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Sample records for professional status australian

  1. Achieving professional status: Australian podiatrists' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Alan M; Nancarrow, Susan A; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper explores the notion of professional status from the perspective of a sample of Australian podiatrists; how it is experienced, what factors are felt to affect it, and how these are considered to influence professional standing within an evolving healthcare system. Underpinning sociological theory is deployed in order to inform and contextualise the study. Methods Data were drawn from a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 21) and focus groups (n = 9) with podiatrists from across four of Australia's eastern states (Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Australian Capital Territory), resulting in a total of 76 participants. Semi-structured interview schedules sought to explore podiatrist perspectives on a range of features related to professional status within podiatry in Australia. Results Central to the retention and enhancement of status was felt to be the development of specialist roles and the maintenance of control over key task domains. Key distinctions in private and public sector environments, and in rural and urban settings, were noted and found to reflect differing contexts for status development. Marketing was considered important to image enhancement, as was the cache attached to the status of the universities providing graduate education. Conclusion Perceived determinants of professional status broadly matched those identified in the wider sociological literature, most notably credentialism, client status, content and context of work (such as specialisation) and an ideological basis for persuading audiences to acknowledge professional status. In an environment of demographic and workforce change, and the resultant policy demands for healthcare service re-design, enhanced opportunities for specialisation appear evident. Under the current model of professionalism, both role flexibility and uniqueness may prove important. PMID:19216783

  2. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  3. Indigenizing Teacher Professional Development: Anticipating the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Zane Ma

    2012-01-01

    It is the Australian Government's intention that all teachers will have, as a minimum, a proficient level of demonstrable professional expertise in both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education and Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. A raft of government policies are giving shape to the engagement of the…

  4. The Amateur-Turned-Professional Syndrome: Two Australian Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    In the nineteenth century, and particularly during the era which saw the gradual replacement of positional astronomy by astrophysics, amateur astronomers were able to make an important contribution to international astronomy. Many were blessed with instruments comparable to those found in professional observatories; they pursued the same astronomical research programs as their professional colleagues; published in the same journals; received the same medals and awards; and played key roles in the formation of the earliest astronomical groups and societies. In this healthy environment of amateur-professional co-operation it was possible for talented amateur astronomers to transfer to professional ranks, and the "amateur-turned-professional" (henceforth ATP) was a distinctive feature of late nineteenth century astronomy. In this paper we focus on two Australian-based ATPs, R.T.A. Innes and C.J. Merfield, and examine their contributions as amateur astronomers in Sydney before reviewing the circumstances surrounding their transfer to the Cape Observatory (South Africa) and Sydney Observatory, in 1896 and 1904, respectively.

  5. Player acceleration and deceleration profiles in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R J; Watsford, M L; Austin, D; Pine, M J; Spurrs, R W

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of global positioning system (GPS) units for measuring a standardized set of acceleration and deceleration zones and whether these standardized zones were capable of identifying differences between playing positions in professional Australian football. Eight well trained male participants were recruited to wear two 5 Hz or 10 Hz GPS units whilst completing a team sport simulation circuit to measure acceleration and deceleration movements. For the second part of this article 30 professional players were monitored between 1-29 times using 5 Hz and 10 Hz GPS units for the collection of acceleration and deceleration movements during the 2011 and 2012 Australian Football League seasons. Players were separated into four distinct positional groups - nomadic players, fixed defenders, fixed forwards and ruckman. The GPS units analysed had good to poor levels of error for measuring the distance covered (<19.7%), time spent (<17.2%) and number of efforts performed (<48.0%) at low, moderate and high acceleration and deceleration zones. The results demonstrated that nomadic players and fixed defenders perform more acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match than fixed forwards and ruckman. These studies established that these GPS units can be used for analysing the distance covered and time spent at the acceleration and deceleration zones used. Further, these standardized zones were proven to be capable of distinguishing between player positions, with nomadic players and fixed defenders required to complete more high acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match. PMID:26470636

  6. Advanced Skills Teachers: Professional Identity and Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, C.; Goodwyn, A.; Francis-Brophy, E.

    2013-01-01

    The teaching profession continues to struggle with defining itself in relation to other professions. Even though public opinion positions teachers second only to doctors and nurses in terms of their professional status and prestige research in the UK suggests that teachers still believe that they have much lower status than other professions. With…

  7. Culture Clash or Ties That Bind? What Australian Academics Think of Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a framework analysis to explore the opinions a cohort of Australian academic staff hold towards professional staff. Five indicative themes were identified from the extant literature on university professional staff: the professional other; managerialism; an expensive bureaucracy; complementary agendas; and the third space and…

  8. Preseason and midseason balance ability of professional Australian footballers.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2008-01-01

    Balance ability has been shown to be important for sports performance and injury prevention. It is unclear whether balance ability changes due to sports participation and regular training without specific balance training. It has not been shown whether certain sports such as the various football codes that often involve single limb stance and balance as part of kicking, running, rapid changes of direction, jumping, and landing actually influence balance ability. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in balance ability measured at preseason and during the competitive season for elite footballer. Twenty-eight professional Australian footballers who did not undertake any specific balance training took part in this study. Postural sway from single limb balance on a force platform was measured for both limbs 1 week before the start and midway through a 22-week competitive season. The subjects were required to step onto a balance mat on top of the force platform and maintain balance for 20 seconds. The maximum sway of the center of pressure in the mediolateral direction was used as the balance score. It was found that there was not a significant difference in the balance ability measurement at the start and during the competitive season. Sports participation and regular training did not influence balance ability in this cohort of athletes. PMID:18296977

  9. Organisational and Occupational Boundaries in Australian Universities: The Hierarchical Positioning of Female Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The effects of gender on organisational structures for professional university staff have been largely overlooked in the literature. Using data from one Australian university, we examine the location of professional female staff in the organisational hierarchy. Our analysis indicated that significant gendered segregation existed within and across…

  10. Continuing Professional Education. Promise and Performance. Australian Education Review, No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Barrie, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a critical appraisal of continuing education for Australian professionals. Part 1 sets the scene, with an introduction in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 examines the key terms from a number of perspectives to provide an overview of the context in which all professionals practice in Australia. Chapter 3 provides a broad framework for the…

  11. Algorithm for the treatment of status epilepticus: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, C L; Koios, J

    2016-04-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency where successful treatment is associated with timely intervention and the use of a protocol has been recommended to provide the highest quality of care. Despite this, there is no nationally available protocol for the treatment of SE in adults in Australia. Treatment is therefore variable and often based on international guidelines or familiarity with certain medications. We have developed an Australian-based algorithm for the treatment of SE, focusing on simplifying management while delivering the safest possible care. We believe this algorithm is suitable for all health practitioners, regardless of training or experience. PMID:27062207

  12. REGULATION OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND NATIONAL SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THREE CASE STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; McKenna, Michael; Rayner, Johanna; Hawes, Jazmin

    2016-03-01

    In recent times, Australia's national security concerns have had controversial impacts on regulation of Australian medical practitioners in areas related to immigration detention. This column explores three recent case studies relevant to this issue. The first involves the enactment of the Australian Border Force Act 2015 (Cth), which has a significant impact on the regulation of medical professionals who work with people in immigration detention. The second involves the decision of the High Court of Australia in Plaintiff M68/2015 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2016] HCA 1 that an amendment to Australian federal legislation justified sending children back to immigration detention centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. This legislation was previously heavily criticised by the Australian Human Rights Commissioner. The third concerns the deregistration of Tareq Kamleh, an Australian doctor of German-Palestinian heritage who came to public attention on ANZAC Day 2015 with his appearance online in a propaganda video for the Islamic State terrorist organisation al-Dawla al-Islamyia fil Iraq wa'al Sham, also known as Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) or Daesh. Australia's professional regulatory system should presumptively respect professional virtues, such as loyalty to the relief of individual patient suffering, when dealing with doctors (whether in Australia or ISIS-occupied Syria) working under regimes whose principles appear inconsistent with those of ethics and human rights. PMID:27323633

  13. An Open Letter to the Professional Communities of Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to the Professional Communities of Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE). In preparing for this article, the author looked back over the contributions of other fellows in publications and ACCE Minutes, and recognized that each had led the ACCE family in this endeavor. Creating direction was the…

  14. Professional Development for Education for Sustainability: How Advanced Are Australian Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Sarah; Wyborn, Carina; Bekessy, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report research undertaken to assess the extent to which Australian universities were engaged in professional development (PD) activities focusing on the development of education for sustainability for their academics. Design/methodology/approach: This web-based survey seeks to identify the existence of PD programs and…

  15. TESOL Professional Standards in the "Asian Century": Dilemmas Facing Australian TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liyanage, Indika; Walker, Tony; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Australian teacher education programmes that prepare teachers of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are confronting the nexus of two facets of globalization: transformations in the Asian region, captured in the notion of the "Asian century", and shifting conceptions of professionalism in TESOL in non-compulsory education. In…

  16. Parent and Professional Perspectives on the Western Australian Infant Hearing Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Jane; Remine, Maria D.; Brown, P. Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the views of parents, newborn hearing screeners and Telethon Speech and Hearing (TSH) professionals of the Western Australian Infant Screening for Hearing (WISH) Program. Three questionnaires were used to gather information from the participants. Sixteen responses to the questionnaire were obtained (five parents, five…

  17. Game story space of professional sports: Australian rules football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiley, Dilan Patrick; Reagan, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Lewis; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2016-05-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of "game stories," we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories rather than distinct clusters. We show how coarse graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last-minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with biased random walks, we show that real AFL games deliver a broader array of motifs than null models, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  18. Mandatory continuing professional development requirements: what does this mean for Australian nurses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents a discussion related to the recent decision in Australia to introduce mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for nurses. Historically there has been international debate surrounding mandatory CPD requirements; this debate is ongoing as Australian nurses face a diverse range of CPD offerings from a variety of providers. Discussion The purpose of this paper is to examine how mandatory CPD requirements for national nursing registration in Australia have evolved and to present an analysis of what this will mean for Australian nurses. What is yet to be determined is how to measure professional development and the effectiveness of professional development education. This is important to the international community with consensus in the literature that professional development is linked to ongoing education. Contradicting arguments are presented about whether this professional development should be mandatory. Summary Presenting a contemporary discussion about the current and potential impact of mandatory CPD requirements for nurses, this discussion paper utilises the case of Australia’s current national policy and CPD operation to examine the choices that nurses make in order to fulfil their legislative requirements. Additional arguments are presented about the barriers nurses face in undertaking CPD. The quest for effective CPD is complex and should incorporate different situations for nurses and individual learning styles. PMID:23537293

  19. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Australian Professional Rugby Union 2014 Super Rugby Competition

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Timothy; Orr, Robin; Fitzgerald, Edward; Harries, Simon; McLellan, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rugby union is a collision-based ball sport played at the professional level internationally. Rugby union has one of the highest reported incidences of injury of all team sports. Purpose: To identify the characteristics, incidence, and severity of injuries occurring in Australian professional Super Rugby Union. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The present study was a prospective epidemiology study on a cohort of 180 professional players from 5 Australian Super Rugby teams during the 2014 Super Rugby Union Tournament. Team medical staff collected and submitted daily training and match-play injury data through a secure, web-based electronic platform. The injury data included the main anatomic location of the injury, specific anatomic structure of the injury, injury diagnosis, training or match injury occurrence, main player position, mechanism of injury, and the severity of the injury quantified based on the number of days lost from training and/or competition due to injury. Results: The total combined incidence rate for injury during training and match-play across all Australian Super Rugby Union teams was 6.96 per 1000 hours, with a mean injury severity of 37.45 days lost from training and competition. The match-play injury incidence rate was 66.07 per 1000 hours, with a mean severity of 39.80 days lost from training and competition. No significant differences were observed between forward- and back-playing positions for match or training injury incidence rate or severity. Conclusion: The incidence of injury for the present study was lower during match-play than has previously been reported in professional rugby union; however, the overall time loss was higher compared with previous studies in professional rugby union. The high overall time loss was due fundamentally to a high incidence of injuries with greater than 28 days’ severity. PMID:27069947

  20. The use of skill tests to predict status in junior Australian football.

    PubMed

    Woods, T E Carl; Raynor, J Annette; Bruce, Lyndell; McDonald, Zane

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether skill tests were predictive of status in junior Australian football. Players were recruited from the 2013 under 18 (U18) West Australian Football League competition and classified into two groups: elite (state U18 squad representative; n = 25; 17.9 ± 0.5 years) and subelite (nonstate U18 squad representative; n = 25; 17.3 ± 0.6 years). Both groups completed the Australian football kicking (AFK) and Australian football handballing (AFHB) tests, assessing kicking accuracy/ball speed and handballing accuracy on dominant and nondominant sides. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) modelled the main effect of "status", whilst logistic regression models were built for the predictive analysis using the same test parameters. Between-group differences were noted across all parameters, with the combination of kicking accuracy and ball speed on the dominant and nondominant sides being the best predictor of status for the AFK test (wi = 0.25, AUC = 89.4%) and the combination of accuracy on the dominant and nondominant sides being the best predictor of status for the AFHB test (wi = 0.80, AUC = 88.4%). The AFK and AFHB tests are predictive of status, suggesting that their use is warranted as a means of talent identification in junior Australian football. PMID:25533678

  1. The Supervisory Status of Professional Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkin, Matthew W.

    1977-01-01

    The National Labor Relations Board by law has authority over professional employees but not supervisory employees. The problems this creates for salaried professionals who are becoming more and more organized are discussed. Available from: Forham University School of Law, Lincoln Center, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023. (LBH)

  2. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  3. Kindergarten Teachers' Professional Training and Their Social Status in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Guang-Lea; Myers, Donald A.; Kim, Kyoung Jin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes kindergarten teachers' professional training and their social status in Korea. It includes discussions of the historical development of Korea's kindergarten teacher training system and pedagogical methods, the unequal social status of kindergarten teachers, and the implementation of innovative pedagogical practices modeled…

  4. Immigrant Status and Home Language Background: Implications for Australian Student Performance in PISA 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresswell, John

    2004-01-01

    The primary focus of this report is to examine the effect that immigrant status and home language background may have on the performance of Australian students who participated in the OECD/Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA 2000). Approximately 5,477 students from 231 schools across Australia participated in the study. In this…

  5. Teaching Students Using Technology: Facilitating Success for Students from Low Socioeconomic Status Backgrounds in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; McKay, Jade

    2016-01-01

    Australian higher education has adopted a widening participation agenda with a focus on the participation of disadvantaged students, particularly those from low socioeconomic status (LSES) backgrounds. As these students begin to enter university in greater number and proportion than ever before, there is increasing interest in how best to…

  6. Socioeconomic Status and the Career Aspirations of Australian School Students: Testing Enduring Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jennifer; Holmes, Kathryn; Smith, Max; Southgate, Erica; Albright, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Recent Australian government targets for higher education participation have produced a flurry of activity focused on raising the aspirations of students from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. In this paper we test two key assumptions underpinning much of this activity: that students from low-SES backgrounds hold lower career…

  7. Health inequalities, physician citizens and professional medical associations: an Australian case study

    PubMed Central

    Furler, John; Harris, Elizabeth; Harris, Mark; Naccarella, Lucio; Young, Doris; Snowdon, Teri

    2007-01-01

    Background As socioeconomic health inequalities persist and widen, the health effects of adversity are a constant presence in the daily work of physicians. Gruen and colleagues suggest that, in responding to important population health issues such as this, defining those areas of professional obligation in contrast to professional aspiration should be on the basis of evidence and feasibility. Drawing this line between obligation and aspiration is a part of the work of professional medical colleges and associations, and in doing so they must respond to members as well as a range of other interest groups. Our aim was to explore the usefulness of Gruen's model of physician responsibility in defining how professional medical colleges and associations should lead the profession in responding to socioeconomic health inequalities. Methods We report a case study of how the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners is responding to the issue of health inequalities through its work. We undertook a consultation (80 interviews with stakeholders internal and external to the College and two focus groups with general practitioners) and program and policy review of core programs of College interest and responsibility: general practitioner training and setting of practice standards, as well as its work in public advocacy. Results Some strategies within each of these College program areas were seen as legitimate professional obligations in responding to socioeconomic health inequality. However, other strategies, while potentially professional obligations within Gruen's model, were nevertheless contested. The key difference between these lay in different moral orientations. Actions where agreement existed were based on an ethos of care and compassion. Actions that were contested were based on an ethos of justice and human rights. Conclusion Colleges and professional medical associations have a role in explicitly leading a debate about values, engaging both external

  8. Analysis of the social network development of a virtual community for Australian intensive care professionals.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Kaye Denise; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Social media platforms can create virtual communities, enabling healthcare professionals to network with a broad range of colleagues and facilitate knowledge exchange. In 2003, an Australian state health department established an intensive care mailing list to address the professional isolation experienced by senior intensive care nurses. This article describes the social network created within this virtual community by examining how the membership profile evolved from 2003 to 2009. A retrospective descriptive design was used. The data source was a deidentified member database. Since 2003, 1340 healthcare professionals subscribed to the virtual community with 78% of these (n = 1042) still members at the end of 2009. The membership profile has evolved from a single-state nurse-specific network to an Australia-wide multidisciplinary and multiorganizational intensive care network. The uptake and retention of membership by intensive care clinicians indicated that they appeared to value involvement in this virtual community. For healthcare organizations, a virtual community may be a communications option for minimizing professional and organizational barriers and promoting knowledge flow. Further research is, however, required to demonstrate a link between these broader social networks, enabling the exchange of knowledge and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25310223

  9. The contribution of individual psychological resilience in determining the professional quality of life of Australian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Hegney, Desley G.; Rees, Clare S.; Eley, Robert; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Francis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Research Topic: The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of trait negative affect and individual psychological resilience in explaining the professional quality of life of nurses. Materials and Methods: One thousand, seven hundred and forty-three Australian nurses from the public, private, and aged care sectors completed an online Qualtrics survey. The survey collected demographic data as well as measures of depression, anxiety and stress, trait negative affect, resilience, and professional quality of life. Results: Significant positive relationships were observed between anxiety, depression and stress, trait negative affectivity, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (compassion fatigue). Significant negative relationships were observed between each of the aforementioned variables and resilience and compassion satisfaction (CS). Results of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS. Conclusion: Results confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life. Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse’s professional quality of life. PMID:26539150

  10. The Mental Status Examination: Its Use by Professional Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanski, Patricia J.; Hinkle, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about professional counselors' use of the mental status examination (MSE) in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Includes an overview of the MSE format and explanation of terminology, counseling skills used for the MSE, considerations in using the MSE across cultures and age groups, and guidelines for writing an MSE…

  11. Criteria for Improving the Professional Status of Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Dale E.

    This description of the distinguishing characteristics, criteria, and responsibilities of a true profession provides an analysis of the traits attributed to professional services by society in the hope that librarians will use them to improve the status of their field. Chapters examine the following topics: the meaning of the term profession,…

  12. The Quest for (Higher) Professional Status: Second Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baizerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The sociopolitical movement to enhance youth workers' occupational status and related emoluments strategically links this goal to competency-based assessment. While the goals of improved conditions, remuneration, and career opportunities for workers is supported, the joining of those goals to both professionalization and in turn competency-based…

  13. Doctoral Programs for Student Affairs Professionals: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coomes, Michael D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Conducted assessment of current status of doctoral education opportunities for student affairs professionals, drawn from data from the Doctoral Programs for Student Affairs Practitioners Questionnaire completed by 36 program directors, the Student Characteristics Questionnaire completed by 48 respondents, and a survey of 775 doctoral students.…

  14. Health professional's perspectives of the barriers and enablers to cancer care for Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, J A; Adams, J; Valery, P C; Walpole, E T; Martin, J H; Williams, H M; Garvey, G

    2016-03-01

    To investigate health professionals' perspectives about factors that impede or facilitate cancer care for Indigenous people. Semi-structured interviews with 22 health professionals involved in Indigenous cancer care. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Participants presented their perspectives on a number of barriers and enablers to Indigenous cancer care. Barriers were related to challenges with communication, the health system and coordination of care, issues around individual and community priorities and views of cancer treatment and health professional judgement. Enablers to cancer care were related to the importance of trust and rapport as well as health care system and support factors. The findings highlighted the need for recording of Indigenous status in medical records and a coordinated approach to the provision of evidence-based and culturally appropriate cancer care. This could go some way to improving Indigenous patient's engagement with tertiary cancer care services. PMID:26918690

  15. Becoming Professional? Exploring Early Years Professional Status and Its Implications for Workforce Reform in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Across the "European learning space" (Lawn, 2006) professionalisation of early years workforces has become a key priority and there has been a flow of this policy between borders (Oberhuemer, 2005). Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) is central to these developments in England. Within what is regarded as a traditionally "split" early years…

  16. Conservation Status of the Australian Humpback Dolphin (Sousa sahulensis) Using the IUCN Red List Criteria.

    PubMed

    Parra, Guido J; Cagnazzi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Australian humpback dolphins (Sousa sahulensis) were recently described as a new species endemic to northern Australia and potentially southern New Guinea. We assessed the species conservation status against IUCN Red List Criteria using available information on their biology, ecology and threatening processes. Knowledge of population sizes and trends across the species range is lacking. Recent genetic studies indicate Australian humpback dolphins live in small and relatively isolated populations with limited gene flow among them. The available abundance estimates range from 14 to 207 individuals and no population studied to date is estimated to contain more than 104 mature individuals. The Potential Biological Removal method indicates populations are vulnerable to even low rates of anthropogenic mortality. Habitat degradation and loss is ongoing and expected to increase across the species range in Australia, and a continuing decline in the number of mature individuals is anticipated. Considering the available evidence and following a precautionary approach, we considered this species as Vulnerable under IUCN criterion C2a(i) because the total number of mature individuals is plausibly fewer than 10,000, an inferred continuing decline due to cumulative impacts, and each of the populations studied to date is estimated to contain fewer than 1000 mature individuals. Ongoing research efforts and recently developed research strategies and priorities will provide valuable information towards the future conservation and management of Australian humpback dolphins. PMID:26790892

  17. Facilitating the Learning of All Students: The "Professional Positive" of Inclusive Practice in Australian Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Christopher; Scriven, Brooke; Durning, Sara; Downes, Carissa

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the positive aspects of inclusion in Australian primary schools through a historical account of the nation's journey to adopting current policies and practices. The authors suggest that across the different states the picture is positive as there are clear attempts to make Australian schools as inclusive as possible. The…

  18. The Professional Status of Teachers: Some Theoretical Concerns and Ontario Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fris, Joe

    1975-01-01

    This paper is designed to help clarify thinking about professionalism and the process of professionalization and to report the status of a study that attempted to assess the professional status of secondary school teachers in Ontario. (Published by Department of Educational Administration, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1) (Author)

  19. Vitamin D status and predictors of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Western Australian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Black, Lucinda J; Burrows, Sally A; Jacoby, Peter; Oddy, Wendy H; Beilin, Lawrence J; Chan She Ping-Delfos, Wendy; Marshall, Carina E; Holt, Patrick G; Hart, Prue H; Mori, Trevor A

    2014-10-14

    Despite the importance of skeletal growth during adolescence, there is limited research reporting vitamin D status and its predictors in adolescents. Using prospective data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, we investigated vitamin D status and predictors of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in adolescents. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured in the same participants at 14 and 17 years (n 1045 at both time points). The percentage of adolescents with serum 25(OH)D concentrations < 50, 50-74·9 and ≥ 75 nmol/l was reported year-round and by month of blood collection. We examined the predictors of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, including sex, race, month of blood collection, physical activity, BMI, family income, and Ca and vitamin D intakes (n 919 at 14 years; n 570 at 17 years), using a general linear mixed model. At 14 years, 31 % of adolescents had serum 25(OH)D concentrations between 50 and 74·9 nmol/l and a further 4 % had concentrations < 50 nmol/l. At 17 years, 40 % of adolescents had serum 25(OH)D concentrations between 50 and 74·9 nmol/l and 12 % had concentrations < 50 nmol/l. Caucasian ethnicity, being sampled at the end of summer, exercising more, having a lower BMI, a higher Ca intake and a higher family income were significantly associated with higher serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The proportion of adolescents with serum 25(OH)D concentrations < 50 nmol/l was low in this Western Australian cohort. There is a need for international consensus on defining adequate vitamin D status in order to determine whether strategies to increase vitamin D status in adolescents are warranted. PMID:25137493

  20. Faculty Status, Tenure, and Professional Identity: A Pilot Study of Academic Librarians in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Faculty status, tenure, and professional identity have been long-lasting issues for academic librarians for nearly forty years, yet there is little agreement on the benefits of faculty status. This paper examines faculty status and tenure for academic librarians and presents the results of a survey inquiry into professional identity, current and…

  1. Is socioeconomic status associated with dietary sodium intake in Australian children? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Carley A; Campbell, Karen J; Riddell, Lynn J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and dietary sodium intake, and to identify if the major dietary sources of sodium differ by socioeconomic group in a nationally representative sample of Australian children. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Participants A total of 4487 children aged 2–16 years completed all components of the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures Sodium intake was determined via one 24 h dietary recall. The population proportion formula was used to identify the major sources of dietary salt. SES was defined by the level of education attained by the primary carer. In addition, parental income was used as a secondary indicator of SES. Results Dietary sodium intake of children of low SES background was 2576 (SEM 42) mg/day (salt equivalent 6.6 (0.1) g/day), which was greater than that of children of high SES background 2370 (35) mg/day (salt 6.1 (0.1) g/day; p<0.001). After adjustment for age, gender, energy intake and body mass index, low SES children consumed 195 mg/day (salt 0.5 g/day) more sodium than high SES children (p<0.001). Low SES children had a greater intake of sodium from processed meat, gravies/sauces, pastries, breakfast cereals, potatoes and potato snacks (all p<0.05). Conclusions Australian children from a low SES background have on average a 9% greater intake of sodium from food sources compared with those from a high SES background. Understanding the socioeconomic patterning of salt intake during childhood should be considered in interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease. PMID:23396559

  2. Identity, Intimacy, Status and Sex Dating Goals as Correlates of Goal-Consistent Behavior and Satisfaction in Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Boislard-P., Marie-Aude

    2012-01-01

    The most common dating goals of adolescents are identity, intimacy, status and sex. In this study of Australian youth (16-30 years, N = 208), dating goals were expected to explain goal-consistent behavior in each domain. Also, goals coupled with consistent behavior were expected to be associated with greater satisfaction in each domain. Age,…

  3. Health Status and Coping Strategies among Older Parent-Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in an Australian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McConnell, David; Gething, Lindsay; Cant, Rosemary; Kendig, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Background: Older parent-carers in Australia are the subject of increasing policy and practice attention due to concerns about their ongoing ability to care in the light of their own ageing and the ageing of their adult son or daughter. This paper examines health status and the coping strategies of a group of older Australian parents caring for an…

  4. Effects of acculturation on lifestyle and health status among older Vietnam-born Australians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong Thuy; Jorm, Louisa; Johnson, Maree; Bambrick, Hilary; Lujic, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Vietnamese immigrants represent a substantial culturally and linguistically diverse population of Australia, but little is known about the health-related effects of acculturation in this population. This study investigated the relationship between measures of acculturation and lifestyle behaviors and health status among 797 older Vietnam-born Australians who participated in the 45 and Up Study (www.45andup.org.au). The findings suggested that higher degrees of acculturation were associated with increased consumption of red meat, white meat, and seafood; higher levels of physical activities; and lower prevalence of overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, and smoking (in men). Targeted health messages could emphasize eating more vegetables, avoiding smoking and alcohol drinking, and increasing levels of physical activity. PMID:23858513

  5. Depressive symptomatology, weight status and obesogenic risk among Australian adolescents: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Erin; Millar, Lynne; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Nichols, Melanie; Malakellis, Mary; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adolescence is a period of increased risk for mental health problems and development of associated lifestyle risk behaviours. This study examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between obesogenic risk factors, weight status, and depressive symptomatology in a cohort of Australian adolescents. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The study used repeated measures data from the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) It's Your Move project, an Australian community-based obesity prevention intervention. Intervention effect was non-significant therefore intervention and comparison groups were combined in this study. Participants Total sample was 634 secondary school students (female n=338, male n=296) with mean age 13 years (SD=0.6) at baseline (2012) and 15 years (SD=0.6) at follow-up (2014) recruited from 6 government secondary schools in the ACT. Primary and secondary outcomes measures Primary outcome was depressive symptomatology measured by Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were weight status, physical activity, screen time and diet related measures. Results Increased physical activity was associated to lower depressive symptomatology among males (OR=0.35, p<0.05). Sweet drink (OR=1.15, p<0.05) and takeaway consumption (OR=1.84, p<0.05) were associated with higher levels of depressive symptomatology among females at follow-up. Males who were classified as overweight or obese at baseline, and remained so over the study period, were at increased risk of depressive symptomatology at follow-up (b=1.63, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.92). Inactivity among males over the 2-year study period was predictive of higher depressive symptomatology scores at follow-up (b=2.55, 95% CI 0.78 to 4.32). For females, those who increased their consumption of takeaway foods during the study period were at increased risk for developing depressive symptomatology (b=1.82, 95% CI −0.05 to 3.71). Conclusions There are multiple, probably complex

  6. Effective University Teaching: Views of Australian University Students from Low Socio-Economic Status Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; O'Shea, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As the Australian higher education population further diversifies as a result of federal government policy changes, the collective understanding of effective university teaching in the Australian context will need to evolve to incorporate such shifts. The Australian Government has set clear targets for increased university participation of people…

  7. Promoting Early Childhood Teacher Professionalism in the Australian Context: The Place of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer; Shepherd, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The early childhood education (ECE) sector in Australia is marked by a habitus where "professionalism" is confined to objective, technical practices. The authors suggest that this is a diminished view of professionalism, and one that compromises high-quality ECE. This article is concerned with how teacher professionalism can be re-imagined and…

  8. Marital Status and Problem Gambling Among Australian Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Loneliness.

    PubMed

    Botterill, Emma; Gill, Peter Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Gomez, Rapson

    2016-09-01

    Problem gambling rates in older adults have risen dramatically in recent years and require further investigation. Limited available research has suggested that social needs may motivate gambling and hence problem gambling in older adults. Un-partnered older adults may be at greater risk of problem gambling than those with a partner. The current study explored whether loneliness mediated the marital status-problem gambling relationship, and whether gender moderated the mediation model. It was hypothesised that the relationship between being un-partnered and higher levels of loneliness would be stronger for older men than older women. A community sample of Australian men (n = 92) and women (n = 91) gamblers aged from 60 to 90 years (M = 69.75, SD = 7.28) completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. The results supported the moderated mediation model, with loneliness mediating the relationship between marital status and problem gambling for older men but not for older women. It appears that felt loneliness is an important predictor of problem gambling in older adults, and that meeting the social and emotional needs of un-partnered men is important. PMID:26450126

  9. Genetic Counseling for Indigenous Australians: an Exploratory Study from the Perspective of Genetic Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Emma; Gallacher, Lyndon; Macciocca, Ivan; Sahhar, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    Indigenous populations are thought to have particularly low levels of access to genetic health services, and cultural issues may be a contributing factor. This article presents the findings of the first study of genetic health service provision to Indigenous Australians. This qualitative study aimed to identify elements of culturally-competent genetic health service provision in Indigenous Australian contexts. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with genetic counselors and clinical geneticists from around Australia who had delivered services to Indigenous Australians. Participants were asked to describe their experiences and identify any collective cultural needs of Indigenous clients, as well as comment on specific training and resources they had received or used. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed with thematic analysis conducted on the data. The findings show that participants were reluctant to generalize the needs of Indigenous peoples. Some participants asserted that Indigenous peoples have needs that differ from the general population, while others felt that there were no collective cultural needs, instead advocating an individualized approach. Being flexible and practical, taking time to build rapport, recognizing different family structures and decision-making processes, as well as socio-economic disadvantage were all identified as important factors in participants' interactions with Indigenous clients. Indigenous support workers and hospital liaison officers were seen as valuable resources for effective service provision. The implications of this study for training and practice are discussed. PMID:25348084

  10. Professional training in the practice of hypnosis--the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R O; Rose, L; Burrows, G D

    1998-07-01

    Increasingly around the world as clinicians and researchers alike become more sophisticated in their understanding of the hypnotic process, there is developing a conviction that the hypnotic state or process itself poses no inherent dangers for patients but that its inexpert use may. The solution to prevent potential patient harm is to ensure that all clinicians of whatever discipline have adequate and appropriate clinical training prior to being allowed to practice. Since 1985, in all the Australian states, the appropriate disciplines, already licensed to practice their profession, have completed 2 years part-time academic and clinical training in the nature and nuances of hypnosis (30 hours), practical experience of direct and indirect approaches, and supervised clinical case management (50 hours). At the end of the training they complete a 3 part examination of competence (clinical cases reports, written examination, and oral examination) in order to be accepted as members of the Australian Society of Hypnosis. Only by completing this training and peer reviewed assessment are clinicians able to receive the backing of the Society and recommendation to patients of their competence as clinicians using hypnosis. Recently in the states of Victoria and South Australia (and soon in the state of Queensland), the training program of the Australian Society of Hypnosis has been incorporated into a university diploma course, giving formal academic recognition to the approach to training. The University of Melbourne diploma course will be discussed with a view to illustrating these recent developments. PMID:9868815

  11. Professional Standards for Australian Teachers of Languages: Context, Processes and Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Professional standards for the teaching profession have received considerable attention over the last decade in Australia and internationally. Teachers of languages and cultures in Australia have been active in this period in developing their own professional standards, supported by a series of nationally funded projects arising from federal…

  12. The Impact of System-Wide Restructuring on Teacher Professionalism and Accountability: A Western Australian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellar, Graham B.

    This paper examines teachers' perceptions of policy related to accountability and professional development in site-based management. The methodology included the development and administration of the Teacher Professional Development and Accountability Questionnaire. Dimensions in the questionnaire were derived from policy documents on…

  13. Relevance and Quality in Australian Tourism Higher Education: Educator and Professional Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jacintha A. C.; Morgan, Damian J.

    2001-01-01

    Survey responses from 56 tourism educators and 100 professionals indicate that one-quarter of the professionals believe the tourism major gives graduates a competitive edge. Competencies in logical thinking, social interaction, content knowledge, and generic skills were outcomes identified by both groups. Communication between academics and…

  14. Social Development Measures Associated with Problem Behaviours and Weight Status in Australian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joanne W; Canterford, Louise; Toumbourou, John W; Patton, George C; Catalano, Richard F

    2015-08-01

    During the adolescent years, substance use, anti-social behaviours and overweight/obesity are amongst the major public health concerns. We investigate if risk and protective factors associated with adolescent problem behaviours and substance use are also associated with weight status in young Australian adolescents. Data comes from the 2006 Healthy Neighbourhoods study, a cross-sectional survey of students attending primary (grade 6, mean age 11) and secondary (grade 8, mean age 12) schools in 30 communities across Australia. Adolescents were classified as not overweight, overweight or obese according to international definitions. Logistic and linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, gender and socio-economic disadvantage quartile, were used to quantify associations between weight status (or BMI z-score) and the cumulative number of problem behaviour risk and protective factors. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 22.6 % (95 % confidence interval (CI), 21.2-24.0 %) and 7.2 % (CI, 6.3-8.3 %). Average number of risk and protective factors present was 4.0 (CI, 3.7-4.2) and 6.2 (CI, 6.1-6.3). Independently, total number of risk factors present was positively associated with likelihood of overweight and obesity, while number of protective factors present was inversely associated with the likelihood of being above a healthy weight. When both risk and protective factors were included in a regression model, only risk factors were associated with the likelihood of being overweight or obese. Average BMI z-score increased by 0.03 units with each additional risk factor present. Prevention programmes targeting developmental risk and protective factors in adolescents that reduce substance use and problem behaviours may also benefit physical health. PMID:25912882

  15. Relationships between Psychosocial Resilience and Physical Health Status of Western Australian Urban Aboriginal Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Katrina D.; Shepherd, Carrington C. J.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths’ psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status. Method and Results We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12–17 years, n = 677) drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups- Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, p<.001) and carer reported lifetime health problems (OR 1.76, p<.04) than Less Resilient youth. Conclusion The findings are consistent with biopsychosocial models and provide a more nuanced understanding of the patterns of risks, resources and adaptation that impact on the physical health of Aboriginal youth. The results support the posited biological pathways between chronic stress and physical health, and identify the protective role of social connections impacting not only psychosocial function but also physical health. Using a resilience framework may identify potent protective factors otherwise undetected in aggregated analyses, offering important insights to augment general public health prevention strategies. PMID:26716829

  16. Implementing Curriculum Reform: Insights into How Australian Early Childhood Directors View Professional Development and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmer, Kaye; Waniganayake, Manjula; Field, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    A range of studies has demonstrated that collaborative professional development and learning (PD&L) is effective in implementing curriculum reform. PD&L that is contextualised within a specific setting enables educators to explore new theoretical perspectives, review existing knowledge and beliefs, and examine their current practice. This…

  17. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.01); the proportion of people with psychological sub-heath and moderate pressure after mental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  18. Australian medical students' perceptions of professionalism and ethics in medical television programs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical television programs offer students fictional representations of their chosen career. This study aimed to discover undergraduate medical students' viewing of medical television programs and students' perceptions of professionalism, ethics, realism and role models in the programs. The purpose was to consider implications for teaching strategies. Methods A medical television survey was administered to 386 undergraduate medical students across Years 1 to 4 at a university in New South Wales, Australia. The survey collected data on demographics, year of course, viewing of medical television programs, perception of programs' realism, depiction of ethics, professionalism and role models. Results The shows watched by most students were House, Scrubs, and Grey's Anatomy, and students nominated watching 30 different medical programs in total. There was no statistical association between year of enrolment and perceptions of accuracy. The majority of students reported that friends or family members had asked them for their opinion on an ethical or medical issue presented on a program, and that they discussed ethical and medical matters with their friends. Students had high recall of ethical topics portrayed on the shows, and most believed that medical programs generally portrayed ideals of professionalism well. Conclusions Medical programs offer considerable currency and relevance with students and may be useful in teaching strategies that engage students in ethical lessons about practising medicine. PMID:21798068

  19. The nurses' self-concept instrument (NSCI): a comparison of domestic and international student nurses' professional self-concepts from a large Australian University.

    PubMed

    Angel, Elizabeth; Craven, Rhonda; Denson, Nida

    2012-08-01

    Professional self-concept is a critical driver of job satisfaction. In Australia, as international nursing enrolments rise, nursing is increasingly characterised by a professional body of international nurses who may differ from domestic Australian nurses in their nursing self-concept. At present, little is known about the extent to which domestic and international students nurses' self-concepts may differ. The present study aimed to elucidate and contrast domestic and international nursing students' self-concepts from one large Australian university. A total of 253 domestic (n=218) and international (n=35) undergraduate nursing students from a large public university in Sydney, Australia completed the Nurses' Self-Concept Instrument (NSCI). Multiple-Indicator-Multiple-Indicator-Cause (MIMIC) modelling was used to assess the effects of student group (domestic and international) on the latent self-concept factors of the NSCI. Domestic and international students' professional self-concepts were similarly high. MIMIC modelling demonstrated that domestic students had a higher patient care self-concept in comparison to international students. Results imply that it may be useful for Australian universities to foster strategies that enhance specific domains of self-concepts (e.g., care) which may be underdeveloped for at least some cultural groups within the international nursing student population compared with domestic nursing students. PMID:22000976

  20. Changes in Anthropometry, Upper-Body Strength, and Nutrient Intake in Professional Australian Football Players During a Season.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, Johann C; Greenway, Kate; Livingston, Steuart; Cordy, Justin; Coutts, Aaron J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the seasonal changes in body composition, nutrition, and upper-body (UB) strength in professional Australian Football (AF) players. The prospective longitudinal study examined changes in anthropometry (body mass, fat-free soft-tissue mass [FFSTM], and fat mass) via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry 5 times during an AF season (start preseason, midpreseason, start season, midseason, end season) in 45 professional AF players. Dietary intakes and strength (bench press and bench pull) were also assessed at these time points. Players were categorized as experienced (>4 y experience, n = 23) or inexperienced (<4 y experience, n = 22). Fat mass decreased during the preseason but was stable through the in-season for both groups. %FFSTM was increased during the preseason and remained constant thereafter. UB strength increased during the preseason and was maintained during the in-season. Changes in UB FFSTM were related to changes in UB-strength performance (r = .37-.40). Total energy and carbohydrate intakes were similar between the experienced and inexperienced players during the season, but there was a greater ratio of dietary fat intake at the start-preseason point and an increased alcohol, reduced protein, and increased total energy intake at the end of the season. The inexperienced players consumed more fat at the start of season and less total protein during the season than the experienced players. Coaches should also be aware that it can take >1 y to develop the appropriate levels of FFSTM in young players and take a long-term view when developing the physical and performance abilities of inexperienced players. PMID:26217046

  1. Relationships among Professional Collaboration, Student Learning, and Student Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Bryan L.

    2012-01-01

    Although professional collaboration has achieved popularity as an element of public school reform efforts, most research on its impact is qualitative in nature or limited to small case studies. This research sought to provide a quantitative examination of the relationships among levels of implementation of five characteristics of professional…

  2. Achieving Professional Status: A Problem in What Teachers Believe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Thomas J.; Galloway, Charles M.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that teachers must begin to reconceptualize definitions of their own professional practice by beginning to assume new educational roles and adopting new ways of thinking. Discusses three modes of thinking to consider: teacher-as-learner, teacher-as-inquirer, and teacher-as-risk taker. (FL)

  3. Knowledge Claims, Jurisdictional Control and Professional Status: The Case of Nurse Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Francke, Anneke L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, professional boundaries in health care have come under pressure, and the expansion of prescriptive authority to include nurses touches on issues of professional domains and interprofessional competition. Knowledge claims play an important role in achieving jurisdictional control. Knowledge can take on multiple forms, ranging from indeterminate to technical (I/T ratio) and from everyday to exclusive knowledge. To investigate the interrelatedness of jurisdiction, knowledge claims and professional status, we examine which knowledge claims were made by the medical and nursing professions in the Netherlands to secure or obtain, respectively, jurisdictional control over prescribing, and which form this knowledge took. The study is based on thirteen semi-structured stakeholder interviews and an extensive document analysis. We found that the nursing profession in its knowledge claims strongly emphasized the technicality and everyday knowledge character of the prescribing task, by asserting that nurses were already prescribing medicines, albeit on an illegal basis. Their second claim focused on the indeterminate knowledge skills of nurses and stated that nurse prescribing would do justice to nurses’ skills and expertise. This is a strong claim in a quest for (higher) professional status. Results showed that the medical profession initially proclaimed that prescribing should be reserved for doctors as it is a task requiring medical knowledge, i.e. indeterminate knowledge. Gradually, however, the medical profession adjusted its claims and tried to reduce nurse prescribing to a task almost exclusively based on technicality knowledge, among others by stating that nurses could prescribe in routine cases, which would generate little professional status. By investigating the form that professional knowledge claims took, this study was able to show the interconnectedness of jurisdictional control, knowledge claims and professional status. Knowledge claims

  4. Knowledge claims, jurisdictional control and professional status: the case of nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, professional boundaries in health care have come under pressure, and the expansion of prescriptive authority to include nurses touches on issues of professional domains and interprofessional competition. Knowledge claims play an important role in achieving jurisdictional control. Knowledge can take on multiple forms, ranging from indeterminate to technical (I/T ratio) and from everyday to exclusive knowledge. To investigate the interrelatedness of jurisdiction, knowledge claims and professional status, we examine which knowledge claims were made by the medical and nursing professions in the Netherlands to secure or obtain, respectively, jurisdictional control over prescribing, and which form this knowledge took. The study is based on thirteen semi-structured stakeholder interviews and an extensive document analysis. We found that the nursing profession in its knowledge claims strongly emphasized the technicality and everyday knowledge character of the prescribing task, by asserting that nurses were already prescribing medicines, albeit on an illegal basis. Their second claim focused on the indeterminate knowledge skills of nurses and stated that nurse prescribing would do justice to nurses' skills and expertise. This is a strong claim in a quest for (higher) professional status. Results showed that the medical profession initially proclaimed that prescribing should be reserved for doctors as it is a task requiring medical knowledge, i.e. indeterminate knowledge. Gradually, however, the medical profession adjusted its claims and tried to reduce nurse prescribing to a task almost exclusively based on technicality knowledge, among others by stating that nurses could prescribe in routine cases, which would generate little professional status. By investigating the form that professional knowledge claims took, this study was able to show the interconnectedness of jurisdictional control, knowledge claims and professional status. Knowledge claims are

  5. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. PMID:22257324

  6. The Incidence of Concussion in a Professional Australian Rugby League Team, 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jason; Hooke, Chloe; Orchard, John; Parkinson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background. Rugby league is a physically demanding team sport and the National Rugby League is the highest-level competition of rugby league in Australia. Frequent tackles and collisions between players result in a high incidence of injury to players. Concussion injuries have been the source of much debate, with reporting varying greatly depending on the definition used. Method. Injury records of 239 players from one professional National Rugby League were analysed during a continuous period of 15 years, with particular interest in the incidence and recurrence of concussions and the change in incidence over time. Result. A total of 191 concussions were recorded, affecting 90 players. The incidence of concussion injuries was found to be 28.33 per 1000 player match hours, with an increase over time (P = 0.0217). Multiple concussions were recorded for 51 players. Conclusion. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of concussion injuries was found, without a concurrent increase in the number of head injuries or total injuries. New rules which mandate removal of players from the field may be beneficial for protection of players on the long term, although they risk being counterproductive, if they make players less likely to report their symptoms during matches. PMID:26464875

  7. Professional Certification in Public Management: A Status Report and Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Steven W.; Duke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Provides a status report on the accomplishments of 16 Certified Public Manager (CPM) certification programs. Describes the growth and development of the program and argues that the interests of the public management community might be served if CPM and Master of Public Administration programs were to cooperate more aggressively. (Author/JOW)

  8. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but "blocking out time" and "time shifting" suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  9. The Professional Status of Educational Research: Professionalism and Developmentalism in Twenty-First-Century Working Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2013-01-01

    "How helpful and how necessary is it for at least some of us to see ourselves as professional educational researchers?" asked Donald McIntyre in his 1996 presidential address to the British Educational Research Association. Still pertinent to consideration of the direction in which the British educational research community ought to…

  10. The Status of Professional Development for K-12 Online Teachers: Insights and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kerry; Dawley, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The authors share findings, insights, and implications from "Going Virtual! The Status of Professional Development for K12 Online Teachers," a 2007 report supported by the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL, now known as iNACOL). The authors conducted a national survey of 259 K-12 online teachers, administrators, and professional…

  11. Improving the Professional Status of Teaching: Perspectives of Future Teachers, Current Teachers, and Education Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Hsieh, Chia-lin

    1999-01-01

    Examined future teachers', current teachers', and teacher educators' attitudes regarding various suggestions for improving the professional status of teaching. All groups rated extrinsic and intrinsic rewards for teaching the most important. They considered raising the standards of preservice programs and teacher certification important and…

  12. Changes in the hearing status and noise injury prevention practices of Australian farmers from 1994 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Depczynski, Julie; Challinor, Kathy; Fragar, Lyn

    2011-04-01

    This study compares the hearing status and behaviors of Australian farmers from 1994-2001 with those from 2002-2008. Over this period the authors found (1) there was a 12.5% overall improvement in the proportion of farmers with normal hearing in left ears, with the likelihood of a screening participant having normal hearing improving by almost 9% each year; (2) significant improvements in the mean hearing threshold of both ears from 1 to 6 kHz; (3) significantly higher mean hearing thresholds for 35- to 44-year-old farmers exposed to firearms, chainsaws, workshop tools, heavy machinery, and tractors with cabins compared to nonexposed groups; (4) nonuse of hearing protection devices by young farmers (15 to 24 years old), was associated with hearing loss for those using uncabined tractors. Despite a reduction in noise injury, further adoption of noise reduction strategies for specific agricultural work practices is required. PMID:21462025

  13. The Association of Socio-Demographic Status, Lifestyle Factors and Dietary Patterns with Total Urinary Phthalates in Australian Men

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Peter Y.; Wittert, Gary A.; Taylor, Anne W.; Martin, Sean A.; Milne, Robert W.; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between socio-demographic status, lifestyle factors, dietary patterns and urinary total phthalate concentration in a cohort of South Australian men. Method We randomly selected 1527 males aged 39 to 84 from wave two of the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) study. Total phthalate concentration was examined in fasting morning urine samples. Socio-demographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire. Food intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Dietary patterns were constructed using factor analysis. Results Total phthalates were detected in 99.6% of the urine samples. The overall geometric mean (95% CI) of total phthalate concentration was 112.4 (107.5–117.5) ng/mL. The least square geometric means (LSGMs) of total phthalate concentration were significantly higher among people who were obese (127.8 ng/mL), consuming less than two serves fruit per day (125.7 ng/mL) and drinking more than one can (375mL) of carbonated soft drink per day (131.9 ng/mL). Two dietary patterns were identified: a prudent dietary pattern and a western dietary pattern. Both the western dietary pattern (p = 0.002) and multiple lifestyle risk factors including smoking, obesity, insufficient physical activity and the highest quartile of the western dietary pattern (p<0.001), were positively associated with total phthalate levels. There was no significant relationship between total phthalate concentration and socio-demographic status. Conclusion Phthalate exposure is ubiquitous and positively associated with lifestyle risk factors in urban dwelling Australian men. PMID:25875472

  14. Associations of variable coloration with niche breadth and conservation status among Australian reptiles.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Anders; Aberg, Viktor

    2008-05-01

    We evaluate predictions concerning the evolutionary and ecological consequences of color polymorphisms. Previous endeavors have aimed at identifying conditions that promote the evolution and maintenance within populations of alternative variants. But the polymorphic condition may also influence important population processes. We consider the prediction that populations that consist of alternative "ecomorphs" with coadapted gene complexes will utilize more diverse resources and display higher rates of colonization success, population persistence, and range expansions, while being less vulnerable to range contractions and extinctions, compared with monomorphic populations. We perform pairwise comparative analyses based on information for 323 species of Australian lizards and snakes. We find that species with variable color patterns have larger ranges, utilize a greater diversity of habitat types, and are underrepresented among species currently listed as threatened. These results are consistent with the proposition that the co-occurrence of multiple color variants may promote the ecological success of populations and species, but there are also alternative interpretations. PMID:18543614

  15. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  16. Australian Public Relations: Status at the Turn of the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raveena; Smyth, Rosaleen

    2000-01-01

    Notes how over the last two decades the Public Relations Institute of Australia together with its strategic alliances have made many changes, structurally, strategically, and academically towards the professional growth of public relations. Discusses the views of the Public Relations Institute of Australia and offers a snapshot of two surveys on…

  17. The relationship between health professionals' weight status and attitudes towards weight management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Norman, I J; While, A E

    2011-05-01

    This systematic review aims to address the question of whether health professionals' weight status is associated with attitudes towards weight management. Twelve eligible studies were identified from a search of the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and three Chinese databases, which included 14 independent samples comprising a total of 10 043 respondents. Attitudes towards weight management were classified under eight attitude indicators. Quantitative synthesis of the findings of included studies showed that health professionals of normal weight were more likely to be more confident in their weight management practice, perceive fewer barriers to weight management and have more positive outcome expectations, have stronger role identity and more negative attitudes towards obese individuals than health professionals who were overweight or obese. However, there was no difference between overweight and non-overweight health professionals in their perceptions of the causes and outcomes of obesity. In addition, being female and having relevant knowledge and clinical experience of weight management appeared to predict positive attitudes towards obesity/obese patients and high self-efficacy in weight management, respectively. Future research should focus on prospectively theory-driven studies, and employ appropriately validated instruments and multivariate analyses to identify the relative contribution of weight status to attitudes towards weight management. PMID:21366836

  18. Does Professional Suitability Matter? A National Survey of Australian Counselling Educators in Undergraduate and Post-Graduate Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brear, Pamela D.; Dorrian, Jillian

    2010-01-01

    This Australian national study was undertaken to profile the unsuitable counselling student, and to achieve greater operational specificity to guide counselling educators who must make critical decisions that impact admittance to the counselling profession. Findings suggest that in every 25 students as many as three will have questionable…

  19. Transforming STEM Education in an Innovative Australian School: The Role of Teachers' and Academics' Professional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissaker, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Science and Mathematics School (ASMS) is a purpose-built innovative senior secondary school situated on the grounds of Flinders University, South Australia. The school was established to address declining enrollments in senior secondary mathematics and science, students' negative attitudes, a shortage of qualified science,…

  20. All professionals are equal but some professionals are more equal than others? Dominance, status and efficiency in Swedish interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Thylefors, Ingela

    2012-09-01

    This study explored status differences in interprofessional teams and their link with efficiency. In total, 62 teams (423 individuals) from occupational health-care, psychiatry, rehabilitation and school health-care responded to a questionnaire. Fifty-four of those teams (360 individuals) also participated in an observation session simulating problem-solving team meetings. Data were reduced to a number of indexes: self-assessed/perceived equality, functional influence and efficiency; and observed verbal dominance/activity and problem-solving capacity. Perceived status differences within the teams appeared moderate, irrespective of professional belonging. With respect to verbal dominance during meetings, however, the findings revealed a hierarchy with psychologists, physicians and social workers at the top together with special education teachers. No relationship was found between self-assessed efficiency and actual problem-solving nor between observed verbal activity and problem-solving. The findings suggest that different problems may demand different prerequisites to be solved effectively: successful solving of simple convergent problems correlated negatively with equality, whereas functional influence was a predictor of success with respect to divergent, complex problem-solving. The findings raise questions about leadership and procedures during team meetings. PMID:22142248

  1. Plasma selenium status in a group of Australian blood donors and fresh blood components.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles; Colebourne, Kathryn; Faddy, Helen M; Flower, Robert; Fraser, John F

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess plasma selenium levels in an Australian blood donor population and measure extra-cellular selenium levels in fresh manufactured blood components. Selenium levels were measured using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. The mean plasma selenium level in healthy plasmapharesis donors was 85.6±0.5 μg/L and a regional difference was observed between donors in South East Queensland and Far North Queensland. Although participants had selenium levels within the normal range (55.3-110.5 μg/L), 88.5% had levels below 100 μg/L, a level that has been associated with sub-optimal activity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Extra-cellular selenium levels in clinical fresh frozen plasma (cFFP) and apheresis-derived platelets (APH Plt) were within the normal range. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) and pooled buffy coat-derived platelets (BC Plt) had levels at the lower limit of detection, which may have clinical implications to the massively transfused patient. PMID:23890534

  2. The Status of Archivists in Relation to Other Information Professionals in the Public Service in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanodi, Aurelio

    This study is intended to promote the development of the archival and records management professions in Latin America by providing basic data on the status of professionals in this area in relation to other information professionals in the public service, particularly librarians and documentalists. It deals with the basic issues of recruitment,…

  3. Chaos in Western Medicine: How Issues of Social-Professional Status are Undermining Our Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N. W.

    2012-01-01

    From the period immediately following the second world war, western (orthodox) medicine – both as a philosophy of medicine and as a professional guild of medical professionals actively practicing medicine – has made progress in leaps and bounds, especially considering the advances in technology and associated enterprises. Over the last thirty years, however, the practice of orthodox medicine has taken a turn for the worst despite progressive philosophies and tenets of basic practice as offered by the professional bodies that regulate how medicine is operated and implemented. Current healthcare environments are in a chaotic state of affairs, most notably due to issues involving affordability of medical professionals. It is argued that the social-professional status of medical doctors allow exorbitant and unreachable demands on governments for increased salaries. The title-based supremacy of doctors within the occupations domain is not supported by what they are offering society at large, and it compromises the ability of medical institutions and governments to provide better and more affordable healthcare. From a sociological point of view, this paper examines the social-religious history of such social class-based occupational power and dominance, and paves the way toward an overhaul of current medical education frameworks that proactively will ensure greater occupational equity in healthcare settings, across all healthcare disciplines tasked with patient care and improvement of healthcare services. In essence, doctoral titles should only be awarded after successful completion of postgraduate doctoral studies, and a new breed of medical professionals must emerge, able to contribute more meaningfully to the advancement of medicine as a profession, as well as toward increased standards of healthcare and improved health services delivery. PMID:23121737

  4. Role of Dietary Pattern Analysis in Determining Cognitive Status in Elderly Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ashby-Mitchell, Kimberly; Peeters, Anna; Anstey, Kaarin J.

    2015-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to determine the association between dietary patterns and cognitive function and to examine how classification systems based on food groups and food items affect levels of association between diet and cognitive function. The present study focuses on the older segment of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) sample (age 60+) that completed the food frequency questionnaire at Wave 1 (1999/2000) and the mini-mental state examination and tests of memory, verbal ability and processing speed at Wave 3 (2012). Three methods were used in order to classify these foods before applying PCA. In the first instance, the 101 individual food items asked about in the questionnaire were used (no categorisation). In the second and third instances, foods were combined and reduced to 32 and 20 food groups, respectively, based on nutrient content and culinary usage—a method employed in several other published studies for PCA. Logistic regression analysis and generalized linear modelling was used to analyse the relationship between PCA-derived dietary patterns and cognitive outcome. Broader food group classifications resulted in a greater proportion of food use variance in the sample being explained (use of 101 individual foods explained 23.22% of total food use, while use of 32 and 20 food groups explained 29.74% and 30.74% of total variance in food use in the sample, respectively). Three dietary patterns were found to be associated with decreased odds of cognitive impairment (CI). Dietary patterns derived from 101 individual food items showed that for every one unit increase in ((Fruit and Vegetable Pattern: p = 0.030, OR 1.061, confidence interval: 1.006–1.118); (Fish, Legumes and Vegetable Pattern: p = 0.040, OR 1.032, confidence interval: 1.001–1.064); (Dairy, Cereal and Eggs Pattern: p = 0.003, OR 1.020, confidence interval: 1.007–1.033)), the odds of cognitive impairment decreased. Different results were

  5. 1980 Status of the Chemical Sciences in the Undergraduate Professional Programs of American Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszak, Alice Jean; Sarnoff, Darwin

    1981-01-01

    A 1980 mail survey of the 72 American colleges of pharmacy concerning the status of required chemistry courses in the professional curriculum was conducted. Results of the survey are discussed and the survey was used to establish the baseline for the status of chemistry courses in the undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. (Author/MLW)

  6. Socio-Economic Status and Related Variables That Influence the Initiation of Professional Medical Care among Montana Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Jack J.

    The purpose of this study was to determine for a sample of Montana families if a positive relationship existed between the family's socioeconomic status and its medical initiation behavior, and then, controlling for socioeconomic status, to determine if a relationship existed between initiation of professional medical care and a number of…

  7. The Association of Vitamin D Status with Dyslipidaemia and Biomarkers of Endothelial Cell Activation in Older Australians

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Ali M.; Lam, Virginie; Soares, Mario J.; Zhao, Yun; Sherriff, Jillian L.; Mamo, John C.; James, Anthony P.; Coombes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Vitamin D has been investigated for many non-skeletal effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether circulating lipids, systemic inflammation, and biomarkers of endothelial cell activation varied with the vitamin D status of older Australians. Methods: One hundred and one participants were proportionately and randomly sampled across tertiles of 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) from a larger cohort of free living older adults (T1 median = 97; T2 median = 74.5; T3 median = 56.8 nmol/L). Overnight fasting blood samples were assayed for 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), insulin, triacylglycerol (TAG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Markers of systemic inflammation (high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) and endothelial activation (hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), P-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM), soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)) were determined. A general linear model multivariate analysis with a backward elimination procedure was performed. Results: Eighty-three participants (48 women, 35 men), aged 65 ± 7.7 years, BMI 28 ± 4.5 kg/m2, with complete data were analyzed. The final parsimonious model controlled for age, gender, BMI, and McAuley’s index, but excluded season, medications, and PTH. There were significant differences across 25(OH)D tertiles in TC (T1 < T3, p = 0.003; T2 < T3, p = 0.001), LDL-C (T1 < T3, p = 0.005; T2 < T3, p = 0.001), TAG (T2 < T3, p = 0.026), HGF (T1 > T3, p = 0.009) and sVCAM (T1 > T3, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Higher vitamin D status may protect the endothelium through reduced dyslipidaemia and increased HGF. PMID:27483306

  8. Redox Status of Professional Soccer Players is Influenced by Training Load Throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, E; Groussard, C; Paillard, T; Chaory, K; Le Bris, R; Plantet, K; Pincemail, J; Zouhal, H

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to follow-up the variation of pro-/antioxidant status throughout a whole season in elite professional soccer players from the French league (n=19, 18.3±0.6 years) and to examine a possible link between these variations and training load. 5 time points (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5) were proposed to surround crucial periods of training during the whole season: the pre-season training/mid-season periods (T1-T2 and T3-T4), the championship or in-season periods (T2-T3 and T4-T5). At these times, blood samples were collected to measure pro-/antioxidant status (in erythrocytes: the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, in plasma: alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene), and dietary intakes were also recorded. Training loads were quantified by the rating of perceived exertion method weekly throughout the season. Pro-/antioxidant-related measurements showed no modifications except for GSH/GSSG ratio, which evolved significantly between season periods: from 36.43±4.15 (T1) to 115.99±16.43 (T2) to 91.64±21.24 (T3) to 202.29±29.26 (T4) to 59.61±14.61 (T5). We observed a significant correlation (r(2)=0.84) between changes in GSH/GSSH ratio and cumulated mean training loads. In conclusion, these results suggest that the redox status of professional soccer players is altered according to training period (in-season periods) and that GSH/GSSH ratio variations are correlated with cumulated training loads. PMID:27286182

  9. Interested and Influential: The Role of a Professional Association in the Development of the Foundation to Year 10 Australian Curriculum: Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Geography Teachers Association (AGTA) represents the views of Australian geography teachers on educational matters. AGTA also seeks to improve the capacity of geography teachers to respond to a changing teaching and learning landscape. The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) is an independent authority…

  10. Regenerating the Australian Landscape of Professional VET Practice: Practitioner-Driven Changes to Teaching and Learning. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figgis, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Donald Schon once famously pictured professional practice as a high, hard ground overlooking a swamp. The high ground is the place of theory and, one might add, of policy. The swampy lowland is where vocational education and training (VET) practitioners meet the learners. It is where the skills, knowledge, and attitudes they wish to see instilled…

  11. Professional Capabilities for Twenty-First Century Creative Careers: Lessons from Outstandingly Successful Australian Artists and Designers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Artists and designers are positioned at the centre of the twenty-first century creative economy. In order to recognise and make the most of the opportunities afforded by this new era, artists and designers still require the creativity, disciplinary depth of knowledge and technical skills traditionally possessed by professionals in these…

  12. Anemia and iron status in young fertile non-professional female athletes.

    PubMed

    Di Santolo, Manuela; Stel, Giuliana; Banfi, Giuseppe; Gonano, Fabio; Cauci, Sabina

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of regular physical exercise on anemia and iron status in young non-professional female athletes. A total of 191 healthy white Italian women (23.5 +/- 4.68 years) were analyzed; 70 were non-professional athletes performing 11.1 +/- 2.63 h week(-1) exercise and 121 were sedentary controls. Blood markers of anemia and iron status-hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), red blood cells (RBC), serum ferritin, iron, transferrin (Tf), transferrin saturation (TfS), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio (sTfR-F index)-were evaluated. Anemia threshold was Hb < 120 g l(-1). Ferritin concentrations < 12 microg l(-1) were considered as iron deficiency (ID). Frequency of anemia (15.7 versus 10.7%, P = 0.32), ID (27.1 versus 29.8%, P = 0.70), and ID anemia (8.6 versus 5.8%, P = 0.46) was not different in athletes and controls. However, athletes were threefold more likely than controls (17.1 versus 5.8%) to have serum iron < 50 microg dl(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.37, P = 0.012]. Low-TfS (<15%) was found in 25.7% of athletes and in 13.2% of controls, OR 2.27, P = 0.030. Elevated-sTfR (>1.76 mg l(-1)) was found in 24.3% of athletes and in 12.4% of controls, OR 2.27, P = 0.034. Regular non-professional sport activity does not cause an increased rate of anemia or of iron deficiency in fertile women. However, physical exercise has an impact on iron status as it reduces serum iron and transferrin saturation, and elevates sTfR. Nearly one fifth of recreational athletes have anemia and a third have iron deficit, these conditions can decrease their physical performance. PMID:18092176

  13. Motivation to Study Music in Australian Schools: The Impact of Music Learning, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Gary E.; Osborne, Margaret S.; Barrett, Margaret S.; Davidson, Jane W.; Faulkner, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This study extends an eight-country mapping exercise (McPherson & O'Neill, 2010; see "Research Studies in Music Education" issues 2010-2011) to include students' motivation to study music within the Australian context. It sought to determine whether music learners (students learning an instrument or voice), might be more motivated to…

  14. The Labour Market Status of Australian Students: Who Is Unemployed, Who Is Working and for How Many Hours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at the factors associated with the decision by school students in Australia to work part-time. I find substantial variation in the probability of working across the eight Australian states and territories, as well as by remoteness. Those who live in households with low income are less likely to work. A person's ancestry is also…

  15. What factors are important for deprescribing in Australian long-term care facilities? Perspectives of residents and health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Susan; Stanners, Melinda; Shakib, Sepehr; Bell, J Simon

    2016-01-01

    different factors, common and contrasting factors emerged. Future deprescribing interventions need to consider the similarities and differences within the range of factors prioritised by residents and health professionals. PMID:26966056

  16. Effects of regular away travel on training loads, recovery, and injury rates in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the acute and longitudinal effects of regular away travel on training load (TL), player wellness, and injury surrounding competitive football (soccer) matches. Eighteen male professional football players, representing a team competing in the highest national competition in Australia, volunteered to participate in the study. Training loads, player wellness and injury incidence, rate, severity, and type, together with the activity at the time of injury, were recorded on the day before, the day of, and for 4 d after each of the 27 matches of the 2012-13 season. This included 14 home and 13 away matches, further subdivided based on the midpoint of the season into early (1-13) and late competition (14-27) phases. While TLs were significantly greater on day 3 at home compared with away during the early competition phase (P=.03), no other significant effects of match location were identified (P>.05). Total TL and mean wellness over the 6 d surrounding matches and TL on day 3 were significantly reduced during the late compared with the early competition phase at home and away (P<.05). Although not significantly (P>.05), training missed due to injury was 60% and 50% greater during the late than during the early competition phase at home and away, respectively. In conclusion, no significant interactions between match location and competition phase were evident during the late competition phase, which suggests that away travel had negligible cumulative effects on the reduction in player wellness in the latter half of the season. PMID:25393013

  17. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P<.01, d>0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P<.05, d>0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P<.05, d>0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition. PMID:25569181

  18. Essential books and journals in clinical neuropsychology: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Karen A; Ryan, Joseph J

    2004-04-01

    To assist in the identification of key professional resources for neuropsychologists, 214 Australian clinical neuropsychologists were asked to identify "essential" reference materials. Fifty members of the Australian College of Clinical Neuropsychologists returned useable surveys. Forty-three respondents provided information about which clinical neuropsychology books and journals they considered essential and why. Results showed 15 books, including 3 Australian books, and 31 journals were included in the essential reading list of at least 10% of this sample. Compared to similar previous surveys (predominantly conducted overseas and mostly over 10 years ago), the results of this survey suggest that, Australian neuropsychologists have similar views about the top ranking books and journals in clinical neuropsychology as their overseas counterparts. An exception to this general trend may be the status of reference books containing norms, which appear to be growing in perceived importance. Importantly, the results of this survey may be used to help practitioners identify key professional resources in the area of clinical neuropsychology. PMID:15202548

  19. Teacher Professional Development in California: Status of Review. Report 09-18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbassekou, Hanouvi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last year, the Improving Teacher Quality (ITQ) program staff have been looking at the scope of professional development for K-12 teachers in California. Staff are assessing current models of professional development offered, how they are funded, and how widespread are the kinds of professional development that research finds best at…

  20. Antioxidant status and oxidative stress in professional rugby players: evolution throughout a season.

    PubMed

    Finaud, J; Scislowski, V; Lac, G; Durand, D; Vidalin, H; Robert, A; Filaire, E

    2006-02-01

    Physical training is known to increase the antioxidant defence system and reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, intense physical aerobic and anaerobic training and competition such as those imposed on professional rugby players, can induce an increase of oxidative stress which can be implicated with the arrival of overtraining. The aim of this study was to test the effect of training and competition load on oxidative stress, antioxidant status, haematological, and cell damage markers in high-level rugby players during a competitive season. Blood samples were collected four times in one year. Oxidative stress (Rmax), antioxidant (vitamin E, uric acid, TAC, and lag phase), haematological (neutrophils and monocytes) and biochemical (CK and myoglobin) parameters, as well as training and competition load, and competition results were measured. Intense periods of training and competition (T1 and T4) induced a significant higher maximum rate of conjugated dienes oxidation (+67.2% in T1 and +40.6% in T4) compared to those observed at the reference time (T3). Those periods also induced an increase in uric acid (+6.9% and 3.2%), and inflammatory markers such as monocytes (+13.3% and 10.7%). On the other hand, vitamin E (-8.7% in T1) and lag phase (-23.0% and -14.7%) were lower during these periods showing a possible training-induced antioxidant down-regulation. The less intense period of training (T2) was accompanied by lower neutrophils (-8.5%), CK (-53.7%), and myoglobin (-16.2%) values. The results suggest that oxidative stress and antioxidant measurement are significant in the biological follow-up of athletes. PMID:16475052

  1. Sleepless nights: the effect of socioeconomic status, physical activity, and lifestyle factors on sleep quality in a large cohort of Australian women.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammmad; Haytabakhsh, Mohammad R; Najman, Jake M; Williams, Gail M; O'Callaghan, Michael J; Bor, William; Dingle, Kaeleen; Clavarino, Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study were to examine: (1) the association between sociodemographic and lifestyle factors and sleep quality in a population-based cohort of Australian women and (2) possible influence of reproductive status and mental and physical health factors on these associations. Data on 3,655 women (mean age = 46.6 years, range 34.3-67.4) were obtained from the Mater Hospital University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy for this cross-sectional study. Self-rated sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. For the purpose of this study, two cutoff points (scores 5 and 10) were used to divide women into three categories: normal (65.2%), moderately poor (26.4%), and very poor sleep quality (8.5%). Other covariates were measured at 21-year follow-up as well. After adjusting for reproductive status, mental and physical health, there were significant associations between moderately poor sleep quality and education and between very poor sleep quality and unemployment, both measures of socioeconomic status. In addition, work-related exertion was associated with increased rates of moderately poor sleep quality, whereas those women undertaking moderate exercise were less likely to experience very poor sleep quality. Independent associations between sociodemographic factors and exercise with moderately poor and very poor sleep quality were identified. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the association between exercise/exertion, socioeconomic status, and sleep quality and highlight the importance of taking these into consideration when dealing with issues of poor sleep quality in women. PMID:22585289

  2. Reactions of Mental Health Professionals to Hypothetical Clients: A Comparison Based on Clients' Adoptive Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Andrea

    Mental health professionals have often reported differences in the psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses of adopted and nonadopted children and adolescents. Since psychiatric diagnoses are influenced by the judgments of the professionals who assign them, it is possible that the differences observed between adopted and nonadopted psychiatric patients…

  3. Assessing the Status of Professional Learning Opportunities in EARCOS Member Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardeman, Mark Brandon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which professional development programs within EARCOS member schools are consistent with research-based principles of effective practice. In addition, this study sought to identify the professional development opportunities that are being provided to EARCOS teachers. Finally, this study…

  4. The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senyonyi, Ruth M.; Ochieng, Lois A.; Sells, James

    2012-01-01

    Professional counseling in Uganda has foundations in traditional cultures of its peoples, guidance offered in schools, and counseling to curb the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Currently, a definitive professional counselor profile in Uganda is being established. The Uganda Counselling Association continues the process of seeking legal authority to regulate…

  5. The Perceived Status of the Professional School Counselor's Advocacy Role, Training, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Darla Janene

    2012-01-01

    Although professionals and organizations in counseling and related fields have identified advocacy as an important role of the professional school counselor, researchers have failed to provide data on how practicing school counselors actually perceive and practice advocacy. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to address how school…

  6. Continuing professional education: Status, trends, and issues related to electronic delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1975-01-01

    Four professional groups, teachers, doctors, lawyers, and engineers were examined to determine if they constitute a potential market for continuing professional education via large scale electronic technology. Data were collected in view of social and economic forces, such as mandatory periodic relicensure, additional course requirements for certification, or the economic health of supporting industries.

  7. Functional Status and Inflammation after Preseason Training Program in Professional and Recreational Soccer Players: a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Sánchez, Francisco J.; Villalón, José María; Zamorano-León, José J.; Rosas, Luis Fernández; Proietti, Ricardo; Mateos-Caceres, Petra J.; González-Armengol, Juan J.; Villarroel, Pedro; Macaya, Carlos; López-Farré, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if an intensive pre- season training program modifies the inflammatory status in professional soccer players and if this inflammatory profile may be associated with the physical state. We compared plasma protein biomarkers, using proteomics, and the physiological state and cardiac function in 12 professional soccer players and 9 recreational soccer players. Reduced cardiac low frequency [LF] after the pre- season training program previous competition with respect to recreational soccer players was found. No differences were found in cardiac high frequency, cardiac high frequency/low frequency ratio, tension index and oxygen volume consumption. Alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-3, fibrinogen-gamma isotypes-1, 2 and 3 and vitamin-D-binding protein isotype-1 were reduced in professionals players compared with those in recreational players. However, an increased content of alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-6 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin 1 and 4 were found in professional soccer players. Spearman’s analysis showed a positive correlation between LF and fibrinogen-gamma chain isotype 3; but LF was negatively correlated with alpha-antichymotrypsin isotype 4. Professional soccer players submitted to an intensive training showed differences in the content of plasma proteins associated with inflammatory/oxidative stress and thrombosis with respect to recreational soccer players. Proteomics analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function assessment may be useful to know more in depth molecular processes associated with sport and intensive exercise. Key points Proteomics allow us to find differences in the plasma protein content in sportsmen. Just after pre-season training program, professional soccer players showed lower content of circulating proteins associated with inflammation compared to recreational soccer players. Proteomic analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function may be useful to know more in depth

  8. Functional status and inflammation after preseason training program in professional and recreational soccer players: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, Francisco J; Villalón, José María; Zamorano-León, José J; Rosas, Luis Fernández; Proietti, Ricardo; Mateos-Caceres, Petra J; González-Armengol, Juan J; Villarroel, Pedro; Macaya, Carlos; López-Farré, Antonio J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if an intensive pre- season training program modifies the inflammatory status in professional soccer players and if this inflammatory profile may be associated with the physical state. We compared plasma protein biomarkers, using proteomics, and the physiological state and cardiac function in 12 professional soccer players and 9 recreational soccer players. Reduced cardiac low frequency [LF] after the pre- season training program previous competition with respect to recreational soccer players was found. No differences were found in cardiac high frequency, cardiac high frequency/low frequency ratio, tension index and oxygen volume consumption. Alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-3, fibrinogen-gamma isotypes-1, 2 and 3 and vitamin-D-binding protein isotype-1 were reduced in professionals players compared with those in recreational players. However, an increased content of alpha-1-antitrypsin isotype-6 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin 1 and 4 were found in professional soccer players. Spearman's analysis showed a positive correlation between LF and fibrinogen-gamma chain isotype 3; but LF was negatively correlated with alpha-antichymotrypsin isotype 4. Professional soccer players submitted to an intensive training showed differences in the content of plasma proteins associated with inflammatory/oxidative stress and thrombosis with respect to recreational soccer players. Proteomics analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function assessment may be useful to know more in depth molecular processes associated with sport and intensive exercise. Key pointsProteomics allow us to find differences in the plasma protein content in sportsmen.Just after pre-season training program, professional soccer players showed lower content of circulating proteins associated with inflammation compared to recreational soccer players.Proteomic analysis in combination with the analysis of cardiac function may be useful to know more in depth molecular

  9. Far from Ideal: Everyday Experiences of Mothers and Early Childhood Professionals Negotiating an Inclusive Early Childhood Experience in the Australian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Rebekah; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Wedgwood, Nikki; Fenech, Marianne; McConnell, David

    2008-01-01

    Using narrative interviews underpinned by an ecocultural framework, this Australian study investigated the experiences of 39 mothers of children with disabilities and 27 staff members from the early childhood services which these children attended. The data highlight serious limitations of current government policy and provisions in Australia to…

  10. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian…

  11. Commentary: The relationship status of digital media and professionalism: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Farnan, Jeanne M; Paro, John A M; Higa, Jennifer T; Reddy, Shalini T; Humphrey, Holly J; Arora, Vineet M

    2009-11-01

    The rising popularity of digital applications, such as social networking, media share sites, and blogging, has significantly affected how medical trainees interact with educators, colleagues, and the public. Despite the increased popularity and use of such applications amongst the current generation of trainees, medical educators have little evidence or guidance about preventing misuse and ensuring standards for professional conduct. As trainees become more technologically savvy, it is the responsibility of medical educators to familiarize themselves not only with the advantages of this technology but also with the potential negative effects of its misuse. Professionalism, appropriateness for public consumption, and individual or institutional representation in digital media content are just some of the salient issues that arise when considering the ramifications of trainees' digital behavior in the absence of established policies or education on risk. In this commentary the authors explore the rising use of digital media and its reflection of medical trainees' professionalism. To address possible issues related to professionalism in digital media, the authors hypothesize potential solutions, including exploring faculty familiarity with digital media and policy development, educating students on the potential risks of misuse, and modeling professionalism in this new digital age. PMID:19858794

  12. A Study of Perceptions of Professional Status Held by Supervisors of Elementary School Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Clyde

    1977-01-01

    Attempts to determine the perceptions of the relationship between student teaching assignment and the professional work assignment as reported by college supervisors of elementary school student teachers in five large mid-western universities. Also evaluates selected characteristics of these supervisors. (Author/RK)

  13. Continuing Professional Education: Status, Trends, and Issues Related to Electronic Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Donna

    Continuing professional education for teachers, doctors, lawyers, and engineers is examined in terms of its potential for large-scale electronic technology. For each profession, a profile is provided, and current continuing education programs and use of electronics in each field are described. These include satellite projects, in-house and closed…

  14. Professional Development Status of Teaching Staff in a Ugandan Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasule, George Wilson; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine general professional development activities perceived to be important in enhancing university teaching staff's job performance, and the extent to which teaching staff participate in these activities in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with faculty deans and department heads (n = 20),…

  15. Status of Chemistry Content in the Professional Pharmacy Curriculum: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Victoria F.; Davis, Patrick J.; Pankaskie, Marvin C.; Currie, Bruce L.; Roche, Edward B.; Sindelar, Robert D.; Wynn, James E.; Zito, S. William

    2000-01-01

    A national survey conducted in 1997-1998 evaluated the current and anticipated future emphasis of chemistry-related content in the professional pharmacy curriculum, the credentials of the teaching faculty, and pedagogical methods used to deliver the content. Thirty-three schools or colleges of pharmacy participated. (Author)

  16. Benefits, Status and Effectiveness of Continuous Professional Development for Teachers in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opfer, V. Darleen; Pedder, David

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is one part of the nationally representative, "Schools and Continuing Professional Development in England--State of the Nation" research study which was funded by the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA). This paper sets out to understand how teachers and school leaders in England perceive the benefits and effectiveness…

  17. The Current Status of Contingent Faculty in Technical and Professional Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloncon, Lisa; England, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although much attention has been paid to issues of contingent faculty in the university (American Association of University Professors [AAUP] position statements) and, more specifically, in composition studies (Schell; Bousquet, Scott, and Parascondola; Miller), the matter of contingent faculty in technical and professional communication (TPC)…

  18. Impact of Dental Neglect Scale on Oral Health Status Among Different Professionals in Indore City-A Cross- Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Dasar, Pralhad; Nagarajappa, Sandesh; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Sandeep; Balsaraf, Swati; Lalani, Afsheen; Chauhan, Astha

    2015-01-01

    Background Young educated Indian generation are very much health conscious. They take adequate nutritious balanced diet and practice physical exercise regularly to keep themselves active and healthy. Oral health is a part of general health care system. If oral health is neglected it may affect our general health and as a result it affects our quality of life too. Aim To assess dental negligence and oral health status by using Dental Neglect scale questionnaire among different professionals of Indore city. Materials and Methods The study consisted of a convenient sample of 400 students of aged 18-25 years from 4 different professional colleges of Sri Aurobindo Group of Institutes of the same campus. A pretested validated questionnaire was used for assessing dental neglect and home dental care practices. Oral health examination was conducted to assess dental caries and oral hygiene status by using DMFT and OHIS respectively. Data was analysed using SPSS Software (version 20). Results For OHI(S), majority of the respondents (57.7%) showed fair oral hygiene for DNS score <15, whereas majority of the professionals (63.7%), showed poor oral hygiene for DNS score >15. The Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) score was found statistically significant with OHIS and caries experience at 95% Confidence Interval. There was no statistically significant difference between DNS score and frequency of Decayed, Missing and Filled teeth DMFT. Conclusion The Dental Neglect Scale appears to be a sound method for objectifying dental neglect. It has many of the features of a satisfying health index. However, further validation with other age groups, cultures, place and a larger population is required in order to justify the utility of Dental Neglect Scale in different situations. PMID:26557621

  19. Is the audiologic status of professional musicians a reflection of the noise exposure in classical orchestral music?

    PubMed

    Emmerich, Edeltraut; Rudel, Lars; Richter, Frank

    2008-07-01

    The sound in classical orchestral music is louder than noise emissions allowed by national rules in industry. We wanted to assess the audiologic status of professional musicians at different ages of their careers and to look for a coherence of declined hearing ability and the sound emissions in order to substantiate advices for hearing protection and occupational medicine in musicians. Data from questionnaires (anamnestic data on sound exposure in profession and leisure times, use of hearing protection, self-evaluation of hearing function and hearing deficits), audiometric data and amplitudes of OAE were evaluated from 109 professional musicians aged 30-69 years from three major German orchestras and from 110 students of an academy of music (aged 11-19 years). Sound emissions of the whole orchestra and of single instruments/instrument groups were measured at the orchestra stages and pits during rehearsals and performances. None of the musicians was engaged in noisy hobbies and only a few used hearing protectors regularly. More than 50% of the musicians had a hearing loss of 15 dB(A) and more. Highest losses were found among the strings and the brass players. DPOAE amplitudes coincidently declined with the duration of performing music in the orchestras. Professional musicians aged older than 60 years had a significantly greater hearing loss at 4 and 6 kHz than those aged 30-39 years. Among the strings in one orchestra a dominant hearing deficit in the left ears was observed. Musicians need the same health care for their hearing as workers in noisy industry. A better education on the hearing hazards (use of hearing protectors) as well as sound protection in the rehearsal rooms is necessary. Hearing loss in professional musicians should be accepted as an occupational disease. PMID:18034257

  20. Seasonal Training Load Distribution of Professional Futsal Players: Effects on Physical Fitness, Muscle Damage and Hormonal Status.

    PubMed

    Miloski, Bernardo; de Freitas, Victor H; Nakamura, Fábio Y; de A Nogueira, Francine C; Bara-Filho, Maurício G

    2016-06-01

    Miloski, B, de Freitas, VH, Nakamura, FY, de A Nogueira, FC, and Bara-Filho, MG. Seasonal training load distribution of professional futsal players: effects on physical fitness, muscle damage and hormonal status. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1525-1533, 2016-The aims of the present study were to describe the training load (TL) distribution of a professional futsal team and verify its subsequent effects on physical performance, muscle damage, and hormonal status. Twelve male professional futsal players (24.3 ± 4.7 years old; 75.5 ± 7.7 kg; and 173.4 ± 4.5 cm) participated in this study. A training program of 22 weeks (6 weeks of pre-season and 16 weeks of in-season) was analyzed. The session rating of perceived exertion method was used to monitor TLs. Physical tests (PTs; countermovement jump (CMJ), 5- and 20-m sprint, T-test, and multistage 20-m shuttle-run tests) were performed 4 times throughout the season (PT1-PT4). Blood sample (BS) collection (Creatine kinase [CK], testosterone, and cortisol) was performed in 7 occasions (BS1-BS7). TLs were higher in pre-season compared to in-season (p < 0.001). Countermovement jumps (CMJs) and 5- and 20-m performances were better in PT3 (CMJ: 0/23/77, 5-m: 0/3/97, and 20-m: 0/1/99) and PT4 (CMJ: 0/8/92, 5- and 20-m: 0/0/100) than in PT1; T-test performance and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max was better in all moments compared with those of PT1 (0/0/100). Higher CK concentration (p = 0.03) and testosterone to cortisol (T:C) ratio values (p = 0.02) were detected in BS2 vs. BS1. An increase in C (p = 0.007) and a decrease in T:C ratio (p = 0.003) was observed from BS4 to BS5. The training program demonstrated higher TLs during the periods with low incidence of matches, emphasis on endurance and strength training during pre-season, speed and power training throughout in-season. This TL organization provides sufficient stimulus for appropriate physical fitness development in professional futsal players, without causing negative

  1. Health Status and Leisure Behavior of Sexual Assault Victims: Educational Opportunities for Health and Leisure Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Emilyn A.; And Others

    The health status and leisure behavior of victims of sexual assault were studied. Data concerning present illness symptoms, past illness symptoms, negative health behavior, family health history, and female reproductive physiology illness symptoms were obtained and analyzed. Sexual assault victims were similar to nonvictims demographically except…

  2. Vitamin D Status, Bone Mineral Density and Mental Health in Young Australian Women: The Safe-D Study

    PubMed Central

    Reavley, Nicola; Garland, Suzanne M.; Gorelik, Alexandra; Wark, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both poor bone health and mental ill-health. More recently, a number of studies have found individuals with depressive symptoms tend to have reduced bone mineral density. To explore the interrelationships between vitamin D status, bone mineral density and mental-ill health we are assessing a range of clinical, behavioural and lifestyle factors in young women (Part A of the Safe-D study). Design and methods. Part A of the Safe-D study is a cross-sectional study aiming to recruit 468 young females aged 16-25 years living in Victoria, Australia, through Facebook advertising. Participants are required to complete an extensive, online questionnaire, wear an ultra-violet dosimeter for 14 consecutive days and attend a study site visit. Outcome measures include areal bone mineral measures at the lumbar spine, total hip and whole body, as well as soft tissue composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density at the tibia is measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Other tests include serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum biochemistry and a range of health markers. Details of mood disorder/s and depressive and anxiety symptoms are obtained by self-report. Cutaneous melanin density is measured by spectrophotometry. Expected impact. The findings of this cross-sectional study will have implications for health promotion in young women and for clinical care of those with vitamin D deficiency and/or mental ill-health. Optimising both vitamin D status and mental health may protect against poor bone health and fractures in later life. Significance for public health Vitamin D deficiency, depression and osteoporosis are all major public health issues. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both reduced bone mineral density and depressive symptoms. Moreover, cohort studies have found that subjects with depression have lower bone mineral density when compared

  3. Professional Families--The Development of the Relationship between a Professional Mother and the Child in the Context of the Mother's Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Búšová, Katarína Šmajdová

    2012-01-01

    A professional family is an organizational form of institutional care which is used mainly in residential children's homes. By considering the psychological development of the child and by providing a supportive environment, the professional family provides systematic, purposeful and professional care and education for the child. It attempts…

  4. Are healthcare professionals working in Australia's immigration detention centres condoning torture?

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2016-07-01

    Australian immigration detention centres are in secluded locations, some on offshore islands, and are subject to extreme secrecy, comparable with 'black sites' elsewhere. There are parallels between healthcare professionals working in immigration detention centres and healthcare professionals involved with or complicit in torture. In both cases, healthcare professionals are conflicted between a duty of care to improve the health of patients and the interests of the government. While this duality of interests has been recognised previously, the full implications for healthcare professionals working in immigration detention have not been addressed. The Australian Government maintains that immigration detention is needed for security checks, but the average duration of immigration detention has increased from 10 weeks to 14 months, and detainees are not informed of the progress of their application for refugee status. Long-term immigration detention causes major mental health problems, is illegal in international law and arguably fulfils the recognised definition of torture. It is generally accepted that healthcare professionals should not participate in or condone torture. Australian healthcare professionals thus face a major ethical dilemma: patients in immigration detention have pressing mental and physical health needs, but providing healthcare might support or represent complicity in a practice that is unethical. Individual healthcare professionals need to decide whether or not to work in immigration detention centres. If they do so, they need to decide for how long and to what extent restrictive contracts and gagging laws will constrain them from advocating for closing detention centres. PMID:26699920

  5. Revalidation: implications for Australian anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L J

    2015-09-01

    In early 2015, the Medical Board of Australia commissioned research into international revalidation models and what might be applicable for Australia. This review examines the implications for Australian anaesthetists. What problem is revalidation seeking to address? What is happening in similar countries? Is there an issue with Australian anaesthetists' performance? Isn't continuing professional development enough? Could the Medical Board target known high-risk doctors? What is the evidence for the benefit of revalidation? How is and how should the profession be involved? Revalidation has been introduced in other developed countries. It commonly involves continuing professional development, feedback from colleagues, co-workers and patients, clinical audit and peer review. Although its evidence base is limited, the General Medical Council in the United Kingdom is evaluating its revalidation system, which should provide useful guidance for other countries. Australian anaesthetists and their professional organisations must remain informed about, and engaged in, the national debate about revalidation, to ensure that any new process is workable for Australian anaesthesia practice. PMID:26310418

  6. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  7. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of Professional Development's Impact on Self- and Collective Efficacy by School Accountability Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study used the Schools and Staffing Survey of 2007-2008, a school-based stratified probability-proportionate-to-size sample of all American schools, to explore the relationships of professional development to teachers' self- and collective efficacy by school accountability status as measured by adequate yearly progress…

  8. An Exploration of How Marital Expectations and Socio-Economic Status Impact Post-Secondary Educational and Professional Goals of Northern California Asian Indian Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the impact of marital expectations and socio-economic status on post-secondary educational and professional goals of Northern California Asian Indian immigrant women both before and after marriage. For the purposes of this study, 15 Southeast Asian Indian immigrant women from the Sacramento metropolitan region…

  9. A Sense of Deja Vu across the Tasman? What Australians Might Learn from the New Zealand Experience with the Te Kotahitanga Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Throughout Australasia, indigenous educational issues remain a subject of considerable debate. In New Zealand, Maori underachievement in education has long been a matter of widespread concern. Currently the most highly visible professional development programme now operating in New Zealand mainstream secondary schools, Te Kotahitanga claims to…

  10. In-Service Professional Development in an Online Environment: What Are South Australian English as an Additional Language or Dialect Teachers' Views?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues concerning in-service English as an additional language or dialect teachers' views on professional development (PD) in an online environment. On the basis of the data collected via a questionnaire survey and a series of interviews, this study finds that intrinsic and extrinsic incentives compel or impede teachers…

  11. Do neighbourhood socioeconomic circumstances not matter for weight status among Australian men? Multilevel evidence from a household survey of 14 691 adults

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Wilson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective A recent analysis of the Australian National Health Survey (2011–2012) reported that the patterning of overweight and obesity among men, unlike for women, was not associated with neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether this gender difference in potential neighbourhood ‘effects’ on adult weight status can be observed in analyses of a different source of data. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional sample of 14 693 people aged 18 years or older was selected from the 2012 wave of the ‘Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia’ (HILDA). Three person-level outcomes were considered: (1) body mass index (BMI); (2) a binary indicator of ‘normal weight’ versus ‘overweight or obese’; and (3) ‘normal weight or overweight’ versus ‘obese’. Area-level socioeconomic circumstances were measured using quintiles of the Socio Economic Index For Areas (SEIFA). Multilevel linear and logistic regression models were used to examine associations while accounting for clustering within households and neighbourhoods, adjusting for person-level socioeconomic confounders. Results Neighbourhood-level factors accounted for 4.9% of the overall variation in BMI, whereas 20.1% was attributable to household-level factors. Compared with their peers living in deprived neighbourhoods, mean BMI was 0.7 kg/m2 lower among men and 2.2 kg/m2 lower among women living in affluent areas, with a clear trend across categories. Similarly, the percentage of overweight and obese, and obesity specifically, was lower in affluent areas for both men and women. These results were robust to adjustment for confounders. Conclusions Unlike findings from the national health survey, but in line with evidence from other high-income countries, this study finds an inverse patterning of BMI by neighbourhood disadvantage for men, and especially among women. The potential mediators which underpin this gender

  12. Low back pain status in elite and semi-elite Australian football codes: a cross-sectional survey of football (soccer), Australian rules, rugby league, rugby union and non-athletic controls

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry; Daff, Chris; Odell, Andrew; Garbutt, Peter; McHardy, Andrew; Hardy, Kate; Dragasevic, George

    2009-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the effects of football code participation on low back pain (LBP) is limited. It is unclear whether LBP is more prevalent in athletic populations or differs between levels of competition. Thus it was the aim of this study to document and compare the prevalence, intensity, quality and frequency of LBP between elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group. Methods A cross-sectional survey of elite and semi-elite male Australian football code participants and a non-athletic group was performed. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire incorporating the Quadruple Visual Analogue Scale (QVAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (short form) (MPQ-SF), along with additional questions adapted from an Australian epidemiological study. Respondents were 271 elite players (mean age 23.3, range 17–39), 360 semi-elite players (mean age 23.8, range 16–46) and 148 non-athletic controls (mean age 23.9, range 18–39). Results Groups were matched for age (p = 0.42) and experienced the same age of first onset LBP (p = 0.40). A significant linear increase in LBP from the non-athletic group, to the semi-elite and elite groups for the QVAS and the MPQ-SF was evident (p < 0.001). Elite subjects were more likely to experience more frequent (daily or weekly OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.29–2.42) and severe LBP (discomforting and greater OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.29–2.38). Conclusion Foolers in Australia have significantly more severe and frequent LBP than a non-athletic group and this escalates with level of competition. PMID:19371446

  13. What's in a Name? Assessing the Accuracy of Self-identifying as a Professional or Semi-Professional Gambler.

    PubMed

    Hing, Nerilee; Russell, Alex; Blaszczynski, Alex; Gainsbury, Sally M

    2015-12-01

    Growing interest in pursuing a professional gambling career has been accompanied by a rise in individuals self-identifying as professional gamblers. Whether this trend reflects an actual increase in individuals sustaining livelihoods from gambling or inaccurate appropriation of a now glamorized identity is unclear. Adopting a self-image of professional gambler in the absence of ability to earn a sustainable income from the activity may increase risk of problem gambling and deter help-seeking. However, extent of problem gambling in this cohort is uncertain. This study aimed to: (1) determine any differences that might validate the self-reported identity of professional and semi-professional gamblers by investigating characteristics and behaviors that distinguish them from amateur gamblers; and (2) identify characteristics and behaviors that distinguish between self-identified semi-professional/professional gamblers with and without gambling problems. In an online survey of 4,594 Australian gamblers, 1.2% identified as professional gamblers, 6.8% as semi-professional gamblers, and 92.0% as amateur gamblers. Self-identified professional and semi-professional gamblers were distinguished from amateur gamblers by preference for skill-based gambling, higher reported likelihood of winning, and greater use of online gambling and multiple online operators. Two-fifths of professional and three-fifths of semi-professional gamblers scored as moderate risk or problem gamblers, but negative consequences were more likely personal, interpersonal and work/study related, rather than financial. Although results support the general accuracy of self-reported semi/professional gambling status, measures are needed to help semi/professional gamblers distinguish whether their gambling is a problem or profession. PMID:25344662

  14. Career Maturity and Well-Being as Determinants of Occupational Status of Recent School Leavers: A Brief Report of an Australian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter A.; Muller, Juanita

    2002-01-01

    Hypothesized that students who continue full-time study after high school have higher levels of career maturity, psychological well-being, and academic achievement while at school. Surveyed 254 Australian seniors and 132 of these students 9 months after graduation. Found that students who proceeded to full-time further study scored higher in all…

  15. Content Validation of Statements Describing the Essential Work of Australian Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dally, Kerry A.; Dempsey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the procedures used in developing and validating a set of statements for Australian special education teachers. Using the existing AITSL Australian Professional Standards for Teachers at the proficient level as a basis, a set of statements describing the specific skills and knowledge required by Australian educators working…

  16. Words matter: a qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health professionals have an important role to play in the management of obesity, but may be unsure how to raise weight issues with patients. The societal stigma associated with excess weight means that weight status terms may be misunderstood, cause offence and risk upsetting patient-professional relationships. This study investigated the views of people who were overweight or obese on the acceptability of weight status terms and their potential to motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. Methods A qualitative study comprising 34 semi-structured interviews with men and women in their mid-to-late 30s and 50s who were overweight or obese and had recently been informed of their weight status. Thematic framework analysis was conducted to allow the systematic comparison of views by age, gender and apparent motivation to lose weight. Results Although many people favoured 'Overweight' to describe their weight status, there were doubts about its effectiveness to motivate weight loss. Terms including 'BMI' ('Body Mass Index') or referring to the unhealthy nature of their weight were generally considered acceptable and motivational, although a number of men questioned the validity of BMI as an indicator of excess weight. Participants, particularly women, felt that health professionals should avoid using 'Fat'. Whilst response to 'Obese' was largely negative, people recognised that it could be appropriate in a health consultation. Some younger people, particularly those who appeared motivated to lose weight, felt 'Obese' could encourage weight loss, but it was also clear the term could provoke negative emotions if used insensitively. Conclusions Although most people who are overweight or obese accept that it is appropriate for health professionals to discuss weight issues with patients, there is great variation in response to the terms commonly used to describe excess weight. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to discussing weight status: some

  17. Strongyloides stercoralis: Systematic Review of Barriers to Controlling Strongyloidiasis for Australian Indigenous Communities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Adrian; Smith, Michelle L.; Judd, Jenni A.; Speare, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis infects human hosts mainly through skin contact with contaminated soil. The result is strongyloidiasis, a parasitic disease, with a unique cycle of auto-infection causing a variety of symptoms and signs, with possible fatality from hyper-infection. Australian Indigenous community members, often living in rural and remote settings, are exposed to and infected with S. stercoralis. The aim of this review is to determine barriers to control of strongyloidiasis. The purpose is to contribute to the development of initiatives for prevention, early detection and effective treatment of strongyloidiasis. Methodology/Principle Findings Systematic search reviewing research published 2012 and earlier was conducted. Research articles discussing aspects of strongyloidiasis, context of infection and overall health in Indigenous Australians were reviewed. Based on the PRISMA statement, the systematic search of health databases, Academic Search Premier, Informit, Medline, PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and Academic was conducted. Key search terms included strongyloidiasis, Indigenous, Australia, health, and community. 340 articles were retrieved with 16 original research articles published between 1969 and 2006 meeting criteria. Review found barriers to control defined across three key themes, (1) health status, (2) socioeconomic status, and (3) health care literacy and procedures. Conclusions/Significance This study identifies five points of intervention: (1) develop reporting protocols between health care system and communities; (2) test all Indigenous Australian patients, immunocompromised patients and those exposed to areas with S. stercoralis; (3) health professionals require detailed information on strongyloidiasis and potential for exposure to Indigenous Australian people; (4) to establish testing and treatment initiatives within communities; and (5) to measure and report prevalence rates specific to communities and to act

  18. Mapping More than Aboriginal Studies: Pedagogy, Professional Practice and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    As undergraduate curriculum is increasingly required to meet a range of intellectual, professional practice and personal learning outcomes, what purpose does Australian Aboriginal Studies have in curriculum? Most Australian universities are currently in the process of developing institution-wide approaches to Indigenous Australian content in…

  19. Commercial Activities and Copyright in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelly, Marita

    2008-01-01

    With government funding for most Australian universities below 60% and falling a major strategic emphasis for universities has been on securing other sources of operating revenue, including commercial opportunities and partnerships. The implication of increasing commercial activities such as non-award and tailored professional programmes, contract…

  20. Shifts in media images of women appearance and social status from 1960 to 2010: A content analysis of beauty advertisements in two Australian magazines.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ann; Knight, Tess

    2015-12-01

    Ageing well and successful ageing have become important themes to describe how older individuals should keep ageing at bay. Products and services aimed at controlling ageing have become associated with ageing well. In this study we aimed to analyse the representation of older women in advertisements specific to appearance and ageing. In particular, we sought to explore how ageing for women was presented in the media over a period 50 years and when advertisements began to use the term 'anti-ageing'. A content analysis of 710 advertisements from two prominent Australian women's magazines, from 1960 to 2010, was conducted. Analyses showed that advertisements provided a narrow range of images representing women's physical appearance. The underlying messages were that ageing is problematic and that it had become unforgivable to show any signs of ageing. Text contained in advertisements for beauty products from the two chosen Australian magazines often gave specific and prescriptive advice to women on ways to avoid losing their youthful appearance. It was concluded that media relay powerful messages to spread and modify cultural beliefs informing individuals of a range of options that propose liberation from the problem of ageing. PMID:26568217

  1. Ivermectin treatment of free-ranging endangered Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) pups: effect on hookworm and lice infection status, haematological parameters, growth, and survival.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alan D; Higgins, Damien P; Gray, Rachael

    2015-07-01

    A placebo-controlled study was used to investigate the effectiveness of ivermectin to treat hookworm (Uncinaria sanguinis) and lice (Antarctophthirus microchir) infections in free-ranging Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) pups and to test the hypotheses that these parasitic infections cause anaemia, systemic inflammatory responses, and reduced growth, and contribute towards decreased pup survival. Ivermectin was identified as an effective and safe anthelmintic in this species. Pups administered ivermectin had significantly higher erythrocyte counts and significantly lower eosinophil counts compared to controls at 1-2 months post-treatment, confirming that U. sanguinis and/or A. microchir are causatively associated with disease and demonstrating the positive effect of ivermectin treatment on clinical health parameters. Higher growth rates were not seen in ivermectin-treated pups and, unexpectedly, relatively older pups treated with ivermectin demonstrated significantly reduced growth rates when compared to matched saline-control pups. Differences in survival were not identified between treatment groups; however, this was attributed to the unexpectedly low mortality rate of recruited pups, likely due to the unintended recruitment bias towards pups >1-2 months of age for which mortality due to hookworm infection is less likely. This finding highlights the logistical and practical challenges associated with treating pups of this species shortly after birth at a remote colony. This study informs the assessment of the use of anthelmintics as a tool for the conservation management of free-ranging wildlife and outlines essential steps to further the development of strategies to ensure the effective conservation of the Australian sea lion and its parasitic fauna. PMID:25911163

  2. Faculty Status for Library Professionals: Its Effect on Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among University Research Library Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the relationships between job turnover, job satisfaction, and faculty status of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) university library directors. Finds a positive relationship between job satisfaction and faculty status; and job satisfaction and staff release time to pursue scholarly endeavors; and a negative relationship between…

  3. [Influence of Professional Contact with Plutonium-239 on Indicators of the Immune Status of the Personnel at Siberian Chemical Plant].

    PubMed

    Oradovskaya, I V; Radzivil, T T

    2015-01-01

    The results of the examination and monitoring of the personnel at the Siberian Chemical Plant (SChP) and adult population of Seversk are presented. The results of primary examination of the personnel who professionally contact the ionizing radiation (IR) from external sources and incorporated 239Pu showed that clinical symptoms of dysfunction of the immune system manifested themselves with a frequency of 75.30%. Infectious-inflammatory diseases (46.95%) and the combined pathology of infectious and allergic character (20.12%) were the most widespread. The allergic diseases (AD) without manifestations of an infectious component were observed not often (7.62%). The monitoring which was carried out for 10 years revealed a decrease in a percentage of persons with clinical signs of disorders of the immune system up to 60.68% among the personnel at the Chemical-Steel Plant and even more among the whole group of the studied personnel at SChP--49.68% (389 : 783). Among the population their frequency made up 51.78%. Features of clinical manifestations of dysfunction ofthe immune system depending on accumulation of 239Pu in the organism are established. Similar dynamics of infectious and infectious and allergic syndromes is revealed when the activity of 239Pu is 40 nCi. AD frequency reliably increased .when the activity of 239Pu is 20 nCi, but if accumulation is higher than 20-40 nCi it decreases and again increases when the activity is over 40 nCi. Pathologies of infectious and allergic genesis are most often observed when the content of 239Pu in an organism is over 40 nCi. Indicators of the immune status (IS) of the personnel at SChP with incorporated 239Pu are analyzed. 59 people--carriers of 239Pu and 408 people without 239Pu accumulated in an organism are examined. In comparison with the control, IS indicators characteristic for all dose loading groups are revealed: increase of lymphocytes, existence of dissociation in indicators of relative and absolute values of the T

  4. Professionalism in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  5. Professional Learning in the Learning Profession: A Status Report on Teacher Development in the United States and Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Wei, Ruth Chung; Andree, Alethea; Richardson, Nikole; Orphanos, Stelios

    2009-01-01

    Improving professional learning for educators is a crucial step in transforming schools and improving academic achievement. To meet federal requirements and public expectations for school and student performance, the nation needs to bolster teacher skills and knowledge to ensure that every teacher is able to teach increasingly diverse learners,…

  6. Australian Apprentice & Trainee Statistics: Electrical and Electronics Trades, 1995 to 1999. Australian Vocational Education & Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    Statistics regarding Australians participating in apprenticeships and traineeships in the electrical and electronics trades in 1995-1999 were reviewed to provide an indication of where skill shortages may be occurring or will likely occur in relation to the following occupations: electrical engineering associate professional; electronics…

  7. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  8. The Status of Archivists in Relation to Other Information Professionals in the Public Service in Africa: A RAMP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Orleans, Jacques

    Prepared under contract with the International Council on Archives, this study is intended to promote the development of the archival and records management professions in Africa by providing basic data on their status in relation to other information professions in the public service, particularly librarians and documentalists. It addresses the…

  9. Living with aphasia: three Indigenous Australian stories.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Hersh, Deborah; Hayward, Colleen; Fraser, Joan; Brown, Melita

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disorders and stroke in Australian Aboriginal communities is more than twice as high as non-Indigenous Australians. Approximately 30% of people who survive stroke are left with some level of aphasia, and yet Indigenous Australians appear to be infrequent users of speech-language pathology services, and there is virtually no research literature about the experiences of aphasia for this group of people. This paper presents the stories of living with aphasia for three Indigenous Australian men living in Perth, Western Australia. Their narratives were collected by an Indigenous researcher through in-depth, supported interviews, and were explored using both within-case and cross-case analyses for common and recurring themes. It is argued that there is value for speech-language pathologists, and other health professionals, to be aware of the broad experiences of living with aphasia for Indigenous Australians because their stories are rarely heard and because, as with people with aphasia generally, they are at risk of social isolation and tend to lack visibility in the community. This study explores the key issues which emerge for these three men and highlights the need for further research in this area. PMID:22472033

  10. Nutritional Status and Daytime Pattern of Protein Intake on Match, Post-Match, Rest and Training Days in Senior Professional and Youth Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Bettonviel A, E O; Brinkmans N, Y J; Russcher, Kris; Wardenaar, Floris C; Witard, Oliver C

    2016-06-01

    The nutritional status of elite soccer players across match, postmatch, training and rest days has not been defined. Recent evidence suggests the pattern of dietary protein intake impacts the daytime turnover of muscle proteins and, as such, influences muscle recovery. We assessed the nutritional status and daytime pattern of protein intake in senior professional and elite youth soccer players and compared findings against published recommendations. Fourteen senior professional (SP) and 15 youth elite (YP) soccer players from the Dutch premier division completed nutritional assessments using a 24-hr web-based recall method. Recall days consisted of a match, postmatch, rest, and training day. Daily energy intake over the 4-day period was similar between SP (2988 ± 583 kcal/day) and YP (2938 ± 465 kcal/day; p = .800). Carbohydrate intake over the combined 4-day period was lower in SP (4.7 ± 0.7 g·kg-1 BM·day-1) vs. YP (6.0 ± 1.5 g·kg-1 BM·day-1, p = .006) and SP failed to meet recommended carbohydrate intakes on match and training days. Conversely, recommended protein intakes were met for SP (1.9 ± 0.3 g·kg-1 BM·day-1) and YP (1.7 ± 0.4 g·kg-1 BM·day-1), with no differences between groups (p = .286). Accordingly, both groups met or exceeded recommended daily protein intakes on individual match, postmatch, rest and training days. A similar "balanced" daytime pattern of protein intake was observed in SP and YP. To conclude, SP increased protein intake on match and training days to a greater extent than YP, however at the expense of carbohydrate intake. The daytime distribution of protein intake for YP and SP aligned with current recommendations of a balanced protein meal pattern. PMID:26630203

  11. Associations between Food Environment around Schools and Professionally Measured Weight Status for Middle and High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuyang; Abbott, Joshua K.; Aggarwal, Rimjhim; Tulloch, David L.; Lloyd, Kristen; Yedidia, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obesity rates among school-age children remain high. Access to energy-dense foods at home, in schools, in stores, and restaurants around homes and schools is of concern. Research on the relationship between food environment around schools and students' weight status is inconclusive. This study examines the association between weight status of middle and high school students and proximity to a comprehensive set of food outlets around schools. Methods: Deidentified nurse-measured heights and weights data were obtained for 12,954 middle and high school students attending 33 public schools in four low-income communities in New Jersey. Geocoded locations of supermarkets, convenience stores, small grocery stores, and limited-service restaurants were obtained from commercial sources. Random-effect regression models with robust standard errors were developed to adjust for unequal variances across schools and clustering of students within schools. Results: Proximity to small grocery stores that offered some healthy options (e.g., five fruits, five vegetables, and low-fat/skim milk) and supermarkets was associated with healthier student weight status. Having a small grocery store within 0.25 mile of school and an additional such store within that radius was associated with a lower BMI z-score (p<0.05). An additional supermarket within 0.25 mile of schools was associated with a lower probability of being overweight/obese (p<0.05). Conclusions: Improving access to healthy food outlets, such as small stores, that offer healthy food options and supermarkets around middle and high schools is a potential strategy for improving weight outcomes among students. PMID:25343730

  12. Against Short Term Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Anne

    2011-01-01

    A three-year study was conducted involving teacher interviews and observation in one high school in NSW. Initially the contact between teacher and researcher came from an Australian Government Quality Teaching Program that provided 12-month funding to support teachers in professional learning. The role of the academic partner was to facilitate…

  13. Mentoring: Immigrant Teachers Bridging Professional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeler, Eleanor; Jane, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    New teachers who enter Australian educational systems must acquire suitable knowledge that enables them to function effectively as a teacher in this country. For immigrant professionals new to the system mere transfer of knowledge does not suffice and does not satisfy their professional perception of self. Teachers who are born and trained…

  14. Professional Staff Carve out a New Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 paper, "The invisible workers" by Szekeres, lamented the "invisibility" of professional staff in Australian higher education. Even then, professional staff constituted more than half the university workforce, but they were defined by what they were not (non-academic) and they experienced a high level of frustration in their relationships…

  15. Non-Standard Assessment Practices in the Evaluation of Communication in Australian Aboriginal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal children typically receive communication assessment services from Standard Australian English (SAE) speaking non-Aboriginal speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Educational assessments, including intelligence testing, are also primarily conducted by non-Aboriginal educational professionals. While the current paper will show…

  16. Professionalism. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Stephanie; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Presents four articles about professionalism in early childhood education: "Early Childhood Education as an Emerging Profession: Ongoing Conversations" (Stephanie Feeney and Nancy Freeman); "Voices in Search of Cultural Continuity in Communities" (Marion Cowee and others); "Early Childhood Professionals: Current Status and Projected Needs" (Ann…

  17. Toward Greater Teacher Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses organizational strength, teacher strikes, collective bargaining and negotiations, and political action as forms of teacher militancy that are linked with increasing professionalism. Concludes that teachers have been able to improve their professional status in recent years largely because of growing activism. (Author/GC)

  18. The role of financial hardship, mastery and social support in the association between employment status and depression: results from an Australian longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Laura; Butterworth, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is robust epidemiological and clinical evidence of the harmful effects of unemployment on psychological well-being, but the mechanisms through which this occurs is still strongly debated. In addition, there is even less evidence on the impact of underemployment on mental health. Using longitudinal data collected from a cohort of 20–24 years old, the present study examines a range of employed states and investigates the role of mastery, financial hardship and social support in the relationship between labour status and depression. Method Responses were from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Project: A representative, community-based survey conducted in Canberra and Queanbeyan (NSW) in Australia, where respondents (n=2404) in their early twenties were followed for 8 years. Depression was measured using the self-report Goldberg Depression Scale, with the likely presence of depression being indicated by scores 7 or greater. Results The analyses identified unemployment and underemployment as significant predictors of depression, compared to their employed counterparts. Both unemployment and underemployment remained significantly correlated with depression even after accounting for sociodemographic, economic and psychological variables. Social support, financial hardship and a sense of personal control (mastery) all emerged as important mediators between unemployment and depression. Conclusions Both unemployment and underemployment were associated with increased risk of depression. The strength of this relationship was attenuated but remained significant after accounting for key variables (mastery, financial hardship and social support), and extensive sociodemographic and health covariates, indicating that no or inade­quate employment contributes to poorer mental health over and above these factors. PMID:27235296

  19. Use of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improves nutritional status but not bone mass or turnover, in a group of Australian aged care residents.

    PubMed

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A

    2009-07-01

    In residential care, inadequate calcium and folate intakes and low serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are common. We assessed whether daily provision of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improved nutritional status (serum micronutrients), bone quality (heel ultrasound), bone turnover markers (parathyroid hormone, C-terminal collagen I telopeptide, terminal propeptide of type I procollagen), and/or muscle strength and mobility in a group of Australian aged care residents. One hundred and seven residents completed the study (mean (SD) age: 79.9 (10.1) years; body weight: 68.4 (15.4) kg). The median (inter-quartile range) volume of fortified milk consumed was 160 (149) ml/day. At the end of the study, the median daily vitamin D intake increased to 10.4 (8.7) μg (P < .001), which is 70% of the adequate intake (15 μg); and calcium density (mg/MJ) was higher over the study period compared with baseline (161 ± 5 mg/MJ vs. 142 ± 4 mg/MJ, P < .001). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased by 23 ± 2 nmol/L (83 (107)%, P < .001), yet remained in the insufficient range (mean 45 ± 2 nmol/L). Consumption of greater than the median intake of milk (160 ml/day) (n = 54, 50%) increased serum 25(OH)D levels into the adequate range (53 ± 2 nmol/L) and reduced serum parathyroid hormone by 24% (P = .045). There was no effect on bone quality, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, or mobility. Consumption of fortified milk increased dietary vitamin D intake and raised serum 25(OH)D concentrations, but not to the level thought to reduce fracture risk. If calcium-fortified milk also was used in cooking and milk drinks, this approach could allow residents to achieve a dietary calcium intake close to recommended levels. A vitamin D supplement would be recommended to ensure adequate vitamin D status for all residents. PMID:21184368

  20. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice. PMID:23330773

  1. Impact of patients' professional and educational status on perception of an antibiotic policy campaign: a pilot study at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Athanasia, Sofia; Plachouras, Diamantis; Kanellaki, Stavroula; Bobota, Fani; Tzepetzi, Georgia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are overused in many European countries, particularly Greece, leading to emerging antimicrobial resistance with sustained high mortality among hospitalised patients. Limited data are available regarding factors influencing people's knowledge and the impact of public campaigns on antibiotic misuse. Patients' beliefs regarding antibiotics were investigated in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Athens, Greece. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted to examine patients' opinions on antibiotic use in the waiting room of the outpatient clinic. All participants read an illustrated pocket-sized leaflet endorsed by official authorities on the European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD). Volunteers then completed a questionnaire containing information on demographics, knowledge on antibiotic use and overuse, and remarks on the quality of the leaflet's content. In a logistic regression analysis including age, sex, educational level and professional status of 605 eligible participants, women were more aware [odds ratio (OR)=3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-5.8; P<0.0001] and people with elementary education were less aware (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.1-0.9; P=0.04) of antimicrobial misuse. Workers were also more aware than retired or unemployed people (P=0.007). However, only 16.0% of participants knew about the EAAD. All participants agreed on antibiotic misuse in Greece, mentioning patient accountability as the main cause (26.8%), an opinion more pronounced in highly educated individuals. In conclusion, targeted interventions taking into account variations in educational level and employee status should be considered in future scheduled educative campaigns on antibiotic overconsumption in highly prescribing antibiotic countries. PMID:27530854

  2. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Duursma, Daisy E.; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K.; Weston, Michael A.; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M.; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Franklin, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically with new data for existing fields and the addition of new fields. The dataset has already had, and will continue to have applications in Australian and international ornithology, especially those that require standard information for a large number of taxa. PMID:26594379

  3. Examining Education Qualifications for Australian Vocational Education Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kim Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the practice of professional development within the vocational education and training (VET) arena. The study objective was to explore appropriate education qualifications for Australian VET practitioners in the tourism and hospitality sector required for effective teaching practice. The study was conducted utilising…

  4. Teaching Professionalism: Passing the Torch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, William A.; Dickey, Nancy W.

    1998-01-01

    Medical faculty must ensure that students understand the appropriate balance between financial and professional considerations. Faculty should place financial considerations in proper perspective and should teach the basic components of professionalism, how current cost-containment efforts may threaten medicine's professional status, appropriate…

  5. Injury profile of amateur Australian rules footballers.

    PubMed

    Shawdon, A; Brukner, P

    1994-01-01

    Australian Rules Football is played by numerous young Australians throughout winter each year. There have been a number of studies on professional and semi-professional footballers, establishing the nature and frequency of injuries within this football code. Medical cover of an amateur football club over the 1993 season allowed detailed recording of injuries over this period. The data collected revealed a markedly different injury profile to that seen previously. The injury rate in this study was 96 per 1000 player hours. The most common injury was concussion (15%), with hand fractures next most frequent (13.5%). The lower limb was the most common site of injury, with head and neck second and upper limb third. Injuries with an overuse component were seen less commonly in the amateur group while traumatic injuries were more frequent. The time allocated by amateur footballers to their sport is less than professional players, quite aside from the difference in skill level attained. Overuse injuries may be correspondingly much less frequent on a time basis alone. The increased incidence of traumatic injuries is postulated to be a manifestation of both less well developed skills and possibly less available and effective preventative measures such as ankle strapping and tape supplies. Considering the large number of young people playing amateur football and the significant time and cost of what are often relatively minor injuries, more work is required to establish what injuries are most common, and importantly, what measures can be taken to decrease their incidence. PMID:8665278

  6. Biochemical assessments of retinol, alpha-tocopherol, pyridoxal--5-phosphate oxidative stress index and total antioxidant status in adolescent professional basketball players and sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Necat; Erel, Ozcan; Hazer, Muhsin; Bağci, Cahit; Namiduru, Emine; Gül, Ece

    2007-01-01

    Physical training is known to increase the antioxidant defence system and reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, intense physical aerobic and anaerobic training with competition, such as those imposed on young professional basketball players can induce an increase of oxidative stress, which can be implicated with overtraining. The aim of this study was to test the effect of training and competition load on oxidative stress, antioxidant status, and vitamin levels in basketball players. Oxidative Stres Index (OSI 1), Total Peroxide (TPx) antioxidant (vitamin E, A and The total antioxidant status (TAC 1)), biochemical lipid parameters, as well as training results were measured. Results showed that all plasma vitamin levels were significantly higher in basketball players (vitamin A: 1.61 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, vitamin E: 26.45 +/- 0.72 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 10.58 +/- 0.7 mgr/l) than sedentary controls (vitamin A: 1.22 +/- 0.04 mmol /l, vitamin E: 19.24 +/- 0.73 mmol/l, vitamin B6: 6.0 +/- 0.35 mgr/l) (p < 0.01). In addition TAC 1 was 2.06 +/- 0.02 and 1.89 +/- 0.01 mmol Trolox eq/L in basketball players and controls, respectively (p < 0.01). Conversely OSI was 0.89 +/- 0.09 arbitrary unit and 0.88 +/- 0.071 arbitrary unit in basketball players and controls, respectively (p > 0.05). However, total plasma peroxide level (TPx) of basketball players and controls was not statistically different (18.55 +/- 2.07 and 17.18 +/- 1.61 micromol H2O2/L, respectively; p > 0.05). We conclude that physical exercise increase antioxidant levels and cause balance of the homeostasis. Training can not have positive or negative effects on oxidative stress depending on training load. The results suggested that oxidative stress and antioxidant measurement are significant in the biological follow-up of young basketball players. PMID:17593769

  7. Scleroderma in Australian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, J; Beroukas, D; Walker, J G; Smith, M D; Ahern, M J; Roberts-Thomson, P J

    2005-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) has not been reported before in Australian Aborigines. We describe in detail a community middle-aged Aboriginal woman whose diffuse scleroderma terminated fatally with a renal crisis. Moreover, we have identified a further five Aboriginal patients on the South Australian Scleroderma Register (two with diffuse, two with limited and one with overlap scleroderma), a number consistent with that expected from the 2001 census data for our state. However, an analysis of all antinuclear antibody (ANA) requests from the Top End of Australia over a 6-year period revealed only two Aborigines with low titre anticentromere antibody (despite frequent occurrence of ANA with other specificities). Neither of these Aborigines had features of scleroderma. In conclusion, scleroderma does occur in indigenous Australians but further studies are needed to confirm the apparent infrequency of centromere-associated limited scleroderma (which is the commonest form of scleroderma in our Caucasian population). PMID:15667472

  8. Student Engagement with School: Individual and School-Level Influences. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullarton, Sue

    The engagement of young Australians with school and individual and school-level influences on student engagement (defined as participation in extracurricular activities) were examined by analyzing data from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Being female, being from a higher socioeconomic background, and having professional parents were…

  9. Australian Rural Accountants' Views on How Locally Provided CPD Compares with City-Based Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses Australian rural accountants' attitudes and levels of satisfaction with continuing professional development (CPD), based on whether the CPD was delivered by a professional accounting body in a rural or metropolitan area. The paper responds to prior research that finds rural accountants are dissatisfied with professional…

  10. Employment of Professionals under NAFTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabetsos, Andrew P.

    1995-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides Canadian and Mexican professionals with an option not available to citizens of other countries: Trade NAFTA, or "TN" status, which provides authorization for business persons. Discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of this status with that of the more conventional H-1B status.…

  11. Bridging and bonding interactions in higher education: social capital and students’ academic and professional identity formation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dorthe H.; Jetten, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that graduates’ achievements depend in important ways on their opportunities to develop an academic and a professional identity during their studies. Previous research has shown that students’ socio-economic status (SES) and social capital prior to entering university affects their ability to obtain these identities in higher education. However, what is less well understood is whether social capital that is built during university studies shapes identity development, and if so, whether the social capital gained during university years impacts on academic and professional identity differently. In a qualitative study, we interviewed 26 Danish and 11 Australian university students about their social interaction experiences, their opportunities to develop bonding capital as well as bridging capital, and their academic and professional identity. Findings show that while bonding social capital with co-students facilitated academic identity formation, such social capital does not lead to professional identity development. We also found that the development of bridging social capital with educators facilitated students’ professional identity formation. However, bonding social capital among students stood in the way of participating in bridging interaction with educators, thereby further hindering professional identity formation. Finally, while students’ parental background did not affect the perceived difficulty of forming professional identity, there was a tendency for students from lower SES backgrounds to be more likely to make internal attributions while those from higher SES backgrounds were more likely to make external attributions for the failure to develop professional identity. Results point to the importance of creating opportunities for social interaction with educators at university because this facilitates the generation of bridging social capital, which, in turn, is essential for students’ professional identity

  12. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  13. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  14. Fraud and Australian Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Brian

    1989-01-01

    A series of highly publicized cases of alleged fraud in the Australian academic community are described. Each case reveals an apparent failure of peer review. The right to pursue investigations and make comments that may offend powerful figures within the scholarly community is precarious. (MLW)

  15. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  16. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes about the…

  17. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants of Apprentice Training by Small and…

  18. GLBTIQ Teachers in Australian Education Policy: Protections, Suspicions, and Restrictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany; Gray, Emily; Harris, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of human rights on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status by the United Nations has led to the development of new policies concerning homophobia and transphobia in educational contexts. This paper examines new Australian education policies impacting gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer…

  19. Team-building through sailing: effects on health status, job satisfaction and work performance of health care professionals involved in organ and tissue donation.

    PubMed

    Ponzin, Diego; Fasolo, Adriano; Vidale, Enrico; Pozzi, Annalaura; Bottignolo, Elisa; Calabrò, Francesco; Rupolo, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a team-building learning project on job satisfaction, psychological wellbeing, and performance of health care workers involved in the process of organ and tissue donation. The project was conducted between June and September 2011 and consisted of two one-day meetings and a one week sailing, involving 20 staff members. GHQ-12, MBI-HSS, and 25 items taken from the Multidimensional Organizational Health Questionnaire (MOHQ) were used to assess health status, burnout, and job satisfaction. Results of the descriptive analyses were expressed as mean ± SD and as counts and percentages; Chi-square test was used to evaluate statistical significance of differences before and after the initiative. 6 (30,0%) participants showed the likelihood to suffering from anxiety and depression (i.e. recognized as 'cases' by the GHQ-12), 3 (15.0%) of them at baseline and 3 (15.0%), different from the previous ones, in the post-intervention. The presence of stress was revealed in 9 (45.0%) and 12 subjects (60.0%) before and after the experience, respectively (6 subjects showed the presence of stress in both circumstances). We documented 4 burnout cases, 3 (15.0%) at baseline and 1 (5.0%) after the experience. Nevertheless, about 80% of the participants showed a high degree ofjob satisfaction, in terms of positive influence of job in the professional satisfaction and of clear satisfaction for the organization, during both evaluation. In respect to 2010, the number of organ donors and that of ocular tissue donors improved of about 16% and 10%, respectively, during the year of the project and in the following year (mean value). We recognize that our team-building project for personnel involved in the stressful and demanding setting of organ and tissue donation, worthwhile and recompensing at the same time, possibly influenced the personal commitment and the quality of job provided. The high level of stress showed by participants should be

  20. Lesson Study for Professional Development and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that "lesson study" may be adapted from its primary use as a professional development strategy for use as a research strategy, especially to identify principles of good lesson design. We report on a project undertaken in two Australian secondary schools where lesson study research was used to investigate the design of…

  1. Designing CBE for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Keith

    Deakin Australia (DA) CBE (Continuing Business Education) programs are designed for use in conjunction with print and audio materials which are distributed as distance learning packages to business studies graduates working or planning to work as accountants, who are enrolled in the professional licensing program run by the Australian Society of…

  2. USGS analysis of the Australian UNCLOS submission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Rowland, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    features of the US margins. The Australian margin has significant geological and morphological variety, similar to the US margin and gives a good idea of the complexity of issues related to the U.S. margin. Decisions about basins and ridges in the Lord Howe Rise and Three Kings Ridge regions will likely bear on the status of ridges in the Arctic, such as Lomonosov Ridge. The Naturaliste Plateau and the South Tasman Rise appear to have parallels with the Chukchi Plateau in the Arctic and the Blake Plateau off the southeastern U.S. The ECS on Macquarie Island/Ridge may determine how boundaries along ridges such as the Mariannas are treated.

  3. Being Professional? Conceptualising Early Years Professionalism in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to the discussion on early years professionalism and reports findings from a qualitative research project that tracked a small number of early years professionals who were among the first in England to acquire this new status early in 2007. Drawing on interview data, the paper highlights shortfalls in perspectives…

  4. The Chimera of Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bonnie R.

    1980-01-01

    Much of what passes for professionalism is self-serving elitism and not relevant to librarianship. Librarians, most of whom are women, should continue to improve service to the public and strive by pragmatic means to overcome low pay and status. (RAA)

  5. Professional Ethics in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin

    Major problems and issues of ethics in elementary, secondary, and higher education are examined. The function and present status of professional ethics are considered, along with specific codes of ethics, including those of the National Education Association, American Association of University Professors, and the American Association of School…

  6. Review of Australian Higher Education: An Australian Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is one of the key foundations that economic prosperity is founded upon. Government policies, funding and strategic planning require a fine balance to stimulate growth, prosperity health and well-being. The key Australian government policies influenced by a Review of Australian Higher Education report include attracting many more…

  7. Professional development for teaching in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Leigh N.; Vu, Tori; Bower, Matt; Brown, Natalie; Skalicky, Jane; Donovan, Diane; Loch, Birgit; Joshi, Nalini; Bloom, Walter

    2011-10-01

    Due to the changing nature of learning and teaching in universities, there is a growing need for professional development for lecturers and tutors teaching in disciplines in the mathematical sciences. Mathematics teaching staff receive some training in learning and teaching but many of the courses running at university level are not tailored to the mathematical sciences. This article reports on a collaborative research project aimed at investigating the type of professional development that Australian tertiary mathematics teachers need and their preference for delivery modes. Effective teaching promotes effective learning in our students and discipline-specific professional development will enhance outcomes for teachers, students, and mathematics.

  8. Through a Freirean Lens: Professional Learning, Faith-Based Schooling and Liberatory Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John Trevitt; Armstrong, Ann Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on a broader qualitative study of professional learning in schools of the Peoples of the Book (Christians, Jews and Muslims) in post-colonial Australia, addressing the role that the growing number of Australian faith-based schools play in shaping a just and inclusive Australian society. By reviewing material in the public domain,…

  9. Australian University International Student Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2009-01-01

    The omission of international students from the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that Australians perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study partially…

  10. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  11. The Nature and Status of STEM Professional Development: Effective Practices for Secondary Level Engineering Education. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.; Daugherty, Jenny L.

    2009-01-01

    Recently engineering has emerged on the K-12 scene as a potentially important content area. However, K-12 teachers typically lack sufficient backgrounds to effectively integrate engineering into their classrooms. Thus teacher professional development is of critical importance. Although there have been several initiatives emerge to assist teachers…

  12. "The Sacred Spark of Wonder": Local Museums, Australian Curriculum History, and Pre-Service Primary Teacher Education: A Tasmanian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the intersections between museum learning in a distinctive Tasmanian setting, the possibilities of a new national History curriculum, and the evolving views and professional practices of pre-service primary teachers at one Australian university. Following a brief overview of the framework for local and Australian history that…

  13. Sexuality and Australian law.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The author describes the changing legal environment concerning same-sex relationships in the common law world with special reference to Australia. He refers to shifts in public opinion recorded in opinion polls; important decisions of human rights courts and tribunals; and changes in national law and court decisions. He then reviews the Australian constitutional setting which divides lawmaking responsibility on such subjects between the federal, State and Territory legislatures. He describes initiatives adopted in the States and Territories and the more modest changes effected in federal law and practice. He concludes on a note of optimism concerning Australia's future reforms affecting discrimination on the grounds of sexuality. PMID:15814500

  14. The responsibilities and rights of dental professionals 2. Professional responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2006-06-01

    Although dentists have well recognised legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, the definition of their role and the corresponding responsibilities broaden further as the profession evolves, the demands from dentistry increase and the context of professionalism changes. Thus, continuous evaluation of the role and responsibilities of dentists is vital for provision of quality care, improvement of professional standards and maintaining professional status. In addition, efforts must be made to uphold the credibility of the profession and the associated public trust as well as meeting the increasing expectations from the profession and individual dentists. PMID:16826884

  15. The Relationship between Career Variables and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations for Australian High School Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study surveyed 925 Australian high school students enrolled in grades 8 through 12 on measures of occupational aspirations, occupational expectations, career status aspirations, and career status expectations; it tested the association between these variables and career maturity, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy, and…

  16. What Do We Really Know about the Outcomes of Australian International Education? A Critical Review and Prospectus for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Denise; Smith, Wendy; Boey, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Australia has been a significant provider of international education in the Asia-Pacific region since 1950 with the inception of the Colombo Plan. Thus, graduates from these early days would by now be mature professionals in a variety of fields, with several decades of professional and academic attainment enabled by their Australian education. Yet…

  17. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  18. The Professional Component in Selected Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David C.; Street, Sue

    1980-01-01

    Compares the time teachers, pharmacists, civil engineers, and lawyers spend in professional preparation programs. Argues that the time spent on professional preparation of teachers should be expanded and that those programs should be of sufficient quality to achieve genuine professional status for teachers. (IRT)

  19. Fully Professionalised Teacher Education: An Australian Study in Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovat, Terry; McLeod, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The article proposes that the proper status for teacher education, both historically and in terms of its research-demonstrated importance, is one of full professionalism alongside other professional training regimes in universities. It proposes furthermore that the many reviews and reports of the past quarter-century have been attempting to move…

  20. Improved professionalism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The availability of good technology does not automatically produce profit (or comparable goals). The necessary bridge between the two is how professionally the technology is used. Many people believe that the general level of professionalism must be elevated if we are to improve the health of the petroleum industry. The petroleum industry is not unique in this regard. This paper discusses professionalism issues from current and historical perspectives, then proposes concrete actions for industry, educators, and SPE to consider.

  1. Evaluating the Australian Traineeship System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Australian Traineeship System (ATS), a program integrating formal education and employment designed to increase options for dropouts. Discusses problems involving the centrality of ATS's educational component and implementation of a program evaluation strategy. Includes two references. (MLH)

  2. The h-index in Australian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2011-06-01

    The Hirsch h-index is now widely used as a metric to compare individual researchers. To evaluate it in the context of Australian astronomy, the h-index for every member of the Astronomical Society of Australia (ASA) is found using NASA's Astrophysics Data System Bibliographic Services. Percentiles of the h-index distribution are detailed for a variety of categories of ASA members, including students. This enables a list of the top ten Australian researchers by h-index to be produced. These top researchers have h-index values in the range 53status. To attempt to specify the h-index distribution relative to opportunity, we also detail the percentiles of its distribution by years since Ph.D. award date. This shows a steady increase in h-index with seniority, as can be expected.

  3. What's in a Word? Australian Experts' Knowledge, Views and Experiences Using the Term Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serry, Tanya Anne; Hammond, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Australian learning difficulties specialists' knowledge about, and the use of, the term dyslexia. An online survey was constructed based on a current definition of, and evidence about, dyslexia and distributed to members of relevant professional associations. A total of 179 participants responded to the…

  4. Shaping a Culture: Oral Histories of Academic Development in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alison; Manathunga, Catherine; Kandlbinder, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Academic development has had an approximately forty-year history within Australian higher education, paralleling the major expansions and changes in the sector, both nationally and internationally. Its principal concerns have been the improvement of teaching and the professional development of the academics who teach. The history of academic…

  5. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  6. Examining the Lived Experience of Bullying: A Review of the Literature from an Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Donna Mathewson; Borg, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Bullying in schools is a significant and continuing issue in education. This is despite widespread attention within the professional education community and beyond, into the wider public arena. In this paper, we review the existing literature on bullying in schools, with a particular focus on the Australian secondary school context, to develop a…

  7. Development and Trialling of a Graduated Descriptors Tool for Australian Pharmacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupans, Ieva; Owen, Susanne; McKauge, Leigh; Pont, Lisa; Ryan, Greg; Woulfe, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Profession-derived competency standards are key determinants for curriculum and assessment in many professional university programmes. An Australian Learning and Teaching Council funded project used a participatory action research approach to enable the collaborative development of a graduated (or incremental) descriptors tool related to…

  8. Mentoring Australian Emerging Researchers in Aging: Evaluation of a Pilot Mentoring Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henwood, Tim; Bartlett, Helen; Carroll, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Australian emerging researchers in aging identified the need for greater professional development and networking opportunities. To address this, a formal mentorship scheme was developed and evaluated. Fourteen postgraduate researchers (proteges) were matched by discipline and research interest to experienced academics (mentors).…

  9. Australian Nurses' Perception of the Impact of Their Postgraduate Studies on Their Patient Care Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Dianne; Donoghue, Judith; Duffield, Christine

    2003-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 403 Australian nurses who undertook postgraduate studies received 236 responses. Respondents indicated that postgraduate education had an impact on a number of professional behaviors but little or no effect on others, such as autonomy, time management, use of computers, and communication with patients. (Contains 25…

  10. Developing Mathematical Proficiency in the Australian Context: Implications for Students with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, David

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of mathematics in Australian schools has received considerable attention over the past decade. States and territories have designed and implemented new mathematics syllabi, and education sectors have supported teachers through sustained professional learning initiatives. Whereas the major focus of these initiatives has been on…

  11. Employees' Perceptions of Email Communication, Volume and Management Strategies in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignata, Silvia; Lushington, Kurt; Sloan, Jeremy; Buchanan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Despite email playing a central role in university business, little is known about the strategies used by staff to manage email and the factors contributing to email overload. In a mixed method study undertaken in one Australian university comparing academic (n = 193) and professional (n = 278) staff, we found that while email volume was higher in…

  12. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  13. Capping Them Off! Exploring and Explaining the Patterns in Undergraduate Capstone Subjects in Australian Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Acker, Liz; Bailey, Janis; Wilson, Keithia; French, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Universities are increasingly offering capstone subjects as part of curricula to prepare final-year undergraduates for employment through consolidating and integrating their knowledge and skills while bridging the gap between academic learning and professional work. This study investigates capstone subjects offered by Australian business schools,…

  14. From Surveillance to Formation? A Generative Approach to Teacher "Performance and Development" in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities and limitations of the AITSL Performance and Development Framework (Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership, 2012b) as a vehicle for authentic teacher professional learning. It suggests that the Framework offers a range of implementation possibilities, from surveillance of teaching practice at…

  15. Australian helminths in Australian rodents: an issue of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Warner, L R

    1998-06-01

    The Australian public as well as Australian funding bodies are generally unsympathetic to native murids, rats and mice, in spite of the fact that 36% have either become extinct or critically endangered since European settlement. The endemic Australian parasites of these rats and mice have been even less sympathetically regarded. Prior to 1958 very little work was carried out on the helminths of Australian rodents and little more is known today. Records are known from only 28% of the extant host species, comprising some 109 species of helminth identified at least to generic level. The rodents invaded Australia from the north, perhaps through New Guinea in at least two separate waves, 5-8 then about 1 million years ago. The parasites they brought with them have adapted and speciated and there has been some host switching between rodent groups and between rodents and the Australian marsupials. This is illustrated particularly in the Trichostrongyloidea. The origins of the rodents from Southeast Asia down the Indonesian island chain are reflected in the presence of the nematode genus Tikusnema in both Australia and Indonesia, and Cyclodontostomum purvisi across Southeast Asia and into New Guinea. Hydromys chrysogaster, the Australian water-rat, illustrates how the biogeographical influences of the host's distribution and lifestyle can affect its parasite fauna. Most of the research to date is merely indicative of where more data are needed. The links between Australian and New Guinean helminth fauna, as well as the links between rodent and marsupial hosts and their fauna, cannot be determined without further research. PMID:9673864

  16. Combining Marriage and Career: The Professional Adjustment of Marital Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Afroz Haider

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, the researcher attempted to assess Professional Adjustment status and level of teachers according to their marital status on a sample of 792 teachers. Teachers have been classified into two categories viz. married and unmarried. To evaluate the status of professional adjustment of teachers, a tool viz. "Manual on Teachers…

  17. Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

  18. Professional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, Ann E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses professional ethics in librarianship as system of values and rules that govern way in which librarians view and practice their profession. Background, definition of terms (ethics, professional), development of codes of ethics, history of American Library Association Code of Ethics and 1981 statement, and role of education are covered.…

  19. Beverage intake and obesity in Australian children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There have been increases in the obesity and overweight rates in Australian children over the past 25 years and it has been suggested that sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) have played a role in this increase. Objective The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine SSB intakes in the 2007 Australian Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2) relate SSB intake to rates of overweight and obesity, socio-economic status (SES), TV viewing time, and activity levels and (3) compare 2007 SSB intakes with data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. Design A computer assisted 24 h dietary recall in 4,400 children aged 2-16 years was performed. Results In the 2007 survey 47% of all children reported drinking SSBs with 25% consuming sugar sweetened soft drinks on the day of the survey. The mean consumption of soft drink was 436 g/d/consumer. Activity levels were unrelated to SSB consumption. Television viewing was positively related to soft drink consumption with a difference of 55 g/day from bottom to top tertile of time spent TV viewing (p = 0.015) in children aged 9-16 years. 55% of SSB consumption occurred at home and 10% occurred at school. Lower SES status was associated with a greater prevalence of SSB consumption- 30% for the lowest SES quartile vs 19% in the highest quartile. The proportion of overweight who consumed SSBs (which excludes 100% fruit) was not different from the non-overweight children although the proportion of SSB consumers in the 6% of children who were obese was significant compared with the non-overweight children (59% vs 47%, p < 0.05). In the 2007 survey 23% of children were overweight (17%) or obese (6%) while in the 1995 survey this figure was 21%. The proportion of children consuming SSBs in 1995 and 2007 for selected age groups were: 2-3 years - 25.8% and 12.8% respectively and 4-7 years - 33.6% and 20.5% respectively (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusions This cross-sectional data set provides evidence that SSB

  20. The Civic Mission of Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lawrence; Muirhead, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins and meaning of civic responsibility in the Australian model of the university, beginning with medieval European universities and progressing through Australian reforms of the 20th century. Warns against the university without a civic mission. (SLD)

  1. ASA24-Australian Version (Under Development)

    Cancer.gov

    In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a consortium of Australian Researchers is adapting the ASA24 system to the Australian context to account for variations in food consumed, portion sizes, and nutrient composition.

  2. Professional Synergy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  3. "English" in the "Australian Curriculum: English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the text of a paper given at the 2011 Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities on the theme, "Educating the Nation: The Humanities in the New Australian Curriculum", the 42nd Annual Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities at the University of Melbourne, 17 November 2011. It was presented in a session on "History,…

  4. Ethnic origin in the Australian census.

    PubMed

    Horn, R V

    1987-05-01

    "This article discusses the Australian statistics of ethnic origin, collected under the headings of race and ancestry in the Australian census, with particular reference to conceptual precision and neutrality and to validity of results. It deals with European and non-European groups, but not with the special problems of counting the Australian aboriginal population." PMID:12341346

  5. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper discusses how this model…

  6. Teacher Professional Conversations--The oz-Teachers Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Margaret; Skyring, Carol; Nykvist, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The oz-Teachers listserv, an email list for teachers, ran continuously for 20 years, from 1995 to 2015. It provided the technical infrastructure for professional communication with the majority of its members being Australian teachers based in classrooms across the country. An analysis of the list archives provides us with interesting insights as…

  7. A Project-Based Model for Professional Environmental Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    The projects described in this article were designed to provide a real world situation akin to the work of environmental professionals. The projects were conducted with Australian students working on environmental issues in Vietnam. The projects demonstrated that multi-disciplinary teamwork fits well into environmental projects, and importantly…

  8. Professional Experience: Learning from the Past to Build the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Cornu, Rosie

    2016-01-01

    The title of the 2014 Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA) conference was "Teacher Education, An Audit: Building a platform for future engagement." One of the conference themes was "Professional Experience: What works? Why?" I seized upon this theme and the title of the conference as it afforded me an opportunity to…

  9. Transnational Education: A Case Study of One Professional Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Marnie

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a Doctor of Education program in a transnational setting is contextualized in Australian national policies for international higher education and influences of regionalization and globalization. The doctorate was designed to meet aspirations of professional practitioners in Australia and South East Asia where the School had…

  10. Looking to the Future: Producing Transdisciplinary Professionals for Leadership in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartmel, Jennifer; Macfarlane, Kym; Nolan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian initiative "Developing and Sustaining Pedagogical Leadership in Early Childhood Education and Care Professionals," where academics and professionals shared knowledge, experience and research about transdisciplinary practice. The project aimed to develop an understanding of the strategies and skills…

  11. Teachers' Talk in Professional Development Activity that Supports Change in Their ICT Pedagogical Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestridge, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Enabling teachers to talk about their professional practice is an essential element of professional development; however, the types of conversations required for transformative outcomes are not clearly defined. Teachers from eight Australian primary schools (grades 1-7) participated in a collaboratively designed information and communication…

  12. Depression literacy among Australians of Chinese-speaking background in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the knowledge of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background, and the perceptions of this population of the causes of mental illness. Methods Adopting a cluster convenience sampling method, the study recruited 200 Chinese-speaking subjects from four major areas in metropolitan Melbourne where many Chinese live. The respondents were presented with a vignette describing an individual with depression and then asked questions to assess their understanding of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods. A comparative approach was used to compare the findings with those of a previous study of the mental health literacy of Australian and Japanese adults. Results Compared to the Australian and Japanese samples, a much lower percentage of Chinese-speaking Australians (14%) could correctly identify major depression described in the vignette, and a higher percentage believed that counseling professionals could be helpful. Higher percentages of those who believed that close family members could be helpful were found in the Chinese-speaking Australian and Japanese samples, and these two groups also expressed more uncertainty about the usefulness or harmfulness of certain medications compared to the Australian sample. Higher percentages of respondents in both the Chinese-speaking Australian and the Australian sample considered "lifestyle changes" to be helpful compared to the Japanese sample. In the Chinese-speaking sample, 30%, 17.4%, 33% and 27% of the respondents rated "traditional Chinese medicine doctors," "Chinese herbal medications," "taking Chinese nutritional foods/supplements" and "qiqong" as helpful. Many perceived "changing fungshui" and "traditional Chinese worship" to be harmful. Regarding the perception of causes of mental illness, items related to psychosocial perspectives including "life stress" and

  13. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  14. Using Most Significant Change Stories to Document the Impact of the Teaching Teachers for the Future Project: An Australian Teacher Education Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Deborah; Sweeney, Trudy-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project engaged teacher educators from all Australian institutions in a professional learning network that provided targeted professional development and fostered collaboration within and between teacher education institutions and relevant teacher education partners to build capacity within each…

  15. Second Languages and Australian Schooling. Australian Education Review No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    It is an underlying principle of Australian Education Review (AER) 54 that active efforts should be made to cultivate the latent bilingual potential within Australia's wider population and that this should be linked to major improvements in the quality of language teaching in schools. A combined approach of this kind will require investment in…

  16. Postmodernist Perceptions of Teacher Professionalism: A Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    This is an era of significant government involvement in schools in England, despite consistent rhetoric from the Department of Education to the contrary. In such a period, signs can be detected of the juncture between a postmodern identity and post-professional status, two models of teacher professionalism supposed in Hargreaves' work on the…

  17. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  18. Arabic in Australian Islamic Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Presents census data on the Muslim population in Australia and overviews full-time independent Islamic schools offering a comprehensive education across the curriculum. Argues that these schools offer great potential for the successful development of Arabic language and cultural literacy skills required by Australian exporters and diplomats in the…

  19. Catalogue of Australian Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A catalogue of all families, subfamilies, genera, and species of Cynipoidea present in Australia is presented here. The Australian cynipoid fauna is very poorly known, with 37 genera cited: one each for Austrocynipidae, Ibaliidae, Liopteridae, two for Cynipidae, and 32 for Figitidae. The first Austr...

  20. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  1. Employee Participation: Some Australian Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansbury, Russell D.; Davis, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey of 2,353 companies showed sporadic employee participation in decision making. Although case studies of Ford Motor, Australia Post, Lend Lease, Telecom Australia, and Woodlawn Mining illustrate successful programs, most managers appear cautious about industrial democracy. (SK)

  2. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  3. Cataloguing Practices in Australian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Janet D.

    A survey sought to compile comprehensive information about the cataloging codes, classification schemes, subject headings lists, and filing rules used in Australian libraries. Questionnaires were sent to 112 libraries, and 98 returns were received, included in the sample were national, state, public, university, college, and special libraries.…

  4. Australian Rural Education Award, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Rural Australia, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Profiles and contact information for 14 candidate programs for the 1999 Australian Rural Education Award. Programs feature tree planting, transportation to boarding school, community development, business awareness, early childhood services, GIS technology, community-based curriculum development, reading resources, environmental service learning,…

  5. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  6. Individual and School-Level Socioeconomic Gradients in Physical Activity in Australian School children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lucy; Maher, Carol; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Olds, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background: We attempted to determine whether there was a socioeconomic gradient in 9- to 11-year-old Australian children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and whether school facilities or policies supporting physical activity were associated with school-level socioeconomic status (SES) and MVPA. Methods: Children (N = 528) from 26…

  7. Assessing Performance in Languages Other than English: The Contribution of the Australian Language Certificates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Catherine; Zammit, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Australian Language Certificates project, an initiative which provides incentives to students studying second languages by offering external recognition of achievement and enhancing the status of secondary school language learning. It includes listening and reading assessment tasks in six languages. Students receive certificates…

  8. Directions for Australian Higher Education Institutional Policy and Practice in Supporting Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; O'Shea, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The Australian Government's response to the 2008 Bradley Review of higher education has set clear targets for increased university participation of people from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. Using a "success-focused" methodological approach, this research documents the factors that a sample of 53 later-year, low socioeconomic status…

  9. A Socioeconomic Comparison of Emergent Literacy and Home Literacy in Australian Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Family socioeconomic status (SES) and home literacy practices impact upon children's early literacy development. The present study explored where current emergent literacy and home literacy differences lie in Australian preschoolers aged three to five years from lower SES (n = 49) and higher SES (n = 52) homes. Children were assessed on letter…

  10. Medical negligence and wrongful birth actions: Australian developments.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K

    1997-10-01

    Wrongful birth actions aim to compensate litigants who are negligently deprived by health professionals of their right to reproductive choice. Access to safe and legal abortion is integral to the action and wrongful birth claims in the United Kingdom have been facilitated by the Abortion Act 1967 (as amended). The recent Australian case CES v Superclinics (1995) 38 NSWLR 47 shows how judicial confusion about the legality of abortion can result in judges condoning medical negligence. The Superclinics case also suggests that doctors are not required to provide pregnant women with the same standard of care as other patients. These developments show that law can become incoherent and health professionals can act negligently with impunity when reproductive choice does not have a secure legal foundation. PMID:9358354