional Climate Modeling: Online Professional Development for Scientists and Decision Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, P.; Yarker, M. B.; Mesquita, M. D. S.; Otto, F. E. L.

    2014-12-01

    There is a clear role for climate science in supporting decision making at a range of scales and in a range of contexts: from Global to local, from Policy to Industry. However, clear a role climate science can play, there is also a clear discrepancy in the understanding of how to use the science and associated tools (such as climate models). Despite there being a large body of literature on the science there is clearly a need to provide greater support in how to apply appropriately. However, access to high quality professional development courses can be problematic, due to geographic, financial and time constraints. In attempt to address this gap we independently developed two online professional courses that focused on helping participants use and apply two regional climate models, WRF and PRECIS. Both courses were designed to support participants' learning through tutor led programs that covered the basic climate scientific principles of regional climate modeling and how to apply model outputs. The fundamental differences between the two courses are: 1) the WRF modeling course expected participants to design their own research question that was then run on a version of the model, whereas 2) the PRECIS course concentrated on the principles of regional modeling and how the climate science informed the modeling process. The two courses were developed to utilise the cost and time management benefits associated with eLearning, with the recognition that this mode of teaching can also be accessed internationally, providing professional development courses in countries that may not be able to provide their own. The development teams saw it as critical that the courses reflected sound educational theory, to ensure that participants had the maximum opportunity to learn successfully. In particular, the role of reflection is central to both course structures to help participants make sense of the science in relation to their own situation. This paper details the different

  15. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  16. ePMV Embeds Molecular Modeling into Professional Animation Software Environments

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham T.; Autin, Ludovic; Goodsell, David S.; Sanner, Michel F.; Olson, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Increasingly complex research has made it more difficult to prepare data for publication, education, and outreach. Many scientists must also wade through black-box code to interface computational algorithms from diverse sources to supplement their bench work. To reduce these barriers, we have developed an open-source plug-in, embedded Python Molecular Viewer (ePMV), that runs molecular modeling software directly inside of professional 3D animation applications (hosts) to provide simultaneous access to the capabilities of these newly connected systems. Uniting host and scientific algorithms into a single interface allows users from varied backgrounds to assemble professional quality visuals and to perform computational experiments with relative ease. By enabling easy exchange of algorithms, ePMV can facilitate interdisciplinary research, smooth communication between broadly diverse specialties and provide a common platform to frame and visualize the increasingly detailed intersection(s) of cellular and molecular biology. PMID:21397181

  17. Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

  18. Developing a Tiered Response Model for Social-Emotional Learning through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maras, Melissa A.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Lewis, Christie; Thornburg, Kathy; Hawks, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    A tiered response model for social-emotional learning (SEL) is needed to address the significant mental health needs of young people in this country. In collaboration with other school mental health professionals, school psychologists have a unique expertise that situates them to be systems change agents in this work. This article describes a…

  19. Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peress, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

  20. On Compensation in Multidimensional Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of compensation in multidimensional response modeling is addressed. We show that multidimensional response models are compensatory in their ability parameters if and only if they are monotone. In addition, a minimal set of assumptions is presented under which the MLEs of the ability parameters are also compensatory. In a recent series of…

  1. An investigation of a professional development model in science education: A systems approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Glenda Love

    The Mathematics and Science Cooperative (MSEC), a four year longevity model of professional development education for in-service teachers, is closely aligned with the spirit and tenets of science for all. This partnership of a university, a school district, and a higher education coordinating board, seeks to promote and improve science and mathematics achievement for underserved and underrepresented populations. This study sought to explore how this model affects elementary in-service teachers' feelings of self-efficacy toward science and science teaching. Interactive Qualitative Research (IQR), a systems approach of natural inquiry, was used for this study. Theory is grounded in the data collected and analyzed through group processes. A core group of teachers, key teachers representing grades one through six and lead teachers the campus contact representatives, received professional development education from university professors in semi-monthly after school workshops and in a three week summer science institute held on-site. In this study, (N = 18) key and lead teachers participated in a focus group, a picture board exercise (a projective type exercise), interviews, and classroom observations. Within the system of the MSEC professional development model, cause and effect relationships among eleven phenomena were identified which had the greatest impact on the teachers' feelings of self-efficacy and science teaching practices. Changed teaching practices were indicated by inquiry-based science lessons with students as active learners. Five principles of self-efficacy: (1) efficacy; (2) goals setting; (3) values; (4) expectancy; and, (5) control beliefs were used to evaluate efficacy beliefs. Findings from the data collection and analysis identified two phenomena, the university instructional leadership role and teacher time commitments and time constraints, both internally and externally imposed, which seemed to have the greatest impact on elementary teachers

  2. Mentor Modeling: The Internalization of Modeled Professional Thinking in an Epistemic Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Padraig; Shaffer, David Williamson

    2011-01-01

    Players of epistemic games--computer games that simulate professional practica--have been shown to develop epistemic frames: a profession's particular way of seeing and solving problems. This study examined the interactions between players and mentors in one epistemic game, Urban Science. Using a new method called epistemic network analysis, we…

  3. Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inouye, Patricia C.; And Others

    A Liaison Committee at the University of California-Davis' library studied the concept of professional development, including the individual librarian's responsibility and the General Library's role in assisting its librarians. This document enumerates the committee's recommendations and outlines (1) the factors which influence the extent of a…

  4. Model for the evaluation of implementation programs and professional pharmacy services.

    PubMed

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical care research of professional services has largely focused on patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Research studies have been, for the most part, conducted in controlled conditions prior to full scale implementation. There appears to be a dearth of process and evaluation of implementation reported. Conducting implementation research or adding implementation measures to an impact study, adds external validity to service and patient outcomes. Evaluations are required for all aspects of implementation including indicators of movement through the implementation stages (formative and summative implementation process evaluation), measures of influencing factors (barriers and facilitators) and change in factors over time (implementation impact), assessment of strategies and/or the implementation program, and overall measures to generate a level of implementation (implementation outcomes). The level of implementation of a professional pharmacy service can be estimated from the level of service delivery (reach and fidelity) and level as a service provider (integration and strength of support in the service environment). The model may be used for evaluating professional pharmacy services and for evaluating implementation programs. PMID:26341944

  5. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for the Bering Strait School District, a geographically isolated area with low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poverty. Scientists from around the globe have converged in this region and other areas of the Arctic to observe and measure changes in climate that are significant, accelerating, and unlike any in recorded history. Climate literacy (the ability to understand Earth system science and to make scientifically informed decisions about climate changes) has become essential for this population. Program resources were designed in collaboration with scientists to mimic the processes used to study Arctic climate. Because the Bering Strait School District serves a 98 percent Alaska Native student population, ACMP focused on best practices shown to increase the success of minority students. Significant research indicates that Alaska Native students succeed academically at higher rates when instruction addresses topics of local interest, links education to the students’ physical and cultural environment, uses local knowledge and culture in the curriculum, and incorporates hands-on, inquiry-based lessons in the classroom. A seven-partner consortium of research institutes and Alaska Native corporations created ACMP to help teachers understand their role in nurturing STM talent and motivating students to explore geoscience careers. Research underscores the importance of increasing school emphasis in content areas, such as climate, that facilitate global awareness and civic responsibility, and that foster critical thinking and

  6. Core Temperature and Sweat Responses in Professional Women's Tennis Players During Tournament Play in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Tippet, Melissa L.; Stofan, John R.; Lacambra, Magie; Horswill, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Tennis is often played in hot, humid environments, intensifying the thermoregulatory strain placed on the athletes. As a safety measure, some tennis organizations allow for a 10-minute break in play between the second and third sets when environmental conditions are extreme. However, the actual effect of these breaks in reducing core temperature is unknown. Objective: To determine change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in play and assess fluid balance in professional female tennis players during tournament matches in the heat. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A Women's Tennis Association Tour–sanctioned outdoor tournament on hard courts under hot conditions (30.3°C ± 2.3°C). Patients or Other Participants: Seven professional tennis players. Main Outcome Measure(s): Change in core temperature after a 10-minute break in tournament play, fluid intake, and sweat losses during match play. Results: Core temperature was reduced from 38.92°C to 38.67°C (change of −0.25°C ± 0.20°C) when a break was taken (P  =  .02). Mean sweat rate during match play was 2.0 ± 0.5 L/h. During that time, mean fluid intake was 1.5 ± 0.5 L/h, resulting in a 1.2% ± 1.0% reduction in body mass. Conclusions: Female professional tennis players are subjected to high heat loads during match play in hot environments. However, a 10-minute break in play decreased core temperature in 6 of 7 players by an average of 0.25°C, indicating that the break provides practical benefits in the field. Furthermore, although mean sweat rate in this group of female tennis players was high, most athletes were still able to minimize mass loss to less than 2% of their prematch weight. PMID:21214351

  7. The Maturing of Hormesis as a Credible Dose-Response Model

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2003-01-01

    Hormesis is a dose-response phenomenon that has received little recognition, credibility and acceptance as evidenced by its absence from major toxicological/risk assessment texts, governmental regulatory dose-response modeling for risk assessment, and non-visibility in major professional toxicological society national meetings. This paper traces the historical evolution of the hormetic dose-response hypothesis, why this model is not only credible but also more common than the widely accepted threshold model in direct comparative evaluation, and how the toxicological community made a critical error in rejecting hormesis, a rejection sustained over 70 years. PMID:19330138

  8. Supervision in tribal and state child welfare agencies: professionalization, responsibilities, training needs, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacEachron, A E

    1994-01-01

    Although tribal child welfare and family services have expanded substantially since the enactment of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, little is known about tribal child welfare services or their personnel. This exploratory study compared supervisors from 11 tribal child welfare agencies and one state child welfare agency. Tribal and state supervisors reported similar levels of supervisory professionalization and satisfaction, but they differed in their ethnicity, their supervisory tasks, and their training needs. The results were interpreted from a systems perspective of ethnic-sensitive agency practice. PMID:8149774

  9. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ ( N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed lessons to advance thinking from macroscopic to abstract models. Middle/secondary teachers gained PSTE, PCK, and introduced macroscopic models to develop understanding of previously taught abstract models. All implemented representational thinking and conceptual change strategies. Results suggest that: (1) constructivist PD meets the needs of teachers of varying CK, and (2) instruction should connect representational models with alternative conceptions, integrating radical and social constructivism.

  10. Regulatory models for human embryo cloning: the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions.

    PubMed

    Annas, George J

    1994-09-01

    Both experimental and therapeutic uses of the new reproductive technologies have been governed not by the medical ideology of the best interests of patients and their children, but by the market ideology of profit maximization under the guise of "reproductive liberty." Government in our constitutional, democratic society has the authority and obligation to make and enforce reasonable regulations to manage the new reproductive market in order to protect the interests of the public, prospective parents, and their future children. The "cloning" debate provides a useful opportunity to compare and contrast the competing regulatory models of the free market, professional guidelines, and government restrictions. PMID:11645280

  11. International Trade Professional Curriculum System Innovation and Personnel Training Model Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang

    With the rapid development of China's foreign trade, now many universities have set up the International Trade major one after another; The University must be based on our own resources superiority to have the scientific orientation of personnel training objectives, which can make trained students meet needs of society and enterprises better. This paper based on the characteristics of International Trade major in University proposes to take the personnel training model combining with "Work, Certificate and Learning" as the objective, proceeding the orientation of professional personnel and settings of certificate testing module and teaching module, to construct the curriculum system from the innovation of theoretical and practical teaching.

  12. A descriptive evaluation of the Seattle Police Department's crisis response team officer/mental health professional partnership pilot program.

    PubMed

    Helfgott, Jacqueline B; Hickman, Matthew J; Labossiere, Andre P

    2016-01-01

    The Seattle Police Department (SPD) recently enhanced their response to individuals in behavioral crisis through a pilot Crisis Response Team (CRT) consisting of dedicated Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officers (OFC) paired with a Mental Health Professional (MHP). This study presents results of an incident-based descriptive evaluation of the SPD's CRT pilot program, implemented from 2010 to 2012. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the value-added by the MHP in cases involving individuals in behavioral crisis as well as the effectiveness of the CRT program with regard to resolution time, repeat contacts, and referral to services. Data were collected from SPD general offense and supplemental reports for a 12-month segment of the program. Key variables included incident location, case clearance, repeat contacts, linkages to services, and case disposition. Results of analyses of general offense and supplemental reports are presented and implications for future development of the OFC/MHP partnership are discussed. PMID:26314890

  13. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program - An effective model built from years of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Macdonald, H.; Beane, R. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Fox, S.

    2015-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge (CE) program offers a successful model for designing and convening professional development events. Information about the model is now available on the CE website. The program model has evolved from more than 12 years of experience, building with input from strong leaders and participants. CE offers face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid events, and features a rich website that supports these professional development events as well as a growing community with a shared interest in effective geoscience teaching. Data from national surveys, participant feedback, and self-report data indicate the program's success in improving undergraduate geoscience education. Successes are also demonstrated in classroom observations using RTOP, indicating a significant difference in teaching style among participants and non-participants. A suite of web pages, with a planning timeline, provides guidance to those interested in designing and convening face-to-face or virtual events based on the CE model. The pages suggest ways to develop robust event goals and evaluation tools, how to choose strong leaders and recruit diverse participants, advice for designing effective event programs that utilize participant expertise, websites, and web tools, and suggestions for effectively disseminating event results and producing useful products. The CE model has been successfully transferred to projects that vary in scale and discipline. Best practices from the CE model include (1) thinking of the workshop as shared enterprise among conveners and participants; (2) incorporating conveners and participants who bring diverse viewpoints and approaches; (3) promoting structured discussions that utilize participants' expertise; (4) emphasizing practical strategies to effect change; and (5) using the website as a platform to prepare for the workshop, share ideas, and problem-solve challenges. Learn more about how to utilize this model for your project at:serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/workshops/convene

  14. Effect of the science teaching advancement through modeling physical science professional development workshop on teachers' attitudes, beliefs and content knowledge and students' content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Laura

    The Science Teaching Advancement through Modeling Physical Science (STAMPS) professional development workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in improving teachers' and students' content knowledge. Previous research has shown modeling to be an effective method of instruction for improving student and teacher content knowledge, evidenced by assessment scores. Data includes teacher scores on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI; Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhamer, 1992) and the Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI; Jenkins, Birk, Bauer, Krause, & Pavelich, 2004), as well as student scores on a physics and chemistry assessment. Quantitative data is supported by teacher responses to a post workshop survey and classroom observations. Evaluation of the data shows that the STAMPS professional development workshop was successful in improving both student and teacher content knowledge. Conclusions and suggestions for future study are also included.

  15. Analysis of the Response Speed of Musculature of the Knee in Professional Male and Female Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, D.; Diez-Vega, I.; Rodríguez-Matoso, D.; Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Sagastume, R.; Molina, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the normalized response speed (Vrn) of the knee musculature (flexor and extensor) in high competitive level volleyball players using tensiomyography (TMG) and to analyze the muscular response of the vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) in accordance with the specific position they play in their teams. One hundred and sixty-six players (83 women and 83 men) were evaluated. They belonged to eight teams in the Spanish women's superleague and eight in the Spanish men's superleague. The use of Vrn allows avoiding possible sample imbalances due to anatomical and functional differences and demands. We found differences between Vrn in each of the muscles responsible for extension (VM, RF, and VL) and flexion (BF) regardless of the sex. Normalized response speed differences seem to be larger in setters, liberos and outside players compared to middle blockers and larger in males when compared to females. These results of Vrn might respond to the differences in the physical and technical demands of each specific position, showing an improved balance response of the knee extensor and flexor musculature in male professional volleyball players. PMID:25003109

  16. Use Of Pre-operative Testing And Physicians’ Response To Professional Society Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sigmund, Alana E.; Stevens, Elizabeth R.; Blitz, Jeanna; Ladapo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The value of routine pre-operative testing prior to most surgical procedures is widely considered to be low. To improve the quality of pre-operative care and reduce waste, two professional societies released guidance in 2002, but researchers and policymakers remain concerned about the health and cost burden of low-value care in the pre-operative setting. Objective To examine the long-term, national impact of 2002 professional guidance from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), on physicians’ use of routine pre-operative testing. Design, Setting, Participants U.S. adults evaluated in pre-operative visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) between 1997-2010. A quasi-experimental, differences-in-differences (DID) approach evaluated whether professional guidance in 2002 was associated with changes in pre-operative testing patterns, while adjusting for temporal trends in routine testing, as captured by testing patterns in general medical exams. Main Measures Physician orders for outpatient plain radiography, hematocrit, urinalysis, electrocardiogram (ECG), and cardiac stress testing. Results Over the 14-year period, the average annual number of pre-operative visits in the US increased from 6.8 million in 1997-1999, to 9.8 million in 2002-2004, to 14.3 million in 2008-2010. After accounting for temporal trends in routine testing, we found no statistically significant overall changes in the use of plain radiography (11.3% in 1997-2002 to 9.9% in 2003-2010, DID=−1.0-per-100-visits 95% CI-4.1,2.2), hematocrit (9.4% in 1997-2002 to 4.1% in 2003-2010, DID=+1.2-per-100-visits 95% CI-2.2,4.7), urinalysis (12.2% in 1997-2002 to 8.9% in 2003-2010, DID=+2.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-1.7,7.1), or cardiac stress testing (1.0% in 1997-2002 to 2.0% in 2003-2010, DID=+0.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-0.1,1.5) after

  17. The Development and Evaluation of a Professional Development Model to Build Meaningful and Effective IEPs for Transition-Aged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Flannery, K. Brigid; Lombardi, Allison

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the potential efficacy of a professional development training model targeting IEP case managers of transition-age students. A training model was developed and a pilot study conducted to understand the promise of the model to improve the development of critical components within the IEP document that support…

  18. Graded Response Model Based on the Logistic Positive Exponent Family of Models for Dichotomous Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    Samejima ("Psychometrika "65:319--335, 2000) proposed the logistic positive exponent family of models (LPEF) for dichotomous responses in the unidimensional latent space. The objective of the present paper is to propose and discuss a graded response model that is expanded from the LPEF, in the context of item response theory (IRT). This specific…

  19. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  20. Experiential Professional Development: A Model for Meaningful and Long-Lasting Change in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Brigid M.

    2013-01-01

    An experiential approach to professional development (EPD) allowed Spanish teachers opportunities to improve their practice through demonstration, observation, collaboration, fieldwork, and reflection. As result of "experiential" professional development, Burke (2012) found that teachers' knowledge about communicative language teaching…

  1. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  2. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school students. To evaluate usability, we analyzed students' task performance and task completion time as they worked on an activity with the repurposed modeling technology. In stage 1, we conducted remote testing of an early modeling prototype with urban middle school students (n = 84). In stages 2 and 3, we used screencasting software to record students' mouse and keyboard movements during collaborative think-alouds (n = 22) and conducted a qualitative analysis of their peer discussions. Taken together, the study findings revealed two kinds of usability issues that interfered with students' productive use of the tool: issues related to the use of data and information, and issues related to the use of the modeling technology. The study findings resulted in design improvements that led to stronger usability outcomes and higher task performance among students. In this paper, we describe our methods for usability testing, our research findings, and our design solutions for supporting students' use of the modeling technology and use of data. The paper concludes with implications for the design and study of modeling technologies for science learning.

  3. Evaluation of a continuing professional development training program for physicians and physician assistants in hospitals in Laos based on the Kirkpatrick model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Medical professionals from Korea and Laos have been working together to develop a continuing professional development training program covering the major clinical fields of primary care. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program from 2013 to 2014 using the Kirkpatrick model. Methods: A questionnaire was used to evaluate the reaction of the trainees, and the trainers assessed the level of trainees’ performance at the beginning and the end of each clinical section. The transfer (behavioral change) of the trainees was evaluated through the review of medical records written by the trainees before and after the training program. Results: The trainees were satisfied with the training program, for which the average score was 4.48 out of 5.0. The average score of the trainees’ performance at the beginning was 2.39 out of 5.0, and rose to 3.88 at the end of each section. The average score of the medical records written before the training was 2.92 out of 5.0, and it rose to 3.34 after the training. The number of patient visits to the district hospitals increased. Conclusion: The continuing professional development training program, which was planned and implemented with the full engagement and responsibility of Lao health professionals, proved to be effective. PMID:27246494

  4. Initiating Small Class Teaching in Hong Kong: Video Reflective Narratives and the Professional Developmental Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Marina W. Y.; Pow, Jacky W. C.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the use of video reflective narratives. It reports on data derived from 28 in-service primary school teachers undertaking professional development to support small class (n = 25) teaching in Hong Kong. The findings serve to highlight that such professional development is fraught with confounds, for professional development…

  5. Implementing inquiry-based kits within a professional development school model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mark Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Implementation of guided inquiry teaching for the first time carries inherent problems for science teachers. Reform efforts on inquiry-based science teaching are often unsustainable and are not sensitive to teachers' needs and abilities as professionals. Professional development schools are meant to provide a research-based partnership between a public school and a university. These collaborations can provide support for the professional development of teachers. This dissertation reports a study focused on the implementation of inquiry-based science kits within the support of one of these collaborations. The researcher describes the difficulties and successful adaptations experienced by science teachers and how a coteaching model provided support. These types of data are needed in order to develop a bottom-up, sustainable process that will allow teachers to implement inquiry-based science. A qualitative methodology with "researcher as participant" was used in this study of two science teachers during 2002--2003. These two teachers were supported by a coteaching model, which included preservice teachers for each teacher as well as a supervising professor. Data were collected from the researcher's direct observations of coteachers' practice. Data were also collected from interviews and reflective pieces from the coteachers. Triangulation of the data on each teacher's case supported the validity of the findings. Case reports were prepared from these data for each classroom teacher. These case reports were used and cross-case analysis was conducted to search for major themes and findings in the study. Major findings described the hurdles teachers encounter, examples of adaptations observed in the teachers' cases and the supportive interactions with their coteachers while implementing the inquiry-based kits. In addition, the data were used to make recommendations for future training and use of the kits and the coteaching model. Results from this study showed that the

  6. Exposure–Response Modeling of Clinical End Points Using Latent Variable Indirect Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Hu, C

    2014-01-01

    Exposure–response modeling facilitates effective dosing regimen selection in clinical drug development, where the end points are often disease scores and not physiological variables. Appropriate models need to be consistent with pharmacology and identifiable from the time courses of available data. This article describes a general framework of applying mechanism-based models to various types of clinical end points. Placebo and drug model parameterization, interpretation, and assessment are discussed with a focus on the indirect response models. PMID:24897307

  7. Enhancing Teachers' Application of Inquiry-Based Strategies Using a Constructivist Sociocultural Professional Development Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brenda R.; Moore, Sandra J.

    2011-05-01

    This two-year school-wide initiative to improve teachers' pedagogical skills in inquiry-based science instruction using a constructivist sociocultural professional development model involved 30 elementary teachers from one school, three university faculty, and two central office content supervisors. Research was conducted for investigating the impact of the professional development activities on teachers' practices, documenting changes in their philosophies, instruction, and the learning environment. This report includes teachers' accounts of philosophical as well as instructional changes and how these changes shaped the learning environment. For the teachers in this study, examining their teaching practices in learner-centered collaborative group settings encouraged them to critically analyze their instructional practices, challenging their preconceived ideas on inquiry-based strategies. Additionally, other factors affecting teachers' understanding and use of inquiry-based strategies were highlighted, such as self-efficacy beliefs, prior experiences as students in science classrooms, teacher preparation programs, and expectations due to federal, state, and local mandates. These factors were discussed and reconciled, as they constructed new understandings and adapted their strategies to become more student-centered and inquiry-based.

  8. Brains Rule!: A Model Program for Developing Professional Stewardship among Neuroscientists

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L.; Frantz, Kyle J.

    2006-01-01

    Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a “reverse science fair” in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study focuses on results of assessments conducted with neuroscientist presenters during Expositions at two sites, Atlanta, Georgia and Corpus Christi, Texas. The effects of participating in the Expositions on presenters' perceptions of their own presentation and communication skills were evaluated, as was the potential for increased active participation by neuroscientists in future outreach programs. In four of the five Expositions studied, pre- versus post-event surveys demonstrated significant changes in presenters' perceptions of their own abilities to explain neuroscience concepts to children. Over the course of an Exposition, presenters learned to fit their approaches to conveying neuroscience concepts to fifth through eighth graders and learned to link information they presented about the brain and nervous system to children's past experiences to improve comprehension. The present data suggest that Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions are effective in improving communication and teaching skills among neuroscience professionals and contribute to professional stewardship by increasing motivation to participate in future informal education programs. PMID:17012206

  9. Brains Rule!: a model program for developing professional stewardship among neuroscientists.

    PubMed

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Carruth, Laura L; Frantz, Kyle J

    2006-01-01

    Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, funded through a National Institute on Drug Abuse Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award, has developed a successful model for informal neuroscience education. Each Exposition is a "reverse science fair" in which neuroscientists present short neuroscience teaching modules to students. This study focuses on results of assessments conducted with neuroscientist presenters during Expositions at two sites, Atlanta, Georgia and Corpus Christi, Texas. The effects of participating in the Expositions on presenters' perceptions of their own presentation and communication skills were evaluated, as was the potential for increased active participation by neuroscientists in future outreach programs. In four of the five Expositions studied, pre- versus post-event surveys demonstrated significant changes in presenters' perceptions of their own abilities to explain neuroscience concepts to children. Over the course of an Exposition, presenters learned to fit their approaches to conveying neuroscience concepts to fifth through eighth graders and learned to link information they presented about the brain and nervous system to children's past experiences to improve comprehension. The present data suggest that Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions are effective in improving communication and teaching skills among neuroscience professionals and contribute to professional stewardship by increasing motivation to participate in future informal education programs. PMID:17012206

  10. Methods of incorporating understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in the engineering curriculum and results from the Fundamentals of Engineering examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Brock Edward

    This study evaluated the methods of incorporating professionalism and ethics in the engineering curriculum to determine the nature of the relationship between the curriculum model used and outcomes on a nationally administered, engineering-specific standardized examination. The study's population included engineering students enrolled at one of nine southeastern public universities between October 1996 and April 2005. The institutions are partners in the Multiple-Institution Database for Investigating Engineering Longitudinal Development (MIDFIELD) project. A mixed-methods (quantitative and qualitative) research program was designed and implemented. The qualitative aspects of the study focused on research questions related to the impetus and considerations given to curriculum changes made by the 23 engineering programs that participated in the study. The qualitative research questions were investigated using semi-structured interviews conducted with program representatives and evaluation of 49 ABET Self-Study accreditation documents. The curriculum model used by each of the participating programs were identified and defined for the period of the study and quantitatively compared to performance on the ethics section of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination. The FE Examination is prepared and administered by the National Council for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) and is the only nationally administered, engineering-specific, standardized assessment that measures performance on ABET-related criteria. A student-level dataset of subject scores was obtained for the FE Examination for all of the MIDFIELD programs. This study represents the first published attempt to utilize NCEES data for the purpose of rigorous educational research. Statistical techniques were used to evaluate the relationship between curriculum methods and examination performance. The findings indicate a statistical relationship, but a lack of structure between the amount of required

  11. An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Georgi Anne

    The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in

  12. How Do You Evaluate Everyone Who Isn't a Teacher? An Adaptable Evaluation Model for Professional Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; And Others

    The evaluation of professional support personnel in the schools has been a neglected area in educational evaluation. The Center for Research on Educational Accountability and Teacher Evaluation (CREATE) has worked to develop a conceptually sound evaluation model and then to translate the model into practical evaluation procedures that facilitate…

  13. Alternate Collegial Model-Based Forms of Networking among Women or Networking in the Nineties for the Professional Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancrazio, Sally Bulkley

    The collegial networking model, advanced for women as an alternative to the traditional "old boy" male network in the late 1970s and early 1980s, is described in this paper. Based on affiliation rather than competitiveness, the collegial model is applicable to professional women in the 1990s, with the following added recommendations: (1)…

  14. Early Childhood Teachers' Professional Learning in Early Algebraic Thinking: A Model that Supports New Knowledge and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of a new mathematics syllabus in the elementary context is problematic, especially if it contains a new content area. A professional development model, Transformative Teaching in the Early Years Mathematics (TTEYM) was specifically developed to support the implementation of the new Patterns and Algebra strand. The model was…

  15. Statewide and District Professional Development in Standards: Addressing Teacher Equity. Models of Inservice. National Writing Project at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Richard; Roop, Laura; Setter, Gail

    2006-01-01

    The National Writing Project at Work (NWP) monograph series documents how the National Writing Project model is implemented and developed at local sites across the country. These monographs describe NWP work, which is often shared informally or in workshops. Richard Koch and Laura Roop present a model of standards-based professional development…

  16. Teaching Science Using Guided Inquiry as the Central Theme: A Professional Development Model for High School Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Anil

    2010-01-01

    The author describes a professional development model for high school science teachers based on the framework of inquiry and science standards. The "Learn-Teach-Assess Inquiry" model focuses on guided inquiry labs as the central theme and builds on these labs to reinforce science concepts and abilities to understand and engage in inquiry in…

  17. Evaluation of an Audience Response System for the Continuing Education of Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Redonda G.; Ashar, Bimal H.; Getz, Kelly J.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) for physicians and other health personnel is becoming increasingly important in light of recertification requirements. Interactive learning is more effective and may be useful in a continuing education setting. This study examines the use of an audience response system (ARS) as an interactive…

  18. Can instruction in engineering ethics change students' feelings about professional responsibility?

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Golnaz; Loui, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student's feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of two short cases that posed moral problems. For each case, the role of the engineer was successively changed and the student was asked how each change altered his or her decisions about the case. Students who had completed the ethics course considered more options before making a decision, and they responded consistently despite changes in the cases. For both cases, even when they were not directly involved, they were more likely to feel responsible and take corrective action. Students who were less successful in the ethics course gave answers similar to students who had not taken the course. This latter group of students seemed to have weaker feelings of responsibility: they would say that a problem was "not my business." It appears that instruction in ethics can increase awareness of responsibility, knowledge about how to handle a difficult situation, and confidence in taking action. PMID:20146104

  19. Professional Development to Increase Problem-Solving Skills in a Response to Intervention Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Kizzy; Truscott, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With the latest re-authorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), states are allowed to use a Response to Intervention (RtI) framework to determine whether students qualify for special education services. Although RtI has promise and has been implemented well with documented results, further research is…

  20. Responsive Medical Professionalism: Integrating Education, Practice, and Community in a Market-Driven Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankford, David M.; Konrad, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    The traditional response of medical education to challenges from the external environment has been to claim that the medical profession must have autonomy concerning educational mission. However, as social, educational, and economic forces change, more explicit, formal, and systematic linkages between practice institutions and educational…

  1. Addressing the Gap between Case Law and Professional Practice: A Response to Zirkel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this article, authors Carl Smith, Antonis Katsiyannis, and Joseph Ryan respond to Zirkel's most recent article, "The Law in the Special Education Literature: A Brief Legal Critique," published in this issue of "Behavioral Disorders." Smith, Katsiyannis, and Ryan begin their response by saying that "The Law in the…

  2. Taking Professional Learning to Isolated Schools: Perceptions of Providers and Principals, and Lessons for Effective Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Kim; Jones, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and outcomes, as perceived by the professional learning providers and school principals, of a professional learning (PL) model devised in response to recognition that models of PL that are effective in urban settings are not effective in rural and remote areas. Rather than expecting the teachers to travel…

  3. Professionals and Workplace Control: Organizational and Demographic Models of Teacher Militancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacharach, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A sample of 524 elementary and 816 secondary teachers was used to evaluate the plausibility of 7 models of teacher militancy concerning issues of workplace control. The more plausible models are those that explain militancy as a function of the extent of teachers' integration into the organization and their affective response to organizational…

  4. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  5. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  6. Professionally designed information materials and telephone reminders improved consent response rates: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Andy; Tilling, Kate; Cornish, Rosie; Davies, Amy; Humphries, Kerry; Macleod, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether different study-to-participant communication methods increase response, increase response from hard-to-engage individuals, and influence participants' consent decisions. Study Design and Setting A randomized controlled trial within the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Cohort members were invited to re-enroll at age 18 and consent to linkage to their health and administrative records. Participants were randomized to receive one of eight combinations of three interventions: a prior-notification postcard or no contact, a standard or professionally designed consent pack, and a phone or postal reminder. The primary outcome was return of the consent form (“response”), with consent decision being the secondary outcome. Results Of 1,950 participants, 806 (41%) responded. Response rates were 2.7% higher (95% confidence interval: −0.06, 5.5%; P = 0.06) among those receiving designed packs than among those receiving standard packs and 6.4% higher (2.3, 10.6%; P = 0.002) among those receiving phone reminders (compared with postal reminders). The prior-notification postcard did not influence response rates [difference = 0% (−2.8, 2.8%; P = 1.0)], and we found no evidence that the communication method influenced consent decision. Conclusion This trial provides evidence that communication material design can influence response rates and that phone reminders have superior cost/benefit returns over designed materials. Experimental evaluation of communications strategies and dissemination of findings may benefit cohort studies. PMID:25920944

  7. A Model for Teaching Health Care Professionals the Components of the Family

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Marcel A.; Mundy, Paul

    1977-01-01

    With the inclusion of the behavioral sciences component in the National Board Examination (1972), many medical schools have revised their curricula to include sociology in the training of the future physician. In dentistry, the behavioral sciences group of the International Association for Dental Research has increased in membership over the past years. In nursing, courses such as sociology, psychology, and anthropology have already been included in the curricula of various schools. However, the tremendous shortage of qualified social scientists who are capable of relating the behavioral sciences to the health care institution makes it difficult to meet the needs of graduate and professional schools everywhere. In view of this problem, this article will present a simple conceptual model that can be used as an organizational device for teaching the components of the family in relation to the health care institution. PMID:864775

  8. Stiffening response of a cellular tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    Wendling, S; Oddou, C; Isabey, D

    1999-02-01

    Living cells exhibit, as most biological tissues, a stiffening (strain-hardening) response which reflects the nonlinearity of the stress-strain relationship. Tensegrity structures have been proposed as a comprehensive model of such a cell's mechanical response. Based on a theoretical model of a 30-element tensegrity structure, we propose a quantitative analysis of its nonlinear mechanical behavior under static conditions and large deformations. This study provides theoretical foundation to the passage from large-scale tensegrity models to microscale living cells, as well as the comparison between results obtained in biological specimens of different sizes. We found two non-dimensional parameters (L*-normalized element length and T*-normalized elastic tension) which govern the mechanical response of the structure for three types of loading tested (extension, compression and shear). The linear strain-hardening is uniquely observed for extension but differed for the two other types of loading tested. The stiffening response of the theoretical model was compared and discussed with the living cells stiffening response observed by different methods (shear flow experiments, micromanipulation and magnetocytometry). PMID:10049624

  9. Salivary Biomarker Responses to Two Final Matches in Women's Professional Football.

    PubMed

    Maya, Javiera; Marquez, Pablo; Peñailillo, Luis; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Deldicque, Louise; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the link between salivary concentrations of cortisol, testosterone, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) as a measure of internal load after two final matches played 3 days apart by professional women football players. Saliva samples were taken before and after the two matches (M1, M2). RPE was used to monitor the exercise intensity after each match. Testosterone concentrations increased after each match (M1: +42%, p = 0.002; M2: +50%, p < 0.001) while cortisol increased only after M1 (+116%, p < 0.001). The testosterone-to-cortisol ratio decreased only after M1 (-32.4%, p < 0.001). IgA concentration did not change after any match. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with IgA concentrations after each match (M1: R = 0.59, p = 0.008; M2: R=0.51, p = 0.02). RPE was correlated with cortisol concentrations after M1 (R = 0.57; p = 0.01), but not after M2 (R = 0.38; p = 0.07). All these results suggest that salivary cortisol and testosterone concentrations increase especially after the first match of a final, without affecting IgA levels. We speculate that increased testosterone concentration in women after football matches may play a protecting role against immune suppression usually observed after intense exercise. Key pointsIn our sample space, IgA concentrations did not change for teams even, before and after separated match. Suggesting that salivary IgA determinations after physical activities remain under debate.Testosterone concentrations were the only one hormone showing a consequent increase in both matches after physical activity carrying.The T/C ratio decrease only after M1 according with a higher cortisol level reach after M1 get-together, suggesting a differential impact over anxiety-associated team performance. So M2 play gives a more stable psychological state. PMID:27274677

  10. Salivary Biomarker Responses to Two Final Matches in Women’s Professional Football

    PubMed Central

    Maya, Javiera; Marquez, Pablo; Peñailillo, Luis; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Deldicque, Louise; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the link between salivary concentrations of cortisol, testosterone, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) as a measure of internal load after two final matches played 3 days apart by professional women football players. Saliva samples were taken before and after the two matches (M1, M2). RPE was used to monitor the exercise intensity after each match. Testosterone concentrations increased after each match (M1: +42%, p = 0.002; M2: +50%, p < 0.001) while cortisol increased only after M1 (+116%, p < 0.001). The testosterone-to-cortisol ratio decreased only after M1 (-32.4%, p < 0.001). IgA concentration did not change after any match. Testosterone concentrations were correlated with IgA concentrations after each match (M1: R = 0.59, p = 0.008; M2: R=0.51, p = 0.02). RPE was correlated with cortisol concentrations after M1 (R = 0.57; p = 0.01), but not after M2 (R = 0.38; p = 0.07). All these results suggest that salivary cortisol and testosterone concentrations increase especially after the first match of a final, without affecting IgA levels. We speculate that increased testosterone concentration in women after football matches may play a protecting role against immune suppression usually observed after intense exercise. Key points In our sample space, IgA concentrations did not change for teams even, before and after separated match. Suggesting that salivary IgA determinations after physical activities remain under debate. Testosterone concentrations were the only one hormone showing a consequent increase in both matches after physical activity carrying. The T/C ratio decrease only after M1 according with a higher cortisol level reach after M1 get-together, suggesting a differential impact over anxiety-associated team performance. So M2 play gives a more stable psychological state. PMID:27274677

  11. Academic freedom and the professional responsibilities of applied ethicists: a comment on Minerva.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Angus; Herington, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Academic freedom is an important good, but it comes with several responsibilities. In this commentary we seek to do two things. First, we argue against Francesca Minerva's view of academic freedom as presented in her article 'New threats to academic freedom' on a number of grounds. We reject the nature of the absolutist moral claim to free speech for academics implicit in the article; we reject the elitist role for academics as truth-seekers explicit in her view; and we reject a possible more moderate re-construction of her view based on the harm/offence distinction. Second, we identify some of the responsibilities of applied ethicists, and illustrate how they recommend against allowing for anonymous publication of research. Such a proposal points to the wider perils of a public discourse which eschews the calm and careful discussion of ideas. PMID:24724542

  12. An Introduction to Polytomous Item Response Theory Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that polytomous item response theory (IRT) models are appropriate for Likert scale and other polytomous item types. Presents polytomous IRT models, including graded response, nominal response, partial credit, and rating scale models. (Author/NB)

  13. Professional responsibilities versus familial responsibilities: an examination of role conflict among first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Adams, Terri; Turner, Mila

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a human-caused or natural disaster, the police are essential front-line first responders. The ability of police departments to provide adequate services is contingent upon critical response personnel working and functioning in an efficient manner. Currently, it is assumed that first responders will continue to work in the event of a disaster, even if they are personally impacted by the disaster to which they are expected to respond. This study examines role conflict among police officers who served as first responders during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. PMID:24691915

  14. An entrustable professional activity (EPA) for handoffs as a model for EPA assessment development.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Michael; Nixon, James; Gladding, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    Medical education is moving toward assessment of educational outcomes rather than educational processes. The American Board of Internal Medicine and American Board of Pediatrics milestones and the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPA)--skills essential to the practice of medicine that educators progressively entrust learners to perform--provide new approaches to assessing outcomes. Although some defined EPAs exist for internal medicine and pediatrics, the continued development and implementation of EPAs remains challenging. As residency programs are expected to begin reporting milestone-based performance, however, they will need examples of how to overcome these challenges. The authors describe a model for the development and implementation of an EPA using the resident handoff as an example. The model includes nine steps: selecting the EPA, determining where skills are practiced and assessed, addressing barriers to assessment, determining components of the EPA, determining needed assessment tools, developing new assessments if needed, determining criteria for advancement through entrustment levels, mapping milestones to the EPA, and faculty development. Following implementation, 78% of interns at the University of Minnesota Medical School were observed giving handoffs and provided feedback. The authors suggest that this model of EPA development--which includes engaging stakeholders, an iterative process to describing the behavioral characteristics of each domain at each level of entrustment, and the development of specific assessment tools that support both formative feedback and summative decisions about entrustment--can serve as a model for EPA development for other clinical skills and specialty areas. PMID:24892402

  15. The ABC's of Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Pamela A.

    2003-01-01

    Every teacher must develop the characteristics of a professional and model professionalism everyday. In fact, among the standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) is a requirement that teacher candidates demonstrate specific dispositions of professionals (NCATE 2001). Bridges (in Ben-Peretz 2001, 50) advised…

  16. Analyzing Information Seeking and Drug-Safety Alert Response by Health Care Professionals as New Methods for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Pernek, Igor; Stiglic, Gregor; Leskovec, Jure; Strasberg, Howard R; Shah, Nigam Haresh

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns in general consumer online search logs have been used to monitor health conditions and to predict health-related activities, but the multiple contexts within which consumers perform online searches make significant associations difficult to interpret. Physician information-seeking behavior has typically been analyzed through survey-based approaches and literature reviews. Activity logs from health care professionals using online medical information resources are thus a valuable yet relatively untapped resource for large-scale medical surveillance. Objective To analyze health care professionals’ information-seeking behavior and assess the feasibility of measuring drug-safety alert response from the usage logs of an online medical information resource. Methods Using two years (2011-2012) of usage logs from UpToDate, we measured the volume of searches related to medical conditions with significant burden in the United States, as well as the seasonal distribution of those searches. We quantified the relationship between searches and resulting page views. Using a large collection of online mainstream media articles and Web log posts we also characterized the uptake of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) alert via changes in UpToDate search activity compared with general online media activity related to the subject of the alert. Results Diseases and symptoms dominate UpToDate searches. Some searches result in page views of only short duration, while others consistently result in longer-than-average page views. The response to an FDA alert for Celexa, characterized by a change in UpToDate search activity, differed considerably from general online media activity. Changes in search activity appeared later and persisted longer in UpToDate logs. The volume of searches and page view durations related to Celexa before the alert also differed from those after the alert. Conclusions Understanding the information-seeking behavior associated with online

  17. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  18. From "Mentor" to "Role Model": Scaling the Involvement of STEM Professionals through Role Model Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Jennifer; Stein, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Mentors and role models can play a significant role in high school students' motivation to pursue specific careers later in life. Although the use of role models in the classroom is an important research topic, little research has been conducted on scaling up STEM role models reach through the use of video vignettes. This essay outlines a series…

  19. Lawyer Proliferation and the Social Responsibility Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wines, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Drawing on the model of social responsibility that colleges of business have been teaching, the boom in lawyer education is examined. It is argued that law schools are irresponsible in overselling the benefits of law school graduation, creating a surplus of lawyers whose abilities could be used as well elsewhere. (MSE)

  20. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  1. Construction of the integrated model for practical career support to the professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Motoki; Hochi, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Mami; Kaneko, Ikuyo; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, along with the enhancement of the argument for career of athletes, many researchers who major in sports psychology focus mainly on athletic retirement, a coordination of transitions in sport or and outside sport, social support and professional assistance in career transition, in the context of the second career concerning to professional athletes in Japan. However, when it comes to career transition of professional athletes, it is necessary to consider "career" from the whole perspectives of human life. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to clarify the career transition of professional athletes by the way of questionnaire and interview survey, which is approached from the view point of industrial/organizational psychology. For this purpose, we implemented the interview survey to professional athletes in 2008. In addition, we carried out the investigation to professional football players (interview survey: 5 players, questionnaire survey: 102 players) in 2009. Consequently, three following findings were led in conclusion. (1)Career intervention to professional athletes should be performed before the turning point of the career (career transition). (2)It is important to assess the career intervention to professional athletes. (3)It is an important stance to watch the processes when professional athletes open up one's career by oneself. PMID:22317681

  2. Continuing professional education and the selection of candidates: the case for a tripartite model.

    PubMed

    Ellis, L B

    2000-02-01

    This paper argues the case for a tripartite model involving the manager educator and practitioner in the selection of candidates to programmes of continuing professional education (CPE). Nurse educators are said to play a key link in the education practice chain (Pendleton & Myles 1991), yet with the introduction of a market philosophy for education, the educator appears to have little, if any, influence over the selection of CPE candidates. Empirical studies on the value of an effective system for identifying the educational needs of the individual and the locality are unequivocal in specifying the benefits of a collaborative selection process (Larcombe & Maggs 1991). However, there are few studies that offer a model of collaboration and fewer still on how to operationalize such a model. This paper presents the policy and legislative context of CPE leading to the development of a market philosophy. The tension between educational reforms such as life-long learning and diminishing and finite resources are highlighted. These strategic issues provide the backdrop and rationale for considering the process for identifying CPE needs, and the characteristics of an effective system as suggested in the literature. Finally, this paper outlines recommendations for a partnership between the manager practitioner and educationalist in the selection of CPE candidates. PMID:11148842

  3. Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers. PMID:23101486

  4. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum likelihood framework. They are explicitly formulated…

  5. Evaluating the Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education Professional Development Program at the Elementary School Level in the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    The overall effectiveness of the culturally relevant and responsive education (CRRE) professional development program in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) was evaluated. Recruitment procedures included general and special educators and school administrators as participants. The "CRRE Observation Coding Scheme" and reflective field…

  6. First Response to "The Teacher as a Service Professional," by Donald A. Myers: Don't Settle for a Booby Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John

    2008-01-01

    In this response to Donald A. Myers's "The Teacher as a Service Professional" (2008 [this issue]), the author suggests that teacher educators should not buy into Myers's concept because such would sell them short and be counterproductive to the advancement of the teaching profession. Teacher educators must not give up their struggle to advance the…

  7. Distinguishing Models of Professional Development: The Case of an Adaptive Model's Impact on Teachers' Knowledge, Instruction, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koellner, Karen; Jacobs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We posit that professional development (PD) models fall on a continuum from highly adaptive to highly specified, and that these constructs provide a productive way to characterize and distinguish among models. The study reported here examines the impact of an adaptive mathematics PD model on teachers' knowledge and instructional practices as…

  8. Professional ethics in extreme circumstances: responsibilities of attending physicians and healthcare providers in hunger strikes.

    PubMed

    Irmak, Nurbay

    2015-08-01

    Hunger strikes potentially present a serious challenge for attending physicians. Though rare, in certain cases, a conflict can occur between the obligations of beneficence and autonomy. On the one hand, physicians have a duty to preserve life, which entails intervening in a hunger strike before the hunger striker loses his life. On the other hand, physicians' duty to respect autonomy implies that attending physicians have to respect hunger strikers' decisions to refuse nutrition. International medical guidelines state that physicians should follow the strikers' unpressured advance directives. When physicians encounter an unconscious striker, in the absence of reliable advance directives, the guidelines advise physicians to make a decision on the basis of the patient's values, previously expressed wishes, and best interests. I argue that if there are no advance directives and the striker has already lost his competence, the physician has the responsibility to resuscitate the striker. Once the striker regains his decision-making capacity, he should be asked about his decision. If he is determined to continue fasting and refuses treatment, the physician has a moral obligation to respect this decisions and follow his advance directives. PMID:26194871

  9. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  10. High-Intensity Training and Salivary Immunoglobulin A Responses in Professional Top-Level Soccer Players: Effect of Training Intensity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Adam L; Wong, Del P; Dunlop, Gordon; Groussard, Carole; Kebsi, Wiem; Dellal, Alexandre; Morgans, Ryland; Zouhal, Hassane

    2016-09-01

    Owen, AL, Wong, DP, Dunlop, G, Groussard, C, Kebsi, W, Dellal, A, Morgans, R, and Zouhal, H. High-intensity training and salivary immunoglobulin A responses in professional top-level soccer players: Effect of training intensity. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2460-2469, 2016-This study aimed (a) to test the hypothesis that salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) would vary with training intensity sessions (low-intensity [LI] vs. high-intensity sessions [HI]) during a traditional training program divided into 4 training periods and (b) to identify key variables (e.g., GPS data, rating of perceived exertion [RPE], and training duration), which could affect s-IgA. Saliva samples of 10 elite professional soccer players were collected (a) before the investigation started to establish the baseline level and (b) before and after each 4 training sessions (LI vs. HI). Training intensity was monitored as internal (through heart rate responses and RPE) and external (through GPS) loads. High-intensity sessions were associated with higher external load (GPS) and with higher RPE. Baseline and pretraining s-IgA did not differ between the 4 training sessions both for HI and LI. Post-training s-IgA were not different (in absolute value and in percentage of change) between HI and LI sessions at the first 3 periods. However, at the fourth period, s-IgA concentration for HI session was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) than the LI session. The percentage change between s-IgA post-training and s-IgA baseline concentrations differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) between HI and LI training sessions. Significant correlations between s-IgA and training intensity were also noted. High-intensity soccer training sessions might cause a significant decrease in s-IgA values during the postexercise window as compared with LI sessions. This study encourages coaches to monitor s-IgA in routine, particularly during HI training periods, to take precautions to avoid upper respiratory tract infection in highly trained

  11. Professional Development in Higher Education: A Model for Meaningful Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dysart, Sarah; Weckerle, Carl

    2015-01-01

    While many institutions provide centralized technology support for faculty, there is a lack of centralized professional development opportunities that focus on simultaneously developing instructors' technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) in higher education. Additionally, there are few professional development opportunities for…

  12. Supporting Elementary Teachers at the "Chalk Face": A Model for In-School Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kervin, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The voluminous literature on teacher professional development presents varied components of what constitutes meaningful professional development experiences for elementary teachers. The research reported here first identifies these components through an analysis of the literature, and then describes a research project in which those components…

  13. Professional Development in Law, Health Care, and Aging: A Model Fellowship Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    2000-01-01

    Argues there is a growing need for a core of professionals with the education and sensitivities necessary to integrate the fields of law, health care, and gerontology. Paper describes a professional development fellowship program which attempts to address this need by having recently graduated attorneys assess, on a firsthand level, provisions of…

  14. A Professional Development Model for Math and Science Educators in Catholic Elementary Schools: Challenges and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchey, Debora; Morrison, Julie Q.; Geer, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    Catholic elementary schools must continue to invest in the professional development of math and science teachers in order to prepare students for the challenging work that lies ahead of them. The purpose of the study was to examine the degree to which the Initiative for Catholic Schools (ICS), a 2-year professional development program for science…

  15. Sport Education for Teachers: Professional Development when Introducing a Novel Curriculum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a description of an on-site professional development program for Russian teachers as they learned to teach Sport Education. A concurrent objective was to investigate the effectiveness of this professional development opportunity. Participants were two physical education teachers (one with 27 and one with 3…

  16. Taking Charge of Professional Development: A Practical Model for Your School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semadeni, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Overcome budget cuts, lack of leadership, top-down mandates, and other obstacles to professional development by using this book's take-charge approach. Joseph H. Semadeni guides you through a systemic method to professional development that: (1) Motivates teachers to continuously learn and apply best practices; (2) Makes adult learning activities…

  17. e-PD: Blended Models of Sustaining Teacher Professional Development in Digital Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil; Henderson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that professional development of teachers in the use of information and communication technologies should be sustained over time. Most professional development, however, is delivered in single or short sequences of face-to-face sessions, paying little heed to this requirement. Once the face-to-face training is completed, a…

  18. Pre-Professional Training for Serving Children with ASD: An Apprenticeship Model of Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with varied skill profiles and levels of severity making development and implementation of specialized school services challenging. Research indicates that school professionals require and desire additional ASD-specific professional development, both at the pre-and in-service levels.…

  19. Modeling and Measuring the Structure of Professional Vision in Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Tina; Stürmer, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Professional vision has been identified as an important element of teacher expertise that can be developed in teacher education. It describes the use of knowledge to notice and interpret significant features of classroom situations. Three aspects of professional vision have been described by qualitative research: describe, explain, and predict…

  20. Developing a Model of Practice: Designing a Framework for the Professional Development of School Leaders and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Jenny; Forde, Christine; Casteel, Viv; Lynas, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Describes the origins and evolution of a framework for leadership and management development in Scottish schools. The design of this competence framework is underpinned by a professional-development model supporting experiential learning and critical reflection. Calls for a synthesis of various approaches to management development based on a…

  1. Using organizational mission, vision, and values to guide professional practice model development and measurement of nurse performance.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Gail L; Witzel, Patricia A; Smith, Toni C

    2005-02-01

    An organization's mission, vision, and values statements are the guiding forces behind the institution's administrative strategic planning and performance assessment activities. Linking nursing professional practice model components and performance evaluation criteria with each of these foundational documents assures that their values, beliefs, and intentions are evident in daily work life. PMID:15714101

  2. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.O.; Lapham, E.V.

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  3. Toward an Innovative, Basic Program Model for the Improvement of Professional Instruction in Dental Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the massive amount of literature pertaining to the improvement of professional instruction in dental education resulted in the formation of a comprehensive model of 10 categories, including Delphi technique; systems approach; agencies; workshops; multi-media, self-instruction; evaluation paradigms, measurement, courses, and…

  4. School/University Partnerships and the UNI Teaching Associates Cadre Model: Professional Benefits to PreK-12 Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selke, Mary J.; Kueter, Roger A.

    The implementation of the University of Northern Iowa's (UNI) Teaching Associates Cadre Model (TAC) Professional Development School (PDS) program is discussed within the context of Kagan's six stages of collaborative relationships: formation, conceptualization, development, implementation, evaluation, and termination or reformation. The TAC was…

  5. Teachers Learning to Use the iPad in Scotland and Wales: A New Model of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Gary; Burden, Kevin; Abbinett, Emily

    2015-01-01

    In learning to use a new technology like the iPad, primary teachers adopt a diverse range of experiential, informal and playful strategies contrasting sharply with traditional models underpinning professional development which emphasise formal courses and events led by "experts" conducted in formal settings such as the school. Since…

  6. Texas 4-H Agents' Perceptions of Selected Competencies in the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Amy; Wingenbach, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    There are many competencies necessary for success as a 4-H agent. The 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies (PRKC) Model organizes competencies into six domains: (a) Youth Development, (b) Youth Program Development, (c) Volunteerism, (d) Partnerships, (e) Organizational Systems, and (f) Equity, Access and Opportunity (National 4-H…

  7. Modelling the superparamagnetic response of AEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattel, Daniel; Mutton, Oaul

    2015-09-01

    Several lines of VTEM data flown at different system elevations across a known sulphide body and surface cover with elevated superparamagnetic (SPM) properties were analysed with MAXWELL, layered-earth inversions (LEI), LEROIAIR and LEROI. The SPM material was modelled with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibilities at shallow depth. Due to their slow late-time decay, SPM responses can be confused with responses of deep conductors and vice versa. Depending on the parameter weighting used, 1D inversions model all late-time responses as deep conductive material or as surficial SPM material. However, the joint 1D inversion of data acquired at different system elevations manages to recover a deep conductor from the sulphide anomaly and elevated SPM values at the location of the SPM response. For the modelled parameters, the VTEM datasets from two elevations (at 70 and 80 m) require a vertical separation of ~10 m to allow for the discrimination between the SPM and sulphide responses. For lower system elevations, less sensor separation is necessary due to the strong gradient of the SPM response. Following the determination of SPM parameters from VTEM survey data, these values were used to hypothesise the SPM response for a range of system geometries, showing that larger transmitter loops and larger offsets between transmitter and receiver loops reduce SPM effects. We suggest that two vertically separated receivers could be used to measure the airborne electromagnetic (AEM) gradient and depending on the flying height of the transmitter, the vertical offset of the receivers should be between 2 and 40 m. If gradient data are not collected, then EM responses measured during the transmitter on-time and x-component data, if available, might offer some model discrimination. Whereas synthetic data of the examined helicopter TEM systems VTEM, AEROTEM and HELITEM indicate a fairly high sensitivity to SPM effects, fixed-wing MEGATEM data are much less affected, due to the higher

  8. Supporting Smart School Teachers' Continuing Professional Development in and through ICT: A Model for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ming, Thang Siew; Hall, Carol; Azman, Hazita; Joyes, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    The general assumption that once the hardware is introduced in schools, ICT integration will automatically follow is not necessarily true. Teachers need to be supported and factors responsible for teachers' failure to integrate ICT into the classrooms identified and rectified. The paper proposes an online model based on the Improvement Quality…

  9. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  10. The Research Dynamic: A Professional Development Model for Secondary School Science Teachers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This essay summarizes the author's 10 years of experience at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation mentoring secondary school science teachers during 8-wk Summer Research Institutes. The summary is presented as a learning model, which we call the research dynamic. This model consists of three interlocked components: specified ignorance, peer interactions, and gateway experiments. Specified ignorance is based on the work of the sociologist Robert K. Merton. It is essentially the art of highlighting what is not known about a phenomenon but must become known for further progress. In practice, specified ignorance is framed as a hypothesis, a prediction, or a question. It is commonly the outcome of peer interactions, which are the second essential component of the research dynamic. Peer interactions are the inevitable outcome of having teachers work together in the same laboratory on related research topics. These topics are introduced as gateway experiments, the third component. The most important attribute of gateway experiments is their authenticity. These experiments, when first carried out, opened new scientific vistas. They are also technically, conceptually, and logically simple. We illustrate the research dynamic with a line of seminal experiments in biochemical genetics. We provide evidence that the research dynamic produced significantly positive effects on teachers' confidence in their professional preparedness. PMID:19487501

  11. NGC1300 dynamics - II. The response models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapotharakos, C.; Patsis, P. A.; Grosbøl, P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the stellar response in a spectrum of potentials describing the barred spiral galaxy NGC1300. These potentials have been presented in a previous paper and correspond to three different assumptions as regards the geometry of the galaxy. For each potential we consider a wide range of Ωp pattern speed values. Our goal is to discover the geometries and the Ωp supporting specific morphological features of NGC1300. For this purpose we use the method of response models. In order to compare the images of NGC1300 with the density maps of our models, we define a new index which is a generalization of the Hausdorff distance. This index helps us to find out quantitatively which cases reproduce specific features of NGC1300 in an objective way. Furthermore, we construct alternative models following a Schwarzschild-type technique. By this method we vary the weights of the various energy levels, and thus the orbital contribution of each energy, in order to minimize the differences between the response density and that deduced from the surface density of the galaxy, under certain assumptions. We find that the models corresponding to Ωp ~ 16 and 22 kms-1kpc-1 are able to reproduce efficiently certain morphological features of NGC1300, with each one having its advantages and drawbacks. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile: programme ESO 69.A-0021. E-mail: ckalapot@phys.uoa.gr (CK); patsis@academyofathens.gr (PAP); pgrosbol@eso.org (PG)

  12. Conflict and Stress in Hospital Nursing: Improving Communicative Responses to Enduring Professional Challenges.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Jennifer J; Apker, Julie

    2016-07-01

    Nurses function as central figures of health teams, coordinating direct care and communication between team members, patients, and their families. The importance of nurses to health care cannot be understated, but neither can the environmental struggles nurses routinely encounter in their jobs. Organizational communication and nursing scholarship show conflict and stress as two visible and ongoing challenges. This case study aims to (a) explore the ways conflict communication and communicative stress are experienced and endure in nursing and (b) understand how nurses discursively (mis)manage conflict and stress. Open-ended survey comments from nurses (N = 135) employed at a large teaching and research hospital were qualitatively analyzed. Weick's model of organizing, specifically his notion of communication cycles, emerged as a conceptual lens helpful for understanding cyclical conflict and stress. Results show that exclusionary communication, specifically nonparticipatory and unsupportive messages, contribute to nurse conflict and stress. Nurses tend to (mis)manage conflict and stress using respectful and disrespectful discourse. These communication patterns can facilitate or prohibit positive change. Metaphorically, nurse communicative conflict and stress can be depicted as fire. Relationships can go up in flames due to out-of-control fires in the form of destructive conflict. However, conflict and stress, like fire, can be harnessed for positive ends such as organizational decision making and innovation. Findings suggest conveying respect may help nurses manage and even avoid flames of conflict and stress. Solutions are offered to mitigate the effects of conflict and stress while developing respectful organizational cultures. PMID:26606058

  13. The Earth2Class Model for Professional Development to Implement the Next Generation Science Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Assumpcao, C. M.; Baggio, F. D.; Hemming, S. R.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Brenner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Professional development for teachers involved in the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) will require a multifaceted approach combining curriculum development, understanding the nature of science, applications of engineering and technology, integrating reading and writing, and other pedagogical components. The Earth2Class Workshops (E2C) at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (LDEO) provides one model for creating effective training to meet the NGSS challenges. E2C has provided more than 135 workshops since 1998 that have brought together LDEO research scientists with classroom teachers and students from the New York metropolitan area and elsewhere. Each session provides teachers with the chance to learn first-hand about the wide range of investigations conducted at LDEO. This approach aligns strongly with the NGSS goals: mastery of the disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices, understanding the nature of science, and cross-cutting relationships. During workshops, participating teachers interact with scientists to gain understanding of what stimulated research questions, how scientists put together all the components of investigations, and ways in which results are disseminated. Networking among teachers often leads to developing lesson plans based on the science, as well as support for professional growth not always possible within the school setting. Through the E2C website www.earth2class.org, teachers and students not able to attend the live workshops can access archival versions of the sessions. The website also provides a wide variety of educational resources. These have proved to be valuable on a national basis, as evidenced by an average of more than 300,000 hits per month from thousands of site visitors. Participating researchers have found E2C to be an effective approach to provide broader outreach of their results. During the next couple of years, the E2C program will expand to provide

  14. Population-expression models of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Antia, Rustom; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    The immune response to a pathogen has two basic features. The first is the expansion of a few pathogen-specific cells to form a population large enough to control the pathogen. The second is the process of differentiation of cells from an initial naive phenotype to an effector phenotype which controls the pathogen, and subsequently to a memory phenotype that is maintained and responsible for long-term protection. The expansion and the differentiation have been considered largely independently. Changes in cell populations are typically described using ecologically based ordinary differential equation models. In contrast, differentiation of single cells is studied within systems biology and is frequently modeled by considering changes in gene and protein expression in individual cells. Recent advances in experimental systems biology make available for the first time data to allow the coupling of population and high dimensional expression data of immune cells during infections. Here we describe and develop population-expression models which integrate these two processes into systems biology on the multicellular level. When translated into mathematical equations, these models result in non-conservative, non-local advection-diffusion equations. We describe situations where the population-expression approach can make correct inference from data while previous modeling approaches based on common simplifying assumptions would fail. We also explore how model reduction techniques can be used to build population-expression models, minimizing the complexity of the model while keeping the essential features of the system. While we consider problems in immunology in this paper, we expect population-expression models to be more broadly applicable.

  15. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  16. Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who Is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Andrew; Coggshall, Jane G.; Dolan, Megan; Powers, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Featured prominently in recent federal education regulations, the term "job-embedded professional development" has come into increasingly common usage for more than a decade, yet rarely is it explicitly defined. But what exactly is job-embedded professional development? What types of teacher learning opportunities count as being job embedded? How…

  17. Professional Development for Teachers' Improvement and Students' Outcomes in Elementary Schools: Responses of Teachers, Coaches, and Administrative Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arjoon, Neelawattie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore why some elementary ETS benefited from professional development in terms of increased students' outcomes, while other ETS did not produce the same gains. The aim of this research was to analyze the degree of satisfaction and effectiveness of professional development by interviewing coaches,…

  18. Weight-Related Attitudes and Experiences of Nutrition Professionals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Learners will describe the attitudes and experiences of nutrition professionals regarding professional responsibility to model an appropriate weight status and the role of personal weight-related issues in nutrition counseling interactions. The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes an...

  19. Developing a Parent-Professional Team Leadership Model in Group Work: Work with Families with Children Experiencing Behavioral and Emotional Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffolo, Mary C.; Kuhn, Mary T.; Evans, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Building on the respective strengths of parent-led and professional-led groups, a parent-professional team leadership model for group interventions was developed and evaluated for families of youths with emotional and behavioral problems. The model was developed based on feedback from 26 parents in focus group sessions and recommendations from…

  20. An Evaluation of the Developmental Designs Approach and Professional Development Model on Classroom Management in 22 Middle Schools in a Large, Midwestern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents findings from an evaluation of the Developmental Designs classroom management approach and professional development model during its first year of implementation across 22 middle schools in a large, Midwestern school district. The impact of this professional development model on teaching and learning as related to participants'…

  1. Models for institutional and professional accreditation of haemophilia centres in Italy.

    PubMed

    Calizzani, G; Vaglio, S; Arcieri, R; Menichini, I; Tagliaferri, A; Antoncecchi, S; Carloni, M T; Breda, A; Santagostino, E; Ghirardini, A; Tamburrini, M R; Morfini, M; Mannucci, P M; Grazzini, G

    2013-07-01

    The Health Commission of the Conference between the Italian State and Regions recognized the need to establish an institutional accreditation model for Haemophilia Centres (HCs) to be implemented by 21 Regions in order to provide patients with haemophilia and allied inherited coagulations disorders with high and uniform standards of care. The Italian National Blood Centre, on behalf of the Commission, convened a panel of clinicians, patients, experts, representatives from Regions and Ministry of Health. The agreed methodology included: systematic literature review and best practice collection, analysis of provisions and regulations of currently available services, priority setting, definition of principles and criteria for the development of recommendations on the optimal requirements for HCs. The result was the formulation of two recommendations sets. Two sets of recommendations were produced. The first concerns regional policy planning, in which the following aspects of comprehensive haemophilia care should be considered for implementation: monitoring and auditing, multidisciplinary approach to clinical care, protocols for emergency management, home treatment and its monitoring, patient registries, drug availability and procurement, recruitment and training of health care professionals. The second set concerns the accreditation process and lists 23 organizational requirements for level 1 HCs and 4 additional requirements for level 2 HCs. These recommendations help to provide Italian Regional Health Authorities with an organizational framework for the provision of comprehensive care to patients with inherited coagulation disorders based on current scientific evidence. PMID:23556420

  2. Demystifying reflective practice: Using the DATA model to enhance evaluators' professional activities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tiffany L; Barlow, Patrick B; Peters, John M; Skolits, Gary J

    2015-10-01

    Reflective practice (RP), one of six essential competency domains in evaluation identified by Stevahn, King, Ghere, and Minnema (2005), refers to thinking critically about one's evaluation practice, alone or with other people, and using critical insights to improve one's practice. Currently, evaluators have minimal guidance in navigating this essential professional competency, professed to be a necessary part of their practice. This article focuses on how RP can serve as a tool for evaluators through the use of the "DATA" integrated RP framework, developed by Peters (1991, 2009). DATA is an acronym with each letter standing for a different step in the process of reflective practice. The "D" step of the acronym focuses on (D)escribing what is or has been happening in practice. The "A" step refers to (A)nalyzing the current state of practice-why is this happening the way it is? The "T" concentrates on a practice-oriented form of (T)heorizing, which comes from analysis and serves as a basis for the resulting (A)ct. The last "A" focuses on the specifics of an action plan to change one's evaluation practice in light of the practical theory developed through theorizing. This paper describes the DATA model and introduces the application of the framework in a practice context. PMID:26051793

  3. Solar-stellar Coffee: A Model For Informal Interdisciplinary Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-12-01

    Initiated at NCAR more than two years ago, solar-stellar coffee is a weekly informal discussion of recent papers that are relevant to solar and stellar physics. The purpose is to generate awareness of new papers, to discuss their connections to past and current work, and to encourage a broader and more interdisciplinary view of solar physics. The discussion is local, but traffic to the website (http://coffee.solar-stellar.org/) is global -- suggesting that solar and stellar astronomers around the world find value in this intelligent pre-filter for astro-ph and other sources (papers are selected by local participants). In addition to enhancing the preprint posting and reading habits of solar physicists (with the associated boost in citation rates), the weekly discussion also provides an interdisciplinary professional development opportunity for graduate students, postdocs, and early career scientists. The web page is driven by a simple set of scripts (available on request), so this interaction model can easily be replicated at other institutions for topics of local interest. The concept of solar-stellar coffee began with support from an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship under award AST-0401441. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations

  5. Modeling listeners' emotional response to music.

    PubMed

    Eerola, Tuomas

    2012-10-01

    An overview of the computational prediction of emotional responses to music is presented. Communication of emotions by music has received a great deal of attention during the last years and a large number of empirical studies have described the role of individual features (tempo, mode, articulation, timbre) in predicting the emotions suggested or invoked by the music. However, unlike the present work, relatively few studies have attempted to model continua of expressed emotions using a variety of musical features from audio-based representations in a correlation design. The construction of the computational model is divided into four separate phases, with a different focus for evaluation. These phases include the theoretical selection of relevant features, empirical assessment of feature validity, actual feature selection, and overall evaluation of the model. Existing research on music and emotions and extraction of musical features is reviewed in terms of these criteria. Examples drawn from recent studies of emotions within the context of film soundtracks are used to demonstrate each phase in the construction of the model. These models are able to explain the dominant part of the listeners' self-reports of the emotions expressed by music and the models show potential to generalize over different genres within Western music. Possible applications of the computational models of emotions are discussed. PMID:22389191

  6. Ballistic Response of Fabrics: Model and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Walker Anderson, James D., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Walker (1999)developed an analytical model for the dynamic response of fabrics to ballistic impact. From this model the force, F, applied to the projectile by the fabric is derived to be F = 8/9 (ET*)h^3/R^2, where E is the Young's modulus of the fabric, T* is the "effective thickness" of the fabric and equal to the ratio of the areal density of the fabric to the fiber density, h is the displacement of the fabric on the axis of impact and R is the radius of the fabric deformation or "bulge". Ballistic tests against Zylon^TM fabric have been performed to measure h and R as a function of time. The results of these experiments are presented and analyzed in the context of the Walker model. Walker (1999), Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Ballistics, pp. 1231.

  7. The Graded Unfolding Model: A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Graded Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to attitude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes analyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent investigations suggest that unfolding models are more appropriate (J. S. Roberts, 1995; W. H. Van Schuur and H. A. L. Kiers, 1994). Advances in…

  8. Pregnancy is more dangerous than the pill: A critical analysis of professional responses to the Yaz/Yasmin controversy.

    PubMed

    Geampana, Alina

    2016-10-01

    The fourth and most recent generation of hormones used in oral contraceptives has stirred a significant amount of debate regarding the safety of these compounds. Drospirenone, a new type of synthetic hormone used in popular oral contraceptives Yaz and Yasmin, has been found by epidemiologists to increase the risk of blood clots when compared to the previous generations of pills. North American regulatory bodies have investigated the health risks of drospirenone and concluded that the increased risks do not require pulling the new contraceptive technology off the market. Instead, the FDA and Health Canada along with several medical associations have actively managed the Yaz/Yasmin controversy through official statements and press releases between 2010 and 2014. This study provides an analysis of these documents and how risk information about drospirenone-containing pills has been presented to the public. The analysis addresses a gap in our knowledge about cultural factors that impact contraceptive risk assessment. Prevalent risk models used by professionals are highlighted and examined through the use of critical discourse analysis methods. More specifically, this paper highlights the main strategies used to put drospirenone risks into perspective and classify it as safe. I argue that while risks related to pregnancy and the postpartum period are overly-emphasized, other risks are downplayed through a selection process underscored by normative beliefs about women's bodies and sexuality. Future research needs to address consumer perspectives and bridge the gap between lay and scientific risk/benefit assessment of oral contraceptives. PMID:27522113

  9. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  10. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  11. Methods of Incorporating Understanding of Professional and Ethical Responsibility in the Engineering Curriculum and Results from the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Brock Edward

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the methods of incorporating professionalism and ethics in the engineering curriculum to determine the nature of the relationship between the curriculum model used and outcomes on a nationally administered, engineering-specific standardized examination. The study's population included engineering students enrolled at one of…

  12. Biological Event Modeling for Response Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Clement; Cecere, Fred; Darneille, Robert; Laverdure, Nate

    People worldwide continue to fear a naturally occurring or terrorist-initiated biological event. Responsible decision makers have begun to prepare for such a biological event, but critical policy and system questions remain: What are the best courses of action to prepare for and react to such an outbreak? Where resources should be stockpiled? How many hospital resources—doctors, nurses, intensive-care beds—will be required? Will quarantine be necessary? Decision analysis tools, particularly modeling and simulation, offer ways to address and help answer these questions.

  13. A national survey of healthcare professionals' views on models of follow-up, holistic needs assessment and survivorship care for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wells, M; Semple, C J; Lane, C

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of follow-up and survivorship care are changing in response to growing numbers of cancer survivors and an increasing recognition that traditional models are unsustainable and result in unmet needs. Clinicians have shown reluctance in changing conventional follow-up practices for patients with head and neck cancer. This study aimed to explore nurses' and allied health professionals' views and practices in relation to follow-up, holistic needs assessment and survivorship care in this patient group. An online survey of members of the British Association of Head and Neck Oncology Nurses was undertaken. The response rate was 43% (74 of 174). Findings revealed a range of existing models of follow-up, rehabilitation and support for people with head and neck cancer across the UK. Specialist staff were open to new models of care and to more responsibility, with adequate training and supervision. There were some gaps in the provision of comprehensive survivorship care and some specific areas of practice in which nurses lacked confidence, knowledge and skills, such as managing medications and complex symptoms. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate effective models of follow-up and support for a growing population of head and neck cancer survivors who have diverse and complex needs. PMID:25615418

  14. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

    2006-12-01

    How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER) and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6) developed during a year and a half (about 330h ), several lessons (minimodules) dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a) Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b) teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c) a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d) the formation of a community of practice; and (e) acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  15. Modeling of Cardiovascular Response to Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. Keith

    1999-01-01

    pressure and, to a limited extent, in extravascular and pedcardial hydrostatic pressure were investigated. A complete hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system was built and flown aboard the NASA KC-135 and a computer model was developed and tested in simulated microgravity. Results obtained with these models have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume. When combined with the acute increase in ventricular pressure associated with the elimination of hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature and the resultant cephalad fluid shift with the models in the upright position, however, stroke volume increased in the models. Imposition of a decreased pedcardial pressure in the computer model and in a simplified hydraulic model increased stroke volume. Physiologic regional fluid shifting was also demonstrated by the models. The unifying parameter characterizing of cardiac response was diastolic ventricular transmural pressure (DVDELTAP) The elimination of intraventricular hydrostatic pressure in O-G decreased DVDELTAP stroke volume, while the elimination of intravascular hydrostatic pressure increased DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the upright posture, but reduced DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the launch posture. The release of gravity on the chest wall and its associated influence on intrathoracic pressure, simulated by a drop in extraventricular pressure4, increased DVDELTAP ans stroke volume.

  16. Ovine model for studying pulmonary immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Chanana, A.D.

    1984-11-25

    Anatomical features of the sheep lung make it an excellent model for studying pulmonary immunity. Four specific lung segments were identified which drain exclusively to three separate lymph nodes. One of these segments, the dorsal basal segment of the right lung, is drained by the caudal mediastinal lymph node (CMLN). Cannulation of the efferent lymph duct of the CMLN along with highly localized intrabronchial instillation of antigen provides a functional unit with which to study factors involved in development of pulmonary immune responses. Following intrabronchial immunization there was an increased output of lymphoblasts and specific antibody-forming cells in efferent CMLN lymph. Continuous divergence of efferent lymph eliminated the serum antibody response but did not totally eliminate the appearance of specific antibody in fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. In these studies localized immunization of the right cranial lobe served as a control. Efferent lymphoblasts produced in response to intrabronchial antigen were labeled with /sup 125/I-iododeoxyuridine and their migrational patterns and tissue distribution compared to lymphoblasts obtained from the thoracic duct. The results indicated that pulmonary immunoblasts tend to relocate in lung tissue and reappear with a higher specific activity in pulmonary lymph than in thoracic duct lymph. The reverse was observed with labeled intestinal lymphoblasts. 35 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  17. RRAWFLOW: Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (v1.15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    The Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow Model (RRAWFLOW) is a lumped-parameter model that simulates streamflow, spring flow, groundwater level, or solute transport for a measurement point in response to a system input of precipitation, recharge, or solute injection. I introduce the first version of RRAWFLOW available for download and public use and describe additional options. The open-source code is written in the R language and is available at http://sd.water.usgs.gov/projects/RRAWFLOW/RRAWFLOW.html along with an example model of streamflow. RRAWFLOW includes a time-series process to estimate recharge from precipitation and simulates the response to recharge by convolution, i.e., the unit-hydrograph approach. Gamma functions are used for estimation of parametric impulse-response functions (IRFs); a combination of two gamma functions results in a double-peaked IRF. A spline fit to a set of control points is introduced as a new method for estimation of nonparametric IRFs. Several options are included to simulate time-variant systems. For many applications, lumped models simulate the system response with equal accuracy to that of distributed models, but moreover, the ease of model construction and calibration of lumped models makes them a good choice for many applications (e.g., estimating missing periods in a hydrologic record). RRAWFLOW provides professional hydrologists and students with an accessible and versatile tool for lumped-parameter modeling.

  18. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, Marissa; Palchak, David; Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Olsen, Daniel J.; Kiliccote, Sila; Matson, Nance; Sohn, Michael; Rose, Cody; Dudley, Junqiao; Goli, Sasank; Ma, Ookie

    2013-12-01

    This report is one of a series stemming from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study. This study is a multi-national-laboratory effort to assess the potential value of demand response (DR) and energy storage to electricity systems with different penetration levels of variable renewable resources and to improve our understanding of associatedmarkets and institutions. This report implements DR resources in the commercial production cost model PLEXOS.

  19. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based…

  20. The influence of personal and environmental factors on professionalism in medical education

    PubMed Central

    West, Colin P; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2007-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a critical quality for physicians to possess. Physician professionalism has received increased attention in recent years, with many authorities suggesting that professionalism is in decline. An understanding of the factors contributing to professionalism may allow the development of more effective approaches to promoting this quality in medical education. Discussion We propose a model of personal and environmental factors that contribute to physician professionalism. Personal factors include distress/well-being, individual characteristics, and interpersonal qualities. Environmental factors include institutional culture, formal and informal curricula, and practice characteristics. Promotion of professionalism requires efforts directed at each of these elements. Summary One responsibility of medical education is to foster the development of professionalism among its learners. Both personal and environmental factors play a role in physician professionalism. Accordingly, institutions should consider these factors as efforts to promote physician professionalism evolve. PMID:17760986

  1. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars. PMID:26244478

  2. Restoring medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

  3. The Value of Response Times in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    A new and very interesting approach to the analysis of responses and response times is proposed by Goldhammer (this issue). In his approach, differences in the speed-ability compromise within respondents are considered to confound the differences in ability between respondents. These confounding effects of speed on the inferences about ability can…

  4. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  5. Reframing Professional Development through Understanding Authentic Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster-Wright, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Continuing to learn is universally accepted and expected by professionals and other stakeholders across all professions. However, despite changes in response to research findings about how professionals learn, many professional development practices still focus on delivering content rather than enhancing learning. In exploring reasons for the…

  6. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in

  7. Modeling event‐related heart period responses

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Philipp C.; Castegnetti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac rhythm is generated locally in the sinoatrial node, but modulated by central neural input. This may provide a possibility to infer central processes from observed phasic heart period responses (HPR). Currently, operational methods are used for HPR analysis. These methods embody implicit assumptions on how central states influence heart period. Here, we build an explicit psychophysiological model (PsPM) for event‐related HPR. This phenomenological PsPM is based on three experiments involving white noise sounds, an auditory oddball task, and emotional picture viewing. The model is optimized with respect to predictive validity—the ability to separate experimental conditions from each other. To validate the PsPM, an independent sample of participants is presented with auditory stimuli of varying intensity and emotional pictures of negative and positive valence, at short intertrial intervals. Our model discriminates these experimental conditions from each other better than operational approaches. We conclude that our PsPM is more sensitive to distinguish experimental manipulations based on heart period data than operational methods, and furnishes a principled approach to analysis of HPR. PMID:26849101

  8. Human responses to augmented virtual scaffolding models.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter; Dotson, Brian; Ammons, Douglas; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Chiou, Sharon

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of adding real planks, in virtual scaffolding models of elevation, on human performance in a surround-screen virtual reality (SSVR) system. Twenty-four construction workers and 24 inexperienced controls performed walking tasks on real and virtual planks at three virtual heights (0, 6 m, 12 m) and two scaffolding-platform-width conditions (30, 60 cm). Gait patterns, walking instability measurements and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. The results showed differences in human responses to real vs. virtual planks in walking patterns, instability score and heart-rate inter-beat intervals; it appeared that adding real planks in the SSVR virtual scaffolding model enhanced the quality of SSVR as a human - environment interface research tool. In addition, there were significant differences in performance between construction workers and the control group. The inexperienced participants were more unstable as compared to construction workers. Both groups increased their stride length with repetitions of the task, indicating a possibly confidence- or habit-related learning effect. The practical implications of this study are in the adoption of augmented virtual models of elevated construction environments for injury prevention research, and the development of programme for balance-control training to reduce the risk of falls at elevation before workers enter a construction job. PMID:16253942

  9. Continuum Models of Stimuli-responsive Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei

    Immersed in a solution of small molecules and ions, a network of long-chain polymers may imbibe the solution and swell, resulting in a polymeric gel. Depending on the molecular structure of the polymers, the amount of swelling can be regulated by moisture, mechanical forces, ionic strength, electric field, pH value, and many other types of stimuli. Starting from the basic principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, this chapter formulates a field theory of the coupled large deformation and mass transportation in a neutral polymeric gel. The theory is then extended to study polyelectrolyte gels with charge-carrying networks by accounting for the electromechanical coupling and migration of solute ions. While the theoretical framework is adaptable to various types of material models, some representative ones are described through specific free-energy functions and kinetic laws. A specific material law for pH-sensitive gels—a special type of polyelectrolyte gels—is introduced as an example of incorporating chemical reactions in modeling stimuli-responsive gels. Finally, a simplified theory for the equilibrium but inhomogeneous swelling of a polymeric gel is deduced. The theory and the specific material models are illustrated through several examples.

  10. A holographic model for quantum critical responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Robert C.; Sierens, Todd; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the dynamical response functions of strongly interacting quantum critical states described by conformal field theories (CFTs). We construct a self-consistent holographic model that incorporates the relevant scalar operator driving the quantum critical phase transition. Focusing on the finite temperature dynamical conductivity σ( ω, T ), we study its dependence on our model parameters, notably the scaling dimension of the relevant operator. It is found that the conductivity is well-approximated by a simple ansatz proposed in [1] for a wide range of parameters. We further dissect the conductivity at large frequencies ω ≫ T using the operator product expansion, and show how it reveals the spectrum of our model CFT. Our results provide a physically-constrained framework to study the analytic continuation of quantum Monte Carlo data, as we illustrate using the O(2) Wilson-Fisher CFT. Finally, we comment on the variation of the conductivity as we tune away from the quantum critical point, setting the stage for a comprehensive analysis of the phase diagram near the transition.

  11. Modeling event-related heart period responses.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Philipp C; Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Bach, Dominik R

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac rhythm is generated locally in the sinoatrial node, but modulated by central neural input. This may provide a possibility to infer central processes from observed phasic heart period responses (HPR). Currently, operational methods are used for HPR analysis. These methods embody implicit assumptions on how central states influence heart period. Here, we build an explicit psychophysiological model (PsPM) for event-related HPR. This phenomenological PsPM is based on three experiments involving white noise sounds, an auditory oddball task, and emotional picture viewing. The model is optimized with respect to predictive validity-the ability to separate experimental conditions from each other. To validate the PsPM, an independent sample of participants is presented with auditory stimuli of varying intensity and emotional pictures of negative and positive valence, at short intertrial intervals. Our model discriminates these experimental conditions from each other better than operational approaches. We conclude that our PsPM is more sensitive to distinguish experimental manipulations based on heart period data than operational methods, and furnishes a principled approach to analysis of HPR. PMID:26849101

  12. Productivity Improvement and Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Benjamin I., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a developmental model designed to help productivity improvement and professional development become an integral part of the natural everyday work experience. Examples and a summarized model are included. (CT)

  13. Model Family Professional Partnerships for Interventions in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Betty; Singer, George

    A meeting of professional experts in pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) focused on gathering current expert opinion regarding assistance to families with a child having such an injury. Quantitative data from an ethnographic survey of 214 parents on the effects of TBI on the family is summarized. Then, normalization for families of TBI children…

  14. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers' (N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed…

  15. Instructional Rounds as a Professional Learning Model for Systemic Implementation of Assessment for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; Klinger, Don; Pyper, Jamie; Woods, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the implementation of a professional learning project aimed at building educators' knowledge and skills in assessment for learning (AfL) within two school districts in Ontario, Canada. Specifically, the research examined the value of a two-tier "Instructional Rounds" (IR) professional…

  16. A Co-Teaching Model: Committed Professionals, High Expectations, and the Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Karen Wise; Magiera, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article relates the story of a first grade teacher and a child who was the only deaf student in the entire school. Because he had no one who could communicate with him--not teachers, not students, no one, this situation tugged at the hearts of a committed team of professionals. A teacher of the deaf, a first grade general education teacher, a…

  17. Social Trajectories or Disrupted Identities? Changing and Competing Models of Teacher Professionalism under New Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaton Gray, Sandra; Whitty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1988 Education Reform Act, the teacher's role in England has changed in many ways, a process which intensified under New Labour after 1997. Conceptions of teacher professionalism have become more structured and formalized, often heavily influenced by government policy objectives. Career paths have become more diverse and specialised. In…

  18. Evaluation of the Correlated Science and Mathematics Professional Development Model, 2009-2010 Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlier, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the 2009-2010 iteration of the Correlated Science and Mathematics (CSM) professional development program which provides teachers and principals experience with integrated and effective science and mathematics teaching strategies and content. Archival CSM data was analyzed via mixed…

  19. A Partnership Model of Distance Education: Students' Perceptions of Connectedness and Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lia-Hoagberg, Betty; Vellenga, Barbara; Miller, Marilee; Li, Tao-Yuan

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of a distance nursing-education program (274 at originating site, 95 at remote site) assessed students' perceptions of professionalization and connectedness with instructor, same-site peers, and offsite peers. Distant-site students were most satisfied with contact with same-site students. There was significantly higher satisfaction with…

  20. Development of a core curriculum in professional growth: practice management military model.

    PubMed

    Perez, R P; Brown, F B; Salminen, E R; Hume, R F; Wittich, A C

    1999-11-01

    Military medicine has faced some big challenges in recent years. Military treatment facilities have not been exempt from these alterations, as the American public has sought to reinvent government practices with regard to medicine. Until recently, professional education consisted almost entirely of emphasis in the particular content of the chosen field. Obstetrics and gynecology was one of the first medical specialties to recognize the importance of practice management, professional growth and development, and to require exposure to it as part of the residency process. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology's instructional objectives dealing with professional growth and development originated as part of the military-unique curriculum for physicians implemented at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii. Later, these objectives were used at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington. Recent changes in the health care environment, coupled with an increasing awareness of professional liability and the newer specter of managed care, force physicians to learn the cost of each health encounter and to be more familiar with the business aspects of health care. As medicine in general is changing, the curricula have been revised and tailored to the needs of our physicians with the addition of ethics, managed care, utilization, and practice management. PMID:10578585

  1. Teachers' Perception of a Professional Learning Community Model and Its Impact on Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    This study of a suburban school district in south central Pennsylvania employed a mixed method design to explore teachers' perceptions of their professional learning community (PLC) and the impact of such on teaching effectiveness and student learning. Perceptual data was collected through the Learning Community Culture Indicator (LCCI) teacher…

  2. Navigating Past and Present Accountability Measures in Search of an Effective Principal Professional Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the perceived experiences encountered by principals in the state of Illinois regarding professional development sessions offered through the Illinois Administrator Academy. The fundamental value of the Illinois Administrator Academy was designed as one of 169 specific initiatives in association with the…

  3. The Professional Development of Early Childhood Center Directors: Key Elements of Effective Training Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Paula Jorde; Rafanello, Donna

    Training for child care center directors should involve experiences that are coherent and connected in a logical or cumulative fashion. Twelve key elements can serve as a framework for planning professional development training experiences for early childhood center directors. These elements relate to the content, structure, and delivery of…

  4. Undergraduates' Intentions to Take Examinations for Professional Certification: Examinations of Four Competing Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Hsu, Ping-Kun; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on professional certification has primarily focused on graduate certificates in intensive care nursing, writing certificates for practitioners, maintenance of certification in radiation oncology, and the certification of teachers and surgeons. Research on certification in the domain of business and management from an…

  5. Information Technology Security Professionals' Knowledge and Use Intention Based on UTAUT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassa, Woldeloul

    2016-01-01

    Information technology (IT) security threats and vulnerabilities have become a major concern for organizations in the United States. However, there has been little research on assessing the effect of IT security professionals' knowledge on the use of IT security controls. This study examined the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology…

  6. A Model for Professional Development to Promote Engineering Design as an Integrative Pedagogy within STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donna, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering design activities can help educators to apply concepts and processes from within and across STEM domains. To facilitate these connections, there is a need for sustained, job-embedded, and collegial professional development that brings together teachers from across STEM domains to engage in design-based activities. These activities can…

  7. Student Affairs Professionals Supporting Students with Disabilities: A Grounded Theory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Ezekiel; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Vargas, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    In an action-based grounded theory project, the authors collected data from 31 student affairs professionals. During seven focus groups, practitioners described feeling unknowledgeable about disability law, accommodations, and diagnoses. However, they drew upon their core values and transferrable skills to support individual students. Participants…

  8. Online Learning in the Workplace: A Hybrid Model of Participation in Networked, Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Mary; Gordon, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The design and conceptualisation of online learning environments for work-related, professional learning was addressed through research with users of an online environment for social workers. The core questions for the research were to identify the nature of participation in the online environment, the relationship between online participation and…

  9. Promoting the Development of Professional Identity of Gerontologists: An Academic/Experiential Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gendron, Tracey L.; Myers, Barbara J.; Pelco, Lynn E.; Welleford, E. Ayn

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in gerontology has an essential role in providing the foundational knowledge required to work with a diverse aging population. It can also play an essential role in promoting best-practice approaches for the development of professional identity as a gerontologist. The primary goal of this study was to determine what factors…

  10. Toward Conceptual Clarity: A Multidimensional, Multilevel Model of Professional Learning Communities in Dutch Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleegers, Peter; den Brok, Perry; Verbiest, Eric; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Daly, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of professional learning communities (PLCs) among researchers, practitioners, and educational policy makers, studies on PLCs differ significantly on the dimensions and capacities used to conceptualize them. Further, the interrelatedness of different dimensions and capacities within PLCs is not often well conceived nor…

  11. English Teachers' Cultural Models about Technology: A Microethnographic Perspective on Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2014-01-01

    Prompted by calls for research on technology-focused professional development, this ethnographic case study investigates how teachers' participation in learning communities may influence technology integration within the secondary English curriculum. In this article, I draw on educational psychology, cognitive anthropology, and…

  12. A Year-Round Professional Development Model for World Language Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Tracy M.; Peterson, Margaret D.; Silva, Duarte M.; Padilla, Amado M.

    2009-01-01

    The Bay Area Foreign Language Program (BAFLP), one of nine regional sites of the California Foreign Language Project, offers ongoing, year-round professional development programs for world language educators. In addition, its leadership program prepares selected educators to assume leadership positions at their school sites, building capacity for…

  13. Professional Development Seminar: A Model for Making Higher Education More Culturally Sensitive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scollon, Suzanne Bau Kam

    A weekly professional development seminar, designed to help University of Alaska education professors (four White, one Alaska Native) become more culturally sensitive in multicultural classrooms and discover ways teaching may construct barriers to participation by Alaska Native students, was supplemented by videotapes of participants' teaching…

  14. Role Modeling Attitudes and Physical Activity and Fitness Promoting Behaviors of HPERD Professionals and Preprofessionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the physical activity and fitness promoting behaviors of health, physical education, recreation, and dance professionals and preprofessionals. Survey data indicated that most respondents were physically active. Overall, overweight and obesity rates were considerably lower than rates reported in the general U.S. adult population. Role…

  15. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  16. Occupational stress and psychopathology in health professionals: an explorative study with the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model approach.

    PubMed

    Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Spencer-Thomas, Sally; Ferracuti, Stefano; Erbuto, Denise; Lester, David; Candilera, Gabriella; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Occupational stress is a multivariate process involving sources of pressure, psycho-physiological distress, locus of control, work dissatisfaction, depression, anxiety, mental health disorders, hopelessness, and suicide ideation. Healthcare professionals are known for higher rates of occupational-related distress (burnout and compassion fatigue) and higher rates of suicide. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationships between occupational stress and some psychopathological dimensions in a sample of health professionals. We investigated 156 nurses and physicians, 62 males and 94 females, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess occupational stress [occupational stress inventory (OSI)], temperament (temperament evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego autoquestionnaire), and hopelessness (Beck hopelessness scale). The best Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes model with five OSI predictors yielded the following results: χ2(9) = 14.47 (p = 0.11); χ2/df = 1.60; comparative fit index = 0.99; root mean square error of approximation = 0.05. This model provided a good fit to the empirical data, showing a strong direct influence of casual variables such as work dissatisfaction, absence of type A behavior, and especially external locus of control, psychological and physiological distress on latent variable psychopathology. Occupational stress is in a complex relationship with temperament and hopelessness and also common among healthcare professionals. PMID:22632290

  17. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  18. Stochastic Approximation Methods for Latent Regression Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias; Sinharay, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an application of a stochastic approximation expectation maximization (EM) algorithm using a Metropolis-Hastings (MH) sampler to estimate the parameters of an item response latent regression model. Latent regression item response models are extensions of item response theory (IRT) to a latent variable model with covariates…

  19. Modeling macroscopic response of random composites

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Rintoul, M.D.; Lo, D.C.S.

    1998-02-01

    Preliminary work is presented on an effort to generate synthetic constitutive data for random composite materials. The long-ranged goal is to use the overall response determined from finite element simulations of representative volumes (RV) of the heterogeneous material to construct a homogenized constitutive model. A simple composite of a matrix containing polydispersed spheres was chosen as the first configuration to simulate. Here the accuracy of the numerical simulation tools is tested by determining effective elastic constants of the ordered elastic composite in which equal-sized spheres are arranged in each of three cubic lattice configurations. The resulting anisotropic effective elastic constant values agree with theoretical results to better than 10%, with typical agreement being better than 4%.

  20. Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Reanyansky, Anatoly D; Bourne, Neil K; Millett, Jeremy C F

    2009-01-01

    The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

  1. Chemistry Teachers' Emerging Expertise in Inquiry Teaching: The Effect of a Professional Development Model on Beliefs and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the beliefs and practices of seven high school chemistry teachers as a result of their participation in a year-long inquiry professional development (PD) project. An analysis of oral interviews, written reflections, and in-class observations were used to determine the extent to which the PD affected the teachers' beliefs and practice. The data indicated that the teachers developed more complete conceptions of classroom inquiry, valued a "phenomena first" approach to scientific investigations, and viewed inquiry approaches as helpful for facilitating improved student thinking. Analysis of classroom observations with the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol indicated that features of the PD were observed in the teachers' practice during the academic year follow-up. Implications for effective science teacher professional development models are discussed.

  2. Professionalism Among Criminal Justice Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regoli, Robert M.; Miracle, Andrew W., Jr.

    Professionalism and its relationship to scholarly productivity was studied. Specific areas of analysis were the degree of professionalism of criminal justice educators, rankings of a series of selected publications, and the relationship between professionalism level and journal productivity. Data were derived from responses by 1,028 of 1,274…

  3. The Three Rs of Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Patricia H.

    2006-01-01

    Professionalism is measured by the best and the highest standards. When teachers use excellence as a critical criterion for judging their actions and attitudes, their professionalism is enhanced. This author contends that three primary indicators constitute the meaning of professionalism: responsibility, respect, and risk taking; and that when…

  4. Who Is the "Professional" in a Professional Learning Community? An Exploration of Teacher Professionalism in Collaborative Professional Development Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servage, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This study is a survey and interpretation of professional development literature related to professional learning communities (PLCs) in schools. Current K 12 trade publications focusing on PLCs were analyzed against four different theoretical models of professionalism. Each model encourages and legitimates a different understanding of the…

  5. Injury and Response: What Parents and Professional Providers Are Telling Us about Treating Children with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Betty

    This report addresses comments and recommendations of parents of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as well as those of professionals. The report is in two sections: (1) What Parents Say about the Time of Injury; and (2) What Emergency Personnel Should Know. The first section presents quotes from five parents about reactions and…

  6. Let's Begin with Ourselves: Attempting Resonance Responses in the Exchange of Researchers' Professional Autobiographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Petry, Paulo; Hernández-Hernández, Fernando; Creus, Amalia

    2014-01-01

    The economic, social, cultural, technological and labour changes experienced by Spanish universities in the last 40?years have had their impact on the professional lives of the university teachers. Our methodological decision to study, through the construction of life histories, how scholars cope with social and institutional changes in their…

  7. Complex Childhood Trauma and School Responses: A Case Study of the Impact of Professional Development in One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderWegen, Terrie A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine one public elementary school in Spokane, Washington that has received significant complex trauma professional development training provided by Washington State University Area Health Education Center (WSU-AHEC). The study explored teachers', specialists', and the principal's perceptions of…

  8. Redefining Leadership and the Roles of School Principals: Responses to Changes in the Professional Worklife of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    This study investigates principals' perceptions of the effect of teacher empowerment on their role as building administrators. The researcher conducted structured interviews with 10 principals, 5 elementary and 5 secondary, in 2 school systems characterized by wider applications of shared decisionmaking and greater professional autonomy among…

  9. Studying Teachers' Sensemaking to Investigate Teachers' Responses to Professional Development Focused on New Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Carrie D.; Penuel, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on teacher professional development (PD) underscores the importance of the coherence of PD with standards, curriculum, and assessment. Teachers' judgments of the coherence of PD with larger system goals influence their decisions about what ideas and resources they appropriate from PD. Little research, however, has examined how…

  10. Unique Challenges, Hopeful Responses: A Handbook for Professionals Working with Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Lili Frank; Jordan, Dixie; Kragthorpe, Candy

    This book provides information about emotional, behavioral, learning and developmental disabilities; disability-specific entitlements; and approaches for professionals who work with youthful offenders with disabilities throughout the juvenile process. Chapter 1 describes characteristics of common disabilities among youthful offenders and details…

  11. Unique Challenges, Hopeful Responses: A Handbook for Professionals Working with Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Lili Frank; Jordan, Dixie; Goldberg, Paula; Pernu, Caryn; Bill, Lissa A.

    This handbook provides information about emotional, behavioral, and learning and developmental disabilities; disability-specific entitlements; and approaches for professionals who work with youthful offenders with disabilities throughout the juvenile process. Chapter 1 describes characteristics of common disabilities among youthful offenders and…

  12. TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2009-12-20

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.

  13. Organization-based self-development prescriptive model for the promotion of professional development of Iranian clinical nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rahimaghaee, Flora; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Mohammadi, Eesa; Salavati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professional development is reiterated in the new definition of modern organizations as a serious undertaking of organizations. This article aims to present and describe a prescriptive model to increase the quality of professional development of Iranian nurses within an organization-based framework. Materials and Methods: This article is an outcome of the results of a study based on grounded theory describing how Iranian nurses develop. The present study adopted purposive sampling and the initial participants were experienced clinical nurses. Then, the study continued by theoretical sampling. The present study involved 21 participants. Data were mainly collected through interviews. Analysis began with open coding and continued with axial coding and selective coding. Trustworthiness was ensured by applying Lincoln and Guba criteria such as credibility, dependability, and conformability. Based on the data gathered in the study and a thorough review of related literature, a prescriptive model has been designed by use of the methodology of Walker and Avant (2005). Results: In this model, the first main component is a three-part structure: Reformation to establish a value-assigning structure, a position for human resource management, and a job redesigning. The second component is certain of opportunities for organization-oriented development. These strategies are as follows: Raising the sensitivity of the organization toward development, goal setting and planning the development of human resources, and improving management practices. Conclusions: Through this model, clinical nurses’ professional development can transform the profession from an individual, randomized activity into more planned and systematized services. This model can lead to a better quality of care. PMID:26457100

  14. Educators' Professional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Anitha, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive model of professional characteristics of an educator that will prepare them for high standards of professional achievements, as all professions demand standardization and formulation of guidelines in today's competitive environment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on essentials of an educator was sourced…

  15. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    PubMed

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency. PMID:26698757

  16. Teachers and Professional Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retsinas, Joan

    1982-01-01

    Models of educational administration are examined to trace the teacher's sphere of professional autonomy. Models include the pre-industrial model, the industrial model, the welfare-statist model, and the collective bargaining model. The author gives her prognosis for the future of teacher autonomy. (CT)

  17. Teachers' personal didactical models and obstacles to professional development: Case-studies with secondary experimental science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamba Aguado, Ana Maria

    The aim of this thesis has been to elaborate criteria which characterise how teachers teach, as a curriculum component of their professional knowledge and to infer the obstacles which hinder their desired professional development, in such a way that they are considered in the design of proposals for teacher training in secondary education. In addition to this, a further objective was to elaborate and validate data analysis instruments. Case studies were carried out on three natural science secondary teachers with more than ten years' experience, enabling the characterisation of the teachers' science and science teaching conceptions as well as the description of classroom practice. Finally, with the help of these data together with the material used by the teachers, the inference of the teachers' personal didactical models and the obstacles to their professional development were made possible. Instruments for data collection used a questionnaire to facilitate the realisation of a semi-structured interview, video recordings of the classroom intervention of each teacher which correspond to a teaching unit taught over a two-week period and all the written material produced for the unit was collected. For the data analysis a taxonomy of classroom intervention patterns and a progression hypothesis towards desirable professional knowledge were elaborated, from the perspective of a research in the classroom model and according to a system of categories and subcategories which refer to their concepts about scientific knowledge, school knowledge, how to teach and evaluation. With the interview and the questionnaire a profile of exposed conceptions was obtained. The intervention profile was obtained using the classroom recordings; according to the patterns identified and their sequencing, both of which determine the characteristic structures and routines of these teachers. An outcome of these results was the validation of the previously mentioned taxonomy as an instrument of

  18. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors Toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-02-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based curricula was employed to determine how science teacher's attitudes and efficacy where impacted while designing science-based video games. The study's mixed-method design ascertained teacher efficacy on five factors (General computer use, Science Learning, Inquiry Teaching and Learning, Synchronous chat/text, and Playing Video Games) related to technology and gaming using a web-based survey). Qualitative data in the form of online blog posts was gathered during the project to assist in the triangulation and assessment of teacher efficacy. Data analyses consisted of an Analysis of Variance and serial coding of teacher reflective responses. Results indicated participants who used computers daily have higher efficacy while using inquiry-based teaching methods and science teaching and learning. Additional emergent findings revealed possible motivating factors for efficacy. This professional development project was focused on inquiry as a pedagogical strategy, standard-based science learning as means to develop content knowledge, and creating video games as technological knowledge. The project was consistent with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework where overlapping circles of the three components indicates development of an integrated understanding of the suggested relationships. Findings provide suggestions for development of standards-based science education software, its integration into the curriculum and, strategies for implementing technology into teaching practices.

  19. Modeling Information Accumulation in Psychological Tests Using Item Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a latent trait model is proposed for the response times in psychological tests. The latent trait model is based on the linear transformation model and subsumes popular models from survival analysis, like the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model. Core of the model is the assumption that an unspecified monotone…

  20. Cognitive models in training health professionals to protect patients' confidential information.

    PubMed

    Patel, V L; Arocha, J F; Shortliffe, E H

    2000-11-01

    Recent advances in theories of learning and knowledge acquisition in culturally-situated environments have illuminated the role of cognition in changing behavior, and in turn on influencing performance for the long term. One such advance focuses on the relationship between explicit formal training and implicit knowledge acquired through daily interactive activities in schools and organizations. The former relates more to instruction regarding the policy issues whereas the latter is tied closely to cultural, moral and organizational values. In this paper, we draw on these theories of cognition and learning to show the shift in thinking that is needed regarding education of health professionals, including steps required to assure that the protection of confidential information becomes part of their routine practices. Illustrative examples are used to show the nature of conceptual change in the health professional's knowledge organization and reasoning strategies that is necessary for more sustained behavior change with regards to protecting data confidentiality and privacy of individual patients. This re-conceptualization is intended to be reflected at various levels of training and education for health professionals, including influences on personal and organizational practices as well as revisions in medical-school and graduate-medical curricula. PMID:11154965

  1. Constitutive modeling of shock response of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Brown, E. N.

    2011-08-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a polymer with a simple atomic structure that shows complex behavior under pressure and demonstrates a highly variable metastable phase structure in shock waves with amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high-pressure transition of the crystalline domain from crystalline phase IV at ambient through phase II to III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region nucleates from the amorphous one with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate features that may be related to the impedance mismatch between the phase domains subjected to such transitions resulting in variations of mechanical and thermophysical characteristics. We consider the inter-phase non-equilibrium and the amorphous-to-crystalline and inter-crystalline transitions that are associated with the high pressure and temperature transformations under shock wave loading as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase constitutive model that considers strength effects to describe the observed response under shock loading of the PTFE material. Experimental plate impact shock-wave histories are compared with calculated profiles using kinetics describing the transitions. The study demonstrates that the inter-phase pressure non-equilibrium of the state parameters plays the key role in the delay of the shock wave attenuation. At the same time, the forward transition associated with the crystallization might be responsible for the velocity spike in the experimental velocity profiles at high impact velocity and the modulus variation at low impact velocity. On the other hand, an accelerated attenuation of the velocity in the rarefaction wave is associated with another transition resulting in the residual crystallinity change during unloading.

  2. Grade of Membership Response Time Model for Detecting Guessing Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokropek, Artur

    2016-01-01

    A response model that is able to detect guessing behaviors and produce unbiased estimates in low-stake conditions using timing information is proposed. The model is a special case of the grade of membership model in which responses are modeled as partial members of a class that is affected by motivation and a class that responds only according to…

  3. Nested Logit Models for Multiple-Choice Item Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Youngsuk; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Nested logit item response models for multiple-choice data are presented. Relative to previous models, the new models are suggested to provide a better approximation to multiple-choice items where the application of a solution strategy precedes consideration of response options. In practice, the models also accommodate collapsibility across all…

  4. Discrete Latent Markov Models for Normally Distributed Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittmann, Verena D.; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Van de Pol and Langeheine (1990) presented a general framework for Markov modeling of repeatedly measured discrete data. We discuss analogical single indicator models for normally distributed responses. In contrast to discrete models, which have been studied extensively, analogical continuous response models have hardly been considered. These…

  5. Relative age and birthplace effect in Japanese professional sports: a quantitative evaluation using a Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Relative age effect (RAE) in sports has been well documented. Recent studies investigate the effect of birthplace in addition to the RAE. The first objective of this study was to show the magnitude of the RAE in two major professional sports in Japan, baseball and soccer. Second, we examined the birthplace effect and compared its magnitude with that of the RAE. The effect sizes were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model with the number of players as dependent variable. The RAEs were 9.0% and 7.7% per month for soccer and baseball, respectively. These estimates imply that children born in the first month of a school year have about three times greater chance of becoming a professional player than those born in the last month of the year. Over half of the difference in likelihoods of becoming a professional player between birthplaces was accounted for by weather conditions, with the likelihood decreasing by 1% per snow day. An effect of population size was not detected in the data. By investigating different samples, we demonstrated that using quarterly data leads to underestimation and that the age range of sampled athletes should be set carefully. PMID:25917193

  6. Growing Connections--The Connected Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews research relating to the concept of "the professional" then considers "the teaching professional" and in particular the "post-compulsory education (PCE) teaching professional" in more depth. Recent positive models of the teaching professional are analysed, including the expansive professional and…

  7. A competencies-based mental health training model for health professionals in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    KUTCHER, STAN; CHEHIL, SONIA; CASH, COLLEEN; MILLAR, JIM

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a competencies-based training model specifically created to teach needed mental health skills to health professionals in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The model combines a mental health training needs assessment with the delivery of mental health training modules aligned with national/regional mental health priorities and designed to be used by all health professionals at various levels of the health care system. The model also defines a sustainability framework that involves the creation of a multidisciplinary training team embedded in the national/regional health system. The training program consists of a number of modules, each one designed to enhance specific mental health competencies for a variety of health care workers. These modules are linked to a number of clinically useful tools that facilitate knowledge transfer into clinical care while concurrently addressing health equity issues. This model may provide an efficient and cost-effective alternative to traditional profession-based mental health training approaches, which have to date not been successful at meeting mental health delivery needs and mental health service priorities in LMICs. PMID:16633545

  8. Item Response Modeling with Sum Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the distinctions between classical test theory and item response theory is that the former focuses on sum scores and their relationship to true scores, whereas the latter concerns item responses and their relationship to latent scores. Although item response theory is often viewed as the richer of the two theories, sum scores are still…

  9. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: III. STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of dose-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. Recently, statistical models appropriate for developmental toxicity testing have been developed and applied (Rai...

  10. Redox response model for partly substituted cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterreicher, H. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-05-01

    Inhomogeneous substitutions (e.g. clustering and preferential site occupations) in compounds such as YBa[sub 2](Cu[sub 1[minus]x]M[sub x])[sub 3]O[sub y] with M = Fe, Co, Ni, etc. are an unavoidable response to the changing redox environments in these O intercalation compounds. The authors collect here experimental evidence for various types of inhomogeneous distributions predicted on a thermodynamic model which considers the preferential desorption'' of O from various local environments. The parameter organizing the redox environment is [Delta]H* (incremental enthalpy of oxygen desorption per mol O[sub 2]). Theory suggests a sequence of discernible states represented by the acronym CLUSTER. With decreasing [Delta]H*, indications for several of these states are obtained from Moessbauer and other experiments. These states are characteristically shifted in [Delta]H* for different M. Also, further substitutions according to (YX)(BaZ)[sub 2](CuM)[sub 3]O[sub y] with X = Ca, Z = Sr, La can change the relevant [Delta]H* for these states, allowing prediction of their preparation conditions. Aspects of the complex electronic phase diagram as a function of redox preparation are discussed.

  11. Modeling Multiple Response Processes in Judgment and Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockenholt, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I show how item response models can be used to capture multiple response processes in psychological applications. Intuitive and analytical responses, agree-disagree answers, response refusals, socially desirable responding, differential item functioning, and choices among multiple options are considered. In each of these cases, I…

  12. Robust Estimation of Latent Ability in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Christof; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2011-01-01

    Because of response disturbances such as guessing, cheating, or carelessness, item response models often can only approximate the "true" individual response probabilities. As a consequence, maximum-likelihood estimates of ability will be biased. Typically, the nature and extent to which response disturbances are present is unknown, and, therefore,…

  13. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  14. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  15. Women and Minority Faculty Job Satisfaction: A Structural Model Examining the Effect of Professional Role Interests, Professional Satisfactions, and Institutional Fit. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Deborah; And Others

    This study examined the professional role interests and satisfactions of tenure track women and minority faculty (N=146) at a Research I university from three schools on campus: Arts and Sciences, Business, and Education. The sample was comprised of 42 white male faculty, 47 minority faculty, and 57 white female faculty. Subjects were interviewed…

  16. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences. PMID:26030375

  17. Back to our future? The Consensus Conference and Combined-Integrated model of doctoral training in professional psychology.

    PubMed

    Shealy, Craig N; Cobb, Harriet C; Crowley, Susan L; Nelson, Paul; Peterson, Gary

    2004-09-01

    Is it possible and advisable for the profession of psychology to articulate and endorse a common, generalist, and integrative framework for the education and training of its students? At the Consensus Conference on Combined and Integrated Doctoral Training in Psychology, held at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA (USA), May 2 to 4, 2003, participants from across the spectrum of education and training in professional psychology ultimately answered "yes." This article, the first in this special series on the Consensus Conference and Combined-Integrated (C-I) model of doctoral training in professional psychology, essentially provides an overview of the conference rationale, participants, goals, proceedings, and results. Because the other 12 articles in this series all reference the Consensus Conference and C-I model, this overview provides a good starting point for understanding what occurred at the conference, what it means to educate and train from a C-I perspective, and what the potential implications of such a model might be for the profession of psychology. PMID:15316925

  18. Collaborative action learning: a professional development model for educational innovation in nursing.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Annette; Spratt, Christine; Reilly, Amanda

    2008-05-01

    The paper describes the processes and outcomes of a major curriculum innovation which was conducted by a collaborative multi-disciplinary team (nurse academics, educational developers and software developers). The paper argues that collaborative professional development in pedagogical innovation in nursing can be successfully supported by action learning as a framework for practice. In presenting this argument the paper draws on the experience of the School of Nursing and Midwifery (SNM) at the University of Tasmania in integrating high-fidelity simulation-based learning into an existing undergraduate case-based learning curriculum in the three year Bachelor of Nursing (BN). PMID:17716945

  19. A Multi-Year Study of the Impact of the Rice Model Teacher Professional Development on Elementary Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viorica Diaconu, Dana; Radigan, Judy; Suskavcevic, Milijana; Nichol, Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    A teacher professional development program for in-service elementary school science teachers, the Rice Elementary Model Science Lab (REMSL), was developed for urban school districts serving predominately high-poverty, high-minority students. Teachers with diverse skills and science capacities came together in Professional Learning Communities, one full day each week throughout an academic year, to create a classroom culture for science instruction. Approximately 80 teachers each year received professional development in science content and pedagogy using the same inquiry-based constructivist methods that the teachers were expected to use in their classrooms. During this four-year study, scientists and educators worked with elementary teachers in a year-long model science lab environment to provide science content and science pedagogy. The effectiveness of the program was measured using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods that allowed the researchers to triangulate the findings from quantitative measures, such as content test and surveys, with the emerging themes from the qualitative instruments, such as class observations and participant interviews. Results showed that, in all four years, teachers from the REMSL Treatment group have significantly increased their science content knowledge (p < 0.05). During the last two years, their gains in science content knowledge, use of inquiry-based instruction and leadership skills were significantly higher than those of the Control group teachers' (p < 0.01, p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). Three themes resonated in the interviews with participants: science content knowledge growth, constructivist pedagogy and leadership skills.

  20. Perceptions and Attitudes of Health Professionals in Kenya on National Health Care Resource Allocation Mechanisms: A Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Chern, Jin-Yuan; Chiu, Chiung-Hsuan Megan; Wang, Bill; Huang, Kuo-Cherh; Muga, Miriam Adoyo

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care resource allocation is key towards attaining equity in the health system. However, health professionals’ perceived impact and attitude towards health care resource allocation in Sub-Saharan Africa is unknown; furthermore, they occupy a position which makes them notice the impact of different policies in their health system. This study explored perceptions and attitudes of health professionals in Kenya on health care resource allocation mechanism. Method We conducted a survey of a representative sample of 341 health professionals in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital from February to April 2012, consisting of over 3000 employees. We assessed health professionals’ perceived impact and attitudes on health care resource allocation mechanism in Kenya. We used structural equation modeling and applied a Confirmatory Factor Analysis using Robust Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure to test the hypothesized model. Results We found that the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their perceived positive impact (-1.04, p < .001), health professionals’ satisfaction (-0.24, p < .01), and professionals’ attitudes (-1.55, p < .001) while it was positively associated with perceived negative impact (1.14, p < .001). Perceived positive impact of the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their overall satisfaction (-0.08) and attitude (-0.98) at p < .001, respectively. Furthermore, overall satisfaction was negatively associated with attitude (-1.10, p <.001). On the other hand, perceived negative impact of the allocation was positively associated with overall satisfaction (0.29, p <.001) but was not associated with attitude. Conclusion The result suggests that health care resource allocation mechanism has a negative effect towards perceptions, attitudes and overall satisfaction of health professionals who are at the frontline in health care. These findings can serve as a crucial reference for policymakers as the Kenyan