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Sample records for program home health

  1. Building a peer mentor home health aide program: implications for home health aide retention.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Athena Lu; Adamski, Tom; Gallagher, Bridget

    2010-09-01

    The Home Health Aide (HHA) industry is challenged with low wages, little possibility of career advancement, and high turnover rates. Jewish Home Lifecare, Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI) is a home care aide agency that has developed a Peer Mentor HHA program. Peer Mentor HHAs mentor newly hired/trained HHAs within our agency. This career path leads to higher paying work that allows for growth of our workforce for the identified growing care need and positively impacts HHA retention. PMID:20811183

  2. Home health programs will continue to add value under PPS.

    PubMed

    Martin, J P; Dodd, K J

    2000-04-01

    As the October 1, 2000, implementation date for the home health prospective payment system approaches, healthcare organizations that include a home health component need to decide whether they will continue offering home health services, and if so, how to ensure that these services are profitable. To determine which services should be continued, these organizations need to analyze each home health business line in terms of utilization and profitability, comparing performance under cost-based payment with projected performance under prospective payment. The organization then should formulate a strategic action plan for rapidly developing the optimum home health network. PMID:10915348

  3. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program: Facilitators and Barriers Observed in Three Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers' and employees' perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(6), 34-42.]. PMID:26977705

  4. Design for the Evaluation of the San Francisco Home Health Services. Emergency Family Care Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remy, Linda L.

    This is a design for the evaluation of emergency family care programs of the San Francisco, California Home Health Services administration. The design objectives are qiven as the promotion of the health and welfare of the family unit and the reduction of the number of out-of-home placements of children and subsequent crises. The objectives of the…

  5. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  6. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home health; Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home ... being in the hospital, skilled nursing center, or rehabilitation facility. You should probably be able to go ...

  7. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing... Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to develop, implement, and evaluate... Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX 79601, T51HP20702...

  8. Impact of a Statewide Home Visiting Program on Parenting and on Child Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldera, Debra; Burrell, Lori; Rodriguez, Kira; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Rohde, Charles; Duggan, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a voluntary, paraprofessional home visiting program on promoting child health and development and maternal parenting knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Methods: This collaborative, experimental study of 6 Healthy Families Alaska (HFAK) programs enrolled 325 families from 1/00 to 7/01, randomly assigned them to…

  9. Evaluation of a Home Health Aide Training Program for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Morgan; Steele, G. Alec

    1977-01-01

    A program training senior citizens as home health aides for the elderly is evaluated, using a variety of procedures (questionnaires, interviews, and observation) and involving many related persons. Primary outcome variables center on graduate employment and graduate and patient satisfaction. Quality of instruction, interorganization cooperation,…

  10. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  11. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  12. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program.

    PubMed

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children's asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013-2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children's asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants' pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term. PMID:27618087

  13. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model - a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  14. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  15. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  16. Effect of a Home Telecare Program on Oral Health among Adults with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design one group pre- and post-test design Objective The primary aim was to examine both the short- and long-term effects of an oral home telecare program on improving gingival health among adults with tetraplegia. Methods Eight adults with tetraplegia participated. The oral home telecare program consisted of individualized oral hygiene training in the use of assistive devices (powered toothbrush and adapted flosser and/or oral irrigator) using PC-based videoconferencing between each participant and an occupational therapist. Training was conducted on an average of five 15 to 30 min sessions across three months. During these training sessions, supervised practice of oral hygiene, and provision of immediate corrective feedback and positive reinforcement in the use of adaptive oral hygiene devices was emphasized. Gingival health assessment using the Löe-Silness gingival index (LSGI) was conducted at baseline, six months and 12 months. Results From baseline to six months, participants showed statistically significant differences (i.e., improvement with less gingival inflammation) in their LSGI scores (z=2.18, P=.03). From baseline to 12 months, participants also showed a statistically significant difference (i.e., improvement, z=2.03; P=.04) in their LSGI scores. Conclusion This study indicates that preventive oral home telecare with repeated oral hygiene training in the use of adaptive devices improved gingival health at six and 12 months among adults with tetraplegia. PMID:23318557

  17. Behavioral changes following participation in a home health promotional program in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Leung, R; Koenig, J Q; Simcox, N; van Belle, G; Fenske, R; Gilbert, S G

    1997-10-01

    This study examined behavioral changes in households after participation in a home environmental assessment. Home assessment visits by a trained coach, which involved a walk-through in the home with the home residents, were conducted in 36 homes. The walk-through included a list of recommended behavioral changes that the residents could make to reduce their exposures to home pollutants in areas such as dust control, moisture problems, indoor air, hazardous household products, and hobbies. Recruited households were surveyed 3 months after the home assessment to evaluate their implementation of the recommendations. Following the home visits, 31 of 36 households reported making at least one behavioral change, and 41% of the recommendations made by the volunteer coaches were implemented. In conclusion, this study found that the majority of the households who participated in the home assessment reported implementing at least one recommendation. This home health promotional method was effective in influencing behavioral changes. PMID:9349831

  18. Behavioral changes following participation in a home health promotional program in King County, Washington.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, R; Koenig, J Q; Simcox, N; van Belle, G; Fenske, R; Gilbert, S G

    1997-01-01

    This study examined behavioral changes in households after participation in a home environmental assessment. Home assessment visits by a trained coach, which involved a walk-through in the home with the home residents, were conducted in 36 homes. The walk-through included a list of recommended behavioral changes that the residents could make to reduce their exposures to home pollutants in areas such as dust control, moisture problems, indoor air, hazardous household products, and hobbies. Recruited households were surveyed 3 months after the home assessment to evaluate their implementation of the recommendations. Following the home visits, 31 of 36 households reported making at least one behavioral change, and 41% of the recommendations made by the volunteer coaches were implemented. In conclusion, this study found that the majority of the households who participated in the home assessment reported implementing at least one recommendation. This home health promotional method was effective in influencing behavioral changes. PMID:9349831

  19. 76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...: Randy Throndset, (410) 786-0131. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-27778 (75 FR...; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  20. Medicare and Medicaid programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update for CY 2014, home health quality reporting requirements, and cost allocation of home health survey expenses. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    This final rule will update the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, the low-utilization payment adjustment (LUPA) add-on, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective January 1, 2014. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule establishes rebasing adjustments, with a 4-year phase-in, to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates; the national per-visit rates; and the NRS conversion factor. In addition, this final rule will remove 170 diagnosis codes from assignment to diagnosis groups within the HH PPS Grouper, effective January 1, 2014. Finally, this rule will establish home health quality reporting requirements for CY 2014 payment and subsequent years and will clarify that a state Medicaid program must provide that, in certifying HHAs, the state's designated survey agency carry out certain other responsibilities that already apply to surveys of nursing facilities and Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IID), including sharing in the cost of HHA surveys. For that portion of costs attributable to Medicare and Medicaid, we will assign 50 percent to Medicare and 50 percent to Medicaid, the standard method that CMS and states use in the allocation of expenses related to surveys of nursing homes. PMID:24294635

  1. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  2. Inside Home Visiting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the wide variation that exists among home visiting programs in their content, theory, and operation, outlining the theoretical goals and operational dimensions of such programs. Numerous home visiting programs that focus on parents of young children are highlighted. Observes that few programs have been rigorously evaluated using the…

  3. Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

  4. Medicare and Medicaid programs; CY 2015 Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update; Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements; and survey and enforcement requirements for home health agencies. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    This final rule updates Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2015. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the second year of the four-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule provides information on our efforts to monitor the potential impacts of the rebasing adjustments and the Affordable Care Act mandated face-to-face encounter requirement. This rule also implements: Changes to simplify the face-to-face encounter regulatory requirements; changes to the HH PPS case-mix weights; changes to the home health quality reporting program requirements; changes to simplify the therapy reassessment timeframes; a revision to the Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) personnel qualifications; minor technical regulations text changes; and limitations on the reviewability of the civil monetary penalty provisions. Finally, this rule also discusses Medicare coverage of insulin injections under the HH PPS, the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and a HH value-based purchasing (HH VBP) model. PMID:25376056

  5. Creating Healthful Home Food Environments: Results of a Study with Participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Smalling, Agueda Lara; Thompson, Debbe; Watson, Kathleen B.; Reed, Debra; Konzelmann, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. Design: Two-group randomized control trial; intervention versus usual EFNEP curriculum. Setting: Texas EFNEP classes. Participants:…

  6. Creating healthful home food environments: Results of a study with participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. We used a two-group randomized control trial: intervention versus usual EF...

  7. MASTER HOME ENVIRONMENTALIST PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Master Home Environmentalist (MHE) program is an innovative approach to address issues of indoor pollution, such as molds and biological contaminants that cause allergies and asthma, dust, indoor air pollution (including asbestos, formaldehyde, radon, combustion sources, tob...

  8. The political economy of a public health case management program's transition into medical homes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Cilenti, Dorothy; Issel, L Michele

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the United States, public health leaders are experimenting with how best to integrate services for individuals with complex needs. To that end, North Carolina implemented a policy incorporating both local public health departments and other providers into medical homes for low income pregnant women and young children at risk of developmental delays. To understand how this transition occurred within local communities, a pre-post comparative case study was conducted. A total of 42 people in four local health departments across the state were interviewed immediately before the 2011 policy change and six months later: 32 professionals (24 twice) and 10 pregnant women receiving case management at the time of the policy implementation. We used constant comparative analysis of interview and supplemental data to identify three key consequences of the policy implementation. One, having medical homes increased the centrality of other providers relative to local health departments. Two, a shift from focusing on personal relationships toward medical efficiency diverged in some respects from both case managers' and mothers' goals. Three, health department staff re-interpreted state policies to fit their public health values. Using a political economy perspective, these changes are interpreted as reflecting shifts in public health's broader ideological environment. To a large extent, the state successfully induced more connection between health department-based case managers and external providers. However, limited provider engagement may constrain the implementation of the envisioned medical homes. The increased focus on medical risk may also undermine health departments' role in supporting health over time by attenuating staff relationships with mothers. This study helps clarify how state public health policy innovations unfold at local levels, and why front line practice may in some respects diverge from policy intent. PMID:26460509

  9. Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This final rule revises the Medicaid home health service definition consistent with section 6407 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (the Affordable Care Act) and section 504 of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) to add requirements that, for home health services, physicians document, and, for certain medical equipment, physicians or certain authorized non-physician practitioners (NPP) document the occurrence of a face-to-face encounter (including through the use of telehealth) with the Medicaid eligible beneficiary within reasonable timeframes. This rule also aligns the timeframes for the face-to-face encounter with similar regulatory requirements for Medicare home health services. In addition, this rule amends the definitions of medical supplies, equipment, and appliances. We expect minimal impact with the implementation of section 6407 of the Affordable Care Act and section 504 of MACRA. We recognize that states may have budgetary implications as a result of the amended definitions of medical supplies, equipment and appliances. Specifically, this rule may expand coverage of medical supplies, equipment and appliances under the home health benefit. There will be items that had previously only been offered under certain sections of the Act that will now be covered under the home health benefit. PMID:26859898

  10. Home-Based Mental Health Services for Older Adults: A Review of Ten Model Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective is to provide information on successful programs providing home-based services to mentally ill elderly in order to assist other communities wishing to establish such programs. Participants The ten programs described in this article were selected by peer review from applications for an award given by the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and were participants in an invitational conference. Results Eight of the programs were components of a community agency while two were components of a medical school department of psychiatry. Six of the programs focused primarily on individuals with anxiety and depression and employed a range of individual psychotherapies. The other four accepted patients with any psychiatric diagnosis including dementia and included medication management as part of their services. The numbers served by the ten programs ranged from about 50 to 300 new cases per year, and the staffing ranged from 2 to 13 often with a combination of full and part time. The annual budget for the ten programs ranged from $30,000 to $1,250,000. Budget sources usually included some combination of public funds, philanthropy, and fee-for-service income. Conclusions Despite the logistic and fiscal challenges of providing home-based services to mentally ill older adults there are many long-standing successful programs that can serve as models for communities wishing to establish similar programs. A great opportunity exists for a unified outcome research endeavor as well as expansion into many more communities. PMID:23567412

  11. Philani Plus (+): A Mentor Mother Community Health Worker Home Visiting Program to Improve Maternal and Infants’ Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    le Roux, Ingrid M.; Tomlinson, Mark; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Comulada, W. Scott; le Roux, Karl; Stewart, Jacqueline; O’Connor, Mary J.; Hartley, Mary; Desmond, Kate; Greco, Erin; Worthman, Carol M.; Idemundia, Faith; Swendeman, Dallas

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant mothers in South African townships face multiple health risks for themselves and their babies. Existing clinic-based services face barriers to access, utilization, and human resource capacities. Home visiting by community health workers (CHW) can mitigate such barriers. The Philani Plus (+) Intervention Program builds upon the original Philani CHW home-visiting intervention program for maternal and child nutrition by integrating content and activities to address HIV, alcohol, and mental health. Pregnant Mothers at Risk (MAR) for HIV, alcohol, and/or nutrition problems in 24 neighborhoods in townships in Cape Town, South Africa (n=1,239) were randomly assigned by neighborhood to an intervention (Philani Plus (+), N=12 neighborhoods; n=645 MAR) or a standard-care control condition of neighborhood clinic-based services (N=12 neighborhoods; n=594 MAR). Positive peer deviant “Mentor Mother” CHWs are recruited from the township neighborhoods and trained to deliver four antenatal and four postnatal home visits that address HIV, alcohol, nutrition, depression, health care regimens for the family, caretaking and bonding, and securing government-provided child grants. The MAR and their babies are being monitored during pregnancy, 1 week post-birth, and 6 and 18 months later. Among the 1,239 MAR recruited: 26% were HIV-positive; 27% used alcohol during pregnancy; 17% previously had low-birthweight babies; 23% had at least one chronic condition (10% hypertension, 5% asthma, 2% diabetes); 93% had recent sexual partners with 10% known to be HIV+; and 17% had clinically significant prenatal depression and 42% had borderline depression. This paper presents the intervention protocol and baseline sample characteristics for the “Philani Plus (+)” CHW home-visiting intervention trial. PMID:21850488

  12. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... standards for health care industries, (65 FR 69432, November 17, 2000). Individuals and States are not... services to the categorically needy populations specified in the Act. Home health care for Medicaid... services as part of a written plan of care reviewed every 60 days. B. Summary of New Medicare Home...

  13. Homemaker-Home Health Aide Program. A Challenge to Vocational Education. A Modified Competency Based Pilot Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Hazel S.

    This curriculum guide is designed to be used by vocational educators in planning, developing, coordinating, and implementing homemaker-health aide programs. It is divided into three parts. Covered first are various aspects of program planning, including planning and organization, the role of the adult educator and the adult learner, and…

  14. Home health care in France.

    PubMed

    Charles, B

    1990-02-23

    Home health care in France has a long tradition, but is limited in its development. Since 1970 hospitals are by law permitted to extend services at home. Apart from this, patient associations are a driving force in the organization of home health care. There is a trend to more home health care, but this is hampered by splitting of responsibilities of local, departmental or central authorities. The hospital pharmacist is recommended to focus on his scientific and technical competence. Improved relations between community pharmacists and hospital pharmacists are advocated. PMID:2314994

  15. Jobs with Service Programs: Home Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    A review of the kinds of jobs available in services developed to help the homebound elderly: Home health care, homemaker-home health aide, chore service, home repair and maintenance, home-delivered meals, telephone reassurance, and friendly visiting. (JT)

  16. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  17. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  18. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  19. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  20. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  1. Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

  2. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  3. The Future of Home Health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  4. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a five-unit home health aide course. Each unit contains 4 to 36 lesson plans. Unit topics and representative lesson plan topics are as follows: (1) introduction (ethical and legal responsibilities, time management, reporting and recording); (2) communication (techniques, meeting the public, therapeutic…

  5. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  6. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... DEA, FDA, and Medicare Part B Drugs Accountable Care Organizations Physician Payment Sunshine Act Stark Law and ... Overview of Medicare Quality Programs Phases of Surgical Care Physician Quality Reporting System Value-Based Payment Modifier ...

  7. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  8. Essential program components for perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, L

    1994-10-01

    Home care will continue to be a rapidly expanding area of health care. This growth will be evident in the perinatal nursing specialty. There are multiple models for delivery of perinatal home services. In each case, consideration needs to be given to licensing and other standards; to operational areas such as staffing, supplies, equipment, and reimbursement; and to quality issues, such as staff development, internal and external customer service, and a continuous quality improvement program. Successful marketing of the services requires recognition that the product is nursing care. PMID:7836991

  9. Home audit program: management manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Many public power systems have initiated home energy audit programs in response to the requests of their consumers. The manual provides smaller public power systems with the information and specific skills needed to design and develop a program of residential energy audits. The program is based on the following precepts: locally owned public systems are the best, and in many cases the only agencies available to organize and coordinate energy conservation programs in many smaller communities; consumers' rights to energy conservation information and assistance should not hinge on the size of the utility that serves them; in the short run, public power systems of all sizes should offer residential energy conservation assistance to their consumers, because such assistance is desirable, necessary, and in the public interest; and in the long run, such programs will complement national energy goals and will produce economic benefits for both consumers and the public power system. A detailed description of home audit program planning, organization, and management are given. (MCW)

  10. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  11. Health Promotion Seminar. An Instructor Resource Guide. Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myer, Donna Foster

    This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with conducting a health promotion seminar. Covered in the first section of the guide are the role of a health care promotion seminar in rural health promotional training,…

  12. Guidelines for Dietitians and Public Health Nutritionists in Home Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Prepared by the Public Health Service to clarify the role of health professionals and subprofessionals in the home care field, this guide is directed to dietitians and public health nutritionists who are involved in planning, directing, carrying out, and evaluating the nutrition aspects of medical care programs for patients at home. Program…

  13. Health "Smart" home: information technology for patients at home.

    PubMed

    Rialle, Vincent; Duchene, Florence; Noury, Norbert; Bajolle, Lionel; Demongeot, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the emerging concept of health "Smart" homes (HSH) and its potential through the use of telemedical information systems and communication technologies. HSH systems provide health care services for people with special needs who wish to remain independent and living in their own home. The large diversity of needs in a home-based patient population requires complex technology. Meeting these needs technically requires the use of a distributed approach and the combination of many hardware and software techniques. We also describe the wide scope of new information, communication, and data-acquisition technologies used in home health care. We offer an introduction to the HSH concept in terms of technical, economic, and human requirements. Examples of HSH projects are presented, including a short description of our own smart home and telehealthcare information system project. PMID:12626109

  14. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  15. Maternal Engagement in Home Visiting: The MOM Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Schwarz, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    The MOM Program is an innovative home visiting program whose aim is to empower low-income urban mothers to obtain health and early intervention services for their children. The authors discuss a recent evaluation of the MOM program which sought to examine maternal involvement in the program. The results raise important questions and call for…

  16. Establishing a successful home dialysis program.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Buxo, Jose A; Crawford-Bonadio, Terri L; St Pierre, Donna; Ingram, Katherine M

    2006-01-01

    The renewed interest in home dialysis therapies makes it pertinent to address the essentials of establishing and running a successful home dialysis program. The success of a home program depends on a clear understanding of the structure of the home program team, the physical plant, educational tool requirements, reimbursement sources and a business plan. A good command of the technical and economic aspects is important, but the primary drivers for the creation and growth of a home dialysis program are the confidence and commitment of the nephrological team. PMID:16361836

  17. Teaching Core Courses with a Focus on Rural Health. An Instructor Resource Guide. Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myer, Donna Foster, Ed.

    This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with teaching courses that focus on rural health. Discussed in the first section of the guide are the role of core courses in rural health promotional training and the…

  18. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  19. The 500-bed hospital that isn't there: the Victorian Department of Health review of the Hospital in the Home program.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Michael

    2010-11-15

    The Victorian Department of Health reviewed its Hospital in the Home (HIH) program in 2009, for the first time in a decade. Annual reimbursements to all Victorian hospitals for HIH care had reached $110 million. Nearly all Victorian hospitals have an HIH program. Collectively, these units recorded 32,462 inpatient admissions in 2008-09, representing 2.5% of all inpatient admissions, 5.3% of multiday admissions and 5% of all bed-days in Victoria. If HIH were a single entity, it would be a 500-bed hospital. Treatment of many patients with acute community- and hospital-acquired infections or venous thromboembolism has moved into HIH. There is still capacity for growth in clinical conditions that can be appropriately managed at home. The review found evidence of gaming by hospitals through deliberate blurring of boundaries between acute HIH care and postacute care. The Victorian HIH program is a remarkable success that has significantly expanded the overall capacity of the hospital system, with lower capital resources. It suggests HIH with access to equivalent hospital remuneration is necessary for a successful HIH policy. Hospitals should invest in HIH medical leadership and supervision to expand their HIH services, including teaching. HIH is a challenge to the traditional vision of a hospital. Greater community awareness of HIH could assist in its continued growth. PMID:21077817

  20. Comparison Between Effects of Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Versus Usual Care on the Patients’ Health Related Quality of Life After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Salavati, Mohsen; Falahinia, Gholamhossein; Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Moosavi, Saeid; Torkamani, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation with usual care on the patients’ Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) after coronary artery bypass graft in patients with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical conducted from March 2013 to June 2013, 110 patients with CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I, were received usual care and patients in group II, in addition to the usual care were received home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs. The 27-item MacNew Heart Disease HRQoL questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient’s HRQoL under and over 2 months after intervention. Results: At the time of 0, mean score of HRQoL was 67.86±7.5 and 64.76±8.4 in patients in group I and group II, respectively (P> 0.05). Although mean score of HRQoL in all patients in both groups increased two month after intervention, but this increase in patients in group II were higher than patients in group I (154.93±4.6 vs 134.20±8.2). This difference were statistically significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Quality of Life (QoL) can be considered as a quality indicator of health care systems. Results of present study showed that home-based cardiac rehabilitation program improved patients HRQoL after CABG surgery. PMID:26573042

  1. Program Plan for Community College Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This guide outlines the core curriculum and articulation plans that were developed by a home economics task force for the purpose of improving and standardizing home economics education programs at community colleges throughout California. The first five chapters deal with the following subject areas addressed in home economics education: child…

  2. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  3. A home visit program for CAPD.

    PubMed

    Warmington, V

    1996-01-01

    In the U.K. in the last five years a reassessment of the central role of the hospital has taken place, with a fundamental shift in care for people with increased dependencies to community settings. For patients using peritoneal dialysis a need has been realized for a home-visiting service by specialist renal nurses who can manage and coordinate the program of care, thus reducing the strain on hospital resources. In addition, the provision of a community nurse to visit the patient at home means that ongoing education and training can be undertaken in a suitable learning environment. The home-visiting program creates an opportunity to develop an holistic care plan using strategies of general health promotion as well as practical nursing care. This paper highlights the experiences of a pioneering model of community continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis care in the South London. Auditing of this unusually funded post has shown significant reductions in peritonitis, exit-site infections, and hospital admissions in this growing patient population. PMID:8728249

  4. The ABCs of DME: a home care durable medical equipment/home oxygen program.

    PubMed

    Fry, L M; Rice, M J

    1992-01-01

    With the evolution of high-tech healthcare in the home setting, patients and families now need to learn the skills to perform the tasks that previously were done in hospital settings by health professionals. Numerous private and federally funded home health organizations are offering services to this patient population. The mission of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) is to improve the quality of care provided to the public (JCAHO, 1991b). In 1988, the commission implemented standards for the accreditation of home care and began to survey home care providers (JCAHO, 1988). Standards governing the provision of durable medical equipment are included in the JCAHO Accreditation Manual for Home Care (1991a). The article describes an effective collaborative approach used to develop a comprehensive durable medical equipment/home oxygen (DME/home O2) program at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC), now called the Veterans Health Administration Medical Center, in East Orange, NJ. Project management principles were used by the quality management (QM) staff to develop and implement the DME/home O2 program successfully. PMID:10119891

  5. Parent involvement with children's health promotion: the Minnesota Home Team.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, C L; Luepker, R V; Murray, D M; Kurth, C; Mullis, R; Crockett, S; Jacobs, D R

    1988-01-01

    This study compares the efficacy of a school-based program to an equivalent home-based program with 2,250 third grade students in 31 urban schools in Minnesota in order to detect changes in dietary fat and sodium consumption. The school-based program, Hearty Heart and Friends, involved 15 sessions over five weeks in the third grade classrooms. The home-based program, the Home Team, involved a five-week correspondence course with the third graders, where parental involvement was necessary in order to complete the activities. Outcome measures included anthropometric, psychosocial and behavioral assessments at school, and dietary recall, food shelf inventories, and urinary sodium data collected in the students' homes. Participation rates for all aspects of the study were notably high. Eighty-six per cent of the parents participated in the Home Team and 71 per cent (nearly 1,000 families) completed the five-week course. Students in the school-based program had gained more knowledge at posttest than students in the home-based program or controls. Students in the home-based program, however, reported more behavior change, had reduced the total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat in their diets, and had more of the encouraged foods on their food shelves. The data converge to suggest the feasibility and importance of parental involvement for health behavior changes with children of this age. PMID:3407811

  6. Development and testing of the Dementia Symptom Management at Home (DSM-H) program: An interprofessional home health care intervention to improve the quality of life for persons with dementia and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Brody, Abraham A; Guan, Carrie; Cortes, Tara; Galvin, James E

    2016-01-01

    Home health care agencies are increasingly taking care of sicker, older patients with greater comorbidities. However, they are unequipped to appropriately manage these older adults, particular persons living with dementia (PLWD). We therefore developed the Dementia Symptom Management at Home (DSM-H) Program, a bundled interprofessional intervention, to improve the care confidence of providers, and quality of care delivered to PLWD and their caregivers. We implemented the DSM-H with 83 registered nurses, physical therapists, and occupational therapists. Overall, there was significant improvement in pain knowledge (5.9%) and confidence (26.5%), depression knowledge (14.8%) and confidence (36.1%), and neuropsychiatric symptom general knowledge (16.8%), intervention knowledge (20.9%), attitudes (3.4%) and confidence (27.1%) at a statistical significance of (P < .0001). We also found significant differences between disciplines. Overall, this disseminable program proved to be implementable and improve clinician's knowledge and confidence in caring for PLWD, with the potential to improve quality of care and quality of life, and decrease costs. PMID:26922312

  7. Orientation to Health Aide Careers Mini-Course & Home Health Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy; And Others

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for home health aides, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines are presented on eight topics: your career as a health aide; maintaining health; recognizing illness; positioning and…

  8. Assessing Quality in Home Visiting Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korfmacher, Jon; Laszewski, Audrey; Sparr, Mariel; Hammel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Defining quality and designing a quality assessment measure for home visitation programs is a complex and multifaceted undertaking. This article summarizes the process used to create the Home Visitation Program Quality Rating Tool (HVPQRT) and identifies next steps for its development. The HVPQRT measures both structural and dynamic features of…

  9. Economic Evaluation of Home Visiting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, W. Steven

    1993-01-01

    Reviews important factors relevant to measuring the costs and outcomes of home visiting programs and examines six cost-benefit studies of such programs. Concludes that these studies demonstrate the feasibility of economic evaluation of home visiting and the importance of the insights it can produce. (MDM)

  10. Parent Experience of Implementing Effective Home Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Iona

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to describe parent views about implementing effective home programs to inform practice recommendations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 parents of children with cerebral palsy (2 fathers and 8 mothers) who had participated in a home program by using a partnership-based approach. Transcripts…

  11. A Guide for Preparing the Application for Program Approval for Certification of Nursing Assistants for Long Term Care Agencies and Home Health Aides in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaincott, Helen K.

    The purpose of this guide is to assist health care agencies and educational institutions to prepare an application for approval by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania Department of Health to train nursing aides for long-term care and home health agencies. Types of materials provided include definitions, a sample…

  12. Infections in Nursing Homes: Epidemiology and Prevention Programs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ana; Cassone, Marco; Mody, Lona

    2016-08-01

    This review summarizes current literature pertaining to infection prevention in nursing home population including post-acute care patients and long-term care residents. Approximately 2 million infections occur each year and more than one-third of older adults harbor multidrug-resistant organisms in this setting. Surveillance, hand hygiene, isolation precautions, resident and employee health programs, education, and antibiotic stewardship are essential elements of infection prevention and control programs in nursing homes. This article discusses emerging evidence suggesting the usefulness of interactive multimodal bundles in reducing infections and antimicrobial resistance, thereby enhancing safety and quality of care for older adults in nursing homes. PMID:27394025

  13. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  14. Home Health Management Aide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincemoyer, Betty Jane

    The report describes a demonstration project to provide a course of study at the senior high level in home health management for the academically handicapped. The course consisted of practice in nursing skills, home management and laboratory work in food preparation techniques, the family, and child care. Activities included field trips,…

  15. The Learning, Physical and Emotional Environment of the Home in the Context of Poverty: The Infant Health and Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gun, Jeanne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined the impact of individual environmental and biological risks on the home environment of three-year olds in a sample of low birth weight, premature infants. Suggests that compared to nonpoor families, poor families experienced more multiple risk factors. Poverty clearly had a negative effect on the provision of learning experiences,…

  16. 78 FR 72255 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Fiscal intermediaries. FR Federal Register. FY Fiscal year. GEM General equivalency mapping. HAVEN Home..., we published a final rule in the July 3, 2000 Federal Register (65 FR 41128) to implement the HH PPS... and full description of the HH PPS as required by the BBA, see the July 2000 HH PPS final rule (65...

  17. EXAMINING LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF AN INFANT MENTAL HEALTH HOME-BASED EARLY HEAD START PROGRAM ON FAMILY STRENGTHS AND RESILIENCE.

    PubMed

    Mckelvey, Lorraine; Schiffman, Rachel F; Brophy-Herb, Holly E; Bocknek, Erika London; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; Reischl, Thomas M; Hawver, Shelley; Cunningham Deluca, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Infant Mental Health based interventions aim to promote the healthy development of infants and toddlers through promoting healthy family functioning to foster supportive relationships between the young child and his or her important caregivers. This study examined impacts of an Infant Mental Health home-based Early Head Start (IMH-HB EHS) program on family functioning. The sample includes 152 low-income families in the Midwestern United States, expectant or parenting a child younger than 1 year of age, who were randomly assigned to receive IMH-HB EHS services (n = 75) or to a comparison condition (n = 77). Mothers who received IMH-HB EHS services reported healthier psychological and family functioning, outcomes that are consistent with the IMH focus, when their children were between the ages of 3 and 7 years of age. Specifically, mothers in the IMH-HB EHS group reported healthier family functioning and relationships, better coping skills needed to advocate for their families, and less stress in the parenting role versus those in the comparison condition. The study also examined support seeking coping, some of which changed differently over time based on program group assignment. Overall, findings suggest that the gains families achieve from participating in IMH-HB EHS services are maintained after services cease. PMID:26118949

  18. Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Kerrie; Hannigan, Eileen

    2013-03-01

    To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results-program cost and energy savings-to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

  19. Comparison of Home Retrofit Programs in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Hannigan, E.

    2013-03-01

    To explore ways to reduce customer barriers and increase home retrofit completions, several different existing home retrofit models have been implemented in the state of Wisconsin. This study compared these programs' performance in terms of savings per home and program cost per home to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of each program design. However, given the many variations in these different programs, it is difficult to establish a fair comparison based on only a small number of metrics. Therefore, the overall purpose of the study is to document these programs' performance in a case study approach to look at general patterns of these metrics and other variables within the context of each program. This information can be used by energy efficiency program administrators and implementers to inform home retrofit program design. Six different program designs offered in Wisconsin for single-family energy efficiency improvements were included in the study. For each program, the research team provided information about the programs' approach and goals, characteristics, achievements and performance. The program models were then compared with performance results -- program cost and energy savings -- to help understand the overall strengths and weaknesses or challenges of each model.

  20. 77 FR 75441 - Healthy Home and Lead Hazard Control Grant Programs Data Collection; Progress Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... progress of Healthy Homes Demonstration Program, Healthy Homes Technical Studies Program, Lead Base paint... of Healthy Homes Demonstration Program, Healthy Homes Technical Studies Program, Lead Base...

  1. 76 FR 79193 - Medicare Program; Independence at Home Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Independence at Home... incentive and service delivery system that utilizes physician and nurse practitioner directed home-based... establishing the Independence at Home (IAH) Demonstration. The IAH Demonstration will test a service...

  2. Medicare Home Visit Program Associated With Fewer Hospital And Nursing Home Admissions, Increased Office Visits.

    PubMed

    Mattke, Soeren; Han, Dan; Wilks, Asa; Sloss, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Clinical home visit programs for Medicare beneficiaries are a promising approach to supporting aging in place and avoiding high-cost institutional care. Such programs combine a comprehensive geriatric assessment by a clinician during a home visit with referrals to community providers and health plan resources to address uncovered issues. We evaluated UnitedHealth Group's HouseCalls program, which has been offered to Medicare Advantage plan members in Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas since January 2008. We found that, compared to non-HouseCalls Medicare Advantage plan members and fee-for-service beneficiaries, HouseCalls participants had reductions in admissions to hospitals (1 percent and 14 percent, respectively) and lower risk of nursing home admission (0.67 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively). In addition, participants' numbers of office visits--chiefly to specialists--increased 2-6 percent (depending on the comparison group). The program's effects on emergency department use were mixed. These results indicate that a thorough home-based clinical assessment of a member's health and home environment combined with referral services can support aging in place, promote physician office visits, and preempt costly institutional care. PMID:26643635

  3. Minding the Baby: Enhancing reflectiveness to improve early health and relationship outcomes in an interdisciplinary home visiting program

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Lois S.; Slade, Arietta; Close, Nancy; Webb, Denise L.; Simpson, Tanika; Fennie, Kristopher; Mayes, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the first wave of outcomes in a pilot phase randomized control trial of a home-based intervention for infants and their families, Minding the Baby® (MTB), an interdisciplinary, mentalization-based intervention in which home visiting services are provided by a team that includes a nurse practitioner and a clinical social worker. Families are recruited during mother's pregnancy and continue through the child's second birthday. Analyses revealed that intervention families were more likely to be on track with immunization schedules at 12 months, had lower rates of rapid subsequent childbearing, and were less likely to be referred to child protective services. In addition, mother-infant interactions were less likely to be disrupted at 4 months when mothers were teenagers, and all intervention infants were more likely to be securely attached, and less likely to be disorganized in relation to attachment at one year. Finally, mothers’ capacity to reflect on their own and their child's experience improved over the course of the intervention in the most high-risk mothers. PMID:24049219

  4. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  5. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  6. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  7. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  8. A home visiting asthma education program: challenges to program implementation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Josephine V; Demi, Alice S; Celano, Marianne P; Bakeman, Roger; Kobrynski, Lisa; Wilson, Sandra R

    2005-02-01

    This study describes the implementation of a nurse home visiting asthma education program for low-income African American families of young children with asthma. Of 55 families, 71% completed the program consisting of eight lessons. The achievement of learning objectives was predicted by caregiver factors, such as education, presence of father or surrogate father in the household, and safety of the neighborhood, but not by child factors, such as age or severity of asthma as implied by the prescribed asthma medication regimen. Incompatibility between the scheduling needs of the families and the nurse home visitors was a major obstacle in delivering the program on time, despite the flexibility of the nurse home visitors. The authors suggest that future home-based asthma education programs contain a more limited number of home visits but add telephone follow-ups and address the broader needs of low-income families that most likely function as barriers to program success. PMID:15642753

  9. Evaluation of Secondary School Programs to Prepare Students for Wage Earning in Health Care Occupations Related to Home Economics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Helen Y.; Jacoby, Gertrude P.

    To evaluate course effectiveness, determine relationship to selected characteristics of success in the course and on the job, and provide answers to a number of educational questions, 16 occupational home economics classes providing training for dietary aides, nurses aides, and health careers were selected for study. Course effectiveness was…

  10. Caring for Our Children. National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.

    This document presents a set of standards to be used in planning and establishing a high quality child care program. The standards are based on the recommendations of technical panels that studied particular facets in child care and are intended to serve as goals for practice and guidelines for implementation. The nine chapters of the text address…

  11. Home Visiting Programs: What the Primary Care Clinician Should Know.

    PubMed

    Finello, Karen Moran; Terteryan, Araksi; Riewerts, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Responsibilities for primary care clinicians are rapidly expanding ascomplexities in families' lives create increased disparities in health and developmental outcomes for young children. Despite the demands on primary care clinicians to promote health in the context of complex family and community factors, most primary care clinicians are operating in an environment of limited training and a shortage of resources for supporting families. Partnerships with evidence-based home visiting programs for very young children and their families can provide a resource that will help to reduce the impact of adverse early childhood experiences and facilitate health equity. Home visiting programs in the United States are typically voluntary and designed to be preventative in nature, although families are usually offered services based on significant risk criteria since the costs associated with universal approaches have been considered prohibitive. Programs may be funded within the health (physical orbehavioral/mental health), child welfare, early education, or early intervention systems or by private foundation dollars focused primarily on oneof the above systems (e.g., health), with a wide range of outcomes targeted by the programs and funders. Services may be primarily focused on the child, the parent, or parent-child interactions. Services include the development of targeted and individualized intervention strategies, better coaching of parents, and improved modeling of interactions that may assist struggling families. This paper provides a broad overview ofthe history of home visiting, theoretical bases of home visiting programs, key components of evidence-based models, outcomes typically targeted, research on effectiveness, cost information, challenges and benefits of home visiting, and funding/sustainability concerns. Significance for primary care clinicians isdescribed specifically and information relevant for clinicians is emphasized throughout the paper. PMID:26872870

  12. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  13. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  14. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  15. Engaging and Retaining Abused Women in Perinatal Home Visitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Bullock, Linda; Bhandari, Shreya; Ghazarian, Sharon; Udo, Ifeyinwa E.; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy affects 0.9% to 17% of women and affects maternal health significantly. The impact of IPV extends to the health of children, including an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and the neonatal period, mental health problems, and cognitive delays. Despite substantial sequelae, there is limited research substantiating best practices for engaging and retaining high-risk families in perinatal home visiting (HV) programs, which have been shown to improve infant development and reduce maltreatment. METHODS: The Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) is a multistate longitudinal study testing the effectiveness of a structured IPV intervention integrated into health department perinatal HV programs. The DOVE intervention, based on an empowerment model, combined 2 evidence-based interventions: a 10-minute brochure-based IPV intervention and nurse home visitation. RESULTS: Across all sites, 689 referrals were received from participating health departments. A total of 339 abused pregnant women were eligible for randomization; 42 women refused, and 239 women were randomly assigned (124 DOVE; 115 usual care), resulting in a 71% recruitment rate. Retention rates from baseline included 93% at delivery, 80% at 3 months, 76% at 6 months, and 72% at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Challenges for HV programs include identifying and retaining abused pregnant women in their programs. DOVE strategies for engaging and retaining abused pregnant women should be integrated into HV programs’ federal government mandates for the appropriate identification and intervention of women and children exposed to IPV. PMID:24187115

  16. Ownership Status and Home Health Care Performance

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Stevenson, David G.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have analyzed for-profit and nonprofit differences in the home health care sector. Using data from the National Home and Hospice Care Survey, we found that patients in nonprofit agencies were more likely to be discharged within 30 days under Medicare cost-based payment compared to patients in for-profit agencies. However, this difference in length of enrollment did not translate into meaningful differences in discharge outcomes between nonprofit and for-profit patients, suggesting that – under a cost-based payment system – nonprofits may behave more efficiently relative to for-profits. These results highlight the importance of organizational and payment factors in the delivery of home health care services. PMID:19333838

  17. Health information technology and the medical home.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) supports development and universal implementation of a comprehensive electronic infrastructure to support pediatric information functions of the medical home. These functions include (1) timely and continuous management and tracking of health data and services over a patient's lifetime for all providers, patients, families, and guardians, (2) comprehensive organization and secure transfer of health data during patient-care transitions between providers, institutions, and practices, (3) establishment and maintenance of central coordination of a patient's health information among multiple repositories (including personal health records and information exchanges), (4) translation of evidence into actionable clinical decision support, and (5) reuse of archived clinical data for continuous quality improvement. The AAP supports universal, secure, and vendor-neutral portability of health information for all patients contained within the medical home across all care settings (ambulatory practices, inpatient settings, emergency departments, pharmacies, consultants, support service providers, and therapists) for multiple purposes including direct care, personal health records, public health, and registries. The AAP also supports financial incentives that promote the development of information tools that meet the needs of pediatric workflows and that appropriately recognize the added value of medical homes to pediatric care. PMID:21518710

  18. Effect of a High-Intensity Exercise Program on Physical Function and Mental Health in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: An Assessor Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken; Engedal, Knut; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia is among the leading causes of functional loss and disability in older adults. Research has demonstrated that nursing home patients without dementia can improve their function in activities of daily living, strength, balance and mental well being by physical exercise. The evidence on effect of physical exercise among nursing home patients with dementia is scarce and ambiguous. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity functional exercise program on the performance of balance in nursing home residents with dementia. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of this exercise on muscle strength, mobility, activities of daily living, quality of life and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Design and Methods This single blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 170 persons with dementia living in nursing homes. Mean age was 86.7 years (SD = 7.4) and 74% were women. The participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 87) or a control group (n = 83). The intervention consisted of intensive strengthening and balance exercises in small groups twice a week for 12 weeks. The control condition was leisure activities. Results The intervention group improved the score on Bergs Balance Scale by 2.9 points, which was significantly more than the control group who improved by 1.2 points (p = 0.02). Having exercised 12 times or more was significantly associated with improved strength after intervention (p<0.05). The level of apathy was lower in the exercise group after the intervention, compared to the control group (p = 0.048). Conclusion The results from our study indicate that a high intensity functional exercise program improved balance and muscle strength as well as reduced apathy in nursing home patients with dementia. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02262104 PMID:25974049

  19. Recommendations for implementing an Arkansas state-wide healthy homes program.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia; Saffell, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    Relative housing condition has been shown to correlate to the health of its occupants. While unhealthy homes affect those from all income levels, geographical areas and cultures or ethnic groups, studies frequently link poorer quality housing to low socioeconomic status. Several factors seem to justify the creation of a State Healthy Homes program. These include the significant health and economic cost of home hazards, the value of an integrated approach, federal actions to support such programs and existing examples from other states. This paper discusses such factors and proposes a healthy homes program approach for Arkansas. PMID:24720007

  20. SCI Hospital in Home Program: Bringing Hospital Care Home for Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Madaris, Linda L; Onyebueke, Mirian; Liebman, Janet; Martin, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of spinal cord injury (SCI) and the level of care required for health maintenance frequently result in repeated hospital admissions for recurrent medical complications. Prolonged hospitalizations of persons with SCI have been linked to the increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and development or worsening pressure ulcers. An evidence-based alternative for providing hospital-level care to patients with specific diagnoses who are willing to receive that level of care in the comfort of their home is being implemented in a Department of Veterans Affairs SCI Home Care Program. The SCI Hospital in Home (HiH) model is similar to a patient-centered interdisciplinary care model that was first introduced in Europe and later tested as part of a National Demonstration and Evaluation Study through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health. This was funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The objectives of the program are to support veterans' choice and access to patient-centered care, reduce the reliance on inpatient medical care, allow for early discharge, and decrease medical costs. Veterans with SCI who are admitted to the HiH program receive daily oversight by a physician, daily visits by a registered nurse, access to laboratory services, oxygen, intravenous medications, and nursing care in the home setting. In this model, patients may typically access HiH services either as an "early discharge" from the hospital or as a direct admit to the program from the emergency department or SCI clinic. Similar programs providing acute hospital-equivalent care in the home have been previously implemented and are successfully demonstrating decreased length of stay, improved patient access, and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:26938182

  1. [Supply and demand in home health care].

    PubMed

    Braga, Patrícia Pinto; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; de Castro, Edna Aparecida Barbosa; Andrade, Angélica Mônica; Silva, Yara Cardoso

    2016-03-01

    The changes in the demographic and epidemiologic profiles of the Brazilian population and the need to rethink the health care model have led many countries like Brazil to consider Home Care (HC) as a care strategy. However, there is a gap between the supply of HC services, the demand for care and the health needs manifested by the population. Thus, this article analyzes scientific output regarding the status of the relation between supply, demand and the needs related to home health care. This work is based on an integrative review of the literature in the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin America and the Caribbean Literature on Health and Science (Lilacs), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) and Web of Science. Despite the fact that few articles refer to the issue in question, there is evidence indicating that health demands and needs are seldom taken into account either in a quantitative or qualitative approach when developing the organization of HC services. The analysis would indicate that there is a national and international deficit in the supply of HC services considering the demand for health care and needs currently prevailing. PMID:26960102

  2. Enhancing fire department home visiting programs: results of a community intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Andrea C; Shields, Wendy; Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen; Jones, Vanya; Bishai, David; O'Brocki, Raymond; Perry, Elise C; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Tracey, Pat; Parsons, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an enhanced fire department home visiting program on community participation and installation of smoke alarms, and describes the rate of fire and burn hazards observed in homes. Communities were randomly assigned to receive either a standard or enhanced home visiting program. Before implementing the program, 603 household surveys were completed to determine comparability between the communities. During a 1-year intervention period, 171 home visits took place with 8080 homes. At baseline, 60% of homes did not have working smoke alarms on every level, 44% had unsafe water temperatures, and 72% did not have carbon monoxide alarms. Residents in the enhanced community relative to those in the standard community were significantly more likely to let the fire fighters into their homes (75 vs 62%). Among entered homes, those in the enhanced community were significantly more likely to agree to have smoke alarms installed (95 vs 92%), to be left with a working smoke alarm on every level of the home (84 vs 78%), and to have more smoke alarms installed per home visited (1.89 vs 1.74). The high baseline rates of home hazards suggest that fire department home visiting programs should take an "all hazards" approach. Community health workers and community partnerships can be effective in promoting fire departments' fire and life safety goals. Public health academic centers should partner with the fire service to help generate evidence on program effectiveness that can inform decision making about resource allocation for prevention. PMID:23237821

  3. INTERFACING INFANT MENTAL HEALTH KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS: REFLECTIONS ON THE NARRATIVES OF LAY HOME VISITORS' EXPERIENCES OF LEARNING AND APPLYING RELATIONAL CONCEPTS OF DEVELOPMENT IN A SOUTH AFRICAN INTERVENTION PROGRAM.

    PubMed

    Baradon, Tessa; Bain, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The question of interfacing research and clinically generated knowledge in the field of infant mental health (IMH) with local cultural knowledge and belief systems has provoked extended discussion in recent years. This article explores convergences and divergences between current research-based, relational IMH mental health models and "community" knowledge held by a group of South African lay home visitors from a socioeconomically deprived township. These women were trained in a psychoanalytic and attachment-informed infant mental health program that promotes a relational model of infant development. They provide an intervention that supports high risk mother-infant relationships in the same locality. A two-tiered approach was taken to the analysis of the home visitor interviews and focused on the home visitors' constructed narratives of infant development posttraining as well as the personal impact of the training and work on the home visitors themselves. The study found that psychoanalytic and attachment-informed thinking about development makes sense to those operating within the local South African cultural context, but that the accommodation of this knowledge is a complex and challenging process. PMID:27186854

  4. Who Drops out of Early Head Start Home Visiting Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggman, Lori A.; Cook, Gina A.; Peterson, Carla A.; Raikes, Helen H.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Early Head Start home-based programs provide services through weekly home visits to families with children up to age 3, but families vary in how long they remain enrolled. In this study of 564 families in home-based Early Head Start programs, "dropping out" was predicted by specific variations in home visits and certain family…

  5. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template. PMID:23938358

  6. Chemistry for the Life Sciences. An Instructor Resource Guide. Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, H. Clyde; Myer, Donna Foster

    This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with teaching chemistry for the life sciences. Covered in the first section of the volume are the role of chemistry in rural health promotional training, general objectives…

  7. Paraprofessional Skills I and Paraprofessional Skills II. An Instructor Resource Guide. An Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Barbara C.; Myer, Donna Foster

    This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with teaching a course in paraprofessional skills. Covered in the first section of this guide are the role of paraprofessional skills in rural health promotional training,…

  8. Introductory Epidemiology. An Instructor Resource Guide. Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Stephen H.; Myer, Donna Foster

    This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with teaching a course in introductory epidemiology. Covered in the first section of the guide are the role of epidemiology in rural health promotional training, general…

  9. Assessing the Deployment of Home Visiting: Learning from a State-Wide Survey of Home Visiting Programs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert L; Anthony, Elizabeth R; Lalich, Nina; Nevar, Ann; Bakaki, Paul; Koroukian, Siran

    2016-03-01

    Objectives Large-scale planning for health and human services programming is required to inform effective public policy as well as deliver services to meet community needs. The present study demonstrates the value of collecting data directly from deliverers of home visiting programs across a state. This study was conducted in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which requires states to conduct a needs assessment of home visiting programs for pregnant women and young children to receive federal funding. In this paper, we provide a descriptive analysis of a needs assessment of home visiting programs in Ohio. Methods All programs in the state that met the federal definition of home visiting were included in this study. Program staff completed a web-based survey with open- and close-ended questions covering program management, content, goals, and characteristics of the families served. Results Consistent with the research literature, program representatives reported great diversity with regard to program management, reach, eligibility, goals, content, and services delivered, yet consistently conveyed great need for home visiting services across the state. Conclusions Results demonstrate quantitative and qualitative assessments of need have direct implications for public policy. Given the lack of consistency highlighted in Ohio, other states are encouraged to conduct a similar needs assessment to facilitate cross-program and cross-state comparisons. Data could be used to outline a capacity-building and technical assistance agenda to ensure states can effectively meet the need for home visiting in their state. PMID:26576591

  10. 78 FR 4157 - Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Program AGENCY: Office of the... information: Title of Proposal: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Program. OMB...

  11. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  12. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  13. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  14. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  15. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  16. A Home Visiting Asthma Education Program: Challenges to Program Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Josephine V.; Demi, Alice S.; Celano, Marianne P.; Bakeman, Roger; Kobrynski, Lisa; Wilson, Sandra R.

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the implementation of a nurse home visiting asthma education program for low-income African American families of young children with asthma. Of 55 families, 71% completed the program consisting of eight lessons. The achievement of learning objectives was predicted by caregiver factors, such as education, presence of father or…

  17. 77 FR 17072 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...This notice announces our decision to approve the Community Health Accreditation Program (CHAP) for recognition as a national accreditation program for home health agencies (HHAs) seeking to participate in the Medicare or Medicaid...

  18. Home health services in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Hale, F A; Jacobs, A R

    1976-01-01

    While home health services have traditionally been an underused component of the health care system, current trends suggest the desirability of expanding these services. These trends include an increase in the number of elderly who need the benefits of home care, the recognition that long-term chronic illnesses require appropriate management at home, and concern that patients have access to care at the level most appropriate to their illnesses. In New Hampshire, 41 certified home health agencies offer services. Little systematic research has been conducted on the kinds of services they provide and the patients seen by their staffs. Patient encounter data were collected from a sample of eight agencies for a 4-week period. Staff of the agencies used the patient contact record developed by the National Functional Task Analysis Cooperative Study to collect data. The data reflected differences among the agencies in the size of the populations they serve, organizational characteristics, reasons for patients' visits, expected sources of the revenue that supported them, and the diagnosis of the patients they cared for. The agencies served areas with populations ranging from 1,000 to 40,000. The staffs ranged from 1 to 14 full-time persons. Two were public agencies; the others had voluntary sponsorship. When data on reasons for visits were averaged for the eight agencies, it was shown that 72% of the visits were made for disease control activities such as care for a chronic or acute condition or for treatment or a laboratory test. Disease prevention activities such as a checkup for adults, children, prenatal or postnatal care, or health education accounted for only 24% of the visits. This result may indicate that, in areas short of physician manpower, the community health nurse is taking on increasing responsibility for medical care as well as health and education. Reimbursement for the visits came from Medicare, 25%; Medicaid-welfare, 14%; the patients, 18%; and health

  19. Federal Enactment of Healthy Homes Legislation in the United States to Improve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Alesia Coralie; Yates, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Not all homes across America are “healthy” homes. This contributes to the poor health of Americans and exacerbates existing health conditions costing millions each year in health-care cost. Newer research is being conducted into strategies to alleviate biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the home, and various programs exist to assist the homeowner in making improvements in the quality of their home. Not every homeowner or renter nationwide or within community localities has access to these strategies or programs that could potentially improve their home environment and therefore the health of their family. The objective of this article is to propose elements of a policy to address this inconsistency and variation. This proposal centers around the federal enactment of a national policy demanding that each state implements a healthy homes program tailored to fit their specific state housing and health needs. Members of Congress from States that have successfully implemented healthy home programs should champion this policy. Organizations that recognize the impact of housing on health should support the development of a national healthy homes strategy. This article will discuss the need, outcomes, stakeholders, and minimum requirements of such a policy. PMID:27047913

  20. Federal Enactment of Healthy Homes Legislation in the United States to Improve Public Health.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia Coralie; Yates, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Not all homes across America are "healthy" homes. This contributes to the poor health of Americans and exacerbates existing health conditions costing millions each year in health-care cost. Newer research is being conducted into strategies to alleviate biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the home, and various programs exist to assist the homeowner in making improvements in the quality of their home. Not every homeowner or renter nationwide or within community localities has access to these strategies or programs that could potentially improve their home environment and therefore the health of their family. The objective of this article is to propose elements of a policy to address this inconsistency and variation. This proposal centers around the federal enactment of a national policy demanding that each state implements a healthy homes program tailored to fit their specific state housing and health needs. Members of Congress from States that have successfully implemented healthy home programs should champion this policy. Organizations that recognize the impact of housing on health should support the development of a national healthy homes strategy. This article will discuss the need, outcomes, stakeholders, and minimum requirements of such a policy. PMID:27047913

  1. Evaluating Fidelity in Home-Visiting Programs a Qualitative Analysis of 1058 Home Visit Case Notes from 105 Families

    PubMed Central

    Saïas, Thomas; Lerner, Emilie; Greacen, Tim; Simon-Vernier, Elodie; Emer, Alessandra; Pintaux, Eléonore; Guédeney, Antoine; Dugravier, Romain; Tereno, Susana; Falissard, Bruno; Tubach, Florence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Objective Implementation fidelity is a key issue in home-visiting programs as it determines a program’s effectiveness in accomplishing its original goals. This paper seeks to evaluate fidelity in a 27-month program addressing maternal and child health which took place in France between 2006 and 2011. Method To evaluate implementation fidelity, home visit case notes were analyzed using thematic qualitative and computer-assisted linguistic analyses. Results During the prenatal period, home visitors focused on the social components of the program. Visitors discussed the physical changes in pregnancy, and psychological and social environment issues. Discussing immigration, unstable employment and financial related issues, family relationships and dynamics and maternity services, while not expected, were found in case notes. Conversely, health during pregnancy, early child development and postpartum mood changes were not identified as topics within the prenatal case notes. During the postnatal period, most components of the intervention were addressed: home visitors observed the mother’s adaptation to the baby; routine themes such as psychological needs and medical-social networks were evaluated; information on the importance of social support and on adapting the home environment was given; home visitors counseled on parental authority, and addressed mothers’ self-esteem issues; finally, they helped to find child care, when necessary. Some themes were not addressed or partially addressed: health education, child development, home environment, mother’s education plans and personal routine, partner support and play with the child. Other themes were not expected, but found in the case notes: social issues, mother-family relationship, relation with services, couple issues, quality of maternal behavior and child’s language development. Conclusions In this program, home visitors experienced difficulties addressing some of the objectives because they gave precedence

  2. A multidimensional approach to case mix for home health services

    PubMed Central

    Manton, Kenneth G.; Hausner, Tony

    1987-01-01

    Developing a case-mix methodology for home health services is more difficult than developing one for hospitalization and acute health services, because the determinants of need for home health care are more complex and because of the difficulty in defining episodes of care. To evaluate home health service case mix, a multivariate grouping methodology was applied to records from the 1982 National Long-Term Care Survey linked to Medicare records on home health reimbursements. Using this method, six distinct health and functional status dimensions were identified. These dimensions, combined with factors describing informal care resources and local market conditions, were used to explain significant proportions of the variance (r2 = .45) of individual differences in Medicare home health reimbursements and numbers of visits. Though the data were not collected for that purpose, the high level of prediction strongly suggests the feasibility of developing case-mix strategies for home health services. PMID:10312187

  3. Educating refugees to improve their home environmental health

    PubMed Central

    Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; George, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Rochester's Healthy Home was a hands-on home environmental health museum that educated over 3500 visitors between June 2006 and December 2009. The Healthy Home provided visitors with the tools, resources, and motivation to make their homes healthier by reducing environmental hazards. The Healthy Home focused on empowering low-income renters to protect their families from home health risks, but served a broad audience. Based on the Healthy Home's initial successes with diverse visitors, in 2009 the county health department provided funding for a six-month project to educate 200 recently arrived refugees. This report summarizes the project's innovative approach to home health education, presents evaluation data on impacts on refugees and other visitors, suggests implications for resettlement agencies, and provides guidelines for those interested in replicating this approach in their own community. PMID:22836539

  4. The Impact of Certificate-of-Need Laws on Nursing Home and Home Health Care Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Galarraga, Omar; Zinn, Jacqueline S.; Grabowski, David C.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, nursing homes and home health care agencies have been influenced by several Medicare and Medicaid policy changes including the adoption of prospective payment for Medicare-paid postacute care and Medicaid-paid long-term home and community-based care reforms. This article examines how spending growth in these sectors was affected by state certificate-of-need (CON) laws, which were designed to limit the growth of providers and have remained unchanged for several decades. Compared with states without CON laws, Medicare and Medicaid spending in states with CON laws grew faster for nursing home care and more slowly for home health care. In particular, we observed the slowest growth in community-based care in states with CON for both the nursing home and home health industries. Thus, controlling for other factors, public postacute and long-term care expenditures in CON states have become dominated by nursing homes. PMID:26223431

  5. Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%. PMID:21563708

  6. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: announcement of the extended temporary moratoria on enrollment of ambulance suppliers and home health agencies in designated geographic locations. Extension of temporary moratoria.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    This document announces the extension of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new ambulance suppliers and home health agencies (HHAs) in specific locations within designated metropolitan areas in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse. PMID:25122941

  7. The role of the Medicare fiscal intermediary and the regional home health intermediary, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Randall, D A

    1992-01-01

    The Medicare fiscal intermediaries (FIs) are private insurance companies that serve as the federal government's agents in the administration of the Medicare program, including the payment of claims. There are two primary functions of the FI--reimbursement review and medical coverage review. Hospital-based home health agencies relate to the hospital's FI for reimbursement purposes. All home health agencies are assigned to a special FI, the Regional Home Health Intermediary (RHHI), for medical review issues. This may be the same FI or a different one than that audits the hospital's cost report. Freestanding home health agencies deal with separate reimbursement and medical review divisions within a single RHHI's office. The author reviews the role of the Medicare FI and the RHHI and their relationship to home health agencies. Part 1 was featured in the June issue. PMID:1506908

  8. A Home-Based Infant Mental Health Intervention: The Centrality of Relationships in Reflective Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherston, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the essential relationship needs and capacities of infants, parents, practitioners, and supervisors in a story about reflective practice. The author shares her experience supervising a home visitor who is a trainee in an infant mental health intervention program. The home visitor's relationship with her supervisor was a…

  9. Private Investment Purchase and Nursing Home Financial Health

    PubMed Central

    Cadigan, Rebecca Orfaly; Stevenson, David G; Caudry, Daryl J; Grabowski, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nursing home acquisition by private investment firms on nursing home costs, revenue, and overall financial health. Data Sources Merged data from the Medicare Cost Reports and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system for the period 1998–2010. Study Design Regression specification incorporating facility and time fixed effects. Principal Findings We found little impact on the financial health of nursing homes following purchase by private investment companies. However, our findings did suggest that private investment firms acquired nursing home chains in good financial health, possibly to derive profit from the company’s real estate holdings. Conclusions Private investment acquired facilities are an important feature of today’s nursing home sector. Although we did not observe a negative impact on the financial health of nursing homes, this development raises important issues about ownership oversight and transparency for the entire nursing home sector. PMID:25104476

  10. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  11. Impact of a Kentucky Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home-Visitation Program on Parental Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jonnisa M.; Vanderpool, Robin C.

    2013-01-01

    As public health organizations continue to implement maternal and child health home-visitation programs, more evaluation of these efforts is needed, particularly as it relates to improving parental behaviors. The purpose of our study was to assess the impact of families' participation in a home-visitation program offered by a central Kentucky…

  12. Home health care with telemonitoring improves health status for older adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J; Struk, Cynthia J; DiCarlo, Christina M; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2013-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalization or emergency visit between those who received telemonitoring versus usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore, for older adults with heart failure, telemonitoring may be an important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  13. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  14. Home health, long-term care, and other compliance activities.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T D; Sadoff, J W

    1999-04-01

    The Federal government continues to crack down on fraud and abuse in the healthcare industry with such initiatives and tools as Operation Restore Trust and intermediate tax sanctions. Home health and long-term care organizations are the latest entities under study by the Office of Inspector General, and the result of these studies likely will be more antifraud and abuse measures being taken against these entities. All healthcare organizations should pay particular attention to their tax risk exposure. Healthcare organizations that put effective compliance programs in place should be able to reduce the overall risk of challenges to their financial practices. PMID:10557979

  15. Home e-health system integration in the Smart Home through a common media server.

    PubMed

    Pau, I; Seoane, F; Lindecrantz, K; Valero, M A; Carracedo, J

    2009-01-01

    Home e-health systems and services are revealed as one of the most important challenges to promote Quality of Life related to Health in the Information Society. Leading companies have worked on e-health systems although the majority of them are addressed to hospital or primary care settings. The solution detailed in this paper offers a personal health system to be integrated with Smart Home services platform to support home based e-care. Thus, the home e-health system and architecture detailed in this research work is ready to supply a seamless personal care solution both from the biomedical data analysis, service provision, security guarantee and information management s point of view. The solution is ready to be integrated within the Accessible Digital Home, a living lab managed by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid for R&D activities. PMID:19964893

  16. Home Foreclosure, Health, and Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Individual, Aggregate, and Contextual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. foreclosure crisis intensified markedly during the Great Recession of 2007-09, and currently an estimated five percent of U.S. residential properties are more than 90 days past due or in the process of foreclosure. Yet there has been no systematic assessment of the effects of foreclosure on health and mental health. Methods and Findings I applied systematic search terms to PubMed and PsycINFO to identify quantitative or qualitative studies about the relationship between home foreclosure and health or mental health. After screening the titles and abstracts of 930 publications and reviewing the full text of 76 articles, dissertations, and other reports, I identified 42 publications representing 35 unique studies about foreclosure, health, and mental health. The majority of studies (32 [91%]) concluded that foreclosure had adverse effects on health or mental health, while three studies yielded null or mixed findings. Only two studies examined the extent to which foreclosure may have disproportionate impacts on ethnic or racial minority populations. Conclusions Home foreclosure adversely affects health and mental health through channels operating at multiple levels: at the individual level, the stress of personally experiencing foreclosure was associated with worsened mental health and adverse health behaviors, which were in turn linked to poorer health status; at the community level, increasing degradation of the neighborhood environment had indirect, cross-level adverse effects on health and mental health. Early intervention may be able to prevent acute economic shocks from eventually developing into the chronic stress of foreclosure, with all of the attendant benefits this implies for health and mental health status. Programs designed to encourage early return of foreclosed properties back into productive use may have similar health and mental health benefits. PMID:25849962

  17. In-home mental health treatment for individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Reif, Susan S; Pence, Brian W; LeGrand, Sara; Wilson, Elena S; Swartz, Marvin; Ellington, Terry; Whetten, Kathryn

    2012-11-01

    Mental health problems are highly prevalent among individuals with HIV and are consistently associated with negative health outcomes. However, mental illness often remains untreated due to significant psychosocial and physical barriers to treatment participation. The Collaborative HIV/AIDS Mental Health Program (CHAMP) assessed the outcomes associated with providing 9 months of in-home mental health counseling for 40 individuals with HIV and a Major Axis I mental disorder. The evidence-based Illness Management and Recovery Model was adapted for use with HIV-positive individuals for the study using a community-based participatory research approach. Study participants were surveyed at baseline, 5 and 9 months to assess for changes in health outcomes. Thirty-five percent of study participants were female, 80% African American, 33% self-identified as MSM and the average participant age was 43. Forty percent of participants were on psychotropic medication at baseline. Participants had an average of 8 counseling visits (median 9). Statistically significant decreases in the global Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) score and a number of BSI symptoms dimensions including anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive, phobic anxiety and hostility were detected, indicating a reduction of psychiatric symptoms. Statistically significant improvement was also identified for the SF-12 mental health scale, adaptive coping, overall social support and emotional support. No differences in psychiatric outcomes were identified by gender, race/ethnicity, or sexual preference. Findings from the CHAMP Study suggest that the use of in-home mental health treatment may be beneficial in engaging and treating HIV-positive individuals with comorbid mental health disorders. PMID:23050767

  18. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    ScienceCinema

    Zoi, Cathy

    2013-05-29

    Acting Under Secretary Cathy Zoi talks about the new Home Energy Score pilot program that was announced today by Vice President Biden and U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The report also includes customized, cost-effective recommendations that will help to reduce their energy costs and improve the comfort of their homes.

  19. Cathy Zoi on the new Home Energy Score pilot program

    SciTech Connect

    Zoi, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Acting Under Secretary Cathy Zoi talks about the new Home Energy Score pilot program that was announced today by Vice President Biden and U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows them how their home compares to others in their region. The report also includes customized, cost-effective recommendations that will help to reduce their energy costs and improve the comfort of their homes.

  20. Healing at Home: 100 Years of Public Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Ellen T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Now More than Ever" (Fahy); "Healing at Home" (photo essay); "Amelia Greenwald: Pioneer in International Public Health Nursing" (Mayer); "Alaska's Watched Pot" (Nord); and "Gertrude Weld Peabody: Unsung Patron of Public Health Nursing Education" (Doona). (JOW)

  1. What can be done about home health fieldwork?

    PubMed

    Lindstrom-Hazel, D; Bush, M A

    1997-06-01

    The literature indicates that health care is moving away from institutional care and specialization to the community and home where providers need generalist competencies. As educators strive to prepare students for this environment, fieldwork experiences in the community and home are opportunities for students to develop generalist competencies. Because of the current scarcity of fieldwork sites, in general, scheduling placements is difficult. As educators seek new sites, home health settings and therapists who provide home health care as a component of their service need to be considered. Home health occupational therapy requires a practitioner to adopt a holistic perspective in order to assist clients to function optimally in their home environment. Because a large number of students work in addition to taking classes, they can be encouraged to find jobs as home health aides or chore providers as part-time employment before and during their didactic education. This work experience can help them to acculturate to the home setting. By encouraging students' participation in home health experiences, educators are helping to facilitate generalist competencies. PMID:9164615

  2. Home Parental Assistance for Underachieving Readers in Third Grade Using Read-at-Home Program Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzo, Theresa Eleanor

    Sixty-four third-grade pupils who were underachieving in reading participated in a study to determine the effect of parental home instruction in reading. A four-cell experimental design was used with two treatment factors: programmed home reading instruction given by mothers trained to administer the program versus no instruction, and mother's…

  3. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  4. Hospitalization Among Medicare-Reimbursed Skilled Home Health Recipients

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a summary and critique of the published empirical evidence between the years 2002 and 2011 regarding rehospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health recipients. The knowledge gained will be applied to a discussion regarding ACH among geriatric home health recipients and areas for future research. The referenced literature in MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane databases was searched using combinations of the following search terms: home care and home health and Medicare combined with acute care hospitalization, rehospitalization, hospitalization, and adverse events and limited to studies conducted in the United States. Twenty-five research studies published in the last eight years investigated hospitalization among patients receiving Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health. Empirical findings indicate telehomecare can reduce hospitalizations and emergency room use. The identification of risk factors for hospitalization relate to an elder’s sociodemographic, clinical and functional status that can be identified upon admission and interventions taken in order to reduce hospitalizations. Disease management, frontloading nurse visits, the structure of home health services and OBQI are also among the interventions identified to reduce hospitalizations. However, the body of evidence is limited by a paucity of research and the over reliance on small sample sizes. Few published studies have explored methods that effectively reduce hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health recipients. Further research is needed to clarify the most effective ways to structure home health services to maximize benefits and reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill geriatric population. PMID:26709341

  5. The Medical Home: Every Child Deserves One! Program Services Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaglione, Tom

    Noting that health benefits for children should be one of the principal goals of comprehensive early childhood initiatives, this Smart Start brochure provides information on "medical homes" and their importance to the overall health of children; the brochure also describes community strategies to help promote a medical home for all children. The…

  6. Insights in public health: the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network: evidence-based home visiting services in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, D Kaulana; Robertson, N Tod; Hayes, Donald K

    2014-05-01

    Home visiting services are cost-effective and improve the health of children and families among those at increased risk. From 1985-2008, home visiting services in Hawai'i were provided primarily through state funding of the Hawai'i Healthy Start Program, but the program was severely reduced due to the economy and state budget changes over the past decade. The Maternal and Child Health Branch (MCHB) in the Family Health Services Division responded to these changes by seeking out competitive grant opportunities and collaborations in order to continue to promote home visiting services to those children and families in need. In 2010, the MCHB was awarded a federally funded Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grant for home visiting services to promote maternal, infant, and early childhood health, safety and development, strong parent-child relationships, and responsible parenting. In 2011, the MCHB was also awarded a competitive MIECHV development grant that funded the re-establishment of the hospital Early Identification program. Families in need of additional support identified through this program are referred for family strengthening services to a network of existing home visiting programs called the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network (HHVN). The HHVN is supported by MIECHV and a small amount of state funds to assist programs with capacity building, training, professional development, quality assurance, and accreditation/certification support. The MIECHV grant requires that programs are evidence-based and address specific outcome measures and benchmarks. The HHVN provides home visiting services to families prenatally through 5 years of age that reside in specific at-risk communities, and is aimed at fostering positive parenting and reducing child maltreatment using a strength-based approach by targeting six protective factors: (1) social connections, (2) nurturing and attachment, (3) knowledge of parenting and child development, (4) parental

  7. Will drivers for home energy efficiency harm occupant health?

    PubMed

    Bone, Angie; Murray, Virginia; Myers, Isabella; Dengel, Andy; Crump, Derrick

    2010-09-01

    The U.K. government has committed to an 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with housing accounting for 27% of total current emissions. There are several drivers both to reduce emissions from homes and to reduce fuel poverty, promoting a range of building and behavioural measures in homes. The health benefits of warmer homes in winter have been described, but there has been less consideration of the potential negative impacts of some of these measures. We examine the changes in U.K. homes, and the possible consequences for health. The main concerns for health surround the potential for poor indoor air quality if ventilation is insufficient and the possible risks of overheating in heatwave conditions. This paper notes a limited evidence base and the need for further research on the health effects of energy-efficient homes, particularly with regard to ventilation. PMID:21086820

  8. Renewing Home-School Linkage: A Program of Division IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, Berkeley, CA.

    The purpose of this program is to reduce dissimilarity between home and school for low-income children by renewing home-school linkage. The program is designed to achieve this goal by training, installing, and utilizing parents as linkage agents. Their functions include serving as sources of information about their children, as informants, as…

  9. Community Service Program in Foster Home Management and Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Univ., Kingston.

    A training program for prospective foster home operators and volunteer workers with creative arts was held in the fall of 1968 and again in the spring of 1969 under the joint sponsorship of the Program in Gerontology of the University of Rhode Island, the Cooperative Extension Service, and the Rhode Island Medical Center. The foster homes under…

  10. The Teaching Nursing Home as an Academic Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Philip G.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the origins of the teaching nursing home concept, describes its goals and major components, and explores some of the problems in developing it as an academic program. Asserts that the teaching nursing home, if properly developed, can be a strong academic program that improves geriatric patient care, research, and teaching. (Author/ABB)

  11. Oral health for adults in care homes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Essential facts It is estimated that more than 400,000 adults live in UK care homes, 80% of whom have dementia. More than half of older people in care homes have tooth decay compared with 40% of over 75s and 33% of over 85s who do not live in care homes. Care home residents are more likely to have fewer natural teeth, and those with teeth are less likely to have enough teeth to eat comfortably and socialise without embarrassment. PMID:27573950

  12. Enhancing Fire Department Home Visiting Programs: Results of a Community Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gielen, Andrea C.; Shields, Wendy; Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen; Jones, Vanya; Bishai, David; O’Brocki, Raymond; Perry, Elise C.; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Tracey, Pat; Parsons, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the impact of an enhanced fire department home visiting program on community participation and installation of smoke alarms and describes the rate of fire and burn hazards observed in homes. Methods Communities were randomly assigned to receive either a standard or enhanced home visiting program. Prior to implementing the program, 603 household surveys were completed to determine comparability between the communities. During a one year intervention period, 171 home visit events took place with 8,080 homes. Results At baseline, 60% of homes did not have working smoke alarms on every level; 44% had unsafe water temperatures; and 72% did not have CO alarms. Residents in the enhanced community relative to those in the standard community were significantly more likely to let the fire fighters into their homes (75% vs 62%). Among entered homes, those in the enhanced community were significantly more likely to agree to have smoke alarms installed (95% vs 92%), to be left with a working smoke alarm on every level of the home (84% vs 78%) and to have more smoke alarms installed per home visited (1.89 vs 1.74). Conclusions The high baseline rates of home hazards suggest that fire department home visiting programs should take an “all hazards” approach. CHWs and other community partnerships can be effective in promoting fire departments’ fire and life safety goals. Public health academic centers should partner with the fire service to help generate evidence on program effectiveness that can inform decision making about resource allocation for prevention. PMID:23237821

  13. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  14. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  15. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  16. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  17. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  18. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  19. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Moratoria-Designated Geographic Locations. Implementation of the waiver demonstration.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This notice announces the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in 6 states. The demonstration is being implemented in accordance with section 402 of the Social Security Amendments of 1967 and gives CMS the authority to grant waivers to the statewide enrollment moratoria on a case-by-case basis in response to access to care issues, and to subject providers and suppliers enrolling via such waivers to heightened screening, oversight, and investigations. PMID:27487580

  20. 76 FR 71979 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section...

  1. Health@Home - An e-Service Model for Disease Prevention and Healthcare in the Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Milon; Chotard, Laure; Ingþórsson, Ólafur; Bastos, João; Borges, Isabel

    The ageing of the population, the growth of chronic diseases, and the explosion of healthcare costs jeopardise the sustainability of healthcare systems in many European countries. This opens opportunities for innovative prevention and healthcare services supported by information and communication technologies (ICT). The natural focus for providing such services is the home. However, the e-health services provided in the home so far are limited in scope and fragmented. This paper suggests a comprehensive service model for home-based e-health services in Europe, which aims to overcome the current service fragmentation. The Health@Home model integrates disease prevention and healthcare for different groups of citizens at different stages on the health scale. The technical challenge of this model is the national and Europe-wide integration of heterogeneous systems and services in a way that makes them reliable and easy to use for all citizens, particularly those with low technical abilities and severe impairments.

  2. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  3. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePlus

    ... 56.1%) valued their work very much. Aides’ perceptions of the three groups’ value of their work ... Aide Survey, 2007. Figure 3. Home health aides’ perception of how others value their work: United States, ...

  4. Home Diuretic Protocol for Heart Failure: Partnering with Home Health to Improve Outcomes and Reduce Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). Objective: To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. Design: In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Main Outcome Measures: Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Results: Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. Conclusion: The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home. PMID:25102518

  5. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  6. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  7. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  8. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  9. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  10. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  11. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  12. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  13. Evaluation of Home Health Care Devices: Remote Usability Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing amount of health care is now performed in a home setting, away from the hospital. While there is growing anecdotal evidence about the difficulty patients and caregivers have using increasingly complex health care devices in the home, there has been little systematic scientific study to quantify the global nature of home health care device usability in the field. Research has tended to focus on a handful of devices, making it difficult to gain a broad view of the usability of home-care devices in general. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe a remote usability assessment method using the System Usability Scale (SUS), and to report on the usability of a broad range of health care devices using this metric. Methods A total of 271 participants selected and rated up to 10 home health care devices of their choice using the SUS, which scores usability from 0 (unusable) to 100 (highly usable). Participants rated a total of 455 devices in their own home without an experimenter present. Results Usability scores ranged from 98 (oxygen masks) to 59 (home hormone test kits). An analysis conducted on devices that had at least 10 ratings showed that the effect of device on SUS scores was significant (P<.001), and that the usability of these devices was on the low end when compared with other commonly used items in the home, such as microwave ovens and telephones. Conclusions A large database of usability scores for home health care devices collected using this remote methodology would be beneficial for physicians, patients, and their caregivers. PMID:27025664

  14. Parent-Classroom Interaction Program: The Home Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan, Janice

    The Home Needs Assessment is the foundation of the Parent-Classroom Interaction Program (P-CIP) of the Title 6B Demonstration Project for the Profoundly Retarded in Dade County, Florida. The Needs Assessment is usually administered during a home visit by a parent coordinator, is designed to gather information in areas such as family make-up and…

  15. Home Visitation Programs: Critical Issues and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzi-Lessing, Lenette

    2011-01-01

    As support for intervening early in the lives of vulnerable children has risen in the United States in recent years, so has interest in home-visitation programs. Home visitation is increasingly recognized for its potential to foster early child development and competent parenting, as well as to reduce risk for child abuse and neglect and other…

  16. Integrating new graduate nurses in home health care.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Carl A

    2009-10-01

    In 2005, the home health nursing sector of a large Canadian health authority was on its way toward changing a hiring prerequisite of acute care (medical or surgical) experience for entry to practice into home care nursing. At that time, home healthcare services in Canada and the United States were generally requiring acute care experience as prerequisites for working in home health. However, much of the research beginning as early as early 2000 challenged this perspective and universities and colleges offering baccalaureate degrees in nursing began including home health content in their curricula. The findings from research add to the ongoing critique of this acute care requirement and support the concept that acute care and home care are different practice areas with distinct competencies. This article discusses the contextual background that influenced the undertaking of our research, the relevant research literature, our research findings, model for integration, and evaluation of our pilot and lessons learned. The successes seen as a result of New Graduate integration are now being utilized by other home care nursing offices as a result of this work. PMID:19820662

  17. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: Utility Bill Analysis on Homes Participating in Austin Energy's Program

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.; Mosey, G.; Plympton, P.; Dagher, L.

    2007-07-01

    Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a jointly managed program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This program focuses on improving energy efficiency in existing homes via a whole-house approach to assessing and improving a home's energy performance, and helping to protect the environment. As one of HPwES's local sponsors, Austin Energy's HPwES program offers a complete home energy analysis and a list of recommendations for efficiency improvements, along with cost estimates. To determine the benefits of this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a statistical analysis using energy consumption data of HPwES homes provided by Austin Energy. This report provides preliminary estimates of average savings per home from the HPwES Loan Program for the period 1998 through 2006. The results from this preliminary analysis suggest that the HPwES program sponsored by Austin Energy had a very significant impact on reducing average cooling electricity for participating households. Overall, average savings were in the range of 25%-35%, and appear to be robust under various criteria for the number of households included in the analysis.

  18. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  19. Automated Assessment of Cognitive Health Using Smart Home Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of this work is to develop intelligent systems to monitor the well being of individuals in their home environments. OBJECTIVE This paper introduces a machine learning-based method to automatically predict activity quality in smart homes and automatically assess cognitive health based on activity quality. METHODS This paper describes an automated framework to extract set of features from smart home sensors data that reflects the activity performance or ability of an individual to complete an activity which can be input to machine learning algorithms. Output from learning algorithms including principal component analysis, support vector machine, and logistic regression algorithms are used to quantify activity quality for a complex set of smart home activities and predict cognitive health of participants. RESULTS Smart home activity data was gathered from volunteer participants (n=263) who performed a complex set of activities in our smart home testbed. We compare our automated activity quality prediction and cognitive health prediction with direct observation scores and health assessment obtained from neuropsychologists. With all samples included, we obtained statistically significant correlation (r=0.54) between direct observation scores and predicted activity quality. Similarly, using a support vector machine classifier, we obtained reasonable classification accuracy (area under the ROC curve = 0.80, g-mean = 0.73) in classifying participants into two different cognitive classes, dementia and cognitive healthy. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that it is possible to automatically quantify the task quality of smart home activities and perform limited assessment of the cognitive health of individual if smart home activities are properly chosen and learning algorithms are appropriately trained. PMID:23949177

  20. Integrating mental health parity for homebound older adults under the medicare home health care benefit.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Gellis, Zvi D

    2011-04-01

    Despite high rates of mental illness, very few homebound older adults receive treatment. Comorbid mental illness exacerbates physical health conditions, reduces treatment adherence, and increases dependency and medical costs. Although effective treatments exist, many home health agencies lack capacity to effectively detect and treat mental illness. This article critically analyzes barriers within the Medicare home health benefit that impede access to mental health treatment. Policy, practice, and research recommendations are made to integrate mental health parity in home health care. In particular, creative use of medical social work can improve detection and treatment of mental illness for homebound older adults. PMID:21462061

  1. The Ethnic Elderly in Metro Toronto Hospitals, Nursing Homes, and Homes for the Aged: Communication and Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldov, Morris; Chow, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Developed database on ethnic elderly persons; examined extent of communication problems they face in hospitals, nursing homes, and homes for aged in Metro Toronto; and reported on institutional response. Nursing home supervisors (n=77) reported that communication was essential to health care needs of ethnic elderly individuals. Most health care…

  2. Correlates of Home Health Care Services Use among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Richard A.; And Others

    The use of health and social services is influenced by economic, community, geographic, organizational, societal, and environmental factors. A study was conducted to examine predisposing, enabling, and need-for-care factors related to the use of home health care services by a stratified random sample of 400 older adults. Predisposing factors…

  3. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  4. Controversial issues in home health care: a roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J C; Black, B L; Griffin, R E; Smith, J E

    1986-04-01

    Controversial issues in home health care (HHC) were discussed by a panel of four individuals involved in or knowledgeable about HHC. The panel addressed the following issues: reluctance of health professionals to participate in home care, challenges in providing HHC services, assigning responsibility for HHC services, reimbursement considerations in joint-venture arrangements, assuming fiscal responsibility for unreimbursed care, selecting HHC providers, defining patient rights, selecting drug products for home-care patients, competing with community pharmacists, circumvention of pharmacist input in preparation of solutions for home infusion, and the future of HHC. Hospital pharmacists who plan to become involved or are already involved in providing HHC services should become familiar with these controversial issues. PMID:3706341

  5. Promoting spiritual health in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2008-06-01

    This article explores how clinicians can promote patient and family caregiver spiritual health. After a review of pertinent theory and research, clinical implications are identified, including appropriate goals for clinicians with regard to spiritual health promotion. PMID:18562823

  6. Home Start: How a Home-Based Preschool Program Raised Black Achievements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ralph

    This presentation discusses longitudinal results of a home-based program for low SES black and white children whose parents received weekly visits designed to chart children's individualized enrichment when they were from 2 to 5 years of age. The program drew upon school and community resource personnel when appropriate, to provide parents with…

  7. Implications of Comprehensive Mental Health Services Embedded in an Adolescent Obstetric Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Bethany; Ranadive, Nikhil; Alaniz, Veronica; St John-Larkin, Celeste; Scott, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Mental health issues in perinatal adolescents are well documented and studies have shown high rates of depressive disorders among this population. Treatment is challenging because pregnant adolescents are poorly adherent with mental health services. We describe a novel integrated mental health care program for pregnant and parenting adolescent mothers and their children. Methods The Colorado Adolescent Maternity Program (CAMP) is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary teen pregnancy and parenting medical home program serving an ethnically diverse and low socioeconomic status population in the Denver metro area. We describe the Healthy Expectations Adolescent Response Team (HEART), an embedded mental health care program focused on improving identification of mental health symptoms and increasing rates mental health treatment in adolescent mothers. Results From January 1, 2011-January 16 2014, 894 pregnant adolescents were enrolled in CAMP and 885 patients were screened for mental health issues. Prior to HEART's inception, 20 % of patients were identified as having mood symptoms in the postpartum period. Successful referrals to community mental health facilities occurred in only 5 % of identified patients. Following the creation of HEART, 41 % of patients were identified as needing mental health services. Nearly half of the identified patients (47 %) engaged in mental health treatment with the psychologist. Demographic factors including age, parity, ethnicity, and parent and partner involvement did not have a significant impact on treatment engagement. Trauma history was associated with lower treatment engagement. Conclusion Our findings suggest that an embedded mental health program in an adolescent obstetric and pediatric medical home is successful in improving identification and engagement in mental health treatment. Key components of the program include universal screening, intensive social work and case management involvement, and ready access to onsite

  8. Stepping Stones To Using "Caring for Our Children": National Health and Safety Performance Standards for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs. Protecting Children from Harm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ. Health Sciences Center, Denver.

    Developed in support of state licensing and regulatory agencies as well as state child care, health, and resource and referral agencies, and a variety of other public and private organizations, parents, and advocacy groups, this guide identifies those standards most needed for the prevention of injury, morbidity, and mortality in child care…

  9. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  10. Home-Based Contingency Management Programs that Teachers Can Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Vincent L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Offers three guidelines to aid teachers in selecting effective contingency management programs, based on degree of positiveness, effectiveness, and costs to teachers and parents. Describes how to use a simple home-based program, which resulted in successful reduction of mild classroom disruptive behavior. (JAC)

  11. The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY).

    PubMed

    Baker, A J; Piotrkowski, C S; Brooks-Gunn, J

    1999-01-01

    The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a two-year home-based early education intervention program designed to help parents with limited formal education prepare their four- and five-year-old children for school. This article begins with a brief overview of the HIPPY program and then presents the findings from a series of interconnected research studies, including a two-site, two-cohort evaluation in New York and Arkansas, a one-site case study, and a three-site qualitative study. With respect to program effectiveness, results varied across the New York and Arkansas sites and across participating cohorts at each site. For Cohort I, children who had been enrolled in HIPPY scored higher than children in the control/comparison groups on measures of cognitive skills (New York), classroom adaptation (New York and Arkansas), and standardized reading (New York); and more children were promoted to first grade (Arkansas). For Cohort II, comparison group children outperformed HIPPY children on school readiness and standardized achievement at posttest (Arkansas). Analyses to account for the differing results between cohorts were inconclusive. Qualitative analyses revealed considerable variation in parent involvement in HIPPY. Program staff identified four patterns of attrition from HIPPY: (1) early attrition within the first month after enrollment, (2) attrition between the program's first and second years, (3) attrition due to changes in the life circumstances of participating families, and (4) attrition due to turnover among the home visitors. Families were more likely to participate in in-home than out-of-home aspects of the program (for example, group meetings), but different family characteristics were associated with participation in the in- and out-of-home aspects of the program. The authors conclude with recommendations for future practice and research. PMID:10414013

  12. Daily Life or Diagnosis? Dual Perspectives on Perinatal Depression within Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting

    PubMed Central

    Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a qualitative inquiry–informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs. PMID:23944165

  13. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  14. Is particle board in the home detrimental to health

    SciTech Connect

    Daugbjerg, P. )

    1989-04-01

    A questionnaire concerning health and living conditions was sent to the parents of 1387 children aged 0-15 years to answer the question if children living in homes built with large amounts of particle board had more headaches and respiratory and skin symptoms than other children. There were 1376 possible respondents, and of those 1036 (75.3)% returned the questionnaire. Of the questionnaires returned, 972 (70.6%) were analyzable. The children lived in homes with much particle board (group A); little particle board, or homes as group A but treated in a special way (group B); and homes with no particle board (group C). For the 0- to 5-year-old children, living in homes with much particle board was a risk factor for developing wheezy bronchitis, eye and nose irritation, and coughing. For the 6- to 15-year-old children, living in a home with much particle board was not a risk factor. Risk factors for headache, irritation of the throat, and need for daily antiasthmatic medication were analyzed for all the children collectively. Living in a home with much particle board was a risk factor for all three conditions.

  15. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  16. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM) grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges. PMID:26740744

  17. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    PubMed

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family. PMID:22284363

  18. Assessment of the need for a home intravenous antibiotic program.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Andrews, J D

    1988-12-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic programs (HIAP) have been in existence for more than 12 years. The feasibility of such a program at the UBC-HSCH was assessed. The health records of all patients discharged between April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1987 with a diagnosis of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, pyelonephritis, skin and soft tissue infections in the diabetic, prostatitis or infective endocarditis were reviewed retrospectively. Selection criteria to determine eligibility of patients for a HIAP were derived from the literature and grouped into three areas: patient, disease, and treatment criteria. From a total of 184 patients identified, 14 diabetic patients were excluded. The exclusion of patients with hospital stays of less than five days or those that did not have the appropriate diagnosis resulted in 77 patients available for more extensive review. Sixteen of 77 patients (20.8%) were judged eligible for a HIAP: 1 of 22 with pyelonephritis; 4 of 12 with septic arthritis; 5 of 21 with prostatitis; 2 of 12 with infective endocarditis; 4 of 10 with osteomyelitis. A total of 81 hospital bed days ($20,250.00) might have been saved if a HIAP was in place. PMID:10291354

  19. The impact of home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits on hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Melissa; Hanlon, Alexandra; Naylor, Mary D; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2015-08-01

    The implementation of the Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 led to a dramatic reduction in home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits among Medicare beneficiaries. While policy leaders have focused on the rising costs of home health care, its potential underutilization, and the relationship between service use and patient outcomes including hospitalization rates have not been rigorously examined. A secondary analysis of five Medicare-owned assessment and claims data sets for the year 2009 was conducted among two independently randomly selected samples of Medicare-reimbursed home health recipients (each n = 31,485) to examine the relationship between home health length of stay or number of skilled nursing visits and hospitalization rates within 90 days of discharge from home health. Patients who had a home health length of stay of at least 22 days or received at least four skilled nursing visits had significantly lower odds of hospitalization than patients with shorter home health stays and fewer skilled nursing visits. Additional study is needed to clarify the best way to structure home health services and determine readiness for discharge to reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill population. In the mean time, the findings of this study suggest that home health providers should consider the benefits of at least four SNV and/or a home health LOS of 22 days or longer. PMID:25990046

  20. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  1. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  2. Health@Home Moves All About the House!

    PubMed

    Casper, Gail R; Brennan, Patricia F; Arnott Smith, Catherine; Werner, Nicole E; He, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    It is now well recognized that patients play an important and active role in self-care and disease management, and many of these activities happen in their homes. Information technologies to support such care might be better used if they were designed taking into account the physical context of the home and the health information management needs of the residents. We conducted home-based interviews of 20 adults including an extensive analysis of their personal health information management (PHIM) tasks. Here we present these task descriptions, locations of their performance, and distribution across space and time. Implications for the informatics community include accommodating the distributed nature of tasks in the design of consumer technologies. PMID:27332185

  3. Determining cost drivers for pediatric home health services.

    PubMed

    Dodson, G M; Sinclair, V G; Miller, M; Charping, C; Johnson, B; Black, M

    1998-01-01

    A variety of cost constraints threaten the financial viability of home health agencies. Thus, tools must be developed that expand the critical information resources that will be the key ingredient in successfully navigating the challenges in the volatile home health market. Identifying and analyzing the core processes with the pediatric home care team provided a template that could be used with other agency patient populations by producing cost trajectories based on anticipated care requirements and capturing information that could be used for both internal and external benchmarking. The cost drivers of key processes and activities must be known so that they can be controlled and appropriate rates for capitation contracts can be established. Activity-based management uses cost driver analysis, activity analysis and performance analysis, to determine strategies for redirecting the work processes and agency activities to achieve lasting cost reductions. PMID:9987325

  4. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  5. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  6. Regional, Rural Home ABE Program Spells Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, Claude

    Maine's State Division of Adult Education began setting up a regionalized Adult Basic Education (ABE) program in rural Franklin county in 1974 to serve the area's functional illiterates. Located in the building housing the Franklin County Community Action Program (CAP), linkages were developed with a large number of agencies; initially the 10 CAP…

  7. KERNELHR: A program for estimating animal home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaman, D.E.; Griffith, B.; Powell, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Kernel methods are state of the art for estimating animal home-range area and utilization distribution (UD). The KERNELHR program was developed to provide researchers and managers a tool to implement this extremely flexible set of methods with many variants. KERNELHR runs interactively or from the command line on any personal computer (PC) running DOS. KERNELHR provides output of fixed and adaptive kernel home-range estimates, as well as density values in a format suitable for in-depth statistical and spatial analyses. An additional package of programs creates contour files for plotting in geographic information systems (GIS) and estimates core areas of ranges.

  8. A Critical Analysis of the Infant Health and Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; Bacharach, Verne R.

    1996-01-01

    An independent analysis of the database for the Infant Health and Development Program, an intervention of home visits, parent meetings, and preschool education designed to prevent mental retardation in children, suggests that the program has not, as supporters have claimed, had meaningful and lasting effects on children's IQs. (SLD)

  9. Far from Home: An Experimental Evaluation of the Mother-Child Home Program in Bermuda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, Sandra; McCartney, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Effects of the Mother-Child Home Program (MCHP) were evaluated with a broad range of measures on cognition, social behavior, and emotion. Findings indicated that children in Bermuda scored above U.S. norms on cognitive tests and were functioning well in the preschool period. The MCHP had few demonstrable effects on any segment of the sample. (RH)

  10. Meaning creation and employee engagement in home health caregivers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mette Strange; Jørgensen, Frances

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an understanding on how home health caregivers experience engagement in their work, and specifically, how aspects of home healthcare work create meaning associated with employee engagement. Although much research on engagement has been conducted, little has addressed how individual differences such as worker orientation influence engagement, or how engagement is experienced within a caregiving context. The study is based on a qualitative study in two home homecare organisations in Denmark using a think-aloud data technique, interviews and observations. The analysis suggests caregivers experience meaning in three relatively distinct ways, depending on their work orientation. Specifically, the nature of engagement varies across caregivers oriented towards being 'nurturers', 'professionals', or 'workers', and the sources of engagement differ for each of these types of caregivers. The article contributes by (i) advancing our theoretical understanding of employee engagement by emphasising meaning creation and (ii) identifying factors that influence meaning creation and engagement of home health caregivers, which should consequently affect the quality of services provided home healthcare patients. PMID:25982838

  11. Review of evaluations of utility home-energy-audit programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, L.; Soderstrom, J.; Hirst, E.; Newman, B.; Weaver, R.

    1981-03-01

    Evaluation efforts of utilities with active home energy audit programs are reviewed to suggest methodologies, issues, and data that can contribute to the development of a comprehensive Residential Conservation Service evaluation plan. On the basis mainly of written reports received from the utilities, findings about customer response to programs are summarized. The topics discussed include: correlates of program penetration rates; use of financing; attitudes toward programs; actions taken; characteristics of participants; and energy savings due to programs. Particular attention is given to three studies (Tennessee Valley Authority, Seattle City Light, and Pacific Gas and Electric) that analyze fuel consumption records as part of the evaluation.

  12. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Chris; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have to be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry. Good

  13. Health IT–Enabled Care Coordination: A National Survey of Patient-Centered Medical Home Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Suzanne; Shih, Sarah C.; Winther, Chloe H.; Tinoco, Aldo; Kessler, Rodger S.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Health information technology (IT) offers promising tools for improving care coordination. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of 6 proposed care coordination objectives for stage 3 of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services electronic health record incentive program (Meaningful Use) related to referrals, notification of care from other facilities, patient clinical summaries, and patient dashboards. METHODS We surveyed physician-owned and hospital/health system–affiliated primary care practices that achieved patient-centered medical home recognition and participated in the Meaningful Use program, and community health clinics with patient-centered medical home recognition (most with certified electronic health record systems). The response rate was 35.1%. We ascertained whether practices had implemented proposed objectives and perceptions of their importance. We analyzed the association of organizational and contextual factors with self-reported use of health IT to support care coordination activities. RESULTS Although 78% of the 350 respondents viewed timely notification of hospital discharges as very important, only 48.7% used health IT systems to accomplish this task. The activity most frequently supported by health IT was providing clinical summaries to patients, in 76.6% of practices; however, merely 47.7% considered this activity very important. Greater use of health IT to support care coordination activities was positively associated with the presence of a nonclinician responsible for care coordination and the practice’s capacity for systematic change. CONCLUSIONS Even among practices having a strong commitment to the medical home model, the use of health IT to support care coordination objectives is not consistent. Health IT capabilities are not currently aligned with clinicians’ priorities. Many practices will need financial and technical assistance for health IT to enhance care coordination. PMID:25964403

  14. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Implementation and Extension of Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Designated Geographic Locations and Lifting of the Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers in All Geographic Locations. Extension, implementation, and lifting of temporary moratoria.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This document announces the extension of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare home health agencies (HHAs), subunits, and branch locations in specific locations within designated metropolitan areas in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse. It also announces the implementation of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare HHAs, subunits, and branch locations in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey on a statewide basis. In addition, it announces the lifting of the moratoria on all Part B emergency ground ambulance suppliers. These moratoria, and the changes described in this document, also apply to the enrollment of HHAs and non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. PMID:27487581

  15. Effect of Weatherization Combined With Community Health Worker In-Home Education on Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sherry; Gregory, Joel; Philby, Miriam; Jacobs, David E.; Krieger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the benefits of adding weatherization-plus-health interventions to an in-home, community health worker (CHW) education program on asthma control. Methods. We used a quasi-experimental design to compare study group homes (n = 34) receiving CHW education and weatherization-plus-health structural interventions with historical comparison group homes (n = 68) receiving only education. Data were collected in King County, Washington, from October 2009 to September 2010. Results. Over the 1-year study period, the percentage of study group children with not-well-controlled or very poorly controlled asthma decreased more than the comparison group percentage (100% to 28.8% vs 100% to 51.6%; P = .04). Study group caregiver quality-of-life improvements exceeded comparison group improvements (P = .002) by 0.7 units, a clinically important difference. The decrease in study home asthma triggers (evidence of mold, water damage, pests, smoking) was marginally greater than the comparison group decrease (P = .089). Except for mouse allergen, the percentage of study group allergen floor dust samples at or above the detection limit decreased, although most reductions were not statistically significant. Conclusions. Combining weatherization and healthy home interventions (e.g., improved ventilation, moisture and mold reduction, carpet replacement, and plumbing repairs) with CHW asthma education significantly improves childhood asthma control. PMID:24228661

  16. School and Home Program, Flint, Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1969

    An experimental program in Flint, Michigan, was designed to raise the academic level of underachieving children by involving their parents in the daily reading exercises and study habits of their children. Children were given materials including booklets made from old basal readers and file boxes for word cards. Parents were given instruction in…

  17. 75 FR 32459 - National Energy Rating Program for Homes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy National Energy Rating Program for Homes AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Request for Information (RFI). SUMMARY: The Department of... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE-1), 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585...

  18. 77 FR 72904 - In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Technology, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading December 4, 2012. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of HealthSport... COMMISSION In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International,...

  19. Effectiveness of Home Visits in Pregnancy as a Public Health Measure to Improve Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Fujiwara, Takeo; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Background Birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), and small for gestational age (SGA), are crucial indicators of child development and health. Purpose To evaluate whether home visits from public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women prevent adverse birth outcomes. Methods In this quasi-experimental cohort study in Kyoto city, Japan, high-risk pregnant women were defined as teenage girls (range 14–19 years old), women with a twin pregnancy, women who registered their pregnancy late, had a physical or mental illness, were of single marital status, non-Japanese women who were not fluent in Japanese, or elderly primiparas. We collected data from all high-risk pregnant women at pregnancy registration interviews held at a public health centers between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012, as well as birth outcomes when delivered from the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (N = 964), which is a record of prenatal check-ups, delivery, child development and vaccinations. Of these women, 622 women were selected based on the home-visit program propensity score-matched sample (pair of N = 311) and included in the analysis. Data were analyzed between January and June 2014. Results In the propensity score-matched sample, women who received the home-visit program had lower odds of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.98) and showed a 0.55-week difference in gestational age (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92) compared to the matched controlled sample. Although the program did not prevent LBW and SGA, children born to mothers who received the program showed an increase in birth weight by 107.8 g (95% CI: 27.0 to 188.5). Conclusion Home visits by public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women in Japan might be effective in preventing preterm birth, but not SGA. PMID:26348847

  20. The benefits of a work-at-home program.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Working from home offers the employee and the organization many benefits. The organization can use telework to recruit and retain valuable employees. The organization can also save money on work space and boost morale and loyalty. Employees enjoy the flexibility and convenience that telework offers. Teleworking is popular in the general business world and can be adapted to some jobs in the health care field. Managers must look throughout their organization to see what jobs can be accomplished either partially or completely at home. PMID:15192994

  1. Revitalizing school health programs worldwide.

    PubMed

    Benzian, Habib

    2010-10-01

    Each year, the Shils Fund recognizes outstanding activities that help improve oral health. The program is named in memory of Dr. Edward B. Shils, who led the Dental Manufacturers of America and Dental Dealers of America for more than 50 years. A 2010 Shils Award will be given to an innovative school health initiative called Fit For Schools Program (FFSP) in the Philippines. Such recognition in the US indicates the lessons that can be learned from a program initially tailored for another country. Health in a highly industrialized nation can be enhanced by heeding the FFSP principles used to craft an effective health promotion initiative. This evidence-based intervention is not exclusively an oral health initiative; it is an integration with other evidence-based health interventions and models a sustainable public-private partnership to advance positive health outcomes in socially responsible entrepreneurial ways. As the editor of this column in Compendium, I wish to applaud both leaders of FFSP: Dr. Habib Benzian and Dr. Bella Monse. The following article was written by the senior advisor, Dr. Benzian, who modestly refers to the program's receipt of another award from the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Health Organization in 2009. To my knowledge, the presentation of that award was the first time a health promotion project led by dentists has ever received such high-level global recognition and was one of three projects so recognized for innovative solutions to global health in that year. PMID:20960987

  2. Welcome Home and Early Start: An Assessment of Program Quality and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daro, Deborah, Howard, Eboni; Tobin, Jennifer; Harden, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, in collaboration with Westat Associates, designed and implemented a comprehensive evaluation of the Early Childhood Initiative's (ECI) two home visitation programs: Welcome Home, a universal home visitation program that provides a single home visit to all first-time and teen parents,…

  3. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... or home modification programs to help older people prevent falls. Check with your local health department, senior ...

  4. Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

    At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

  5. Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

    2006-01-01

    Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

  6. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  7. Components Associated With Home Visiting Program Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Filene, Jill H.; Kaminski, Jennifer W.; Valle, Linda Anne; Cachat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although several systematic reviews have concluded that home visiting has strong evidence of effectiveness, individual evaluations have produced inconsistent results across and within programs. We used a component-based, domain-specific approach to determine which program characteristics most strongly predict outcomes across a range of programs and models. Methods Medline and PsycINFO searches identified evaluations of universal and selected home visiting programs implemented in the United States. Coders trained to criterion coded characteristics of research design, program content, and service delivery. We conducted random-effects, inverse-variance-weighted linear regressions using program characteristics to predict effect sizes (ESs) on six outcome domains (birth outcomes, parenting behavior, maternal life course, child cognitive outcomes, child physical health, and child maltreatment). Results Aggregated to a single ES per study (k=51), the mean ES was 0.20 (95% CI = 0.14, 0.27), with a range of – 0.68 to 3.95. Mean ESs were significant and positive for three of the six outcome domains (maternal life course outcomes, child cognitive outcomes, and parent behaviors and skills), with marked heterogeneity of ESs in all six outcome domains. Research design characteristics generally did not predict ESs across the six outcome domains. No consistent pattern of effective components emerged across all outcome domains. Conclusions Home visiting programs evidenced small but significant overall effects, with wide variability in the size of domain-specific effects and in the components that significantly predicted domain-specific effects. Communities may need complementary or alternative strategies to home visiting programs to ensure widespread impact on these six important public health outcomes. PMID:24187111

  8. Classroom-Directed Home Training Activities. Preschool Program: A Regional Demonstration Program for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jacquelyn O.

    One of 10 documents developed for preschool programs for handicapped children, the manual presents classroom directed home training activities. The activities are based on such principles as the effectiveness of home instruction by a parent and the need for a parent to feel responsibility for the child's learning. Intended to provide teachers of…

  9. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  10. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  11. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  12. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  13. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  14. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification - Chicago, IL; Denver, CO; Devens, MA

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    In this project, three production home builders—K. Hovnanian Homes, David Weekley Homes, and Transformations, Inc.—partnered with Building America team Building Science Corporation to evaluate the certification of five test homes to the new DOE Challenge Home program performance standard (now DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program). The builders identified key benefits and barriers that impacted the certification of the test homes, and the likelihood of whether DOE Challenge Home certification would be pursued in future homes

  16. Loan impacts in home energy audit programs: a Minnesota example

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.; Tonn, B.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes an effort to explore loan impacts and decisionmaking processes in home energy audit programs. Data collected in a recent evaluation of two Northern States Power (NSP) programs in Minnesota are used for two purposes. First, the effect of loan availability on investment levels and energy savings is estimated while controlling for self-selection. Second, models that predict audit, loan and retrofit expenditure decisions are developed. These models are intended to be an initial step in identifying characteristics of successful programs and in suggesting useful marketing strategies.

  17. 'Redefining health care': medical homes or archipelagos to navigate?

    PubMed

    Enthoven, Alain C; Crosson, Francis J; Shortell, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the structure of the health care delivery system, emphasizing physician group practices. The authors argue for comprehensive integrated delivery systems (IDSs). The jumping-off point for their analysis is the recently published Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results, by Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg. The authors focus on the book's core idea that competitors should be freestanding integrated practice units (or "islands in archipelagos") versus IDSs (or "medical homes"). In any case, the authors contend that this issue should be resolved by competition to attract and serve informed, cost-conscious, responsible consumers on a level playing field. PMID:17848447

  18. Parent education home visitation program: adolescent and nonadolescent mother comparison after six months of intervention.

    PubMed

    Culp, A M; Culp, R E; Blankemeyer, M; Passmark, L

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an intervention over a 6-month period to improve first time mothers knowledge about parenting and safety in the home. The sample included 61 mothers who completed a baseline and follow-up survey. Mothers were first time adolescent (38) and nonadolescent (22) mothers recruited from rural county health departments for participation in a voluntary home visitation intervention program. Four hypotheses were tested that associated home visitation with greater parenting skill and child development knowledge and safety. Adolescent mothers were expected to make greater gains but to lag behind nonadolescent mothers in child development knowledge, parenting skills knowledge, household safety, and use of community resources. The sample included 32% with a high school degree and 12% African American. 83% were in school. 85% lived at or below the US federal poverty level. Parent Educators provided weekly in-home education based on a manual and individualized curriculum. Parenting skills knowledge was measured by the Adolescent-Adult Parenting Inventory (Bavolek, 1984). Home safety was measured by Culp's Home Safety Checklist. Educators recorded use of 13 community services. Analysis of variance revealed that infant knowledge increased to the same level among all mothers regardless of adolescents' lesser knowledge at baseline. Parenting skill knowledge of child roles increased for both ages, but older mothers scored higher. Parenting skill knowledge of alternatives to corporal punishment increased similarly for both ages. No age or interactive effects were related to improvement in safety or use of community services. PMID:12294463

  19. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  20. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  1. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  2. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  3. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  4. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Area Primary Health Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  5. Home health nursing care agenda based on health policy in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hosihn; An, Jiyoung; Koabyashi, Mia

    2005-06-01

    Home health nursing care (HHNC) in Korea has taken on an important role under the mandate of the national health care system since 2000. This program was developed to verify the possibility of early discharge of hospitalized patients and cost containment through a research and development project that was conducted with the government from 1994 to 1999. The process of development of HHNC provided an opportunity to realize the advancement and changes in the system into a consumer-focused structure. This is an important turning point for the Korean health care system that suggests certain possibilities for building a foundation for further changes in the service delivery structure. The structure, which had been limited to a supplier-oriented model, is moving to a consumer-oriented structure. Accordingly, the major function and role of nursing policy makers in Korea is to develop an agenda and alternatives for policy-making in a systematic manner and to present implementation strategies clearly. PMID:15877685

  6. The Grimes Alternative School Program and Home Remedies Program. Interim Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jay R.

    This report describes and evaluates two programs which deal with chronic status offenders: the Grimes Alternative School Program, a delinquency prevention project which targets intermediate school (grades 4 and 5) students with chronic discipline and/or truant behaviors, and the Home Remedies Program, a short-term crisis intervention and…

  7. How to establish a perinatal home care program.

    PubMed

    Miller, T H

    1990-09-01

    Current clinical data indicates that despite advances in the obstetric and neonatal arenas, preterm birth and subsequent low birth weight infants continue to be born. Technology-based perinatal home care programs are the fastest growing segment of services available to high-risk pregnant women, recuperating post-partum women, and newborns. It is anticipated that these services will alter forever the traditional measures of care for high-risk pregnant women and newborns. PMID:10107048

  8. Bringing home the health humanities: narrative humility, structural competency, and engaged pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Tsevat, Rebecca K; Sinha, Anoushka A; Gutierrez, Kevin J; DasGupta, Sayantani

    2015-11-01

    As health humanities programs grow and thrive across the country, encouraging medical students to read, write, and become more reflective about their professional roles, educators must bring a sense of self-reflexivity to the discipline itself. In the health humanities, novels, patient histories, and pieces of reflective writing are often treated as architectural spaces or "homes" that one can enter and examine. Yet, narrative-based learning in health care settings does not always allow its participants to feel "at home"; when not taught with a critical attention to power and pedagogy, the health humanities can be unsettling and even dangerous. Educators can mitigate these risks by considering not only what they teach but also how they teach it.In this essay, the authors present three pedagogical pillars that educators can use to invite learners to engage more fully, develop critical awareness of medical narratives, and feel "at home" in the health humanities. These pedagogical pillars are narrative humility (an awareness of one's prejudices, expectations, and frames of listening), structural competency (attention to sources of power and privilege), and engaged pedagogy (the protection of students' security and well-being). Incorporating these concepts into pedagogical practices can create safe and productive classroom spaces for all, including those most vulnerable and at risk of being "unhomed" by conventional hierarchies and oppressive social structures. This model then can be translated through a parallel process from classroom to clinic, such that empowered, engaged, and cared-for learners become empowering, engaging, and caring clinicians. PMID:25945967

  9. Care Coordination/Home Telehealth: the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management to support the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Darkins, Adam; Ryan, Patricia; Kobb, Rita; Foster, Linda; Edmonson, Ellen; Wakefield, Bonnie; Lancaster, Anne E

    2008-12-01

    Between July 2003 and December 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) introduced a national home telehealth program, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT). Its purpose was to coordinate the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions and avoid their unnecessary admission to long-term institutional care. Demographic changes in the veteran population necessitate VHA increase its noninstitutional care (NIC) services 100% above its 2007 level to provide care for 110,000 NIC patients by 2011. By 2011, CCHT will meet 50% of VHA's anticipated NIC provision. CCHT involves the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management technologies. It helps patients live independently at home. Between 2003 and 2007, the census figure (point prevalence) for VHA CCHT patients increased from 2,000 to 31,570 (1,500% growth). CCHT is now a routine NIC service provided by VHA to support veteran patients with chronic conditions as they age. CCHT patients are predominantly male (95%) and aged 65 years or older. Strict criteria determine patient eligibility for enrollment into the program and VHA internally assesses how well its CCHT programs meet standardized clinical, technology, and managerial requirements. VHA has trained 5,000 staff to provide CCHT. Routine analysis of data obtained for quality and performance purposes from a cohort of 17,025 CCHT patients shows the benefits of a 25% reduction in numbers of bed days of care, 19% reduction in numbers of hospital admissions, and mean satisfaction score rating of 86% after enrolment into the program. The cost of CCHT is $1,600 per patient per annum, substantially less than other NIC programs and nursing home care. VHA's experience is that an enterprise-wide home telehealth implementation is an appropriate and cost-effective way of managing chronic care patients in both urban and rural settings. PMID:19119835

  10. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  11. Home Visiting: A Promising Early Intervention Strategy for At-Risk Families. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies, Committee on Appropriations, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The report reviews home visiting as an early intervention strategy to provide health, social, education, or other services to improve maternal and child health and well-being. The report describes: (1) the nature and scope of existing home-visiting programs in the United States and Europe; (2) the effectiveness of home visiting; (3) strategies…

  12. Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  13. Programmed Multiphasic Health Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershberg, P. I.

    1970-01-01

    Multiphase health screening procedures are advocated for detection and prevention of disease at an early stage through risk factor analysis. The use of an automated medical history questionnaire together with scheduled physical examination data provides a scanning input for computer printout. This system makes it possible to process laboratory results from 1,000 to 2,000 patients for biochemical determinations on an economically feasible base.

  14. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  15. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  16. Home Health Care Utilization: A Review of the Research for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadushin, Goldie

    2004-01-01

    The author reviewed the literature to identify the variables associated with home health care utilization using the Andersen-Newman model as a framework for analysis. Sixty-four studies published between 1985 and 2000 were identified through PUBMED, Sociofile, and PsycINFO databases. Home health care was defined as in-home skilled nursing,…

  17. Making the relationship work. Management of a hospital-based home health agency and hospital for-profit home health aide service.

    PubMed

    Scharf, J H; Lindner, M K; Gordon, J; Albers, J H

    1990-04-01

    In 1984, Overlook Hospital added a for-profit home health agency to its already established hospital-based home health agency. While the rationale for the development of two distinct organizations was sound, there were special legal, financial, and quality assurance issues and problems to consider. PMID:10104803

  18. Automated Health Alerts Using In-Home Sensor Data for Embedded Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rainer Dane; Rantz, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    We present an example of unobtrusive, continuous monitoring in the home for the purpose of assessing early health changes. Sensors embedded in the environment capture behavior and activity patterns. Changes in patterns are detected as potential signs of changing health. We first present results of a preliminary study investigating 22 features extracted from in-home sensor data. A 1-D alert algorithm was then implemented to generate health alerts to clinicians in a senior housing facility. Clinicians analyze each alert and provide a rating on the clinical relevance. These ratings are then used as ground truth for training and testing classifiers. Here, we present the methodology for four classification approaches that fuse multisensor data. Results are shown using embedded sensor data and health alert ratings collected on 21 seniors over nine months. The best results show similar performance for two techniques, where one approach uses only domain knowledge and the second uses supervised learning for training. Finally, we propose a health change detection model based on these results and clinical expertise. The system of in-home sensors and algorithms for automated health alerts provides a method for detecting health problems very early so that early treatment is possible. This method of passive in-home sensing alleviates compliance issues. PMID:27170900

  19. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  20. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  1. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  2. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  3. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  4. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  5. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Cornerstone Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  6. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  7. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Polivka, Barbara J.; Wills, Celia E.; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  8. Scope and Sequence for Vocational Home Economics Education in Oklahoma. Consumer and Homemaking Programs, Occupational Programs, Special Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    Intended for use by high school teachers of vocational home economics in Oklahoma to aid in local planning and developing of a nonrepetitious core curriculum to prepare students for home economics-related occupations and their roles as consumers and homemakers, this curriculum guide covers the entire course program for the high school years. Three…

  9. Eligibility for home oxygen programs and funding across Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Yves; Bernard, Sarah; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Canada, although medical insurance is generally universal, significant differences exist in the provision of home oxygen therapy across the country. OBJECTIVE: To systematically compare the terms of reference for home oxygen across Canada, with a focus on the clinical inclusion criteria to the programs. METHODS: The authors searched the terms of reference of the 10 Canadian provinces and three territories, focusing on general eligibility criteria for home oxygen (including blood gas criteria, and eligibility criteria for ambulatory and nocturnal oxygen), and compared the eligibility criteria to the widely accepted criteria of the Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial (NOTT) trial, the clinical recommendations of the Canadian Thoracic Society and the results of Cochrane reviews. RESULTS: The terms of reference for nine provinces were retrieved. All jurisdictions have similar criteria for long-term oxygen therapy, with slight differences in the thresholds of prescription and the clinical criteria defining ‘pulmonary hypertension’ or ‘cor pulmonale’. The use of oxyhemoglobin saturation as a criterion for funding is inconsistent. All nine provinces fund nocturnal oxygen, all with different clinical criteria. Funding for portable oxygen widely varies across provinces, whether the ambulatory equipment is offered to patients on long-term oxygen therapy or to those who have isolated exercise-induced desaturation. The terms of reimbursement are very heterogeneous. CONCLUSIONS: Heterogeneity exists in the criteria for eligibility to home oxygen programs and funding across Canada. Terms of prescription and reimbursement of oxygen are not necessarily supported by available evidence from the current literature in several Canadian jurisdictions. PMID:26306331

  10. WORKSHOP FOR THE PREPARATION OF HOME ECONOMICS TEACHERS TO TEACH WAGE EARNING PROGRAMS IN FOOD SERVICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FULTS, ANNA CAROL

    A SUMMER WORKSHOP WAS CONDUCTED IN 1965 TO PREPARE HOME ECONOMICS TEACHERS TO CONDUCT TRAINING PROGRAMS IN THE FOOD SERVICE AREA TO (1) PREPARE OLDER HIGH SCHOOL AND POST-HIGH SCHOOL YOUTH TO BECOME COOKS FOR NURSING HOMES, DAY CARE CENTERS, HOMES FOR CHILDREN, AND SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAMS AND (2) DEVELOP CURRICULUM MATERIALS IN THE FOOD SERVICE…

  11. Joint Explorations Program. A Supplement to Home Economics/Industrial Arts 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This Joint Explorations Program for Home Economics/Industrial Arts, middle years, is a guide and support document related to the curriculum guides for Home Economics 7-9, and Industrial Arts 7-9. Developed as part of the overall revision of the Home Economics and Industrial Arts programs for the junior high schools of Manitoba, the guide provides…

  12. 78 FR 53150 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting: Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home... Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. Date and Time: September 12,...

  13. 76 FR 12978 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of..., Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. Date and Time: March 23, 2011, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. EST. Place: Webinar. The Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home...

  14. 78 FR 9936 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA): PowerSaver Home Energy Retrofit Loan Pilot Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ..., 2011, HUD published a notice at 76 FR 17936 that announced HUD's FHA Home Energy Retrofit Loan Pilot... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Housing Administration (FHA): PowerSaver Home Energy Retrofit Loan Pilot... Home Energy Retrofit Loan Pilot Program (Retrofit Pilot Program) known as FHA PowerSaver, which is...

  15. Developing a preceptorship/mentorship model for home health care nurses.

    PubMed

    DeCicco, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Preceptorship and mentorship programs are used in the health care sector to educate nurses, enhance their leadership skills, and improve their quality of work life. Recognizing the importance of these initiatives, Saint Elizabeth Health Care sought funding to create an innovative model of preceptorship/mentorship that meets the unique needs of home health care nurses. The methods utilized included focus groups, key informant interviews, and a workflow analysis. Factors that influence preceptorship such as nursing workload, preceptor training and remuneration were examined to develop a new model that offers career enhancement and leadership opportunities for preceptors and mentors, and promotes a welcoming environment for preceptees. Reward and recognition programs were created for preceptors to acknowledge their leadership contribution at the front line. This study demonstrates how evidence and innovation were used to create a preceptorship/mentorship model to develop community nursing leaders of the future. PMID:18444063

  16. Experiences from development of home health care applications based on emerging Java technology.

    PubMed

    Lind, L; Sundvall, E; Ahlfeldt, H

    2001-01-01

    Home health care is an expanding area within the health care system. The idea of moving parts of the health care process from expensive specialised hospital care to primary health care and home health care might be attractive in a cost perspective. The introduction of home health care applications must be based on a rigorous analysis of necessary requirements to secure a safe and reliable health care. This article reports early experiences from the development of a home health care application based on emerging Java technologies such as the OSGi platform. A pilot application for follow-up of diabetes patients is presented and discussed in relation to a list of general requirements on home health care applications. PMID:11604851

  17. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    PubMed

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training. PMID:12557465

  18. Patterns of depression among adolescent mothers: Resilience related to father support and home visiting program.

    PubMed

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Kotake, Chie; Raskin, Maryna; Bumgarner, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The negative consequences of maternal depression are a major public health concern, both for mothers and for their children. Despite the high prevalence of depression among adolescent mothers, little is known about the patterns of adolescent mothers' depression in the early parenting years. The present study examined mothers' depression during the first 2 years following childbirth in a sample of 428 young mothers (20 or younger at first childbirth) who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of a home visiting parenting support program. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-reported Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Mothers were classified into groups based on whether their depressive symptoms were below or above the cutoff for clinically significant symptomatology. Depression groups (stable nondepressed, stable depressed, remitted depression) were associated with variations in mothers' satisfaction with support from the baby's father and enrollment in the home visiting program. Maternal depression was more likely to remit when mothers were satisfied with father support; assignment to the home visiting program was associated with mothers remaining mentally healthy. Results have clinical and policy implications for prevention and intervention programs. PMID:26460697

  19. Home-Based Care Program Reduces Disability And Promotes Aging In Place.

    PubMed

    Szanton, Sarah L; Leff, Bruce; Wolff, Jennifer L; Roberts, Laken; Gitlin, Laura N

    2016-09-01

    The Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program, funded by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, aims to reduce the impact of disability among low-income older adults by addressing individual capacities and the home environment. The program, described in this innovation profile, uses an interprofessional team (an occupational therapist, a registered nurse, and a handyman) to help participants achieve goals they set. For example, it provides assistive devices and makes home repairs and modifications that enable participants to navigate their homes more easily and safely. In the period 2012-15, a demonstration project enrolled 281 adults ages sixty-five and older who were dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and who had difficulty performing activities of daily living (ADLs). After completing the five-month program, 75 percent of participants had improved their performance of ADLs. Participants had difficulty with an average of 3.9 out of 8.0 ADLs at baseline, compared to 2.0 after five months. Symptoms of depression and the ability to perform instrumental ADLs such as shopping and managing medications also improved. Health systems are testing CAPABLE on a larger scale. The program has the potential to improve older adults' ability to age in place. PMID:27605633

  20. [Health hazards for immigrants when travelling to their home countries].

    PubMed

    Brunvatne, Reidun; Blystad, Hans; Hoel, Terje

    2002-06-20

    Vacations in the home country are important and positive events in the lives of immigrants, events that allow them to maintain contact with their culture, relatives and friends. However, vacations also carry certain health risks, though these risks can to some degree be prevented. Infectious disease is the greatest risk. Some children and adolescents also run the risk of female genital mutilation, forced marriage, and the risk og being left behind in the home country against their will. Among the notifiable diseases registered with the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS), five stand out as having a higher incidence in people of foreign background than in people of Norwegian origin: malaria, hepatitis A, shigella infection, typhoid and paratyphoid fever. This higher incidence is partly the result of less use of pre-travel vaccines and malaria prophylaxis. Immigrants as a group are exposed to varied risks and should be given high priority in relation to vaccines and malaria prophylaxis for travel abroad. High priority should also be given to preventive health measures designed to reduce the risk of female genital mutilation and other violations against children and young people on visit to their country of origin. PMID:12119784

  1. Wyandotte Neighborhood Stabilization Program: Retrofit of Two Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukachko, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district ground source heat pump (GSHP) system to service the project. This report details the retrofit of two existing houses in the program, and examines the energy efficiency recommendations for the homes. The report will be of interest to anyone planning an affordable, high performance retrofit of an existing home in a cold climate zone. Information from this report will also be useful to retrofit or weatherization program staff as some of the proposed retrofit solutions will apply to a wide range of projects. Preliminary results from the first complete house suggest that the technology package employed (which includes spray foam insulation and insulating sheathing) does meet the specific whole house water, air, and thermal control requirements, as well as, the project’s affordability goals. Monitoring of the GSHP system has been recommended and analysis of this information is not yet available.

  2. Wyandotte Neighborhood Stabilization Program: Retrofit of Two Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukachko, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report will detail the retrofit of 2 existing houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for retrofit construction at these homes. The report will be of interest to anyone planning an affordable, high performance retrofit of an existing home in a Cold Climate zone. Information from this report will also be useful to retrofit or weatherization program staff as some of the proposed retrofit solutions will apply to a wide range of projects. Preliminary results from the first complete house suggest that the technology package employed (which includes spray foam insulation and insulating sheathing) does meet the specific whole house water, air, and thermal control requirements, as well as, the project's affordability goals. Monitoring of the GSHP system has been recommended and analysis of this information is not yet available.

  3. Does Participation in Home-Delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults? Results of a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony D; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R; Locher, Julie L

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of all studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the keyword "Meal" was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based on self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to (1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, (2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, (3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and (4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  4. Does Participation in Home-delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults?: Results of a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anthony D.; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R.; Locher, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of ALL studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the Keyword “Meal” was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based upon self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to: 1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, 2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, 3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and 4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  5. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  6. Horizon's patient-centered medical home program shows practices need much more than payment changes to transform.

    PubMed

    Patel, Urvashi B; Rathjen, Carl; Rubin, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Skyrocketing costs and the uneven quality of patient care challenge the US health care system. Some health insurance companies are exploring patient-centered medical homes as a way to change incentives and transform the health care delivery system by increasing primary care providers' accountability for care coordination and outcomes. Horizon Healthcare Services, Inc., New Jersey's oldest and largest health insurance company, developed medical home programs that include financial incentives with essential support tools. Our experience in implementing and evaluating various approaches indicates that medical homes require intensive and targeted patient care coordination supported by committed primary care leadership, as well as new payment structures that include a monthly care coordination fee and outcome-based payments. Our experience also indicates that considerable nonmonetary support-such as an education program for population care coordinators, a medical home guide that offers effective ways to transform a practice into a medical home, and useful data sharing-are needed to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. PMID:22949451

  7. Construction work practices and conditions improved after 2-years' participation in the HomeSafe pilot program.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, David P; Hautaluoma, Jacob E; Ahmed, Taslim P; Keefe, Thomas J; Herron, Robert E; Bigelow, Philip L

    2003-01-01

    This study reevaluated changes in job-site safety audit scores for a cohort of residential construction workers that had protracted exposure to the HomeSafe pilot program for 2(1/2) years. The investigation was a repeated measure of a cohort study underway in the six-county metro area of Denver, Colo. The larger study was a longitudinal, quasi-experimental design with a cohort of residential construction workers within the HomeSafe strategic partnership between Occupational Safety and Health Administration Region VIII and the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Denver (HBA). Audits were conducted on residential construction sites. Study subjects were construction workers employed by partner or control companies within the study. Repeated measures of 41 companies showed significant improvement (p=.01) in audit scores, increasing from 71.8 to 76.8 after 2(1/2) years in the program. HomeSafe companies out-performed controls (p=.01) for both the retest group and previously unaudited HomeSafe companies. Prolonged exposure in the HomeSafe pilot program resulted in improved audit scores for companies within the program for at least 2 years. PMID:12809540

  8. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Careers Opportunity Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive...

  9. How to overcome barriers and establish a successful home HD program.

    PubMed

    Young, Bessie A; Chan, Christopher; Blagg, Christopher; Lockridge, Robert; Golper, Thomas; Finkelstein, Fred; Shaffer, Rachel; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2012-12-01

    Home hemodialysis (HD) is an underused dialysis modality in the United States, even though it provides an efficient and probably cost-effective way to provide more frequent or longer dialysis. With the advent of newer home HD systems that are easier for patients to learn, use, and maintain, patient and provider interest in home HD is increasing. Although barriers for providers are similar to those for peritoneal dialysis, home HD requires more extensive patient training, nursing education, and infrastructure support in order to maintain a successful program. In addition, because many physicians and patients do not have experience with home HD, reluctance to start home HD programs is widespread. This in-depth review describes barriers to home HD, focusing on patients, individual physicians and practices, and dialysis facilities, and offers suggestions for how to overcome these barriers and establish a successful home HD program. PMID:23037981

  10. How to Overcome Barriers and Establish a Successful Home HD Program

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christopher; Blagg, Christopher; Lockridge, Robert; Golper, Thomas; Finkelstein, Fred; Shaffer, Rachel; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2012-01-01

    Summary Home hemodialysis (HD) is an underused dialysis modality in the United States, even though it provides an efficient and probably cost-effective way to provide more frequent or longer dialysis. With the advent of newer home HD systems that are easier for patients to learn, use, and maintain, patient and provider interest in home HD is increasing. Although barriers for providers are similar to those for peritoneal dialysis, home HD requires more extensive patient training, nursing education, and infrastructure support in order to maintain a successful program. In addition, because many physicians and patients do not have experience with home HD, reluctance to start home HD programs is widespread. This in-depth review describes barriers to home HD, focusing on patients, individual physicians and practices, and dialysis facilities, and offers suggestions for how to overcome these barriers and establish a successful home HD program. PMID:23037981

  11. Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Helena; Gore, Rebecca J.; Boyer, Jon; Nobrega, Suzanne; Punnett, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors. Methods. A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity. Results. Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity. Conclusions. Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health. PMID:26380373

  12. A home health monitoring system including intelligent reporting and alerts.

    PubMed

    Garsden, H; Basilakis, J; Celler, B G; Huynh, K; Lovell, N H

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of an intelligent reporting and alerts system that has been designed with a specific goal to address the needs of managing chronic and complex disease through the use of home telecare technology. Our approach has been to develop these tools using as far as possible, open standards. Clinical measurement data gathered using home telecare and stored in a relational database in XML format is extracted and converted into a Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) as defined by the Health Level 7 (HL7) organization. Data trends are presented to the clinician as simple graphs and summary statistics (means, standard deviations) over time for an individual patient. Clinicians may receive this data by display through a Web-interface or by email or faxed reports. A Ripple Down Rules (RDR) knowledge base supports more complex decision-making provided in the Alerts module. The RDR output is incorporated into the output reports as a textual statement, and/or a graphical highlighting of key parameters in the trends images and tables. Rule development and validation is part of ongoing research. PMID:17270948

  13. Identifying the key performance improvement domains for home health agencies

    PubMed Central

    Koru, Güneş; Alhuwail, Dari; Rosati, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to support home health agencies (HHAs) in the United States (US) in their individualized quality assessment and performance improvement (QAPI) initiatives by identifying their key performance improvement domains (KPIDs). Methods: Qualitative research was conducted by following the Framework method. Rich contextual data were obtained through focus group meetings participated by domain experts. The analysis results were further refined in an online forum and validated at a final meeting. Results: Four focus groups involving a total of 20 participants resulted in useful discussions during which various perspectives were expressed by the expert participants. A well-defined set of 17 KPIDs emerged under four categories, namely, economical value, sociocultural sensitivity, interpersonal relationships, and clinical capabilities. Conclusions: The feedback we received from the focus groups indicates that performance improvement in HHAs is a lot more complicated than simply assessing whether certain clinical tasks are performed. The KPIDs identified in this study can help HHAs in their focused and individualized QAPI initiatives. Therefore, the results should be immediately relevant, interesting, and useful to the home care industry and policy makers in the US. PMID:27092266

  14. Directory of Health Education Programs for Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Kansas City. Center on Rural Elderly.

    Health education programs for older adults can be an efficient and cost-effective way to meet the challenge of a healthy old age. This directory describes 36 health education programs for the rural elderly in the areas of comprehensive programs, mental health, nutrition, physical health (including exercise), medication, safety, and health…

  15. Migrant Education Health Program 1990. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    The Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program (CMHP) together plan and implement a comprehensive health program for migrant summer school students on a yearly basis. This report provides statistical data about the health status of the migrant students and the health services provided to them during the 1990…

  16. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  17. Weatherizing the Homes of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Clients: A Programmatic Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.

    2002-09-16

    The purpose of this project was to assess the relationships between two federal programs that support low income households, the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The specific question addressed by this research is: what impact does weatherizing homes of LIHEAP recipients have on the level of need for LIHEAP assistance? The a priori expectation is that the level of need will decrease. If this is the case, then it can be argued that a non-energy benefit of WAP is the reduction in the level of need for LIHEAP assistance for households receiving weatherization assistance. The study area for this project was Boston, Massachusetts, which is representative of large northern urban areas. Additionally, Boston was chosen because one of its social service agencies, Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), administers both WAP and LIHEAP programs. ABCD has a substantial client base of low-income households and was willing to cooperate in this study. In the State of Massachusetts, an income test is used to determine whether low-income households qualify for standard LIHEAP benefits. Benefits provided to eligible households are determined by a schedule that gauges benefit levels based on household income and number of members in the household. Additionally, households that consume large amounts of primary heating fuel can also qualify an additional high energy subsidy. It was expected that weatherization's biggest influence on the LIHEAP program would be in reducing the number of households qualifying for high energy subsidies. Data were collected for three groups of households that received both weatherization and LIHEAP assistance and for one control group that only received LIHEAP assistance. Table ES-1 indicates the sample sizes, weatherization dates, and winter time periods when changes in energy consumption and receipt of LIHEAP benefits could be expected to be observed. The reason why there is a lag

  18. Preparing Nursing Homes for the Future of Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, M.; Galambos, C.; Vogelsmeier, A.; Flesner, M.; Popejoy, L.; Mueller, J.; Shumate, S.; Elvin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Our purpose was to describe how we prepared 16 nursing homes (NHs) for health information exchange (HIE) implementation. Background NH HIE connecting internal and external stakeholders are in their infancy. U.S. initiatives are demonstrating HIE use to increase access and securely exchange personal health information to improve patient outcomes. Method To achieve our objectives we conducted readiness assessments, performed 32 hours of clinical observation and developed 6 use cases, and conducted semi-structured interviews with 230 participants during 68 site visits to validate use cases and explore HIE. Results All 16 NHs had technology available to support resident care. Resident care technologies were integrated much more with internal than external stakeholders. A wide range of technologies were accessible only during administrative office hours. Six non-emergent use cases most commonly communicated by NH staff were: 1) scheduling appointments, 2) Laboratory specimen drawing, 3) pharmacy orders and reconciliation, 4) social work discharge planning, 5) admissions and pre-admissions, and 6) pharmacy-medication reconciliation. Emerging themes from semi-structured interviews about use cases included: availability of information technology in clinical settings, accessibility of HIE at the point of care, and policies/procedures for sending/receiving secure personal health information. Conclusion We learned that every facility needed additional technological and human resources to build an HIE network. Also, use cases help clinical staff apply theoretical problems of HIE implementation and helps them think through the implications of using HIE to communicate about clinical care. PMID:26171073

  19. Early Head Start Home Visitation: The Role of Implementation in Bolstering Program Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones Harden, Brenda; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel; Raikes, Helen; Vogel, Cheri

    2012-01-01

    Home visitation has emerged as a key strategy for promoting child and family well-being in the current policy context. This article examines the effectiveness of the Early Head Start (EHS) home-based program for children and families at the end of the program and 2 years later, with a particular focus on the role of program implementation in the…

  20. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  1. Implementation Differences of Two Staffing Models in the German Home Visiting Program "Pro Kind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Tilman; Jungmann, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    As different competencies or professional backgrounds may affect the quality of program implementation, staffing is a critical issue in home visiting. In this study, N = 430 women received home visits delivered either by a tandem of a midwife and a social worker or by only one home visitor (primarily midwives, continuous model). The groups were…

  2. A Model Education Program for Juvenile Detention Homes in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Paul C.

    This model, developed to establish standards for effective detention home education, is based on results of a questionnaire sent to staff members of 45 youth homes in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin. The model covers seven aspects of youth home education: (1) purpose, (2) target persons, (3) personnel, (4) program, (5) procedures,…

  3. 77 FR 65574 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Programs Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Programs Data Collection--Progress Reporting AGENCY: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD... Miller, Reports Liaison Officer, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, Department of...

  4. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  5. Parents' Perspectives: An Evaluation of Case Management Interventions in Home Visiting Programs for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Susan F.

    2007-01-01

    In home visiting programs for children younger than age three, home visitors work with parents to enhance the child's environment. This study examined how the home visitor-parent relationship, amount of contact, and level of need affected the intensity of case management interventions received. Researchers interviewed 90 mothers to measure the…

  6. Funding and planning: what you need to know for starting or expanding a home hemodialysis program.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kirsten; McFarlane, Phil A; Marshall, Mark R; Eastwood, Deborah O; Morton, Rachael L

    2015-04-01

    Planning and funding a home hemodialysis (HD) program requires a well-organized effort and close collaboration between clinicians and administrators. This resource provides guidance on the processes that are involved, including a thorough situational analysis of the dialysis landscape, emphasizing the opportunity for a home HD program; careful consideration of the clinical and operational characteristics of a proposed home HD program at your institution; the development of a compelling business case, highlighting the clinical and organizational benefits of a home HD program; and careful construction and evaluation of a request for proposal. PMID:25925821

  7. Space radiation health program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program intends to establish the scientific basis for the radiation protection of humans engaged in the exploration of space, with particular emphasis on the establishment of a firm knowledge base to support cancer risk assessment for future planetary exploration. This document sets forth the technical and management components involved in the implementation of the Space Radiation Health Program, which is a major part of the Life Sciences Division (LSD) effort in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For the purpose of implementing this program, the Life Sciences Division supports scientific research into the fundamental mechanisms of radiation effects on living systems and the interaction of radiation with cells, tissues, and organs, and the development of instruments and processes for measuring radiation and its effects. The Life Sciences Division supports researchers at universities, NASA field centers, non-profit research institutes and national laboratories; establishes interagency agreements for cooperative use and development of facilities; and conducts a space-based research program using available and future spaceflight vehicles.

  8. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  9. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  10. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  11. Promoting Health of People with Intellectual Disabilities: Views of Professionals Working in Group Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlström, Lina; Bergström, Helena; Marttila, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Deinstitutionalisation has influenced the life situation for people with intellectual disabilities, whilst the experiences of health promotion in group homes now are limited. This study aimed to explore aspects important to consider when promoting health amongst persons with intellectual disabilities in group homes, from the perspective of…

  12. Home Exercise Programs for Adults With Neurological Injuries: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to describe current occupational therapy practices in the usage and prescription of and clinical reasoning process supporting home exercise programs (HEPs) for clients with neurological injuries (CWNIs). METHOD. A survey was distributed via mail to 2,000 members of the American Occupational Therapy Association. The survey questions concerned basic demographics, current HEP practices, and attitudes toward using HEPs with CWNIs. RESULTS. In the 360 returned surveys, occupational therapists reported numerous benefits of using HEPs and were able to clearly articulate their clinical reasoning. Commonly reported HEP activities were preparatory in nature, and the most frequently prescribed dosage was 16–30 min daily. Most therapists relied on the same clinical reasoning process but varied in implementation methods. CONCLUSION. This study’s results highlight the gaps between evidence and practice. The active ingredients in HEPs for CWNIs need to be more clearly defined and described. PMID:27089296

  13. Supporting SIDS Families: The Public Health Nurse SIDS Home Visit.

    PubMed

    Stastny, Penny F; Keens, Thomas G; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-05-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) death has a devastating effect on parents. There is no known cause, so parents experience guilt about what they might have done or not done to contribute to the death. Although some SIDS parents may receive support from family and friends, the public health nurse (PHN) has an important professional role in providing grief support, SIDS education, and offering SIDS resources and referrals. Based on years of clinical practice, we recommend the following: Perform the home visit as soon as possible. Show care and compassion. Personalize the baby by using his or her name and asking to see photographs. Reassure the parents that grief is a process which takes time. Educate about what SIDS is and what it is not. Increasingly, SIDS deaths occur in the presence of risk factors. Explain that risk factors are not causes of death. As an authority in health care, reassuring families that they did not cause their baby's death has a tremendous impact on relieving guilt. Putting newly bereaved SIDS parents in contact with other SIDS parents is one of the most helpful actions a PHN can take to help families. PMID:26822270

  14. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    Background To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. Material/Methods This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50–70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30–50 min. Results The experimental group’s body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=−2.94, p=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  15. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50-70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30-50 min. RESULTS The experimental group's body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=-2.94, p=.005). CONCLUSIONS Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  16. Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.

    2010-01-01

    This document establishes the policy and procedures for the HSP and is authorized through the Director, Johnson Space Center (JSC). This document delineates the medical operations requirements for the HSP. The HSP goals are accomplished through an awareness campaign and procedures such as limiting access to flight crewmembers, medical screening, and controlling flight crewmember activities. NASA's Human Space Flight Program uses strategic risk mitigation to achieve mission success while protecting crew health and safety. Infectious diseases can compromise crew health and mission success, especially in the immediate preflight period. The primary purpose of the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program (HSP) is to mitigate the risk of occurrence of infectious disease among astronaut flight crews in the immediate preflight period. Infectious diseases are contracted through direct person-to-person contact, and through contact with infectious material in the environment. The HSP establishes several controls to minimize crew exposure to infectious agents. The HSP provides a quarantine environment for the crew that minimizes contact with potentially infectious material. The HSP also limits the number of individuals who come in close contact with the crew. The infection-carrying potential of these primary contacts (PCs) is minimized by educating them in ways to avoid infections and avoiding contact with the crew if they are or may be sick. The transmission of some infectious diseases can be greatly curtailed by vaccinations. PCs are strongly encouraged to maintain updated vaccinations.

  17. The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

    2011-10-01

    Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P < 0.001) whereby feeding the HP diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily. PMID:22005407

  18. Health home visiting for vulnerable families: what has occurred and what is yet to arrive?

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Joanne M; Achat, Helen M

    2012-01-01

    Sustained health home visiting (SHHV) is a valuable means of implementing early intervention for vulnerable families with infants or young children. This first of a two-part report describes clients and identifies nurses' activities with or on behalf of clients as part of a pilot SHHV program undertaken within a socioeconomically disadvantaged suburban area of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A forthcoming report describes the results of the intervention. Child and family health nurses visited vulnerable clients who were pregnant and/or had an infant aged 36 months or younger. Interventions consisted of direct and indirect (i.e. services involving a third party) client contact. Nurses documented all activities undertaken with or on behalf of clients using pre-determined codes. Over 29 months, the program accepted 136 referrals and 118 (87%) consented to the evaluation. Families had a mean of eight risk factors, which commonly included current mental health symptoms or disorders (49%), a history or current experience of domestic violence (51%) and being known to the Department of Community Services (40%). Nurses' most frequent interventions addressed the main carer's emotional and health needs, and infant development. Clients' level of need required coordinated care from a specialised multidisciplinary team, which was unavailable to program clients and their families. PMID:22394659

  19. Early Childhood Health--Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence S.

    The Maimonides Early Childhood Health-Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program is described. The program provides a broad range of preventive services to children who are five years of age and younger. Services are organized into Post-Natal and Pre-School Programs. The Post-Natal Program offers group education and counseling, individual…

  20. Health consumption as work: the home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool.

    PubMed

    Childerhose, Janet E; Macdonald, Margaret E

    2013-06-01

    A growing array of biomedical goods and services has become central to the North American experience of navigating illness and pursuing good health. Yet despite the utility of consumption as an analytical framework within the social sciences, the selection, purchase, and use of biomedical goods and services has been understudied. By using the home pregnancy test as a case study, we suggest new approaches to thinking about the consumption of these goods and services. We chose the home pregnancy test because it is the best-known example of a mass-produced diagnostic tool used by consumers. We draw on two sources of data for this qualitative analysis: a set of stories submitted between 2003 and 2005 by women and men to an online exhibit mounted by the National Institutes of Health called "A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit," which we analysed between 2006 and 2007; and web sampling conducted in 2009 and 2010 of personal web and video logs of women and men who have posted stories and opinions about their experiences with contemporary home pregnancy testing products. We adapt the term "domestication" from Science and Technology Studies scholarship to describe the movement of diagnostic devices into homes for use by consumers. Specifically, we propose that the consumption of domesticated biomedical devices, goods, and services should be theorized as work performed by consumers, in two senses: as a form of tool use that allows non-experts to produce diagnostic knowledge about their own bodies and health; and as the ongoing biopolitical work that is expected of citizens to produce healthy bodies. Our paper draws attention to these understudied phenomena, while suggesting new approaches to theorizing the social and cultural elements of goods and services for health. PMID:23608088

  1. Cost Analysis of a Home-Based Nurse Care Coordination Program

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Karen Dorman; Stetzer, Frank; Adams, Scott J; Bub, Linda Denison; Schlidt, Andrea; Colorafi, Karen Jiggins

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a home-based care coordination program focused on medication self-management would affect the cost of care to the Medicare program and whether the addition of technology, a medication-dispensing machine, would further reduce cost. Design Randomized, controlled, three-arm longitudinal study. Setting Participant homes in a large Midwestern urban area. Participants Older adults identified as having difficulty managing their medications at discharge from Medicare Home Health Care (N = 414). Intervention A team consisting of advanced practice nurses (APNs) and registered nurses (RNs) coordinated care for two groups: home-based nurse care coordination (NCC) plus a pill organizer group and NCC plus a medication-dispensing machine group. Measurements To measure cost, participant claims data from 2005 to 2011 were retrieved from Medicare Part A and B Standard Analytical Files. Results Ordinary least squares regression with covariate adjustment was used to estimate monthly dollar savings. Total Medicare costs were $447 per month lower in the NCC plus pill organizer group (P = .11) than in a control group that received usual care. For participants in the study at least 3 months, total Medicare costs were $491 lower per month in the NCC plus pill organizer group (P = .06) than in the control group. The cost of the NCC plus pill organizer intervention was $151 per month, yielding a net savings of $296 per month or $3,552 per year. The cost of the NCC plus medication-dispensing machine intervention was $251 per month, and total Medicare costs were $409 higher per month than in the NCC plus pill organizer group. Conclusion Nurse care coordination plus a pill organizer is a cost-effective intervention for frail elderly Medicare beneficiaries. The addition of the medication machine did not enhance the cost effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:25482242

  2. Outcomes in a Nursing Home Transition Case-Management Program Targeting New Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomber, Robert; Kang, Taewoon; Graham, Carrie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The Providing Assistance to Caregivers in Transition (PACT) program offers nursing home discharge planning and case management for individuals in the transitional period following a return to the community. The PACT program targeted individuals newly admitted to nursing homes and worked with a family caregiver to develop and implement a…

  3. MANUAL OF OPERATION FOR VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAMS IN JOB TRAINING IN HIGH SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    AS REQUIRED BY THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ACT OF 1963, PART OF THE HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAM INCLUDES CLASSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS AND BOYS WHO WISH TO PREPARE FOR GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT UTILIZING HOME ECONOMICS KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS. OHIO OFFERS THE COOPERATIVE 2-YEAR PROGRAM, AND THE OCCUPATIONAL WORK-EXPERIENCE WHICH IS DESIGNED PRIMARILY FOR THE 11TH-…

  4. MCHP/VIP: Mother-Child Home Program of the Verbal Interaction Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbal Interaction Project, Freeport, NY.

    This report to the Joint Dissemination Review Panel of the Office of Education and the National Institute of Education provides an overview of the Mother-Child Home Program of the Verbal Interaction Project: a voluntary, home-based early education program for low-income pre- preschoolers (2- and 3-year-old children), their mothers and other adults…

  5. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…

  6. 76 FR 22713 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation; Notice of..., Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program Evaluation. Date and Time: Thursday, May 5..., tpring.westbrook@acf.hhs.gov . Supplementary Information: The Advisory Committee on the Maternal,...

  7. 76 FR 12977 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation AGENCY... Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. SUMMARY: HRSA and ACF announce through this notice the establishment of the Advisory Committee on the Maternal,...

  8. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  9. Outcomes Assessment Handbook: How To Develop a Practical Outcomes Assessment Program for a Home Study School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Robert J.

    This handbook is designed to provide school decision makers with a global view of how assessment programs for home study schools are developed. Outcomes assessment (OA) is a required element for recognition by the National Home Study Council Accrediting Committee and hence for member schools. This handbook is designed to enable program developers…

  10. 24 CFR 3288.215 - Effect on other manufactured home program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect on other manufactured home... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM State Dispute Resolution Programs in Non-HUD Administered States § 3288.215 Effect on other manufactured...

  11. 24 CFR 3288.215 - Effect on other manufactured home program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effect on other manufactured home... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM State Dispute Resolution Programs in Non-HUD Administered States § 3288.215 Effect on other manufactured...

  12. YogaHome: teaching and research challenges in a yoga program with homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Farkas, Jean

    2012-01-01

    YogaHome is a therapeutic yoga program for homeless women. Developing and refining YogaHome provided a unique opportunity to explore the process of teaching yoga to women faced with the physical and emotional stress of living in a homeless shelter. Unique teaching and research challenges are presented and recommendations for future programs are discussed. PMID:23070681

  13. 24 CFR 3288.215 - Effect on other manufactured home program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect on other manufactured home... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM State Dispute Resolution Programs in Non-HUD Administered States § 3288.215 Effect on other manufactured...

  14. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  15. Rochester’s Healthy Home: A community-based innovation to promote environmental health action

    PubMed Central

    Kuholski, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Environmental hazards in the home can contribute significantly to disease. These hazards disproportionately affect low income, urban, and minority children. Childhood lead poisoning and asthma are prime examples of health concerns to which poor housing conditions may contribute significantly. A community-academic partnership in Rochester, New York created a model Healthy Home, an interactive museum in a typical city home, to help residents, property owners, contractors, and community groups reduce environmental hazards. The Healthy Home project educates visitors about home environmental health hazards, demonstrates low-cost methods for reducing home hazards, and helps visitors develop individualized strategies for action. In its first year of operation, over 700 people visited the Healthy Home. Evaluation surveys indicate that the Healthy Home experience motivated visitors to take action to reduce environmental hazards in their homes. Follow-up phone interviews indicate that most visitors took some action to reduce home environmental hazards. The Healthy Home has established a diverse Advisory Council to share its messages more broadly, invite input into future directions, and recruit visitors. This paper presents experiences from the Healthy Home’s first year, highlighting the partnership principles that guided its development and lessons learned from the process. PMID:20634943

  16. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  17. Impact of cooking and home food preparation interventions among adults: outcomes and implications for future programs

    PubMed Central

    Reicks, Marla; Trofholz, Amanda C.; Stang, Jamie S; Laska, Melissa N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cooking programs are growing in popularity; however an extensive review has not examined overall impact. Therefore, this study reviewed previous research on cooking/home food preparation interventions and diet and health-related outcomes among adults and identified implications for practice and research. Design Literature review and descriptive summative method. Main outcome measures Dietary intake, knowledge/skills, cooking attitudes and self-efficacy/confidence, health outcomes. Analysis Articles evaluating effectiveness of interventions that included cooking/home food preparation as the primary aim (January 1980 through December 2011) were identified via OVID MEDLINE, Agricola and Web of Science databases. Studies grouped according to design and outcomes were reviewed for validity using an established coding system. Results were summarized for several outcome categories. Results Of 28 studies identified, 12 included a control group with six as non-randomized and six as randomized controlled trials. Evaluation was done post-intervention for five studies, pre- and post-intervention for 23 and beyond post-intervention for 15. Qualitative and quantitative measures suggested a positive influence on main outcomes. However, non-rigorous study designs, varying study populations, and use of non-validated assessment tools limited stronger conclusions. Conclusions and Implications Well-designed studies are needed that rigorously evaluate long-term impact on cooking behavior, dietary intake, obesity and other health outcomes. PMID:24703245

  18. Preventive home visits and health – experiences among very old people

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As more people reach older age, there is a growing interest in improving old person’s health, activity, independence and social participation, thereby adding quality to the extended years. Preventive home visits (PHV) programs for old people have received much attention in recent decades. A large body of research shows mixed effects, and argues that a home visit is a complex social process influenced by numerous factors. To evaluate the impact of PHV, as well as making decisions on whether, how, and to whom the service should be provided, requires a deeper understanding of PHV than we have now. Consequently, the aim of the study was to describe the variations in older people’s (80+) experiences of a single preventive home visit and its consequences for health. Methods Seventeen participants between 80 and 92 years of age who had all received a structured PHV were interviewed in their own homes. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenographic method, looking at the variations in the participants’ experiences. Results The interviews revealed four categories: “The PHV made me visible and proved my human value”; “The PHV brought a feeling of security”; “The PHV gave an incentive to action”; and “The PHV was not for me”. Conclusions The experiences of a PHV were twofold. On one hand, the positive experiences indicate that one structured PHV was able to empower the participants and strengthen their self-esteem, making them feel in control over their situation and more aware of the importance of keeping several steps ahead. Together this could motivate them to take measures and engage in health-promoting activities. On the other hand, the PHV was experienced as being of no value by a few. These findings may partly explain the positive results from PHV interventions and emphasize that one challenge for health care professionals is to motivate older people who are healthy and independent to engage in health-promoting and disease

  19. Medicare personnel qualifications for therapists and home health agency compliance.

    PubMed

    Gold, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Together with the updated Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule published in the Federal Register, November 27, 2007, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) revised the personnel qualification standards for therapy services by amending Medicare Regulation 42 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 484.4. These new qualifications and grandfathering provisions applied to home health January 1, 2008 and will apply to all settings by December 31, 2009. As stated by CMS, these changes were necessary to have consistent standards for personnel providing therapy services in all settings, to correct outdated terminology related to relevant professional organizations, and to update the licensure, training, and education requirements for all therapists, whether trained in the United States or in a foreign setting. It is important for agencies to review the requirements now because some therapy staff may need the next year to fulfill certain educational and national examination requirements, depending on their state of practice, and to be considered qualified based on the grandfathering provisions. PMID:19001920

  20. Identifying Feasible Physical Activity Programs for Long-Term Care Homes in the Ontario Context

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Saad; Newhouse, Ian; Malik, Ali; Heckman, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured exercise programs for frail institutionalized seniors have shown improvement in physical, functional, and psychological health of this population. However, the ‘feasibility’ of implementation of such programs in real settings is seldom discussed. The purpose of this systematic review was to gauge feasibility of exercise and falls prevention programs from the perspective of long-term care homes in Ontario, given the recent changes in funding for publically funded physiotherapy services. Method Six electronic databases were searched by two independent researchers for randomized controlled trials that targeted long-term care residents and included exercise as an independent component of the intervention. Results A total of 39 studies were included in this review. A majority of these interventions were led by physiotherapist(s), carried out three times per week for 30–45 minutes per session. However, a few group-based interventions that were led by long-term care staff, volunteers, or trained non-exercise specialists were identified that also required minimal equipment. Conclusion This systematic review has identified ‘feasible’ physical activity and falls prevention programs that required minimal investment in staff and equipment, and demonstrated positive outcomes. Implementation of such programs represents cost-effective means of providing long-term care residents with meaningful gains in physical, psychological, and social health. PMID:26180563

  1. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  2. Rapid EHR development and implementation using web and cloud-based architecture in a large home health and hospice organization.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Charlotte A; Teenier, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Health care organizations have long been limited to a small number of major vendors in their selection of an electronic health record (EHR) system in the national and international marketplace. These major EHR vendors have in common base systems that are decades old, are built in antiquated programming languages, use outdated server architecture, and are based on inflexible data models [1,2]. The option to upgrade their technology to keep pace with the power of new web-based architecture, programming tools and cloud servers is not easily undertaken due to large client bases, development costs and risk [3]. This paper presents the decade-long efforts of a large national provider of home health and hospice care to select an EHR product, failing that to build their own and failing that initiative to go back into the market in 2012. The decade time delay had allowed new technologies and more nimble vendors to enter the market. Partnering with a new start-up company doing web and cloud based architecture for the home health and hospice market, made it possible to build, test and implement an operational and point of care system in 264 home health locations across 40 states and three time zones in the United States. This option of "starting over" with the new web and cloud technologies may be posing a next generation of new EHR vendors that retells the Blackberry replacement by iPhone story in healthcare. PMID:24943570

  3. Program characteristics of home-delivered meals programs for persons with HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Balsam, A; Grant, N; Rogers, B L

    1996-02-01

    The nutritional status of persons with HIV and AIDS [PWAs] is constantly challenged throughout the progression of the illness. Home-delivered meals programs for PWAs are rapidly developing across the country to address this problem among the growing population of people with HIV infection and AIDS. This study examined client socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, ethnicity), types of services offered by these programs, organizational and financial criteria, and characteristics of survey respondents. Data for this study was obtained from 15 of the 17 known home-delivered meals programs for PWAs in the United States through an original, cross-sectional survey instrument conducted by telephone interview between March 1994 and May 1994. Results from this study show an increase in the number of minority populations who participate in these programs (36% African-American and 12% Hispanic vs. 51% Caucasian), as well as women (17.2%) and children (7%). Geographic location was an important determinant for program eligibility. The number of meals served weekly varied greatly (from 510 to 12,600 per week). Other significant services included nutrition counselling, newsletters, and holiday-basket programs. Enhancing service-delivery systems was one of the more prevalent "high-priority" concerns cited, especially with regard to food quality and safety. These results show that these programs are catering increasingly to minority populations, women and children, and that they are expanding their services to meet the growing needs of their client populations. These findings suggest that there is a greater need for meals and other home-based services for persons living with HIV and AIDS. PMID:8903582

  4. Rehabilitation outcome in home-based versus supervised exercise programs for chronically dizzy patients.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hsu, Li-Chi; Chen, Chih-Chun; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercise between supervised and home-based programs in young and senior age groups of patients with chronic dizziness. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Dynamic gait index (DGI), Tinetti fall risk performance scales and Timed "Up and Go" test (TUG) were administered to patients on their initial and follow-up visits for forty-one patients suffering from chronic dizziness. Twenty-eight patients received three 30-min vestibular training exercise sessions per week. Thirteen patients who could not visit our clinic on regular basis were instructed to do the same set of exercises at home, with the same duration and frequency. All scales were evaluated again on their follow-up visits 2 months later. Patients in both groups showed statistically significant improvement in DHI and Tinetti scales. A higher percentage of patients in the supervised-exercise-program (SP) group showed clinically significant outcome improvements. Age was not a predictive factor for rehabilitation outcome. We concluded that for all ages of chronically dizzy patients, 2 months of VR can reduce handicap, improve balance function and a consequent improvement of life quality. Health care professionals need to be educated about the importance of rehabilitation program for treatment of chronic dizziness. PMID:20022390

  5. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system. PMID:24889943

  6. Health Is Academic. A Guide to Coordinated School Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva, Ed.; Wooley, Susan Frelick, Ed.; Northrop, Daphne, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers that define comprehensive school health programs and their components and provide action steps for their implementation at the local, state, and national levels: (1) "Linking Health and Learning: An Overview of Coordinated School Health Programs" (Floretta Dukes McKenzie and Julius B. Richmond); (2)…

  7. Ethiopia's health extension program: improving health through community involvement.

    PubMed

    Banteyerga, Hailom

    2011-07-01

    The Health Extension Program is one of the most innovative community-based health programs in Ethiopia. It is based on the assumption that access to and quality of primary health care in rural communities can be improved through transfer of health knowledge and skills to households. Since it became operational in 2004-2005, the Program has had a tangible effect on the thinking and practices of rural people regarding disease prevention, family health, hygiene and environmental sanitation. It has enabled Ethiopia to increase primary health care coverage from 76.9% in 2005 to 90% in 2010. PMID:21778960

  8. Occupational health of home care aides: results of the safe home care survey

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Margaret M; Markkanen, Pia K; Galligan, Catherine J; Sama, Susan R; Kriebel, David; Gore, Rebecca J; Brouillette, Natalie M; Okyere, Daniel; Sun, Chuan; Punnett, Laura; Laramie, Angela K; Davis, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In countries with ageing populations, home care (HC) aides are among the fastest growing jobs. There are few quantitative studies of HC occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess quantitatively the OSH hazards and benefits for a wide range of HC working conditions, and (2) compare OSH experiences of HC aides who are employed via different medical and social services systems in Massachusetts, USA. Methods HC aides were recruited for a survey via agencies that employ aides and schedule their visits with clients, and through a labour union of aides employed directly by clients or their families. The questionnaire included detailed questions about the most recent HC visits, as well as about individual aides’ OSH experiences. Results The study population included 1249 HC aides (634 agency-employed, 615 client-employed) contributing information on 3484 HC visits. Hazards occurring most frequently related to musculoskeletal strain, exposure to potentially infectious agents and cleaning chemicals for infection prevention and experience of violence. Client-hired and agency-hired aides had similar OSH experiences with a few exceptions, including use of sharps and experience of verbal violence. Conclusions The OSH experience of HC aides is similar to that of aides in institutional healthcare settings. Despite OSH challenges, HC aides enjoy caring for others and the benefits of HC work should be enhanced. Quantification of HC hazards and benefits is useful to prioritise resources for the development of preventive interventions and to provide an evidence base for policy-setting. PMID:26209318

  9. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  10. Parents as Teachers Health Literacy Demonstration project: integrating an empowerment model of health literacy promotion into home-based parent education.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lauren N; Smith, Sandra A; Thomson, Nicole R

    2015-03-01

    The Parents as Teachers (PAT) Health Literacy Demonstration project assessed the impact of integrating data-driven reflective practices into the PAT home visitation model to promote maternal health literacy. PAT is a federally approved Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting program with the goal of promoting school readiness and healthy child development. This 2-year demonstration project used an open-cohort longitudinal design to promote parents' interactive and reflective skills, enhance health education, and provide direct assistance to personalize and act on information by integrating an empowerment paradigm into PAT's parent education model. Eight parent educators used the Life Skills Progression instrument to tailor the intervention to each of 103 parent-child dyads. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and logistic regression combined with qualitative data demonstrated that mothers achieved overall significant improvements in health literacy, and that home visitors are important catalysts for these improvements. These findings support the use of an empowerment model of health education, skill building, and direct information support to enable parents to better manage personal and child health and health care. PMID:24957219

  11. Process Evaluation of a Home-Based Program to Reduce Diet-Related Cancer Risk: The "WIN at Home Series."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Following media recruitment campaign, WIN at Home, series of diet-related booklets mailed to participants, was evaluated through survey of 226 participants (75 percent). Results showed that 97 percent learned about program through media, women were more likely to learn about it from personal sources, 57 percent shared information with spouses, and…

  12. Effectiveness of a Home Exercise Program in Combination with Ultrasound Therapy for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, İrfan; Eroğlu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:25540479

  13. Effect of a home intervention program on pediatric asthma in an environmental justice community.

    PubMed

    Shani, Zalika; Scott, Richard G; Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Johnson, John H; Williams, Ellen R; Hampton, Janiene; Ramprasad, Vatsala

    2015-03-01

    Asthma prevalence rates are at an all-time high in the United States with over 25 million persons diagnosed with asthma. African Americans and other minorities have higher asthma prevalence and higher exposure to environmental factors that worsen asthma as compared to Caucasians. This article describes the evaluation of an inner-city home-based asthma education and environmental remediation program that addressed both indoor and outdoor triggers through collaboration between a health system and local environmental justice organization. The program enrolled 132 children older than 2.5 years and centers on a 4- to 6-week intervention with peer counselors using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Asthma Home Environment Checklist and the You Can Control Asthma curriculum. Families receive asthma-friendly environmental home kits. Peer counselors reinforce key asthma management messages and facilitate the completion of Asthma Action Plans. The environmental justice community partner organized block cleanups to reduce outdoor triggers. The evaluation used a pretest-posttest design to assess changes in client behavior and asthma symptoms. Data were collected at baseline and during a 6-month postintervention period. Participants saw enhanced conditions on asthma severity and control. The improvement was greatest for children whose asthma was considered "severe" based on the validated Asthma Control Test. Other positive results include the following: greater completion of Asthma Action Plans, significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits (p = .006), and substantial decreases in school absenteeism (p = .008) and use of rescue medications (p = .049). The evaluation suggests that the program was effective in improving asthma self-management in a high-risk population living within an environmental justice community. PMID:24733733

  14. SHIP: the Seafarers Health Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Urner, C J

    1987-06-01

    The Seafarers Health Improvement Program (SHIP) was initiated in 1978 by the United States Public Health Service to improve the health status of seafarers, their health environment, medical care and safety aboard ship, and communication between parties responsible for the health and safety of American seafarers. The program is a collaborative effort of representatives of the maritime industry, physicians, and concerned governmental agencies. Principal achievements of SHIP include establishment of Entry Level Standards and Retention Guidelines for seafarers, development of the Seafarer Emergency Medical Training Program, and initiation of a program making medical records available on board. PMID:3612327

  15. The NASA Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program (SRHP) is defined in terms of motivation and methodology with specific reference given to the impacts of HZE particles and solar energetic particles. The biological hazards are mentioned that can be associated with the two particle types and ionizing radiation in general. The lack of data on the impact of such radiation and effective shielding countermeasures is identified as the primary motivation for worst-case assumptions. However, the resulting shielding designs can potentially overestimate the thickness by a factor of 10 and add unnecessarily to vehicle take-off mass. A space-based validation system is proposed to complement ground-based investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation in interplanetary space. The Lifesat satellite is proposed as a part of the SRHP effort to determine the requirements for protection and future shielding specifications.

  16. An oral health program for children.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carol; Bachman, Jean; Casalone, Gregory G; Farberman, Susann; Fish, Anne

    2014-02-15

    Caries, the most infectious chronic disease of childhood in America, leads to health, learning, and quality-of-life issues. Using the Missouri Preventive Service Program model, a pilot oral health program for children from ages birth to 5 years in a rural health clinic was the first to implement the application of fluoride varnish. PMID:24441318

  17. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of February 4, 2009 State Children's Health Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's...

  18. Outcomes for Children with Problematic Behavior in School and at Home Served By Public Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, K.; Xue, Y.; Wotring, J.

    2004-01-01

    The authors report outcomes for 4,777 youth served by the public mental health system in Michigan who had problems in school, at home, in interpersonal relationships, or in modulating their mood. Cluster analysis identified five subgroups: Pervasive Problems with Mood Disturbance (i.e., severe or moderate impairment in school, at home, in behavior…

  19. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  20. The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation: Early Findings on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. A Report to Congress. OPRE Report 2015-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalopoulos, Charles; Lee, Helen; Duggan, Anne; Lundquist, Erika; Tso, Ada; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Burrell, Lori; Somers, Jennifer; Filene, Jill H.; Knox, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    "The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation: Early Findings on the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program--A Report to Congress" presents the first findings from the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE), the legislatively mandated national evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, and…

  1. Volunteer Training Manual. Bureau of Home Health and Long Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This manual is intended to help human services agencies to create home care volunteer programs. The manual is organized in nine sections. The first section provides initial information about volunteer programs that agencies should consider before starting a program. It is followed by two sections that provide an overview of the program's structure…

  2. California Community College Home Economics Program Plan, 1992. Including: Directory of Professional and Trade Organizations and Directory of Home Economics and Related Program Areas and Instructional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    Designed to assist local colleges/districts in assessing their existing home economics program, and in developing curricula that respond to the changing needs of students, communities, and the workforce, this plan presents the program guidelines of the California Community Colleges (CCCs). Introductory material describes the history of the program…

  3. Survey of Student Interest in Home Economics Wage-Earning Programs and Employment Opportunities in Home Economics Related Occupations in Dade County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Margaret R.

    Occupational areas and coincident student interest in home economics were surveyed in Dade County to provide a basis for future program planning. Surveyed were 11,402 junior and senior high school students enrolled in home and family education courses in May 1972 and 64 employers in home economics related occupations. A series of recommendations…

  4. The Perceived Need for Home Health Care of the Elderly as Stated by Both the Elderly and Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cindy C.; Wallace, Bill C.

    The differences between what health professionals and the elderly perceive concerning the need for home health care were studied. Elderly persons were interviewed to ascertain their perceived needs while health professionals responded to a questionnaire. Preliminary analysis of the resulting data revealed that the most frequently perceived…

  5. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. PMID:22575784

  6. Determining the relevance of a certification exam to home health care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Holland, D E

    1999-01-01

    Home health care is enjoying increased use and popularity. Unfortunately, in today's cost-cutting environment, home healthcare is also subject to increased scrutiny and inevitable reimbursement limitations. This is borne out by the impact on home healthcare as a result of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Berke (1998) reports that those at greatest risk for cutbacks in care are those that can least afford it--the oldest, sickest, poorest, and most frail. Compounding the financial dilemma that home health care clients face are multiple providers of care, an unrealistic media presentation of health care, and less time for anyone to provide psychosocial-focused care (Simmons, 1990). Home health care clients have a desperate need for an advocate to provide expert navigation through the health care system. Home health care providers are aware of and often responsible for bridging gaps in health, medical benefits, and social services. This article describes a process for determining the relevance of a certification to community nursing clinical practice--using the Advanced Certification in Continuity of Care (A-CCC) exam as the example. PMID:10695177

  7. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  8. [Home care for the chronically ill: a self-care health system].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leticia Robles

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on home care for chronically ill adults and seniors. According to our thesis, home care should be understood as a self-care system, and its aim is to guarantee the individual's social and bodily survival. Home care consists of three areas, related to illness, the home, and to life history. Caregiving, usually under women's responsibility, is present throughout the history of the illness and the health-seeking process. The article analyzes these issues in light of the ageing process, the epidemiological changes occurring worldwide, and the urgency to incorporate this analysis into the heath care research agenda. PMID:15073644

  9. Blending Key Ingredients to Assure Quality in Home Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Deloris G.

    1986-01-01

    Careful staff selection, training, and review are among the methods the author recommends to home care agencies striving to provide top-notch services. Discusses measuring the quality of care employees are providing, accreditation, and the benefits of accreditation. (CT)

  10. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... noticed an increase in the number of medical tests you can use in the privacy of your own home. Advances in testing technology—and changing attitudes towards patients’ responsibility for their ...

  11. 77 FR 69550 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  12. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model. PMID:27180473

  13. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult...

  14. A Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Approach to Providing Health Care for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Steven D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes ENHANCE (Excellence in Health Care for Abused and Neglected Children) of Onondaga County, New York, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary clinic for children in out-of-home care involving pediatrics, child psychology, nursing, child development, and child welfare components. Also presents profiles of the health, mental health, and…

  15. Understanding Challenges in the Front Lines of Home Health Care: A Human-Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jenay M.; McBride, Sara E.; Mitzner, Tracy L.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    A human-systems perspective is a fruitful approach to understanding home health care because it emphasizes major individual components of the system – persons, equipment/technology, tasks, and environments –as well as the interaction between these components. The goal of this research was to apply a human-system perspective to consider the capabilities and limitations of the persons, in relation to the demands of the tasks and equipment/technology in home health care. Identification of challenges and mismatches between the person(s) capabilities and the demands of providing care provide guidance for human factors interventions. A qualitative study was conducted with 8 home health Certified Nursing Assistants and 8 home health Registered Nurses interviewed about challenges they encounter in their jobs. A systematic categorization of the challenges the care providers reported was conducted and human factors recommendations were proposed in response, to improve home health. The challenges inform a human-systems model of home health care. PMID:24958610

  16. 78 FR 56575 - Changes to the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage Program Requirements: Financial Assessments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... September 12, 2013 Part V Department of Housing and Urban Development Changes to the Home Equity Conversion... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Changes to the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage Program Requirements: Financial... the Regulations Division, Office of General Counsel, Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  17. Children in Transition: The Salvation Army Playschool and Home Visiting Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toelle, Miriam E.; Kerwin, Sheila

    1988-01-01

    The Salvation Army Emergency Lodge in Chicago, Illinois, provides a playschool and home visitation program for homeless children and families who have recently found homes. The lodge temporarily houses families, and the playschool gives children a protective, supportive environment during their stay. (SKC)

  18. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  19. Toddlers' Expressive Vocabulary Outcomes after One Year of Parent-Child Home Program Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Patricia H.; Bracaliello, Catherine B.; Pressimone, Vanessa J.; Eisenberg, Rachel A.; Gernhart, Amanda C.; Fu, Qiong; Zuniga, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined expressive vocabulary outcomes for Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP) toddlers, after one year of home-visiting services. First, this study applied Rasch modelling to establish the construct validity and reliability of a widely used expressive vocabulary measure, as modified for a sample of ethnic and…

  20. The Effects of an Education Program on Home Renovation for Fall Prevention of Korean Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Miseon; Lee, Yeunsook

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of an education program on home renovation for fall prevention among older people, more specifically fall efficacy and home renovation intentions. A quasiexperimental study with nonequivalent control and comparative groups was conducted to demonstrate the effects of the education. A total of 51 older people…

  1. Enriched Home Environment Program for Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Divya; Szymanski, Monika; Schranz, Caren

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses the impact of the Enriched Home Environment Program (EHEP) on participation in home activities among two children with ASD using case study methodology. EHEP involves occupational therapists to collaborate with families of children with ASD to educate them about the impact of factors that influence child's participation within…

  2. Creating a Child Care Center in a Nursing Home and Implementing an Intergenerational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Karen B.

    The success of the Champaign County Nursing Home Child Care Center (CCNHCCC) in Illinois provides a model for the establishment of child care centers in nursing homes. Needs assessment, financial support, licensing, staff hiring and training are all important factors that need to addressed in the start up and running of such a program. The…

  3. Evaluation of Chapter I Take-Home Computer Program. Report No. 7, Vol. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Lowrie A.

    The Chapter I Take-Home Computer (THC) program was established in nine elementary and eight middle schools in Atlanta (Georgia) in the 1989-90 school year. One hundred and eighty computers were sent home with 422 students, whose parents were willing to work with the students, for 6-week periods. Log sheets were kept by each child regarding the…

  4. Characteristics Predicting Nursing Home Admission in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Burton, Lynda C.; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2005-01-01

    Long term care in a nursing home prior to enrollment in PACE remain at high risk of readmission, despite the availability of comprehensive services. This study determined overall risk and predictors of long-term nursing home admission within the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Design and Methods: Data PACE records for 4,646…

  5. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  6. Health Careers Recruitment Program Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Bill, Ed.

    Designed to encourage Native American students in Colorado and New Mexico to pursue health careers, this handbook presents the following information: (1) statistics documenting the need for American Indian health professionals; (2) current career opportunities in the health professions (descriptions of the many health fields and descriptions of…

  7. Effect of a Consumer-Directed Voucher and a Disease-Management-Health-Promotion Nurse Intervention on Home Care Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Mukamel, Dana; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the impact of two interventions, a consumer-directed voucher for in-home supportive services and a chronic disease self-management-health-promotion nurse intervention, on the probability of use of two types of home care-skilled home health care and personal assistance services-received by functionally impaired Medicare…

  8. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities. PMID:23108741

  9. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. Methods The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. Results There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. Conclusion In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients’ own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents

  10. Private nursing homes: contribution to long stay care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, J

    1986-01-01

    Two surveys of private nursing homes, designated geriatric wards, and a sample of social service part III homes were carried out in the Brighton Health District using questionnaires supplemented (in the second survey) by some interviews. The dependency of old people in the private nursing homes was more like that of long stay hospital patients rather than that of residents in social services homes. In the private nursing homes, however, a smaller proportion of patients were in the medium to heavy nursing category (178 (31%) compared with 158 (63%) in the hospital long stay wards) and a larger proportion in the heavy nursing category (170 (30%) compared with 44 (17%) in the long stay wards). Of the patients in private nursing homes, 401 (82%) were local residents, 488 (86%) were long stay, and 459 (88%) were women; their mean age was 88 years. Two thirds of the patients were over 80. There were no significant differences between the private nursing homes and the wards in nursing workloads or staffing, except for a slightly higher provision of state registered nurses in the private sector. In the private nursing homes 348 (63%) of the patients had fees paid by private funds, 26 (5%) were in contract beds paid for by the National Health Service, and 176 (32%) were subsidized by the Department of Health and Social Security. Private nursing homes make a substantial contribution to the care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District, and the health authority should develop a more active partnership with this sector. PMID:3094690

  11. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments. PMID:25530925

  12. PERCEIVED RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AMONG HOME HEALTH AIDES: EVIDENCE FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Muslin, Ivan; McInerney, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Home health aides are one of our essential human resources in the U.S. long-term care industry but understanding whether home health aides experience racial discrimination in the workplace and, if so, which personal/organizational factors are associated at the national level has been unnoticed. Using a nationally representative sample (n=3377), we attempt to investigate the association between racial discrimination and personal and organizational factors. The study found the 13.5% prevalence rate of racial discrimination. The study findings from multiple regression analysis reveal that black home care aides are more likely than white aides to experience racial discrimination in the workplace, suggesting that racial disparity may be an additional barrier to our home health care industry. National chain affiliation and low income were also found to be associated with perceived racial discrimination. PMID:27079055

  13. Reducing Children's Susceptibility to Alcohol Use: Effects of a Home-Based Parenting Program.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christine; Ennett, Susan T; Reyes, H Luz McNaughton; Hayes, Kim A; Dickinson, Denise M; Choi, Seulki; Bowling, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    This 4-year efficacy trial tested whether a home-based, self-administered parenting program could have a long-term effect on children's cognitive susceptibility to alcohol use, and it tested hypothesized moderators and mediators of any such program effect. Using a two-group randomized controlled design, 1076 children (540 treatment; 536 control; mean age of 9.2 years at baseline) completed telephone interviews prior to randomization and follow-up interviews 12, 24, 36, and 48 months post-baseline. Mothers of children randomized to treatment received a 5-month-long parenting program during year 1, followed by two 1-month-long boosters in years 2 and 3. Exposure to the program was significantly inversely associated with susceptibility to alcohol use 48 months post-baseline (b = -0.03, p = .04), with no variation in program effects by parental alcohol use or mother's race/ethnicity or education, suggesting broad public health relevance of the parenting program. Path analyses of simple indirect effects through each hypothesized mediator showed that program exposure positively influenced parental communication to counter pro-drinking influences in the family and media domains and parental rule setting 36 months post-baseline; these variables, in turn, predicted reduced susceptibility to alcohol use 48 months post-baseline. Parallel (multiple) mediation analysis showed that the program had a significant indirect effect on susceptibility through parental rule setting. Together, the findings indicate that internalization of protective alcohol-related expectancies and intentions is possible among children whose mothers provide early exposure to alcohol-specific socialization. Additional research is needed to link alcohol-specific socialization during childhood with adolescent drinking outcomes. PMID:27154767

  14. Home Health Aide Training: An Appeal for Organizational Support.

    PubMed

    Palesy, Debra

    2016-01-01

    How home healthcare aides (HHAs) adapt their classroom training to their workplaces is central to their own safety and that of their care recipients. A qualitative approach was adopted for this inquiry, where new workers were interviewed in-depth following their classroom training. Findings suggest a perceived lack of supervisor support for classroom training and lack of follow-up in the workplace. Moreover, the need for more peer support was contended, and more comprehensive written materials in clients' homes may also assist workers' learning and enacting safe manual handling techniques in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for supporting HHAs' learning, and includes suggestions for future research. PMID:27348032

  15. The health risks of incense use in the home: an underestimated source of indoor air pollution?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Debbie; Pontin, David

    2016-03-01

    The health impact of indoor air pollution is a growing area of interest for public health professionals. People typically spend up to 90 per cent of their time indoors, particularly women, young children and elders. Although the adverse health effects of second-hand tobacco smoke are well recognised, the impact of burning incense in the home has received little attention in Western literature. Incense burning in the home is common in a number of cultures (particularly Asian, North African or Arabic). Many health visitors (HVs) work with communities who use incense regularly for religious/cultural reasons and it is a neglected area of study and research.The literature suggests that home incense use can have significant adverse health effects, particularly on cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Further research is needed to identify which individuals are most susceptible, which types of incense are most harmful, and whether any actions can be taken to minimise exposure. PMID:27111977

  16. Environmental health program in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrazzo, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    The NASA policy on environmental health uses medical and environmental concepts to: (1) Determine the health status of employees; (2) prevent illness and promote good health among employees; and (3) identify and control factors that affect the health of personnel and quality of environment. Evaluation and control of physical, chemical, radiological and biological factors surrounding personnel and which represent physiological and psychological stresses and impairment are considered.

  17. Migrant Education Health Program, 1983. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1983 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  18. Migrant Education Health Program, 1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Compensatory Education Services Unit.

    During 1984 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  19. Planning and Implementing Health Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Katherine P.

    1980-01-01

    School health screening programs, which include screening, education of children and parents, and follow-up in the form of appropriate treatment, are described. A scoliosis screening program is described as an example of the model presented. Suggestions for planners, participants, and evaluators of any school health screening are summarized. (JMF)

  20. Migrant Education Health Program, 1982. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Charles L.; Swanson, Terri M.

    During 1982 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  1. Mental Health Program Reports - 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Julius, Ed.

    The volume is reported to reflect the broad range of National Institute of Mental Health activities in areas of research, development of mental health manpower, and delivery of mental health services. Twenty papers examine, respectively, relationship of life histories and biochemistry of siblings and twins to schizophrenia, training of Navaho…

  2. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  3. 78 FR 59121 - Basic Health Program: State Administration of Basic Health Programs; Eligibility and Enrollment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... 14, 2011 (76 FR 56767), HHS published a Request for Information (RFI) inviting the public to provide... Insurance Program (CHIP). This proposed rule sets forth a framework for Basic Health Program eligibility and... Advance Payments of the Premium Tax Credit BHP Basic Health Program CHIP Children's Health...

  4. Home accidents in older people: role of primary health care team.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, H. J.; Firth, J.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the incidence and nature of unreported and reported home accidents in older people and to investigate associated environmental factors. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire requesting information on home accidents in the preceding month. SETTING--Inner London general practice. SUBJECTS--All registered patients aged over 65 years (n = 1662), of whom 120 were inappropriately registered and 1293 responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Circumstances and consequences of accidents in the home. RESULTS--108 accidents were recorded in 100 patients, giving a home accident rate of 84/1000 patients, equivalent to an annual rate of 1002/1000. 73 accidents were falls, and 83 were unreported. Of the 25 reported accidents, 19 were reported to general practice and six to accident and emergency departments (5.6% of all events). Rates of home accidents increased with age and were higher in women than men (79/819 upsilon 29/474; chi 2 = 4.5, df = 1, p less than 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--The incidence of home accidents in people aged over 65 years was high but few events were reported to medical services. General practice provided the main contact for patients who reported home accidents, and primary care workers have important opportunities for advising elderly patients on home accident prevention. Improved publicity on home safety targeted at older people and their carers would support the primary health care team in this role. PMID:1638198

  5. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  6. Evaluation of a Behavior Management Training Program for Nursing Home Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiske, Michael; And Others

    This study examined the effectiveness of a new skills training program designed to increase nurse aides' knowledge of behavior management. The training program, designed as five 90-minute group learning modules, was implemented in two Western Pennsylvania nursing homes over a 5-month period. Topics covered within the training program included…

  7. Survey of Community Agencies [with Home Economics Related Programs--Central Quadrant].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Margaret A.; And Others

    The survey was designed to identify home economics related programs in community agencies in the central quadrant of the Syracuse City School District. Factual information and descriptive information about the programs and perceived program needs were gathered using the interview method. A grid was set up with four subject areas (food and…

  8. Making Connections: Promoting Music Making in the Home through a Preschool Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Shelly; Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2008-01-01

    The Musical Play program is designed to assist children ages 2 to 5 and their parents. The program creators sought to help families build a repertoire of songs and activities for everyday living and to encourage musical play at home. The program includes developmentally appropriate songs, materials, and activities and incorporates a wide variety…

  9. Improved cost, health, and satisfaction with a health home benefit plan for self-insured employers and small physician practices.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jerry; Kapp, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We compared the impacts on total costs, health, and satisfaction among 615 adults enrolled 2 years in an employer's health home benefit plan to their baseline year in a standard preferred provider organization plan. The new plan combined strong continuity care incentives with nurse coaching support. After 24 months, total medical costs were 23% lower than the baseline year, biometric measures improved for more than 85% of members, and patient satisfaction exceeded 85%. Emergency department visits decreased by 16% and hospital days decreased by 48%. Health home benefit plans engaging small primary care physician practices and members in coordinated continuity care can deliver high value. PMID:23448916

  10. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  11. Migrant Education Health Program, 1989. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This report details specific 1989 activities of the Migrant Education Health Program in Colorado. The state health department wrote the report to demonstrate that the health services it provided to migrants that year were within the scope of a contractual agreement with the Colorado Department of Education. The report was also designed to share…

  12. "For the dream of being here, one sacrifices...": voices of immigrant mothers in a home visiting program.

    PubMed

    Paris, Ruth

    2008-04-01

    Fourteen Latina immigrants participating in an innovative home visiting program for mothers of infants and young children at risk of child maltreatment were interviewed about their experiences coming to the United States, conditions they were living in after arriving, and perceptions of the intervention. Findings from the qualitative analyses detail rich, descriptive information regarding the struggles and adaptations of the immigrant mothers and families. Poverty in home countries propelled these women to move to the United States, leaving close family and sometimes children behind. Harrowing journeys to a new country are chronicled as well as the women's isolation and depression, and the strengths they utilized in adapting to new lives. Findings provide insight into the role of the bilingual/bicultural home visitors who were overwhelmingly perceived as helpful in providing emotional support, case management/advocacy, translation, education, and friendship. Implications include the need for mental health and social service providers to (a) appreciate viscerally the histories of immigrant clients, (b) understand the role of the home visitor-client relationship in enhancing client engagement and retention, and (c) recognize the multi-dimensional contribution of paraprofessional home visitors. PMID:18954178

  13. New Careers: The Community/Home Health Aide Trainee's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Florence

    Intended for trainee use, the manual is in notebook format with a curriculum corresponding to the trainers' manual (VT 007 909), a related document. Part I, Basic Health Curriculum, deals with (1) the roles of health service aides, (2) Biological Potential and Equilibrium, (3) Professionals in the Health Field, (4) Public Health Administration,…

  14. E-health blood pressure control program.

    PubMed

    Ahern, David K; Stinson, Lynda J; Uebelacker, Lisa A; Wroblewski, Joseph P; McMurray, Jerome H; Eaton, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Both technological and human factors design requirements for integration of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) into a patient centered medical home (PCMH) model primary care practice are described. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension were given home blood pressure (BP) monitors, and after a three-month run-in period introduced to either a high-tech only (HBPM connectivity to personal health record and tailored Web portal access) or a high-tech/"high-touch" (high-tech solution plus patient navigator [PN]) solution. Features of the Web portal included: BP graphing function, traffic-light feedback system of BP goal attainment, economic incentives for self-monitoring, and dual patient-facing and care-team-facing dashboard functions. The e-health BP control system with PN support was well received by patients, providers, and the healthcare team. Current e-health technology and limited technological literacy of many patients suggest that a PN or some other personnel resource may be required for the adoption of patient-facing technology in primary care. PMID:23167022

  15. [Challenges Associated with Involvement of Small-Scale Pharmacies in Home Health Care].

    PubMed

    Oka, Toyoka; Takeda, Namihiro; Hamana, Tomoko; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2015-12-01

    As our society is progressing towards a composition wherein a significant portion is constituted by the elderly, a comprehensive home health care system is warranted. The provision of pharmacy services is a key factor in ensuring comprehensive home health care. Our pharmacy has been involved in home health care since its inception. This report is an attempt at evaluation of future prospects through identification and analysis of current operational issues. Our pharmacy is adequately equipped to accommodate home cared patients with significant medical dependency. However, being a small-scale business with few employees, coordinating shifts to ensure 24 hours operation in addition to providing home visits when required has been challenging. These place a substantial burden on the staff pharmacists. It is highly challenging for a single small-scale pharmacy to operate as a"self-contained pharmacy"that remains independent and still adequately serves their clients. Creating a collaborative pharmaceutical service team, consisting of several complementary small-scale pharmacies, provisionally called a "regional cooperative pharmacy,"could prove to be a more realistic alternative. In the coming decade, improving the implementation of home health care through regional level cooperation is necessary. This would require the collaboration various professionals, and the involvement of municipalities and professional organizations to ensure adequate regional support services. PMID:26809404

  16. 75 FR 45149 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Programs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Programs (FR-5300-N-06); on September 21, 2009 for the Healthy Homes Demonstration (FR-5300-N-17), Lead Hazard Control Capacity Building (FR-5300-N-31) and Green and Healthy Homes Technical Studies (FR-5300- N-20); and on June 17, 2009 for the Healthy Homes Technical Studies Grant Programs (FR-5300-N-07)....

  17. A Case for Increasing Empirical Attention to Head Start's Home-Based Program: An Exploration of Routine Collaborative Goal Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Patricia H.; Lehtinen, Jaana; Bracaliello, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting among home visitors and family members is a mandate for Head Start's home-based program. Yet, a dearth of research is available for advancing evidence-based practices for setting and monitoring home visiting goals or for understanding how family characteristics or program features are associated with them. With the…

  18. Home care of children and youth with complex health care needs and technology dependencies.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ellen Roy; Murphy, Nancy A

    2012-05-01

    Children and youth with complex medical issues, especially those with technology dependencies, experience frequent and often lengthy hospitalizations. Hospital discharges for these children can be a complicated process that requires a deliberate, multistep approach. In addition to successful discharges to home, it is essential that pediatric providers develop and implement an interdisciplinary and coordinated plan of care that addresses the child's ongoing health care needs. The goal is to ensure that each child remains healthy, thrives, and obtains optimal medical home and developmental supports that promote ongoing care at home and minimize recurrent hospitalizations. This clinical report presents an approach to discharging the child with complex medical needs with technology dependencies from hospital to home and then continually addressing the needs of the child and family in the home environment. PMID:22547780

  19. Using home gardens to decipher health and healing in the Andes.

    PubMed

    Finerman, Ruthbeth; Sackett, Ross

    2003-12-01

    Home gardens are a pervasive component of Andean agricultural systems, but have been ignored in anthropological and agronomic research. Recent research in the indigenous community of Saraguro, Ecuador, employed a combination of in-depth interviews, free-listing, videotaped walk-throughs, and mapping to explore the role of home gardens, which are established and controlled by women. Findings reveal that, although gardens offer multiple benefits, they are overwhelmingly devoted to the cultivation of medicinal plants, operating as de facto medicine cabinets that supply women with most of the resources they need to treat family illnesses. Results also suggest that the natural history of home gardens mirrors transformations within the family, and that Saraguro women study the contents of their neighbors' gardens, using this knowledge as a foundation for deciphering the owners' economic and health status. New threats to the sustainability of home gardens threaten the foundation of Saraguro's ethnomedical system and women's authority in the home and community. PMID:14716919

  20. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  1. Annual health examination program, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, L.; Ladou, J.

    1975-01-01

    A cost analysis of a low-volume multiphasic health testing program is presented. The results indicate that unit costs are similar to those of high-volume automated programs. The comparability in unit cost appears to result from the savings in personnel and space requirements of the smaller program as compared with the larger ones.

  2. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  3. Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Home Economics. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This document contains three learning standards for health, physical education, and home economics at three levels: elementary, intermediate, and commencement. The first section consists of these three standards: (1) personal health and fitness, (2) a safe and healthy environment, and (3) resource management. The format for displaying the…

  4. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  6. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  7. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nursing care, but is receiving another skilled service (that is, physical therapy, occupational therapy... services are provided to a patient who is not receiving skilled nursing care, physical or occupational... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health...

  8. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., but are not limited to— (i) Ensuring the overall quality of the care provided by the aide; (ii... job. They are closely supervised to ensure their competence in providing care. For home health... endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients and has had a temporary management appointed...

  9. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., but are not limited to— (i) Ensuring the overall quality of the care provided by the aide; (ii... job. They are closely supervised to ensure their competence in providing care. For home health... endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients and has had a temporary management appointed...

  10. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Home Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater treatment plant operators to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. The objective of this manual is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for certification. Participants learn the basic operational aspects of treatment…

  11. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. Fowler, Cecile; Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally; Martinez, Yolanda; Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice; Jacobs, David E.

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  12. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility... Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective...

  13. Formaldehyde complaint investigations in mobile homes by the Texas Department of Health

    SciTech Connect

    Norsted, S.W.; Kozinetz, C.A.; Annegers, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    The Texas Department of Health sampled for formaldehyde (HCHO) in 443 mobile homes between April, 1979, and May, 1982, at the request of the occupants. Colorimetric detector tubes were used most frequently for sample acquisition. HCHO concentrations ranged from below detectable limits (less than 0.5 ppm) to 8.0 ppm. Twenty-seven percent of homes one year of age or less had mean concentrations equal to or greater than 2.0 ppm while 11.5% of older homes had concentrations of 2.0 ppm or more. An inverse relationship is demonstrated between home age and HCHO level. The primary health complaints reported were headaches, respiratory discomfort, and ocular irritation. Evidence of a dose-response relationship was not present.

  14. Global Health: The Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health: Vision and Mission, Programs, and Accomplishments

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Joel G.; Bridbord, Kenneth; Kupfer, Linda E.; Glass, Roger I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Fogarty International Center (FIC) of the U.S. National Institutes of Health has supported long-term (>6 months) basic, clinical and applied research training and research for over 3,600 future leaders in science and public health from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); tens of thousands more persons have received short-term training. FIC started these programs in 1988 with the flagship HIV/AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) in response to the global pandemic. More than 23 extramural training and research programs plus an intramural program are now operating – all in collaboration with other Institutes and Centers at NIH, U.S. government agencies, foundations, and partner institutions in LMICs and the U.S. While infectious diseases still reign mightily in Sub-Saharan African and South East Asian countries, non-communicable diseases are emerging globally, including in LMICs. Newer FIC training programs are addressing chronic, non-communicable diseases and strengthening the quality of medical schools and health care provider training, in addition to expanding expertise in infectious diseases. The model for successful training is based on long-term commitments, institutional strengthening, “twinning” of research centers, focus on local problems, and active mentoring. Trainees from Africa, Asia, and Latin America have made notable scientific contributions to global health, attained leadership positions, and received special recognition nationally and internationally. As the FIC programs are institutional-strengthening partnerships and candidates are carefully selected and mentored, close to 90% of FIC trainees return to their countries of origin. After returning home the FIC-trained leaders have continued to mentor and train thousands of individuals in their home countries. PMID:21896356

  15. Mental Health In-Service Program for Employed Long-Term Care Personnel. Final Report for May and June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souhrada, Julie

    Since June 1973, Iowa Lakes Community College (Iowa) has been conducting an in-service training program for employees of local nursing homes. The program was designed to upgrade the participants' knowledge of the mental health aspects of care for the aged and to improve their abilities to provide physical health care. The specific objectives of…

  16. High School Health Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This curriculum guide contains units of study for high school health science courses in Iowa. The first section is a competency outline for three topics: introduction to health care; nurse aide/orderly; and rehabilitation aide. For each competency, the following information is provided: objectives; suggested learning activities; resources; and…

  17. Arbitration agreements in health care nursing home contracts.

    PubMed

    Infante, Marie C; Lovitch, Karen S

    2003-11-01

    Increasingly, long-term care facilities are adopting alternative dispute resolution measures, such as arbitration, in admission contracts. Whereas avoiding the onus of civil lawsuits is understandable, nursing homes must ensure that the arbitration wording in the contract is precise, enforceable, and most importantly, pursuant to state and federal laws, regulations, and guidelines. Otherwise, the contract itself may be the subject of a court action. PMID:14650372

  18. An international randomized study of a home-based self-management program for severe COPD: the COMET

    PubMed Central

    Bourbeau, Jean; Casan, Pere; Tognella, Silvia; Haidl, Peter; Texereau, Joëlle B; Kessler, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most hospitalizations and costs related to COPD are due to exacerbations and insufficient disease management. The COPD patient Management European Trial (COMET) is investigating a home-based multicomponent COPD self-management program designed to reduce exacerbations and hospital admissions. Design Multicenter parallel randomized controlled, open-label superiority trial. Setting Thirty-three hospitals in four European countries. Participants A total of 345 patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III/IV COPD. Intervention The program includes extensive patient coaching by health care professionals to improve self-management (eg, develop skills to better manage their disease), an e-health platform for reporting frequent health status updates, rapid intervention when necessary, and oxygen therapy monitoring. Comparator is the usual management as per the center’s routine practice. Main outcome measures Yearly number of hospital days for acute care, exacerbation number, quality of life, deaths, and costs. PMID:27418817

  19. HOME VISIT QUALITY VARIATIONS IN TWO EARLY HEAD START PROGRAMS IN RELATION TO PARENTING AND CHILD VOCABULARY OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Roggman, Lori A; Cook, Gina A; Innocenti, Mark S; Jump Norman, Vonda; Boyce, Lisa K; Christiansen, Katie; Peterson, Carla A

    2016-05-01

    Home-visiting programs aiming to improve early child development have demonstrated positive outcomes, but processes within home visits to individual families are rarely documented. We examined family-level variations in the home-visiting process (N = 71) from extant video recordings of home visits in two Early Head Start programs, using an observational measure of research-based quality indicators of home-visiting practices and family engagement, the Home Visit Rating Scales (HOVRS). HOVRS scores, showing good interrater agreement and internal consistency, were significantly associated with parent- and staff-reported positive characteristics of home visiting as well as with parenting and child language outcomes tested at program exit. When home-visiting processes were higher quality during the program, home visit content was more focused on child development, families were more involved in the overall program, and most important, scores on measures of the parenting environment and children's vocabulary were higher at the end of the program. Results showed that home visit quality was indirectly associated with child language outcomes through parenting outcomes. Observation ratings of home visit quality could be useful for guiding program improvement, supporting professional development, and increasing our understanding of the links between home-visiting processes and outcomes. PMID:27079807

  20. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    This editorial paper presents a vision for intelligent health care in the home of the future, focusing on technologies with the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. A secure, plug-and-play information framework provides the starting point for identifying technologies that must be developed before home-based devices can know their context and assimilate information to support care decisions.

  1. My Home Planet Earth: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. It includes (1) an activities guide for teachers, which focuses on physical science, life science, and environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that entice students to discover concepts in science,…

  2. The Impact of a Home-Delivered Meal Program on Nutritional Risk, Dietary Intake, Food Security, Loneliness, and Social Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Wright, Lauri; Vance, Lauren; Sudduth, Christina; Epps, James B

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining independence and continuing to live at home is one solution to manage the rising health care costs of aging populations in the United States; furthermore, seniors are at risk of malnutrition and food insecurity. Home-delivered meal programs are a tool to address food, nutrition, and well-being concerns of this population. Few studies have identified outcomes from these programs; this pilot study reviews the nutritional status, dietary intake, well-being, loneliness, and food security levels of seniors participating in a Meals on Wheels delivery service. Clients, new to the meal program, participated in pre- and postphone interviews, and 51 seniors completed the study. The survey was composed of five scales or questionnaires, and statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS. Improvements across all five measures were statistically significant after participating two months in the home-delivered meal program. Implications for further research, practice, and the Older Americans Act are discussed. PMID:26106989

  3. The NASA Space Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Sulzman, F. M.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Health Program is a part of the Life Sciences Division in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA). The goal of the Space Radiation Health Program is development of scientific bases for assuring adequate radiation protection in space. A proposed research program will determine long-term health risks from exposure to cosmic rays and other radiation. Ground-based animal models will be used to predict risk of exposures at varying levels from various sources and the safe levels for manned space flight.

  4. Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohio's Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Elizabeth J; Seidu, Dazar; Ryan, Norma J; Chapman, Dj Sam

    2013-06-01

    Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination. PMID:23242811

  5. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  6. [EurSafety Health-Net: MRSA Eradication in Nursing Homes and Home Care - A Practice Report].

    PubMed

    Bergen, P; Rocker, D; Claußen, K; Kluba, J; Vogelsang, E; Vogelsang, G

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 the project EurSafety Health-Net, funded by Interreg IVa, was initiated in order to create a cross-border quality alliance to enhance patient safety in the field of infectious diseases. Within this framework, several studies and projects addressing key topics of infection control were carried out. We describe the two-year project "MRSA decolonisation in care settings (MSP)", which aimed at evaluating a simple and economic way of decolonisation of non-hospitalised MRSA carriers in 2 districts in Lower Saxony. In the course of the project 181 decolonisations of MRSA carriers were performed by nursing homes and nursing services for outpatients in cooperation with the local public health authorities of the districts Ammerland and Grafschaft Bentheim. Of 181 cases 134 were eligible for statistical analysis. The project provided protocols for 2 different starting situations: 1) Continuing and completing a decolonisation treatment subsequent to a hospital stay by nursing services for outpatients or in a nursing home. 2) Starting a decolonisation treatment in a nursing home or by nursing services for outpatients. The carriers were provided with the required materials either by the hospitals (situation 1) or by the local public health authorities (situation 2) free of charge. The decolonisation treatment and the testing were offered only to carriers free of properties deemed as decolonisation obstacles and was applied without involvement of the general practitioner. Short- and long-term success of the 5 day decolonisation treatment was tested afterwards by two swabs (14 days and 6 months after the end of the treatment). The results of the 6-month control swabs showed that 45% of the carriers were successfully decolonised in the long term. All parties involved regarded the procedure of the MSP project as effective with respect to the target. Thus, even after the project was finished, both districts continued applying the MSP protocol. PMID:25951112

  7. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers: A Room-by-Room Analysis.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Barbara J; Wills, Celia E; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  8. Facilitators and barriers to self-management of nursing home residents: perspectives of health-care professionals in Korean nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Bang, Hwal Lan; Kim, Ga Hye; Ha, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore facilitators and barriers to self-management from the viewpoint of staff taking care of nursing home (NH) residents with chronic diseases in South Korea. Patients and methods A qualitative content analysis was done using the focus group interview method. A total of 23 health-care professionals (16 registered nurses and 7 social workers) were interviewed from three urban NHs, each with more than 100 beds. Results Five facilitators were identified: grouping the residents; the resident’s awareness of his/her current health status; the willingness of residents to engage in self-management; residence in the facility; and support from the staff. Additionally, seven barriers were identified: deterioration of the resident’s health; the dependency expectations of the resident; hesitation in asking for help; difference in expectations between the staff and the resident’s family; insufficient staffing and time; lack of standardized guidelines; and conservative tendencies of the staff due to rigid policies. Conclusion The findings of this study can help health-care professionals recognize the factors that influence self-management and provide direction for registered nurses and other health professionals involved in supporting self-management programs for NH residents. PMID:26491277

  9. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  10. Challenges in evaluating rural health programs.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Joyce; Webb, John

    2002-01-01

    Complex community-based prevention programs are being held to scientific evidence of their effectiveness and rural public health departments that implement such programs often are not equipped to evaluate them. Rural public health departments are fettered by small budgets, small staffs, and less access to evaluation experts and similar resources. Community-based health promotion programs can include complex designs that may work differently in rural areas and evaluation of rural programs can be hampered by lack of control groups and the instability of results from small populations. The University of Kentucky has entered into a contract with the state Department for Public Health to implement an internal, participatory model of evaluation. In this model, the university evaluation expert trains local public health department staff in technical skills for program evaluation and acts as mentor and technical consultant to local public health departments on an ongoing basis. Through training and site visits, this model is one approach to addressing the challenges of evaluating rural health promotion programs. PMID:12135148

  11. Home care assistants’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Åke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hillerås, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients’ mental health status. Aim To describe HCAs’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. Methods We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Results Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors’ own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. Conclusion The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers’ decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health

  12. Social Support Perspectives on Programs for Parents: Lessons from the Child Survival/Fair Start Home Visiting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larner, Mary

    This paper discusses home visiting programs for low income parents and infants and describes five such programs known collectively as the Child Survival/Fair Start (CS/FS) projects, funded by the Ford Foundation. It describes a conceptual model which links risk factors and intervention activities to effects on mothers and children and explains how…

  13. Pilot Study of a Parent Training Program for Young Children with Autism: The PLAY Project Home Consultation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Richard; Necheles, Jonathan; Ferch, Courtney; Bruckman, David

    2007-01-01

    The PLAY Project Home Consultation (PPHC) program trains parents of children with autistic spectrum disorders using the DIR/Floortime model of Stanley Greenspan MD. Sixty-eight children completed the 8-12 month program. Parents were encouraged to deliver 15 hours per week of 1:1 interaction. Pre/post ratings of videotapes by blind raters using the…

  14. Pilot States Program report: Home energy ratings systems and energy-efficient mortgages

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.

    2000-04-04

    This report covers the accomplishments of the home energy ratings systems/energy-efficient mortgages (HERS/EEMs) pilot states from 1993 through 1998, including such indicators as funding, ratings and EEMs achieved, active raters, and training and marketing activities. A brief description of each HERS program's evolution is included, as well as their directors' views of the programs' future prospects. Finally, an analysis is provided of successful HERS program characteristics and factors that appear to contribute to HERS program success.

  15. Improvements in Balance in Older Adults Engaged in a Specialized Home Care Falls Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Susan L.; Marchetti, Gregory F.; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Otis, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To determine if persons older than 65 years receiving a combination of physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech, or nursing interventions in their home demonstrated changes in gait/balance function after an episode of home care services. Methods Charts from 11 667 persons who were at risk for falling and who were participating in an exercise program in the home were included. Study design Data were retrieved from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set, Version B, and the computerized database of physical therapist–collected outcome data. Recorded physical therapist–data may have included a neuropathic pain rating, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Performance Oriented Measurement Assessment (POMA), the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), and the modified Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance (mCTSIB). Data analysis Data were extracted by an honest broker and were analyzed. Mean (SD) change in each performance test and the percentage of participants in the total sample and in the 9 age/health condition strata that exceeded the minimum detectable change (MDC) for each gait/balance measure were described. The value of MDC95 describes the amount of true change in participant status beyond measurement error with 95% certainty. Results The gait/balance measures demonstrated MDCs ranging between 68% and 91% for the study sample. Mean (SD) of improvement on the BBS was 12 (8) points, with 88% of all participants exceeding the BBS MDC95 value of 5 points. Mean (SD) of improvement in gait/balance performance as measured by the POMA was 8 (4) points, with 91% of all participants exceeding the POMA MDC95 value of 3 points. Among all patients, mean (SD) of improvement on the DGI was 7 (4) points with 91% of all participants exceeding the DGI MDC95 value of 2 points by discharge. At admission, the median number of mCTSIB conditions that could be completed was 1 and the median number of completed conditions on the mCTSIB increased to 3 at

  16. Home Health Care (HHC) Managers Perceptions About Challenges and Obstacles that Hinder HHC Services in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Ajlouni, Musa T.; Dawani, Hania; Diab, Salah M.

    2015-01-01

    Home care aims at supporting people with various degrees of dependency to remain at home rather than use residential, long-term, or institutional-based nursing care. Demographic, epidemiological, social, and cultural trends in Jordan as in other countries are changing the traditional patterns of care with growing emphasis on home care. The purpose of this study is to highlight the most common challenges related to home health care (HHC) services in Jordan as perceived by the managers of HHC agencies. Methods: a descriptive qualitative design that depends on focus group discussions has been used to collect data from a sample of 18 managers who met the selection criteria and who are willing to participate, the study found that, the main challenges of HHC services as perceived by managers were: shortage of female staff, lack of governance and regulation, poor management, unethical practices, lack of referral systems, and low accessibility of the poor and less privileged as HHC services are not included in health insurance schemes, it concludes also that the home health care industry in Jordan is facing many challenges and problems that may have negative effects on the effectiveness, efficiency, equity and quality of services and should be addressed by health policy makers. PMID:25946949

  17. NATIONAL EYE HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM (NEHEP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public and professional education programs that encourage early detection and timely treatment of glaucoma and diabetic eye disease and the appropriate treatment for low vision. NEHEP provides referrals to vision professionals and other health resources.

  18. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings.

    PubMed

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E; Kumpfer, Karol L; Merrill, Ray M; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  19. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  20. Preventing unintentional injuries in the home using the Health Impact Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Mack, Karin A; Liller, Karen D; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-04-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  1. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes. PMID:24652941

  2. Preventing Unintentional Injuries in the Home Using the Health Impact Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Karin A.; Liller, Karen D.; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-01-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social–environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social–environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  3. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home

  4. Prevalence of Nursing Assistant Training and Certification Programs within Nursing Homes, 1997-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Denise A.; Jung, Hye-Young; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how the prevalence of nurse aide training and competency evaluation programs (NATCEPs) provided in the nursing home (NH) setting changed between 1997 and 2007, to explore the environmental factors that may be influencing the prevalence of these programs, and to examine how the changing prevalence…

  5. New Homes, New Neighborhoods, New Schools: A Progress Report on the Baltimore Housing Mobility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engdahl, Lora

    2009-01-01

    In the Baltimore region, a successful housing mobility program is providing families living in very disadvantaged inner city communities with a new home and a chance for a new life. Minority voucher holders in the federal Housing Choice Voucher Program (formerly titled Section 8) have often been limited to living in "voucher submarkets" where…

  6. A Home-Based Orientation and Mobility Program for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joffee, E.

    1988-01-01

    A home-based orientation and mobility program was developed for blind/visually impaired infants and toddlers. Three stages in functional mobility were identified focusing on the development of gross motor skills, related conceptual activities, auditory awareness, orientation skills, and mobility skills. The program included parent education and a…

  7. Impact of a Statewide Home Visiting Program to Prevent Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Anne; Caldera, Debra; Rodriguez, Kira; Burrell, Lori; Rohde, Charles; Crowne, Sarah Shea

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a voluntary, paraprofessional home visiting program in preventing child maltreatment and reducing the multiple, malleable psychosocial risks for maltreatment for which families had been targeted. Methods: This collaborative, experimental study focused on 6 Healthy Families Alaska (HFAK) programs; 325 families…

  8. In-Home Respite Care Program Development. Background. Coordinator's Manual. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, J. D.; And Others

    This volume consists of a background discussion, coordinator's manual, and training manual dealing with developing programs for the in-home respite care (IHRC) of the developmentally disabled. Addressed in the background information unit are the nature of developmental disabilities; program variables, planning, and funding; and practical…

  9. The Medical Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  10. A club approach to social work treatment within a home dialysis program.

    PubMed

    Leff, B

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses one approach to helping patients and their families cope with the stresses of a program where dialysis treatments are performed at home. The "Home Dialysis Club" includes many facets and levels of group work treatment. The need for support is unending for families with this difficult life-style. The club approach offers ongoing services with flexibility to change as needs change. PMID:1235180

  11. International health program: preventing health problems associated with living abroad.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Carol A

    2004-02-01

    1. The components of the international health program consist of identifying health risks overseas, the availability of the medical resources, the assessment of the medical facility, primary care, as well as the pre-departure health evaluations. 2. The organization should develop and implement standards of care while working toward maintaining and improving those standards to achieve an innovative, effective international medical program. This should be linked by a top down commitment to insure success. 3. The implementation of the emergency response plan will help support employees and their family members while working abroad if a serious illness or injury should occur. PMID:14979618

  12. Building America: The Advanced Whole-Home Efficiency Program (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Engebrecht, C.

    2012-02-01

    This presentation discusses the Building America Program. This presentation discusses the background and goals of the program. A few hot topic technologies are discussed. Outreach activities are discussed as well.

  13. Improving patient outcomes with better care transitions: the role for home health.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Michael O; Haney, Tara Trahan

    2013-01-01

    Patients, particularly the old and frail, are especially vulnerable at the time of hospital discharge. Fragmentation of care, characterized by miscommunications and lack of follow-up, can lead to oversights in diagnosis and management. The frequent result is avoidable rehospitalization. Amedisys, a home health and hospice organization, created and tested a care transitions initiative for its impact on patients' quality of life and avoidable rehospitalizations. The initiative was carried out in three academic institutions with 12 months of observation. The results suggested reduced hospital readmissions and a critical role for the home health industry in improving patient outcomes and reducing costs. PMID:23420797

  14. Mental health services expenditures among children placed in out-of-home care.

    PubMed

    Clark, Colleen; Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Robst, John

    2011-11-01

    This study examined Florida Medicaid mental health expenditures for children in out-of-home care. Child welfare and Medicaid administrative databases were analyzed using two-part models to identify characteristics associated with expenditures. Mental health expenditures were higher for older children, boys, children who were abused or lost their caregivers, or with a longer length of stay in out-of-home care. In contrast, African American children were less likely to have positive expenditures than White children, but among youth with positive expenditures, African Americans had higher expenditures. In addition, among youth with positive expenditures, substance use and affective disorders were associated with higher expenditures. PMID:21116702

  15. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  16. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  17. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  18. Focus on School Health. MCH Program Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This issue of the "MCH Program Interchange" provides information about approximately 55 selected materials and publications related to school health, which have been developed by or are available from Federal agencies, state and local public health agencies, and voluntary and professional organizations. The interchange of this information is meant…

  19. Migrant Health Program, 1969 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Health, Trenton.

    The New Jersey State Department of Health has placed increasing emphasis on high-quality health care since the first hospital-based Migrant Family Clinic replaced field clinics in 1965. Statistics show that medical services provided by the program reached 38% of all migrant workers in New Jersey at the peak of the 1969 crop season; however,…

  20. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment From Smart Home-Based Behavior Data.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behavior in the home and predicting clinical scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a clinical assessment using activity behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident's daily behavior and predict the corresponding clinical scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident's daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years. We obtain a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive scores and a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. These prediction results suggest that it is feasible to predict clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis. PMID:26292348

  1. Assessment of Airborne Exposures and Health in Flooded Homes Undergoing Renovation

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Kimberly A.; Metwali, Nervana; Perry, Sarah Spencer; Hart, Tom; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2008, the Cedar River crested flooding more than 5,000 Cedar Rapids homes. Residents whose homes were flooded were invited to participate in this study. Household assessments and resident interviews were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. We characterized exposures and symptoms experienced by individuals inhabiting 73 flood-damaged homes. Active air sampling and passive electrostatic dust collectors were used to assess exposures to: culturable mold, culturable bacteria, fungal spores, inhalable particulate matter (iPM), endotoxin, glucans, allergens, lead, asbestos, radon, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Wall moisture levels and relative humidity were also measured. Exposures and questionnaire-based health assessments were compared at two levels of remediation, in-progress and completed. Homes with remediation in-progress (n=24), as compared to the completed homes (n=49), had significantly higher airborne concentrations of mold, bacteria, iPM, endotoxin and glucan. Residents of in-progress homes had a significantly higher prevalence of doctor diagnosed allergies (adjusted OR=3.08; 95%CI: 1.05–9.02) and all residents had elevated prevalence of self-reported wheeze (adjusted OR=3.77; 95%CI: 2.06–6.92) and prescription medication use for breathing problems (adjusted OR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.01–1.88) after the flood as compared to before. Proper post-flood remediation led to improved air quality and lower exposures among residents living in flooded homes. PMID:22519834

  2. Educational Programs in the Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospitals, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This document lists by location educational programs in the health field in the United States and Canada. Areas covered include Certified Laboratory Assistant Programs, Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Dietetics, Hospital Administration, Inhalation Therapy, Library Science, Medical Illustration, Medical Records, Medical Technology,…

  3. Diversifying the Health Professions: A Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Penny A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a university-based mentoring program in the food and nutritional sciences that addresses the need for multicultural professionals in allied health fields. Methods: The conceptual model for the program includes inputs (goals, resources), transformational process (professional development, social support and recognition) and…

  4. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  5. Coordinated School Health Programs. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that all children should have the right to coordinated school health programs. NASN supports continued research to document the outcomes of these programs. School nurses should use their professional education and skills to assist their schools and communities in the…

  6. Health Indicators: A Tool for Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank K.

    2006-01-01

    A visual tool used to evaluate instructional program performance has been designed by the University of Hawaii Community College system. The tool combines features from traffic lights, blood-chemistry test reports, and industry production control charts, and is labeled the Program Health-Indicator Chart. The tool was designed to minimize the labor…

  7. Seeking stability in the Medicare home health benefit. Margins evaporate; agencies in financial jeopardy.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    In a watershed moment for the home care industry, National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) staff has obtained, decoded, deciphered, and tabulated rates of return for all Medicare-participating agencies in the nation. The results show the average rate of return for Medicare agencies in the latest fiscal year--that is, before the October 2002 15 percent cut in home health reimbursements, before audits, and before partial episode payment adjustments--is 5.15 percent. That figure is well below the average 22 percent rate of return the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission alleged that home care agencies were making. Following is the text of NAHC's report, along with a letter from the respected firm of Muse & Associates vouching for the accuracy of NAHC's methodology. PMID:12959032

  8. Effects of Electronic Health Information Technology Implementation on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda H.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Chen, Emily K.; Henderson, Charles R.; Lachs, Mark S.; Boratgis, Gabriel; Silver, Stephanie; Eimicke, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of electronic health information technology (HIT) on nursing home residents. Methods The study evaluated the impact of implementing a comprehensive HIT system on resident clinical, functional, and quality of care outcome indicators, as well as measures of resident awareness of and satisfaction with the technology. The study used a prospective, quasi-experimental design, directly assessing 761 nursing home residents in 10 urban and suburban nursing homes in the greater New York City area. Results No statistically significant impact of the introduction of HIT on residents was found on any outcomes, with the exception of a significant negative effect on behavioral symptoms. Residents' subjective assessment of the HIT intervention were generally positive. Discussion The absence of effects on most indicators is encouraging for the future development of HIT in nursing homes. The single negative finding suggests that further investigation is needed on possible impact on resident behavior. PMID:21646551

  9. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families. PMID:17694890

  10. Understanding why women adopt and sustain home water treatment: insights from the Malawi antenatal care program.

    PubMed

    Wood, Siri; Foster, Jennifer; Kols, Adrienne

    2012-08-01

    In many settings in Africa, social marketing has proven more successful in generating brand recognition for chlorine water treatment products than in promoting their use. To promote household use of one such product in Malawi, WaterGuard, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and Population Services International (PSI) distributed free hygiene kits that included WaterGuard to pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2007. Follow-up surveys documented a sustained increase in WaterGuard use three years after the initial intervention. In 2010, PATH (www.path.org) conducted qualitative research on the factors motivating women to adopt, sustain, or discontinue use. To provide context, interviews were also conducted with their friends, relatives, and husbands. Interviews revealed that sustained use of WaterGuard does not necessarily imply consistent use. Most respondents reported switching back and forth between WaterGuard and stock chlorine distributed for free by the government, and many treated water seasonally rather than year-round. Qualitative findings suggest that two program strategies strongly influenced women's decisions to adopt, purchase, and continue using WaterGuard. First, positive, ongoing contacts with health care workers, especially during home visits, raised awareness of the need to treat water, encouraged trial use, and supported continuing use. Second, an extended free trial of the product overcame initial cost barriers and allowed women and their families to experience the health benefits of WaterGuard, appreciate its value and relevance to their lives, and get used to its taste. Social support-from like-minded relatives, friends, neighbors, health care workers, husbands, and children-was also a critical factor that promoted consistent, ongoing use of WaterGuard. The findings confirm the importance of interpersonal communication in prompting adoption of household water treatment and suggest that consumers assess the perceived value of a product, not

  11. Effects of the Patient-Centered Environment Program on Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Home-Dwelling Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Park, Heeok; Chun, Youngmi; Gang, Min Suk

    2015-12-01

    The current pilot study examined the effects of the Patient-Centered Environment Program (PCEP) on agitation, cognition, stress, pain, sleep, and activities of daily living for home-dwelling patients with dementia. Nine individuals participated in the study. The PCEP included visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile areas based on participants' preferences. PCEP sessions were held for 30 minutes twice per week and a total of 16 sessions were performed at participants' homes. Findings showed that agitation and pain improved with the PCEP (t = 2.91, p < 0.02; t = 4.51, p < 0.002, respectively). Findings suggested that a better study design, repeated with a reasonable sample size, must be considered for participants' health statuses to meet the PCEP contents. PMID:26594953

  12. Long-acting injectables and risk for rehospitalization among patients with schizophrenia in the home care program in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ju, Po-Chung; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih; Lai, Te-Jen; Chuang, Po-Ya; Lin, Yung-Jung; Yang, Ching-Wen Wendy; Tang, Chao-Hsiun

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the relationship between medication and treatment effectiveness in a home care setting among patients with schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia hospitalized between 2004 and 2009 with a primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code of 295 were identified from Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claims Data released by the National Health Research Institute in Taiwan. Patients who joined the home care program after discharge and were prescribed long-acting injection (LAI) (the LAI group) or oral antipsychotic medications (the oral group) were included as study subjects. The final sample for the study included 810 participants in the LAI group and 945 in the oral group. Logistic regression was performed to examine the independent effect of LAI medication on the risk for rehospitalization within the 12-month observation window after controlling for patient and hospital characteristics and propensity score quintile adjustment. The unadjusted odds ratio for rehospitalization risk was 0.80 (confidence interval, 0.65-0.98) for the LAI group compared to the oral group. The adjusted odds ratio was further reduced to 0.78 (confidence interval, 0.63-0.97). Results remained unchanged when the propensity score quintiles were entered into the regression for further adjustment. In a home care setting, patients treated with long-acting antipsychotic agents are at a significantly lower risk for psychiatric rehospitalization than those treated with oral medication. Consequently, LAI home-based treatment for the prevention of schizophrenia relapse may lead to substantial clinical and economic benefits. PMID:24145217

  13. Texas Field Experiment Results: Performance of the Weatherization Assistance Program in Hot-Climate, Low-Income Homes

    SciTech Connect

    McCold, Lance Neil; Goeltz, Rick; Ternes, Mark P; Berry, Linda G

    2008-04-01

    A field test involving 35 houses was performed in Texas between 2000 and 2003 to study the response of low-income homes in hot climates to weatherization performed as part of the U.S Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program and to investigate certain methods to improve weatherization performance. The study found that improved Program designs and the use of advanced energy audits resulted in better weatherization measures being installed (use of blower doors to guide the infiltration work, more frequent installation of attic insulation, and installation of wall insulation) in the study homes, improved space-heating savings performance compared to the Program as implemented in the hot climates in 1989, and more comfortable indoor temperatures. Two key policy dilemmas for Texas and other hot-climate states were highlighted by the study; namely, how to balance expenditures between installing cost-effective weatherization measures and performing health, safety, and repair items, and that health, safety, and repair items can have an adverse impact on energy savings, which further complicates the weatherization decision process. Several occupant and equipment-related behaviors were observed in the field test homes that help explain why audits may over predict energy consumptions and savings and why air-conditioning electricity savings are difficult to measure. Based on this study, it is recommended that states in hot climates be encouraged to select from an expanded list of measures using advanced audits or other techniques, and further studies examining the benefits obtained from air conditioner measures should be performed. In addition, guidelines should be developed for the hot-climate states on how to (a) balance the objectives of saving energy, improving health and safety, and addressing repair issues, and (b) select repair items.

  14. A comparative analysis of disability measures and their relation to home health care use.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Carol L; Laditka, Sarah B

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between various definitions of disability and the use of home health care. Using data from the 1993 Survey of Asset and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old, four measures of disability are constructed based on the concepts of difficulty and assistance. Logistic regression techniques are used to examine differences across measures in the probability of home health care use for specific subgroups of the older population (e.g., married Black females, unmarried White males). Home health care use was most likely when the presence of both assistance and difficulty were included in the definition of disability. Regardless of the measure used, women, Whites, and unmarried people had higher likelihoods of using home health care than men, Blacks, and married people respectively. If used as a service eligibility criterion, an inclusive measure of disability would result in a large number of potential service users. Efforts to control expenditures through the use of a narrower measure that requires the presence of assistance may disadvantage some subgroups of the older population. PMID:12749525

  15. Identification of Essential Food Skills for Skill-Based Healthful Eating Programs in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce-Voorham, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify the food skills deemed essential to include in skill-based healthful eating programs in secondary schools. Methods: Fifty-one food experts including home economics educators, chefs, nutritionists and dietitians, community educators, homemakers, and young people were recruited by invitation, mail, and advertising. Data were…

  16. Caregiver Involvement in the Intensive Mental Health Program: Influence on Changes in Child Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Margaret M.; Bowers, Mark J.; Lazicki, Tammy; Krall, Dan; Jacobs, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    We examined behavioral markers of caregiver involvement and the ways in which family participation was related to treatment outcomes in 47 elementary school children with SED enrolled in a school-based intensive mental health program. Measures of caregiver involvement included therapeutic home visits, attendance at therapeutic meetings, completion…

  17. Pre-Service Education for Nurses' Aides in Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Home Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    The guide was developed on the basis of advice from a widely representative committee appointed by the Colorado State Department of Public Health. The materials were tested in a course in an urban center and a course in a rural center. The initial portion of the manual presents: (1) guidelines for organizing preparatory nurse aide courses, (2)…

  18. HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AND VISUAL AND COGNTIVE IMPAIRMENT AMONG NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Amanda F.; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Aim To examine whether the relationship between vision impairment and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in nursing home residents is impacted by co-existing cognitive impairment. Methods This cross-sectional study involved a total of 382 English-speaking older adults (>55 years of age) with ≥13 on the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) from seventeen nursing homes in Birmingham, AL. Assessments were taken of visual acuity (Lighthouse Near Visual Acuity Test), cognition (MMSE), and health-related quality of life (Nursing Home Vision-Targeted Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire, VF-14, and the SF-36). Results A greater portion of participants had both vision and cognitive impairments (38.5%) as compared to those with neither impairment (21.5%), vision impairment alone (13.4%), and cognitive impairment alone (26.7%). Cognitive impairment did not modify the impact of vision impairment on HRQoL. The reduction in HRQoL associated with vision impairment was similar for those with and without cognitive impairment. Conclusion The deleterious impact of vision impairment on HRQoL in nursing home residents was not exacerbated by the co-occurrence of cognitive impairment. Aging-related visual impairment in nursing home residents is often reversible through treatment leading to improved HRQoL, and thus it is clinically important to know that cognitive impairment is unlikely to interfere with this benefit. PMID:18971236

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of a home-based program for alcohol use prevention among urban youth: the "Slick Tracy Home Team Program".

    PubMed

    Komro, Kelli A; Perry, Cheryl L; Veblen-Mortenson, Sara; Farbakhsh, Kian; Kugler, Kari C; Alfano, Karen A; Dudovitz, Bonnie S; Williams, Carolyn L; Jones-Webb, Rhonda

    2006-03-01

    The current study describes the extensive cross-cultural adaptation of a brief home-based alcohol prevention program for racially and ethnically diverse sixth grade students and their families, using a randomized controlled trial design involving 60 public schools in the city of Chicago (N = 3,623 students). The adapted program achieved high participation levels (73%) overall, as well as in single parent families, non-English homes, and low-income students, among other at risk groups. Lower levels of factors associated with the onset of alcohol use (i.e., normative expectations and outcome expectations) were achieved in the intervention group compared to the control group. However, no differences were observed for several other protective factors or alcohol use. PMID:16502143

  20. 77 FR 19306 - Announcement of Funding Awards: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Based Paint Hazard Control and Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration Programs (FR- 5500-N-02); on May 18, 2011 for the Healthy Homes Production Program (FR-5500-N-03); on May 9, 2011 for Lead Technical Studies and Healthy Homes Technical Studies Programs (FR-5500-N-15); and on May 20, 2011 for Asthma in...