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Sample records for progression tissue microarray

  1. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency. PMID:26667454

  2. CHTN :: Tissue Microarrays

    Cancer.gov

    The Mid-Atlantic Division manufactures and distributes Tissue Microarrays (TMAs) for the CHTN. A number of different arrays designs targeted to discovery research are available. All TMAs are constructed from formalin-fixed tissue and provided as unstained sections, 4 microns thick, mounted on charged glass slides. TMA slides are suitable for standard histologic staining, immunohistochemistry, and some in-situ applications.

  3. NCI-Frederick PHL - Tissue Microarray

    Cancer.gov

    Services Price List Courier Services & Shipment Procedures Scheduling Contact Information Related Links Establishing an Account PHL Forms Staff Publications PHL Portal Rodent Tissue Microarray Tissue microarays allow the possibility to represent a large

  4. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  5. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  6. The tissue microarray OWL schema: An open-source tool for sharing tissue microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunseok P.; Borromeo, Charles D.; Berman, Jules J.; Becich, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tissue microarrays (TMAs) are enormously useful tools for translational research, but incompatibilities in database systems between various researchers and institutions prevent the efficient sharing of data that could help realize their full potential. Resource Description Framework (RDF) provides a flexible method to represent knowledge in triples, which take the form Subject-Predicate-Object. All data resources are described using Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), which are global in scope. We present an OWL (Web Ontology Language) schema that expands upon the TMA data exchange specification to address this issue and assist in data sharing and integration. Methods: A minimal OWL schema was designed containing only concepts specific to TMA experiments. More general data elements were incorporated from predefined ontologies such as the NCI thesaurus. URIs were assigned using the Linked Data format. Results: We present examples of files utilizing the schema and conversion of XML data (similar to the TMA DES) to OWL. Conclusion: By utilizing predefined ontologies and global unique identifiers, this OWL schema provides a solution to the limitations of XML, which represents concepts defined in a localized setting. This will help increase the utilization of tissue resources, facilitating collaborative translational research efforts. PMID:20805954

  7. Tissue tablet method: an efficient tissue banking procedure applicable to both molecular analysis and frozen tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Torata, Nobuhiro; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Akagawa, Shin; Cui, Lin; Kozono, Shingo; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Aishima, Shinichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Frozen human tissues are necessary for research purposes, but tissue banking methods have not changed for more than a decade. Many institutions use cryovial tubes or plastic molds with an optimal cutting temperature compound. However, these methods are associated with several problems, such as samples sticking to one another and the need for a larger storing space. We established an efficient tissue freezing and storing procedure ("tissue tablet method") applicable to both molecular analysis and frozen tissue microarray. Tissue samples were chopped into tiny fragments and embedded into tablet-shaped frozen optimal cutting temperature compound using our original tissue-freezing plate. These tablets can be sectioned and stored in cryovial tubes. We compared the tissue quality of tablet-shaped samples with that of conventional optimal cutting temperature blocks and found no significant difference between them. Tissue microarray is a key method to utilize tissue-banking specimens. However, most tissue microarrays require the coring out of cylindrically shaped tissues from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. Antigenic changes and mRNA degradation are frequently observed with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. Therefore, we have applied tablet-shaped samples to construct frozen tissue microarrays with our original mounting base. Constructed tissue microarray sections showed good morphology without obvious artifact and good immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization results. These results suggest that the quality of arrayed samples was sufficiently appropriate for research purposes. In conclusion, the tissue tablet method and frozen tissue microarray procedure can save time, provides easy tissue handling and processing, and satisfies the demands of research methodologies and tissue banking. PMID:24321523

  8. Gene expression changes in progression of cervical neoplasia revealed by microarray analysis of cervical neoplastic keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, John Charles; Bosi, Silvia; Bassi, Cristian; Ferracin, Manuela; Lanza, Giovanni; Gafŕ, Roberta; Magri, Eros; Selvatici, Rita; Torresani, Stefania; Marci, Roberto; Garutti, Paola; Negrini, Massimo; Tognon, Mauro; Martini, Fernanda

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the gene expression changes involved in neoplastic progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Using microarray analysis, large-scale gene expression profile was carried out on HPV16-CIN2, HPV16-CIN3, and normal cervical keratinocytes derived from two HPV16-CIN2, two HPV-CIN3 lesions, and two corresponding normal cervical tissues, respectively. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed in normal cervical keratinocytes compared with HPV16-CIN2 keratinocytes and in HPV16-CIN2 keratinocytes compared with HPV16-CIN3 keratinocytes; 37 candidate genes with continuously increasing or decreasing expression during CIN progression were identified. One of these genes, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, was chosen for further characterization. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that expression of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase consistently increases during progression of CIN toward cancer. Gene expression changes occurring during CIN progression were investigated using microarray analysis, for the first time, in CIN2 and CIN3 keratinocytes naturally infected with HPV16. Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase is likely to be associated with tumorigenesis and may be a potential prognostic marker for CIN progression. PMID:25205602

  9. Tissue Microarray Validation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and SALL2 in Synovial Sarcoma

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Tissue Microarray Validation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and SALL2 in Synovial Sarcoma,§ Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California Histological diagnosis of synovial sarcoma can levels in synovial sarcoma than in other soft tissue tumors, representing excellent candidates

  10. TAMEE: data management and analysis for tissue microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Thallinger, Gerhard G; Baumgartner, Kerstin; Pirklbauer, Martin; Uray, Martina; Pauritsch, Elke; Mehes, Gabor; Buck, Charles R; Zatloukal, Kurt; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2007-01-01

    Background With the introduction of tissue microarrays (TMAs) researchers can investigate gene and protein expression in tissues on a high-throughput scale. TMAs generate a wealth of data calling for extended, high level data management. Enhanced data analysis and systematic data management are required for traceability and reproducibility of experiments and provision of results in a timely and reliable fashion. Robust and scalable applications have to be utilized, which allow secure data access, manipulation and evaluation for researchers from different laboratories. Results TAMEE (Tissue Array Management and Evaluation Environment) is a web-based database application for the management and analysis of data resulting from the production and application of TMAs. It facilitates storage of production and experimental parameters, of images generated throughout the TMA workflow, and of results from core evaluation. Database content consistency is achieved using structured classifications of parameters. This allows the extraction of high quality results for subsequent biologically-relevant data analyses. Tissue cores in the images of stained tissue sections are automatically located and extracted and can be evaluated using a set of predefined analysis algorithms. Additional evaluation algorithms can be easily integrated into the application via a plug-in interface. Downstream analysis of results is facilitated via a flexible query generator. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to the specific needs of research projects using high density TMAs. It covers the complete workflow of TMA production, experimental use and subsequent analysis. The system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions from . PMID:17343750

  11. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  12. Merging Discovery with Validation in Tissue Based Translation Research: Toward the Goal of Multiplex Testing of Tissue Microarrays

    Cancer.gov

    April 30, 2015 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Shady Grove Room TE 406 + Add to Outlook Calendar Title:  Merging Discovery with Validation in Tissue Based Translation Research: Toward the Goal of Multiplex Testing of Tissue Microarrays Speaker: Lawrence R Sternberg,

  13. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  14. Identification of Differentially Expressed IGFBP5-Related Genes in Breast Cancer Tumor Tissues Using cDNA Microarray Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Peker, ?rem; Özmen, Tolga; Güllü Amuran, Gökçe; Güllüo?lu, Bahad?r M.; Kaya, Handan; Özer, Ay?e

    2015-01-01

    IGFBP5 is an important regulatory protein in breast cancer progression. We tried to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between breast tumor tissues with IGFBP5 overexpression and their adjacent normal tissues. In this study, thirty-eight breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissue samples were used to determine IGFBP5 expression by qPCR. cDNA microarrays were applied to the highest IGFBP5 overexpressed tumor samples compared to their adjacent normal breast tissue. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 186 genes were differentially expressed in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissues. Of the 186 genes, 169 genes were downregulated and 17 genes were upregulated in the tumor samples. KEGG pathway analyses showed that protein digestion and absorption, focal adhesion, salivary secretion, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, and phenylalanine metabolism pathways are involved. Among these DEGs, the prominent top two genes (MMP11 and COL1A1) which potentially correlated with IGFBP5 were selected for validation using real time RT-qPCR. Only COL1A1 expression showed a consistent upregulation with IGFBP5 expression and COL1A1 and MMP11 were significantly positively correlated. We concluded that the discovery of coordinately expressed genes related with IGFBP5 might contribute to understanding of the molecular mechanism of the function of IGFBP5 in breast cancer. Further functional studies on DEGs and association with IGFBP5 may identify novel biomarkers for clinical applications in breast cancer. PMID:26569312

  15. Identification of Differentially Expressed IGFBP5-Related Genes in Breast Cancer Tumor Tissues Using cDNA Microarray Experiments.

    PubMed

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Peker, ?rem; Özmen, Tolga; Amuran, Gökçe Güllü; Güllüo?lu, Bahad?r M; Kaya, Handan; Özer, Ay?e

    2015-01-01

    IGFBP5 is an important regulatory protein in breast cancer progression. We tried to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between breast tumor tissues with IGFBP5 overexpression and their adjacent normal tissues. In this study, thirty-eight breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissue samples were used to determine IGFBP5 expression by qPCR. cDNA microarrays were applied to the highest IGFBP5 overexpressed tumor samples compared to their adjacent normal breast tissue. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 186 genes were differentially expressed in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissues. Of the 186 genes, 169 genes were downregulated and 17 genes were upregulated in the tumor samples. KEGG pathway analyses showed that protein digestion and absorption, focal adhesion, salivary secretion, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, and phenylalanine metabolism pathways are involved. Among these DEGs, the prominent top two genes (MMP11 and COL1A1) which potentially correlated with IGFBP5 were selected for validation using real time RT-qPCR. Only COL1A1 expression showed a consistent upregulation with IGFBP5 expression and COL1A1 and MMP11 were significantly positively correlated. We concluded that the discovery of coordinately expressed genes related with IGFBP5 might contribute to understanding of the molecular mechanism of the function of IGFBP5 in breast cancer. Further functional studies on DEGs and association with IGFBP5 may identify novel biomarkers for clinical applications in breast cancer. PMID:26569312

  16. MicroRNA profiling of breast cancer tissue using an LNA-based microarray

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    MicroRNA profiling of breast cancer tissue using an LNA-based microarray Abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer suggests their applicability as diagnostic and prognostic signatures. Here expression profiles of miRNAs in breast cancer with the aim of identifying potential new biomarkers. mi

  17. Phosphoprotein Stability in Clinical Tissue and Its Relevance for Reverse Phase Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Virginia; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated proteins reflect the activity of specific cell signaling nodes in biological kinase protein networks. Cell signaling pathways can be either activated or deactivated depending on the phosphorylation state of the constituent proteins. The state of these kinase pathways reflects the in vivo activity of the cells and tissue at any given point in time. As such, cell signaling pathway information can be extrapolated to infer which phosphorylated proteins/pathways are driving an individual tumor’s growth. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays (RPMA) are a sensitive and precise platform that can be applied to the quantitative measurement of hundreds of phosphorylated signal proteins from a small sample of tissue. Pre-analytical variability originating from tissue procurement and preservation may cause significant variability and bias in downstream molecular analysis. Depending on the ex vivo delay time in tissue processing, and the manner of tissue handling, protein biomarkers such as signal pathway phosphoproteins will be elevated or suppressed in a manner that does not represent the biomarker levels at the time of excision. Consequently, assessment of the state of these kinase networks requires stabilization, or preservation, of the phosphoproteins immediately post tissue procurement. We have employed reverse phase protein microarray analysis of phosphoproteins to study the factors influencing stability of phosphoproteins in tissue following procurement. Based on this analysis we have established tissue procurement guidelines for clinical research with an emphasis on quantifying phosphoproteins by RPMA. PMID:21901591

  18. A cDNA microarray analysis of the response to heat stress in hepatopancreas tissue of the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes

    E-print Network

    Stillman, Jonathon

    A cDNA microarray analysis of the response to heat stress in hepatopancreas tissue of the porcelain heat stress in the intertidal porcelain crab, Petrolisthes cinctipes using custom cDNA microarrays made

  19. Decentralized Data Sharing of Tissue Microarrays for Investigative Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjin; Schmidt, Cristina; Parashar, Manish; Reiss, Michael; Foran, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue microarray technology (TMA) is a relatively new approach for efficiently and economically assessing protein and gene expression across large ensembles of tissue specimens. Tissue microarray technology holds great potential for reducing the time and cost associated with conducting research in tissue banking, proteomics, and outcome studies. However, the sheer volume of images and other data generated from even limited studies involving tissue microarrays quickly approach the processing capacity and resources of a division or department. This challenge is compounded by the fact that large-scale projects in several areas of modern research rely upon multi-institutional efforts in which investigators and resources are spread out over multiple campuses, cities, and states. To address some of the data management issues several leading institutions have begun to develop their own “in-house” systems, independently, but such data will be only minimally useful if it isn’t accessible to others in the scientific community. Investigators at different institutions studying the same or related disorders might benefit from the synergy of sharing results. To facilitate sharing of TMA data across different database implementations, the Technical Standards Committee of the Association for Pathology Informatics organized workshops in efforts to establish a standardized TMA data exchange specification. The focus of our research does not relate to the establishment of standards for exchange, but rather builds on these efforts and concentrates on the design, development and deployment of a decentralized collaboratory for the unsupervised characterization, and seamless and secure discovery and sharing of TMA data. Specifically, we present a self-organizing, peer-to-peer indexing and discovery infrastructure for quantitatively assessing digitized TMA’s. The system utilizes a novel, optimized decentralized search engine that supports flexible querying, while guaranteeing that once information has been stored in the system, it will be found with bounded costs. PMID:19081778

  20. Multiplex Quantitative Measurement of mRNAs from Fixed Tissue Microarray Sections

    PubMed Central

    Armani, Michael; Tangrea, Michael; Yang, Brian; Rosenberg, Alex; Ylaya, Kris; Morris, Jennifer; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Shapiro, Benjamin; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Smela, Elisabeth; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, such as those from gene expression studies, requires independent validation in clinical specimens. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (TMAs) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is often used to increase statistical power, and it is used more often than in situ hybridization (ISH), which can be technically limiting. Here we introduce a method for performing quantitative gene expression analysis across a TMA using an adaptation of 2D-RT-qPCR, a recently developed technology for measuring transcript levels in a histological section while maintaining two-dimensional positional information of the tissue sample. As a demonstration of utility, a TMA with tumor and normal human prostate samples was used to validate expression profiles from previous array-based gene discovery studies of prostate cancer. The results show that 2D-RT-qPCR expands the utility of TMAs to include sensitive and accurate gene expression measurements. PMID:24809843

  1. Biofunctionalization of surfaces by energetic ion implantation: Review of progress on applications in implantable biomedical devices and antibody microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2014-08-01

    Despite major research efforts in the field of biomaterials, rejection, severe immune responses, scar tissue and poor integration continue to seriously limit the performance of today's implantable biomedical devices. Implantable biomaterials that interact with their host via an interfacial layer of active biomolecules to direct a desired cellular response to the implant would represent a major and much sought after improvement. Another, perhaps equally revolutionary, development that is on the biomedical horizon is the introduction of cost-effective microarrays for fast, highly multiplexed screening for biomarkers on cell membranes and in a variety of analyte solutions. Both of these advances will rely on effective methods of functionalizing surfaces with bioactive molecules. After a brief introduction to other methods currently available, this review will describe recently developed approaches that use energetic ions extracted from plasma to facilitate simple, one-step covalent surface immobilization of bioactive molecules. A kinetic theory model of the immobilization process by reactions with long-lived, mobile, surface-embedded radicals will be presented. The roles of surface chemistry and microstructure of the ion treated layer will be discussed. Early progress on applications of this technology to create diagnostic microarrays and to engineer bioactive surfaces for implantable biomedical devices will be reviewed.

  2. Classification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on mutagenicity in lung tissue through DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Minoru; Tanaka, Shiho; Asami, Osamu

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants produced in the combustion of organic matter. Exposure to PAHs raises the risk of lung cancer and inflammatory and allergic disorders such as asthma. DNA microarray technologies have been applied to research on toxicogenomics in the recent years. To evaluate the mutagenicity of PAHs and constituents of environmental pollutants in lung tissue, including metabolic activation, human alveolar epithelial type II cells (A549) were treated with nonmutagenic PAH pyrene and with the mutagenic PAHs benzo-[a]-pyrene, 1-nitropyrene, or 1,8-dinitropyrene. Comparison of genome-wide microarray expression profiles between a nonmutagenic and a mutagenic PAH-treated group revealed that xenobiotic response genes such as CYP1B1 were commonly upregulated in two groups and that DNA damage induced genes, especially p53-downstream genes such as p21 (CDKN1A) were upregulated only in the mutagenic PAH-treated group. Pretreatment with cytochrome P450 inhibitor ?-naphthoflavone or p53 inhibitor pifithrin-? inhibited the benzo-[a]-pyrene-induced p21 expression. These data suggest that when PAHs enter the cells, lung epithelium induces PAH metabolic activating enzymes, and then the DNA damages-recognition signal is converged with p53 downstream genes. This metabolic activation and DNA damage is induced in lung epithelium, and the mutagenicity of PAHs can be classified by DNA microarray expression profiles. PMID:21887816

  3. Ultra-Fast Processing of Gigapixel Tissue MicroArray Images Using High Performance Computing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinhai; McCleary, David; Wang, Ching-Wei; Kelly, Paul; James, Jackie; Fennell, Dean A.; Hamilton, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a valuable platform for tissue based translational research and the discovery of tissue biomarkers. The digitised TMA slides or TMA Virtual Slides, are ultra-large digital images, and can contain several hundred samples. The processing of such slides is time-consuming, bottlenecking a potentially high throughput platform. Methods: A High Performance Computing (HPC) platform for the rapid analysis of TMA virtual slides is presented in this study. Using an HP high performance cluster and a centralised dynamic load balancing approach, the simultaneous analysis of multiple tissue-cores were established. This was evaluated on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer TMAs for complex analysis of tissue pattern and immunohistochemical positivity. Results: The automated processing of a single TMA virtual slide containing 230 patient samples can be significantly speeded up by a factor of circa 22, bringing the analysis time to one minute. Over 90 TMAs could also be analysed simultaneously, speeding up multiplex biomarker experiments enormously. Conclusion: The methodologies developed in this paper provide for the first time a genuine high throughput analysis platform for TMA biomarker discovery that will significantly enhance the reliability and speed for biomarker research. This will have widespread implications in translational tissue based research. PMID:21127378

  4. Microarray Based Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Brown and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue: Significance with Human

    PubMed Central

    Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Mantri, Shrikant; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Two types of adipose tissues, white (WAT) and brown (BAT) are found in mammals. Increasingly novel strategies are being proposed for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications by altering amount and/or activity of BAT using mouse models. Methodology/Principle Findings The present study was designed to: (a) investigate the differential expression of genes in LACA mice subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and BAT using mouse DNA microarray, (b) to compare mouse differential gene expression with previously published human data; to understand any inter- species differences between the two and (c) to make a comparative assessment with C57BL/6 mouse strain. In mouse microarray studies, over 7003, 1176 and 401 probe sets showed more than two-fold, five-fold and ten-fold change respectively in differential expression between murine BAT and WAT. Microarray data was validated using quantitative RT-PCR of key genes showing high expression in BAT (Fabp3, Ucp1, Slc27a1) and sWAT (Ms4a1, H2-Ob, Bank1) or showing relatively low expression in BAT (Pgk1, Cox6b1) and sWAT (Slc20a1, Cd74). Multi-omic pathway analysis was employed to understand possible links between the organisms. When murine two fold data was compared with published human BAT and sWAT data, 90 genes showed parallel differential expression in both mouse and human. Out of these 90 genes, 46 showed same pattern of differential expression whereas the pattern was opposite for the remaining 44 genes. Based on our microarray results and its comparison with human data, we were able to identify genes (targets) (a) which can be studied in mouse model systems to extrapolate results to human (b) where caution should be exercised before extrapolation of murine data to human. Conclusion Our study provides evidence for inter species (mouse vs human) differences in differential gene expression between sWAT and BAT. Critical understanding of this data may help in development of novel ways to engineer one form of adipose tissue to another using murine model with focus on human. PMID:26010905

  5. Distinct and Complementary Information Provided by Use of Tissue and DNA Microarrays in the Study of Breast Tumor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Bertucci, François; Eisinger, François; Geneix, Jeannine; Bechlian, Didier; Conte, Nathalie; Adélaďde, José; Toiron, Yves; Nguyen, Catherine; Viens, Patrice; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Houlgatte, Rémi; Birnbaum, Daniel; Jacquemier, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput screening technologies are rapidly providing opportunities to identify new diagnostic and prognostic markers and new therapeutic targets in human cancer. Currently, cDNA arrays allow the quantitative measurement of thousands of mRNA expression levels simultaneously. Validation of this tool in hospital settings can be done on large series of archival paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the new technique of tissue microarray. On a series of 55 clinically and pathologically homogeneous breast tumors, we compared for 15 molecules with a proven or suspected role in breast cancer, the mRNA expression levels measured by cDNA array analysis with protein expression levels obtained using tumor tissue microarrays. The validity of cDNA array and tissue microarray data were first verified by comparison with quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction measurements and immunohistochemistry on full tissue sections, respectively. We found a good correlation between cDNA and tissue array analyses in one-third of the 15 molecules, and no correlation in the remaining two-thirds. Furthermore, protein but not RNA levels may have prognostic value; this was the case for MUC1 protein, which was studied further using a tissue microarray containing ?600 tumor samples. For THBS1 the opposite was observed because only RNA levels had prognostic value. Thus, differences extended to clinical prognostic information obtained by the two methods underlining their complementarity and the need for a global molecular analysis of tumors at both the RNA and protein levels. PMID:12368196

  6. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 ?m thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins encoded by the human genome. PMID:22688270

  7. A Comprehensive Inter-Tissue Crosstalk Analysis Underlying Progression and Control of Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Samdani, Pawan; Singhal, Meet; Sinha, Neeraj; Tripathi, Parul; Sharma, Sachin; Tikoo, Kamiya; Rao, Kanury V. S.; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a metabolic state associated with excess of positive energy balance. While adipose tissues are considered the major contributor for complications associated with obesity, they influence a variety of tissues and inflict significant metabolic and inflammatory alterations. Unfortunately, the communication network between different cell-types responsible for such systemic alterations has been largely unexplored. Here we study the inter-tissue crosstalk during progression and cure of obesity using multi-tissue gene expression data generated through microarray analysis. We used gene expression data sets from 10 different tissues from mice fed on high-fat-high-sugar diet (HFHSD) at various stages of disease development and applied a novel analysis algorithm to deduce the tissue crosstalk. We unravel a comprehensive network of inter-tissue crosstalk that emerges during progression of obesity leading to inflammation and insulin resistance. Many of the crosstalk involved interactions between well-known modulators of obesity and associated pathology like inflammation. We then used similar datasets from mice that in addition to HFHSD were also administered with a herbal concoction known to circumvent the effects of HFHSD in the diet induced model of obesity in mice. We propose, the analysis presented here could be applied to understand systemic details of several chronic diseases. PMID:26202695

  8. Differentially expressed angiogenic genes in diabetic erectile tissue - results from a microarray screening.

    PubMed

    Castela, Ângela; Soares, Raquel; Rocha, Fátima; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Gomes, Pedro; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald; Costa, Carla

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes-induced metabolic derangements promote endothelial malfunction, contributing to erectile dysfunction (ED). However, it remains unclear which angiogenic molecular mechanisms are deregulated in diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC). We investigated early and late alterations in cavernosal angiogenic gene expression associated to diabetes. Angiogenic changes were assessed in penile tissue of streptozotocin-induced Wistar rats, in an early (2-week) and established stage (8-week) of diabetes. Differentially expressed genes were identified by microarrays and expression data validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR). At protein level, quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed the arrays data and dual immunofluorescence for selected alterations and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) identified the cellular location of target proteins. The selected differentially expressed genes were also evaluated in human non-diabetic and diabetic CC by quantitative immunolabeling. At 2-week diabetes there was no differential gene expression between non-diabetic and diabetic CC. At 8-week, 10 genes were found down-regulated in diabetics. The results were validated by qrt-PCR for the insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) and the natriuretic peptide receptor-1 (Npr1) genes. Dual immunofluorescence for IGF-1/ ?-SMA showed predominant localization of IGF-1 in SM. NPR-1 expression was diffuse and mostly present in trabecular fibroblasts and SM. Quantitative immunostaining confirmed the decreased expression of both proteins in diabetic tissues. Concordantly, we detected a significant reduction in IGF-1 and NPR-1 protein expressions in human diabetic samples. Microarray analysis identified 10 angiogenic-related molecules deregulated in CC of established diabetes. Among them, IGF-1 and NPR-1 were significantly down-regulated and might result in preventive/therapeutic targets for ED management. PMID:22133301

  9. Recent progress in tissue optical clearing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Larin, Kirill V; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique provides a prospective solution for the application of advanced optical methods in life sciences. This paper gives a review of recent developments in tissue optical clearing techniques. The physical, molecular and physiological mechanisms of tissue optical clearing are overviewed and discussed. Various methods for enhancing penetration of optical-clearing agents into tissue, such as physical methods, chemical-penetration enhancers and combination of physical and chemical methods are introduced. Combining the tissue optical clearing technique with advanced microscopy image or labeling technique, applications for 3D microstructure of whole tissues such as brain and central nervous system with unprecedented resolution are demonstrated. Moreover, the difference in diffusion and/or clearing ability of selected agents in healthy versus pathological tissues can provide a highly sensitive indicator of the tissue health/pathology condition. Finally, recent advances in optical clearing of soft or hard tissue for in vivo imaging and phototherapy are introduced. PMID:24348874

  10. A metadata-aware application for remote scoring and exchange of tissue microarray images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of tissue microarrays (TMA) and advances in digital scanning microscopy has enabled the collection of thousands of tissue images. There is a need for software tools to annotate, query and share this data amongst researchers in different physical locations. Results We have developed an open source web-based application for remote scoring of TMA images, which exploits the value of Microsoft Silverlight Deep Zoom to provide a intuitive interface for zooming and panning around digital images. We use and extend existing XML-based standards to ensure that the data collected can be archived and that our system is interoperable with other standards-compliant systems. Conclusion The application has been used for multi-centre scoring of TMA slides composed of tissues from several Phase III breast cancer trials and ten different studies participating in the International Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The system has enabled researchers to simultaneously score large collections of TMA and export the standardised data to integrate with pathological and clinical outcome data, thereby facilitating biomarker discovery. PMID:23635078

  11. Determination of Tumor Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancers Using Heterogeneity Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Phillip R; Schnellert, Jessica; Koop, Christina; Simon, Ronald; Marx, Andreas; Izbicki, Jakob R; Sauter, Guido; Quaas, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is often heterogeneous both on a morphological and on a genetic level. Though resected tumors are often large, molecular tumor analysis is usually restricted to one tissue block. In this project we introduce a new tool for a high-throughput heterogeneity analysis of colorectal cancer. A heterogeneity tissue microarray (TMA) was manufactured from tissues of 340 patients with colorectal cancer. For this purpose 8 different tissue spots were taken from as many different cancer blocks per patient as possible (at least 4 different blocks). Additional tissue samples from 1 to 4 corresponding lymph node metastases were added from 134 patients. The system was then validated by analysing one parameter each known for minimal (p53) or substantial (HER2) heterogeneity in colorectal cancer. P53 alterations as detected by immunohistochemistry were seen in 174 (51.3 %) of 339 analyzable primary tumors of which 23 (13.2 % of positive cases) showed a heterogeneous distribution pattern. HER2 overexpression was seen in 18 (5.4 %) of 336 evaluable tumors. HER2 amplification occurred in 6 (33.3 %) of the 18 cases with HER2 overexpression. Genomic heterogeneity was more prevalent for HER2 alterations than for p53 alterations. For immunohistochemical expression analysis, 16 of 18 positive cases were heterogeneous (88.9 %) and for amplification 3 of 6 cases (50 %) were heterogeneous. Large section validation revealed, however a considerable fraction of heterogeneous cases were due to technical artifacts. In summary, our data suggest, that heterogeneity TMAs are a powerful tool to rapidly screen for molecular heterogeneity in colorectal cancer. PMID:26026893

  12. Prognostic significance of epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related markers in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: comprehensive immunohistochemical study using a tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, T; Mitsuhashi, T; Hatanaka, Y; Miyamoto, M; Oba, K; Tsuchikawa, T; Suzuki, Y; Hatanaka, K C; Hirano, S; Matsuno, Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is characterised by the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion and gaining of mesenchymal phenotypes. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition is proposed to occur in various developmental processes and cancer progression. ‘Cadherin switch', a process in which cells shift to express different isoforms of the cadherin transmembrane protein and usually refers to a switch from the expression of E-cadherin to N-cadherin, is one aspect of EMT and can have a profound effect on tumour invasion/metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological significance of EMT-related proteins and cadherin switch in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC). Methods: We investigated the association between altered expression of 12 EMT-related proteins and clinical outcomes in patients with EHCC (n=117) using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Results: Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that, in addition to N classification (P=0.0420), the expression of E-cadherin (P=0.0208), N-cadherin (P=0.0038) and S100A4 (P=0.0157) was each an independent and a significant prognostic factor. We also demonstrated that cadherin switch was independently associated with poor prognosis (P=0.0143) in patients with EHCC. Conclusions: These results may provide novel information for selection of patients with EHCC who require adjuvant therapy and strict surveillance. PMID:25077440

  13. Association of molecular biomarkers expression with biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer through tissue microarray immunostaining

    PubMed Central

    MA, DING; ZHOU, ZHE; YANG, BING; HE, QUN; ZHANG, QIAN; ZHANG, XIANG-HUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic role of metallothionein-2A (MT-2A), E-cadherin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), cyclin-E, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 in the biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) using tissue microarray immunostaining. Tissue specimens from 128 PCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were processed and transferred onto tissue microarrays. The clinicopathological parameters of PCa patients were also recorded. Following immunohistochemical examination of MT-2A, E-cadherin, IL-6, cyclin-E, PCNA and Bcl-2 expression in PCa specimens, association analysis of biomarkers expression with the biochemical recurrence of PCa was performed. The results revealed that the overall rate of biochemical recurrence was 30.5% (39/128) and the median biochemical recurrence-free time was 19 months (range, 6–35 months). The biochemical recurrence rates in low-, intermediate- and high-risk PCa classification were 14.8 (8/54), 38.7 (24/62) and 58.3% (7/12), respectively. Survival analysis demonstrated that a decreased biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was noted in PCa cases with positive MT-2A and cyclin E expression as well as those with negative E-cadherin expression (P=0.022, 0.028 and 0.011, respectively). Subsequent multivariate Cox analysis revealed that MT-2A [hazard ratio (HR)=2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08–3.15; P=0.005], E-cadherin (HR=1.79; 95% CI=1.08–2.21; P=0.042) and cyclin E (HR=1.92; 95% CI=1.22–2.45; P=0.020) were independent predictors of the biochemical recurrence of PCa. In conclusion, the present study provided clinical evidence that evaluation of molecular biomarkers expression may improve clinical prognostic accuracy for the biochemical recurrence of PCa. Of note, the expression of MT-2A, cyclin E and E-cadherin may serve as independent predictors for biochemical recurrence of PCa. PMID:26622816

  14. Profiling miRNAs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma FFPE tissue by microarray and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jin; Feng, Yanjun; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Levine, Paul; Easley, Samantha; Martinez, Elizabeth; Hashmi, Salman; Sadeghi, Nader; Brindley, Paul J.; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Plieskatt, Jordan L.

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a non-lymphomatous, squamous-cell carcinoma that occurs in the epithelial lining of the nasopharynx. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma has a geographically well-defined distribution worldwide, with the highest prevalence in China, Southeast Asia, and Northern Africa. Symptoms of nascent NPC may be unapparent or trivial, with diagnosis based on the histopathology of biopsied tissue following endoscopy of the nasopharynx. The tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system is the benchmark for the prognosis of NPC and guides treatment strategy. However, there is a consensus that the TNM system is not sufficiently specific for the prognosis of NPC, as it does not reflect the biological heterogeneity of this tumor, making another biomarker for the detection of NPC a priority. We have previously reported on different approaches for microRNA (miRNA) biomarker discovery for Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) NPC tissue samples by both a targeted (microarray) and an untargeted (small RNA-Seq) discovery platform. Both miRNA discovery platforms produced similar results, narrowing the miRNA signature to 1–5% of the known mature human miRNAs, with untargeted (small RNA-Seq approach) having the advantage of indicating “unknown” miRNAs associated with NPC. Both miRNA profiles strongly associated with NPC, providing two potential discovery platforms for biomarker signatures for NPC. Herein, we provide a detailed description of the methods that we used to interrogate FFPE samples to discover biomarkers for NPC. PMID:26484110

  15. Tissue microarray analysis of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying-Chun; Liu, Qiang; Dai, Jia-Qi; Yin, Zhi-Qiang; Tang, Lei; Ma, Yue; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Hong-Xia

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic and prognostic potential of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression in breast cancer. We analyzed a tissue microarray comprised of 100 breast cancer cases and 70 matched normal samples. Analysis of an online database, which included 2,977 patients, was also performed. There was a significant difference in cytoplasmic expression of XIAP (XIAP-C) between breast cancer tissue and matched normal (p<0.001). Staining of XIAP-C was defined as negative (breast cancer 8.42% vs. normal 30.91%), slight (40.0 vs. 45.45%), moderate (43.16 vs. 23.64%), or high (8.42 vs. 0%). High XIAP-C protein expression correlated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) status (p=0.010) and with human p53 mutant-type (P53) status (p=0.039). We found that XIAP expression did not correlate with disease-free survival (p=0.706) and overall survival (p=0.496) of breast cancer patients. An Internet-based system analysis confirmed our results. In the subgroup analysis, basal-like breast cancer patients with high XIAP levels in the tumor had a significantly increased risk of relapse; thus, the up-regulation of XIAP appeared to be predictive of poor relapse-free survival (p=0.013). Kaplan-Meier curves also identified a significant correlation between distant metastasis-free survival and XIAP expression in patients with lymph-node-negative disease (p=0.030). In summary, expression of XIAP-C was significantly higher in breast cancer compared to normal tissue. XIAP-C expression correlated with HER-2 status and may be considered a prognostic biomarker for basal-like breast cancer patients. PMID:24446252

  16. Extending the tissue microarray data exchange specification for inclusion of data analysis results

    PubMed Central

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Quirke, Philip; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) specification for encoding TMA experiment data in a machine-readable format that is also human readable. TMA DES defines Common Data Elements (CDEs) that form a basic vocabulary for describing TMA data. TMA data are routinely subjected to univariate and multivariate statistical analysis to determine differences or similarities between pathologically distinct groups of tumors for one or more markers or between markers for different groups. Such statistical analysis tests include the t-test, ANOVA, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. All these generate output that needs to be recorded and stored with TMA data. Materials and Methods: We propose extending the TMA DES to include syntactic and semantic definitions of CDEs for describing the results of statistical analyses performed upon TMA DES data. These CDEs are described in this paper and it is illustrated how they can be added to the TMA DES. We created a Document Type Definition (DTD) file defining the syntax for these CDEs, and a set of ISO 11179 entries providing semantic definitions for them. We describe how we wrote a program in R that read TMA DES data from an XML file, performed statistical analyses on that data, and created a new XML file containing both the original XML data and CDEs representing the results of our analyses. This XML file was submitted to XML parsers in order to confirm that they conformed to the syntax defined in our extended DTD file. TMA DES XML files with deliberately introduced errors were also parsed in order to verify that our new DTD file could perform error checking. Finally, we also validated an existing TMA DES XML file against our DTD file in order to demonstrate the backward compatibility of our DTD. Results: Our experiments demonstrated the encoding of analysis results using our proposed CDEs. We used XML parsers to confirm that these XML data were syntactically correct and conformed to the rules specified in our extended TMA DES DTD. We also demonstrated that this extended DTD was capable of being used to successfully perform error checking, and was backward compatible with pre-existing TMA DES data which did not use our new CDEs. Conclusions: The TMA DES allows Tissue Microarray data to be shared. A variety of statistical tests are used to analyze such data. We have proposed a set of CDEs as an extension to the TMA DES which can be used to annotate TMA DES data with the results of statistical analyses performed on that data. We performed experiments which demonstrated the usage of TMA DES data containing our proposed CDEs. PMID:21572505

  17. Comparative microarray analyses of adult female midgut tissues from feeding Rhipicephalus species.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem A; Stutzer, Christian; Olivier, Nicholas A; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, has a debilitating effect on the livestock industry worldwide, owing to its being a vector of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In South Africa, co-infestation with R. microplus and R. decoloratus, a common vector species on local livestock, occurs widely in the northern and eastern parts of the country. An alternative to chemical control methods is sought in the form of a tick vaccine to control these tick species. However, sequence information and transcriptional data for R. decoloratus is currently lacking. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying genes that are shared between midgut tissues of feeding adult female R. microplus and R. decoloratus ticks. In this regard, a custom oligonucleotide microarray comprising of 13,477 R. microplus sequences was used for transcriptional profiling and 2476 genes were found to be shared between these Rhipicephalus species. In addition, 136 transcripts were found to be more abundantly expressed in R. decoloratus and 1084 in R. microplus. Chi-square analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly overrepresented in R. microplus and R. decoloratus. This study is the first transcriptional profiling of R. decoloratus and is an additional resource that can be evaluated further in future studies for possible tick control. PMID:25448423

  18. Selective invocation of shape priors for deformable segmentation and morphologic classification of prostate cancer tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan I; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-04-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all three terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images from 40 patient studies. Nuclear shape based, architectural and textural features extracted from these segmentations were extracted and found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 86% via a quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 60% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid active contour model involving a shape prior. PMID:25466771

  19. An adaptable method using human mixed tissue ratiometric controls for benchmarking performance on gene expression microarrays in clinical laboratories

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular biomarkers that are based on mRNA transcripts are being developed for the diagnosis and treatment of a number of diseases. DNA microarrays are one of the primary technologies being used to develop classifiers from gene expression data for clinically relevant outcomes. Microarray assays are highly multiplexed measures of comparative gene expression but have a limited dynamic range of measurement and show compression in fold change detection. To increase the clinical utility of microarrays, assay controls are needed that benchmark performance using metrics that are relevant to the analysis of genomic data generated with biological samples. Results Ratiometric controls were prepared from commercial sources of high quality RNA from human tissues with distinctly different expression profiles and mixed in defined ratios. The samples were processed using six different target labeling protocols and replicate datasets were generated on high density gene expression microarrays. The area under the curve from receiver operating characteristic plots was calculated to measure diagnostic performance. The reliable region of the dynamic range was derived from log2 ratio deviation plots made for each dataset. Small but statistically significant differences in diagnostic performance were observed between standardized assays available from the array manufacturer and alternative methods for target generation. Assay performance using the reliable range of comparative measurement as a metric was improved by adjusting sample hybridization conditions for one commercial kit. Conclusions Process improvement in microarray assay performance was demonstrated using samples prepared from commercially available materials and two metrics - diagnostic performance and the reliable range of measurement. These methods have advantages over approaches that use a limited set of external controls or correlations to reference sets, because they provide benchmark values that can be used by clinical laboratories to help optimize protocol conditions and laboratory proficiency with microarray assays. PMID:21486464

  20. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  1. Current progress in 3D printing for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Xiong, Guanglei; Dunham, Simon; Min, James K

    2015-06-01

    3D printing is a technology that allows the fabrication of structures with arbitrary geometries and heterogeneous material properties. The application of this technology to biological structures that match the complexity of native tissue is of great interest to researchers. This mini-review highlights the current progress of 3D printing for fabricating artificial tissues of the cardiovascular system, specifically the myocardium, heart valves, and coronary arteries. In addition, how 3D printed sensors and actuators can play a role in tissue engineering is discussed. To date, all the work with building 3D cardiac tissues have been proof-of-principle demonstrations, and in most cases, yielded products less effective than other traditional tissue engineering strategies. However, this technology is in its infancy and therefore there is much promise that through collaboration between biologists, engineers and material scientists, 3D bioprinting can make a significant impact on the field of cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:25775166

  2. Tissue Stiffness Dictates Development, Homeostasis, and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Handorf, Andrew M; Zhou, Yaxian; Halanski, Matthew A; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tissue development is orchestrated by the coordinated activities of both chemical and physical regulators. While much attention has been given to the role that chemical regulators play in driving development, researchers have recently begun to elucidate the important role that the mechanical properties of the extracellular environment play. For instance, the stiffness of the extracellular environment has a role in orienting cell division, maintaining tissue boundaries, directing cell migration, and driving differentiation. In addition, extracellular matrix stiffness is important for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis, and when matrix mechanics become imbalanced, disease progression may ensue. In this article, we will review the important role that matrix stiffness plays in dictating cell behavior during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. PMID:25915734

  3. Overexpression of ?2,3sialyl T-antigen in breast cancer determined by miniaturized glycosyltransferase assays and confirmed using tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shilpa A.; Bshara, Wiam; Morrison, Carl; Chandrasekaran, E. V.; Matta, Khushi L.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Glycan structure alterations during cancer regulate disease progression and represent clinical biomarkers. The study determined the degree to which changes in glycosyl transferase activities during cancer can be related to aberrant cell-surface tumor associated carbohydrate structures (TACA). To this end, changes in sialyltransferase (sialylT), fucosyltransferase (fucT) and galactosyltransferase (galT) activity were measured in normal and tumor tissue using a miniaturized enzyme activity assay and synthetic glycoconjugates bearing terminal LacNAc Type-I (Gal?1,3GlcNAc), LacNAc Type-II (Gal?1,4GlcNAc), and mucin core-1/Type-III (Gal?1,3GalNAc) structures. These data were related to TACA using tissue microarrays containing 115 breast and 26 colon cancer specimen. The results show that primary human breast and colon tumors, but not adjacent normal tissue, express elevated ?1,3 galT and ?2,3sialylT activity that can form ?2,3sialylated Type-III glycans (Sia?2,3Gal?1,3GalNAc). Prostate tumors did not exhibit such elevated enzymatic activities. ?1,3/4fucT activity was higher in breast, but not colon tissue. The enzymology based prediction of enhanced ?2,3sialylated Type-III structures in breast tumors was verified using histochemical analysis of tissue sections and tissue microarrays. Here, the binding of two markers that recognize Gal?1,3GalNAc (peanut lectin and mAb A78-G/A7) was elevated in breast tumor, but not normal control, only upon sialidase treatment. These antigens were also upregulated in colon tumors though to a lesser extent. ?2,3sialylated Type-III expression correlated inversely with patient HER2 expression and breast metastatic potential. Overall, enzymology measurements of glycoT activity predict glycan structure changes during cancer. High expression of the ?2,3sialylated T-antigen O-glycans occur in breast tumors. A transformation from linear core-1 glycan to other epitopes may accompany metastasis. PMID:25142811

  4. Quantitative assessment of Tn antigen in breast tissue micro-arrays using CdSe aqueous quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Au, Giang H T; Mejias, Linette; Swami, Vanlila K; Brooks, Ari D; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the use of CdSe aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) each conjugated to three streptavidin as a fluorescent label to image Tn antigen expression in various breast tissues via a sandwich staining procedure where the primary monoclonal anti-Tn antibody was bound to the Tn antigen on the tissue, a biotin-labeled secondary antibody was bound to the primary anti-Tn antibody, and finally the streptavidin-conjugated AQDs were bound to the biotin on the secondary antibody. We evaluated the AQD staining of Tn antigen on tissue microarrays consisting of 395 cores from 115 cases including three tumor cores and one normal-tissue core from each breast cancer case and three tumor cores from each benign case. The results indicated AQD-Tn staining was positive in more than 90% of the cells in the cancer cores but not the cells in the normal-tissue cores and the benign tumor cores. As a result, AQD-Tn staining exhibited 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity in differentiating breast cancer against normal breast tissues and benign breast conditions. These results were better than the 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity exhibited by the corresponding horse radish peroxidase (HRP) staining using the same antibodies on the same tissues and those of previous studies that used different fluorescent labels to image Tn antigen. In addition to sensitivity and specificity, the current AQD-Tn staining with a definitive threshold was quantitative. PMID:24411673

  5. A novel microarray approach reveals new tissue-specific signatures of known and predicted mammalian microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Beuvink, Iwan; Kolb, Fabrice A.; Budach, Wolfgang; Garnier, Arlette; Lange, Joerg; Natt, Francois; Dengler, Uwe; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays to examine the global expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a systematic in-parallel manner have become important tools to help unravel the functions of miRNAs and to understand their roles in RNA-based regulation and their implications in human diseases. We have established a novel miRNA-specific microarray platform that enables the simultaneous expression analysis of both known and predicted miRNAs obtained from human or mouse origin. Chemically modified 2?-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-(MOE) oligoribonucleotide probes were arrayed onto Evanescent Resonance (ER) microchips by robotic spotting. Supplementing the complementary probes against miRNAs with carefully designed mismatch controls allowed for accurate sequence-specific determination of miRNA expression profiles obtained from a panel of mouse tissues. This revealed new expression signatures of known miRNAs as well as of novel miRNAs previously predicted using bioinformatic methods. Systematic confirmation of the array data with northern blotting and, in particular, real-time PCR suggests that the described microarray platform is a powerful tool to analyze miRNA expression patterns with rapid throughput and high fidelity. PMID:17355992

  6. Tissue oxygen saturation during hyperthermic progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Rivas, Eric; Soller, Babs R; Convertino, Victor A; Crandall, Craig G

    2014-09-15

    During normothermia, a reduction in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived tissue oxygen saturation (So2) is an indicator of central hypovolemia. Hyperthermia increases skin blood flow and reduces tolerance to central hypovolemia, both of which may alter the interpretation of tissue So2 during central hypovolemia. This study tested the hypothesis that maximal reductions in tissue So2 would be similar throughout normothermic and hyperthermic central hypovolemia to presyncope. Ten healthy males (means ± SD; 32 ± 5 yr) underwent central hypovolemia via progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope during normothermia (skin temperature ?34°C) and hyperthermia (+1.2 ± 0.1°C increase in internal temperature via a water-perfused suit, skin temperature ?39°C). NIRS-derived forearm (flexor digitorum profundus) tissue So2 was measured throughout and analyzed as the absolute change from pre-LBNP. Hyperthermia reduced (P < 0.001) LBNP tolerance by 49 ± 33% (from 16.7 ± 7.9 to 7.2 ± 3.9 min). Pre-LBNP, tissue So2 was similar (P = 0.654) between normothermia (74 ± 5%) and hyperthermia (73 ± 7%). Tissue So2 decreased (P < 0.001) throughout LBNP, but the reduction from pre-LBNP to presyncope was greater during normothermia (-10 ± 6%) than during hyperthermia (-6 ± 5%; P = 0.041). Contrary to our hypothesis, these findings indicate that hyperthermia is associated with a smaller maximal reduction in tissue So2 during central hypovolemia to presyncope. PMID:25031230

  7. Evaluation of cytokeratin-19 in breast cancer tissue samples: a comparison of automatic and manual evaluations of scanned tissue microarray cylinders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital image (DI) analysis avoids visual subjectivity in interpreting immunohistochemical stains and provides more reproducible results. An automated procedure consisting of two variant methods for quantifying the cytokeratin-19 (CK19) marker in breast cancer tissues is presented. Methods The first method (A) excludes the holes inside selected CK19 stained areas, and the second (B) includes them. 93 DIs scanned from complete cylinders of tissue microarrays were evaluated visually by two pathologists and by the automated procedures. Results and conclusions There was good concordance between the two automated methods, both of which tended to identify a smaller CK19-positive area than did the pathologists. The results obtained with method B were more similar to those of the pathologists; probably because it takes into account the entire positive tumoural area, including the holes. However, the pathologists overestimated the positive area of CK19. Further studies are needed to confirm the utility of this automated procedure in prognostic studies. PMID:26329009

  8. Microarray analysis of CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mouse model of tauopathy reveals progressive synaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Alldred, Melissa J; Duff, Karen E; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2012-02-01

    The hTau mouse model of tauopathy was utilized to assess gene expression changes in vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. CA1 pyramidal neurons were microaspirated via laser capture microdissection followed by RNA amplification in combination with custom-designed microarray analysis and qPCR validation in hTau mice and nontransgenic (ntg) littermates aged 11-14months. Statistical analysis revealed ~8% of all the genes on the array platform were dysregulated, with notable downregulation of several synaptic-related markers including synaptophysin (Syp), synaptojanin, and synaptobrevin, among others. Downregulation was also observed for select glutamate receptors (GluRs), Psd-95, TrkB, and several protein phosphatase subunits. In contrast, upregulation of tau isoforms and a calpain subunit were found. Microarray assessment of synaptic-related markers in a separate cohort of hTau mice at 7-8months of age indicated only a few alterations compared to the 11-14month cohort, suggesting progressive synaptic dysfunction occurs as tau accumulates in CA1 pyramidal neurons. An assessment of SYP and PSD-95 expression was performed in the hippocampal CA1 sector of hTau and ntg mice via confocal laser scanning microscopy along with hippocampal immunoblot analysis for protein-based validation of selected microarray observations. Results indicate significant decreases in SYP-immunoreactive and PSD-95-immunoreactive puncta as well as downregulation of SYP-immunoreactive and PSD-95-immunoreactive band intensity in hTau mice compared to age-matched ntg littermates. In summary, the high prevalence of downregulation of synaptic-related genes indicates that the moderately aged hTau mouse may be a model of tau-induced synaptodegeneration, and has profound effects on how we perceive progressive tau pathology affecting synaptic transmission in AD. PMID:22079237

  9. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  10. Microarray gene expression profiles from mature gonad tissues of Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bluefin tunas are highly prized pelagic fish species representing a significant economic resource to fisheries throughout the world. Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) populations have significantly declined due to overexploitation. As a consequence of their value and population decline, T. thynnus has been the focus of considerable research effort concerning many aspects of their life history. However, in-depth understanding of T. thynnus reproductive biology is still lacking. Knowledge of reproductive physiology is a very important tool for determining effective fisheries and aquaculture management. Transcriptome techniques are proving powerful and provide novel insights into physiological processes. Construction of a microarray from T. thynnus ESTs sourced from reproductive tissues has provided an ideal platform to study the reproductive physiology of bluefin tunas. The aim of this investigation was to compare transcription profiles from the ovaries and testes of mature T. thynnus to establish sex specific variations underlying their reproductive physiology. Results Male and females T. thynnus gonad tissues were collected from the wild and histologically staged. Sub-samples of sexually mature tissues were also measured for their mRNA differential expression among the sexes using the custom microarray design BFT 4X44K. A total of 7068 ESTs were assessed for differential expression of which 1273 ESTs were significantly different (p<0.05) with >2 fold change in expression according to sex. Differential expression for 13 of these ESTs was validated with quantitative PCR. These include genes involved in egg envelope formation, hydration, and lipid transport/accumulation more highly expressed in ovaries compared with testis, while genes involved in meiosis, sperm motility and lipid metabolism were more highly expressed in testis compared with ovaries. Conclusions This investigation has furthered our knowledge of bluefin tunas reproductive biology by using a contemporary transcriptome approach. Gene expression profiles in T. thynnus sexually mature testes and ovaries were characterized with reference to gametogenesis and potential alternative functions. This report is the first application of microarray technology for bluefin tunas and demonstrates the efficacy by which this technique may be used for further characterization of specific biological aspects for this valuable teleost fish. PMID:23036107

  11. [Progress of Autoantibody Examinations for Connective Tissue Diseases].

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Morinobu, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that can affect multiple organs and, thus, have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Various autoantibodies are detected in patients with connective tissue diseases, represented by anti-nuclear antibody for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Assessment of the autoantibody profile is fundamental for the clinical management of patients with connective tissue diseases, providing important data for the diagnosis, clinical characterization, and disease activity evaluation. Anti-ribosomal P antibody and anti-NMDA receptor antibody are associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Anti-synthetase syndrome comprises the association of myositis (PM/DM), interstitial lung disease, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibodies. Anti-MDA5 antibody is detected in patients with clinically amyopathic DM, often complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Between 50 and 75% of malignancy-associated DM patients are positive for anti-TIF1-? antibody. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibody is associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc and renal crisis. This review focuses on the importance and usefulness of these autoantibodies for the diagnosis and management of patients with connective tissue diseases in clinical practice. PMID:26524895

  12. Building quantitative prediction models for tissue residue of two explosives compounds in earthworms from microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Loh, Po-Ru; Barker, Natalie D; Tucker, George; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Chenhua; Escalon, B Lynn; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Soil contamination near munitions plants and testing grounds is a serious environmental concern that can result in the formation of tissue chemical residue in exposed animals. Quantitative prediction of tissue residue still represents a challenging task despite long-term interest and pursuit, as tissue residue formation is the result of many dynamic processes including uptake, transformation, and assimilation. The availability of high-dimensional microarray gene expression data presents a new opportunity for computational predictive modeling of tissue residue from changes in expression profile. Here we analyzed a 240-sample data set with measurements of transcriptomic-wide gene expression and tissue residue of two chemicals, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), in the earthworm Eisenia fetida. We applied two different computational approaches, LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) and RF (Random Forest), to identify predictor genes and built predictive models. Each approach was tested alone and in combination with a prior variable selection procedure that involved the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and HOPACH (Hierarchical Ordered Partitioning And Collapsing Hybrid). Model evaluation results suggest that LASSO was the best performer of minimum complexity on the TNT data set, whereas the combined Wilcoxon-HOPACH-RF approach achieved the highest prediction accuracy on the RDX data set. Our models separately identified two small sets of ca. 30 predictor genes for RDX and TNT. We have demonstrated that both LASSO and RF are powerful tools for quantitative prediction of tissue residue. They also leave more unknown than explained, however, allowing room for improvement with other computational methods and extension to mixture contamination scenarios. PMID:21776976

  13. A Graph-Theoretic Technique for Classification of Normal and Tumor Tissues Using Gene Expression Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Kim, Saejoon

    on the expression levels of genes available from it. Of particular interest in the use of microarray technology is small. I. INTRODUCTION Microarray is a fascinating technology capable of provid- ing high throughput into its subtypes is an important application area of microarray technology since correct diagnosis

  14. Systematic antibody generation and validation via tissue microarray technology leading to identification of a novel protein prognostic panel in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although omic-based discovery approaches can provide powerful tools for biomarker identification, several reservations have been raised regarding the clinical applicability of gene expression studies, such as their prohibitive cost. However, the limited availability of antibodies is a key barrier to the development of a lower cost alternative, namely a discrete collection of immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based biomarkers. The aim of this study was to use a systematic approach to generate and screen affinity-purified, mono-specific antibodies targeting progression-related biomarkers, with a view towards developing a clinically applicable IHC-based prognostic biomarker panel for breast cancer. Methods We examined both in-house and publicly available breast cancer DNA microarray datasets relating to invasion and metastasis, thus identifying a cohort of candidate progression-associated biomarkers. Of these, 18 antibodies were released for extended analysis. Validated antibodies were screened against a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from a cohort of consecutive breast cancer cases (n?=?512) to test the immunohistochemical surrogate signature. Results Antibody screening revealed 3 candidate prognostic markers: the cell cycle regulator, Anillin (ANLN); the mitogen-activated protein kinase, PDZ-Binding Kinase (PBK); and the estrogen response gene, PDZ-Domain Containing 1 (PDZK1). Increased expression of ANLN and PBK was associated with poor prognosis, whilst increased expression of PDZK1 was associated with good prognosis. A 3-marker signature comprised of high PBK, high ANLN and low PDZK1 expression was associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (p?

  15. Tissue Array Research Program (TARP)

    Cancer.gov

    New technologies, including: Tissue microarray construction using an automated tissue microarray tool. Digital imaging of tissue microarrays for automated or manual interpretation. Standard histology techniques, including: Tissue fixation and processing.

  16. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; MacDermott, Sarah; Hoyland, Judith; Yin, John Liu; Byers, Richard

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  17. The development and validation of the Virtual Tissue Matrix, a software application that facilitates the review of tissue microarrays on line

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Catherine M; O'Shea, Deirdre; O'Brien, Sallyann; Lawler, Darragh K; Dodrill, Graham D; O'Grady, Anthony; Barrett, Helen; Gulmann, Christian; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Gallagher, William M; Kay, Elaine W; O'Shea, Daniel G

    2006-01-01

    Background The Tissue Microarray (TMA) facilitates high-throughput analysis of hundreds of tissue specimens simultaneously. However, bottlenecks in the storage and manipulation of the data generated from TMA reviews have become apparent. A number of software applications have been developed to assist in image and data management; however no solution currently facilitates the easy online review, scoring and subsequent storage of images and data associated with TMA experimentation. Results This paper describes the design, development and validation of the Virtual Tissue Matrix (VTM). Through an intuitive HTML driven user interface, the VTM provides digital/virtual slide based images of each TMA core and a means to record observations on each TMA spot. Data generated from a TMA review is stored in an associated relational database, which facilitates the use of flexible scoring forms. The system allows multiple users to record their interpretation of each TMA spot for any parameters assessed. Images generated for the VTM were captured using a standard background lighting intensity and corrective algorithms were applied to each image to eliminate any background lighting hue inconsistencies or vignetting. Validation of the VTM involved examination of inter-and intra-observer variability between microscope and digital TMA reviews. Six bladder TMAs were immunohistochemically stained for E-Cadherin, ?-Catenin and PhosphoMet and were assessed by two reviewers for the amount of core and tumour present, the amount and intensity of membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. Conclusion Results show that digital VTM images are representative of the original tissue viewed with a microscope. There were equivalent levels of inter-and intra-observer agreement for five out of the eight parameters assessed. Results also suggest that digital reviews may correct potential problems experienced when reviewing TMAs using a microscope, for example, removal of background lighting variance and tint, and potential disorientation of the reviewer, which may have resulted in the discrepancies evident in the remaining three parameters. PMID:16707006

  18. Genome-wide effects of acute progressive feed restriction in liver and white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C; Moffat, Ivy D; Lindén, Jere; Wendelin, Dominique; Okey, Allan B

    2008-07-01

    Acute progressive feed restriction (APFR) represents a specific form of caloric restriction in which feed availability is increasingly curtailed over a period of a few days to a few weeks. It is often used for control animals in toxicological and pharmacological studies on compounds causing body weight loss to equalize weight changes between experimental and control groups and thereby, intuitively, to also set their metabolic states to the same phase. However, scientific justification for this procedure is lacking. In the present study, we analyzed by microarrays the impact on hepatic gene expression in rats of two APFR regimens that caused identical diminution of body weight (19%) but differed slightly in duration (4 vs. 10 days). In addition, white adipose tissue (WAT) was also subjected to the transcriptomic analysis on day-4. The data revealed that the two regimens led to distinct patterns of differentially expressed genes in liver, albeit some major pathways of energy metabolism were similarly affected (particularly fatty acid and amino acid catabolism). The reason for the divergence appeared to be entrainment by the longer APFR protocol of peripheral oscillator genes, which resulted in derailment of circadian rhythms and consequent interaction of altered diurnal fluctuations with metabolic adjustments in gene expression activities. WAT proved to be highly unresponsive to the 4-day APFR as only 17 mRNA levels were influenced by the treatment. This study demonstrates that body weight is a poor proxy of metabolic state and that the customary protocols of feed restriction can lead to rhythm entrainment. PMID:18394668

  19. Genome-wide effects of acute progressive feed restriction in liver and white adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo Boutros, Paul C.; Moffat, Ivy D.; Linden, Jere; Wendelin, Dominique; Okey, Allan B.

    2008-07-01

    Acute progressive feed restriction (APFR) represents a specific form of caloric restriction in which feed availability is increasingly curtailed over a period of a few days to a few weeks. It is often used for control animals in toxicological and pharmacological studies on compounds causing body weight loss to equalize weight changes between experimental and control groups and thereby, intuitively, to also set their metabolic states to the same phase. However, scientific justification for this procedure is lacking. In the present study, we analyzed by microarrays the impact on hepatic gene expression in rats of two APFR regimens that caused identical diminution of body weight (19%) but differed slightly in duration (4 vs. 10 days). In addition, white adipose tissue (WAT) was also subjected to the transcriptomic analysis on day-4. The data revealed that the two regimens led to distinct patterns of differentially expressed genes in liver, albeit some major pathways of energy metabolism were similarly affected (particularly fatty acid and amino acid catabolism). The reason for the divergence appeared to be entrainment by the longer APFR protocol of peripheral oscillator genes, which resulted in derailment of circadian rhythms and consequent interaction of altered diurnal fluctuations with metabolic adjustments in gene expression activities. WAT proved to be highly unresponsive to the 4-day APFR as only 17 mRNA levels were influenced by the treatment. This study demonstrates that body weight is a poor proxy of metabolic state and that the customary protocols of feed restriction can lead to rhythm entrainment.

  20. Pathways regulated by glucocorticoids in omental and subcutaneous human adipose tissues: a microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Da-Wei; Burkey, Bryan F.; Fried, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are powerful regulators of adipocyte differentiation, metabolism, and endocrine function and promote the development of upper body obesity, especially visceral fat stores. To provide a comprehensive understanding of how GC affect adipose tissue and adipocyte function, we analyzed patterns of gene expression (HG U95 Affymetrix arrays) after culture of abdominal subcutaneous (Abd sc) and omental (Om) adipose tissues from severely obese subjects (3 F, 1 M) in the presence of insulin or insulin (7 nM) plus dexamethasone (Dex, 25 nM) for 7 days. About 20% (561 genes in Om and 569 genes in sc) of 2,803 adipose expressed genes were affected by long-term GC. While most of the genes (90%) were commonly regulated by Dex in both depots, 26 in Om and 34 in Abd sc were affected by Dex in only one depot. 60% of the commonly upregulated genes were involved in metabolic pathways and were expressed mainly in adipocytes. Dex suppressed genes in immune/inflammatory (IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, expressed in nonadipocytes) and proapoptotic pathways, yet induced genes related to the acute-phase response (SAA, factor D, haptoglobin, and RBP4, expressed in adipocytes) and stress/defense response. Functional classification analysis showed that Dex also induced expression levels of 22 transcription factors related to insulin action and lipogenesis (LXR?, STAT5?, SREBP1, and FoxO1) and immunity/adipogenesis (TSC22D3) while suppressing 17 transcription factors in both depots. Overall, these studies reveal the powerful effects of GC on gene networks that regulate many key functions in human adipose tissue. PMID:21189358

  1. Comparing computer-generated and pathologist-generated tumour segmentations for immunohistochemical scoring of breast tissue microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Shazia; Jordan, Lee B; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McKenna, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have become a valuable resource for biomarker expression in translational research. Immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of TMAs is the principal method for analysing large numbers of patient samples, but manual IHC assessment of TMAs remains a challenging and laborious task. With advances in image analysis, computer-generated analyses of TMAs have the potential to lessen the burden of expert pathologist review. Methods: In current commercial software computerised oestrogen receptor (ER) scoring relies on tumour localisation in the form of hand-drawn annotations. In this study, tumour localisation for ER scoring was evaluated comparing computer-generated segmentation masks with those of two specialist breast pathologists. Automatically and manually obtained segmentation masks were used to obtain IHC scores for thirty-two ER-stained invasive breast cancer TMA samples using FDA-approved IHC scoring software. Results: Although pixel-level comparisons showed lower agreement between automated and manual segmentation masks (?=0.81) than between pathologists' masks (?=0.91), this had little impact on computed IHC scores (Allred; =0.91, Quickscore; =0.92). Conclusions: The proposed automated system provides consistent measurements thus ensuring standardisation, and shows promise for increasing IHC analysis of nuclear staining in TMAs from large clinical trials. PMID:26348443

  2. Integrative proteomics and tissue microarray profiling indicate the association between overexpressed serum proteins and non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yansheng; Luo, Xiaoyang; Hu, Haichuan; Wang, Rui; Sun, Yihua; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases. PMID:23284758

  3. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-?), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-?, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration. PMID:26092703

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of ARID1A in penile squamous cell carcinomas: a tissue microarray study of 112 cases?

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Sheila F.; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Cubilla, Antonio L.; Shih, Ie-Ming; Netto, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary ARID1A, a member of the chromatin remodeling genes family, has been suggested as a novel tumor suppressor gene in gynecologic malignancies. However, its role in penile cancer has yet to be determined. This study assesses the immunohistochemical expression of ARID1A in penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its association with pathologic features, human papillomavirus (HPV) status, and previously reported mammalian target of rapamycin pathway markers in the same cohort. Four tissue microarrays were constructed from 112 cases of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded penile SCC from Paraguay. Each tumor was sampled 3 to 12 times. ARID1A expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal rabbit anti-ARID1A (BAF250A) antibody. An H score was calculated in each spot as the sum of expression intensity (0-3+) by extent (0%-100%). Median H score per case was used for statistical analysis. ARID1A expression was observed in all cases, ranging from 3% to 100% of tumor cells (median, 95%). In 96 cases (86%), ARID1A expression was observed in 90% or more tumor cells. HPV DNA was detected in 20 (38%) of 52 analyzed samples. There was a significant trend of association between ARID1A and histologic grade. ARID1A expression was not associated with histologic subtype (P = .61) or HPV status (P = .18). ARID1A expression decreased with decreasing levels of PTEN expression (P = .01). ARID1A was expressed in penile SCC, in most cases at high levels. A significant trend of association was found between histologic grade and ARID1A expression, with lower ARID1A expression, lower histologic grades, and decreased PTEN expression. PMID:25776029

  5. Expression of ITGB1 predicts prognosis in colorectal cancer: a large prospective study based on tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi-Zhi; Gao, Xian-Hua; Chang, Wen-Jun; Gong, Hai-Feng; Fu, Chuan-Gang; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: ITGB1 is a heterodimeric cell-surface receptor involved in cell functions such as proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. The aim of this study was to assess ITGB1 expression in colorectal cancer and correlate it with clinicopathological features, as well as to evaluate its potential prognostic significance. Materials and methods: In this study, we examined the expression of ITGB1 using tissue microarrays containing analyzed specimens by immunohistochemistry. ITGB1 expression was further correlated with clinicopathological and prognostic data. The prognostic significance was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests. A multivariate study with the Cox’s proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the prognostic aspects. Results: ITGB1 expression was present in 88.5% of the analyzed specimens. Significant differences in ITGB1 expression were found between normal mucosa and carcinomas (P<0.001). High ITGB1 expression was associated with poor prognosis, and it independently correlated with shortened overall survival and disease-free survival in colorectal cancer patients (P<0.001). More so, ITGB1 expression, bowel wall invasion, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Additionally, significant differences in ITGB1 expression were observed in adenomas and tumors from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis compared to normal colon mucosa (P<0.05) Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that ITGB1 overexpression in colorectal tumors is associated with poor prognosis, as well as aggressive clinicopathological features. Therefore, ITGB1 expression could be used as potential prognostic predictor in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26722470

  6. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  7. Functional tissue engineering: Ten more years of progress.

    PubMed

    Guilak, Farshid; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    "Functional tissue engineering" is a subset of the field of tissue engineering that was proposed by the United States National Committee on Biomechanics over a decade ago in order to place more emphasis on the roles of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue repair and regeneration. Over the past decade, there have been tremendous advances in this area, pointing out the critical role that biomechanical factors can play in the engineered repair of virtually all tissue and organ systems. In this special issue of the Journal of Biomechanics, we present a series of articles that address a broad array of the fundamental topics of functional tissue engineering, including: (1) measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment and history in native and repair tissues; (2) further understanding of the biomechanical properties of native tissues across all geometric scales, in the context of repair or regeneration; (3) prioritization of specific biomechanical properties as design criteria; (4) development of biomaterials, scaffolds, and engineered tissues with prescribed biomechanical properties; (5) development of success criteria based on appropriate outcome measures; (6) investigation of the effects of mechanical factors on tissue repair in vivo; (7) investigation of the mechanisms by which physical factors may enhance tissue regeneration in vitro; and (8) development and validation of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. These articles represent the tremendous expansion of this field in recent years, and emphasize the critical roles that biomechanics and mechanobiology play in controlling tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:24746021

  8. Pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George TJ

    2009-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue is vulnerable to infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection – commonly known as root-canal therapy. Regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. However, with the advent of the concept of modern tissue engineering and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the early attempts to regenerate pulp tissue and the current endeavor of pulp and dentin tissue engineering, and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:19761395

  9. [Progress on strategies to promote vascularization in bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Lu; Mao, Yu-Yan; Lu, Jian-Xi; Chen, Lei

    2015-04-01

    With the continuous development of bone tissue engineering, a variety of emerging bone graft materials provided various methods for repairing bone defects. Early and rapid accomplishment of revascularization of materials interior after implantation of bone transplantation materials is a difficulty faced to bone tissue engineering. Blood vessels ingrowth provides the requisite netritional support for the regeneration reconstruction of bone tissue, for this reason, vascularization plays a significant role in bone tissue engineering. However,there is not a golden standard strategy of vascularization at present. Scaffold materials, cells and growth factors still are three indispensable elements in tissue engineering, and are cardinal points of the promoting vascularization strategies. Multiple growth factors or multiple cells combined with scaffolds, which are hot spots, have obtained excellent vascularization. This review focused on the comprehensive strategies for promoting the successful vascularization of tissue engineered scaffolds. PMID:26072627

  10. Hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering: Progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2013-01-01

    Designing of biologically active scaffolds with optimal characteristics is one of the key factors for successful tissue engineering. Recently, hydrogels have received a considerable interest as leading candidates for engineered tissue scaffolds due to their unique compositional and structural similarities to the natural extracellular matrix, in addition to their desirable framework for cellular proliferation and survival. More recently, the ability to control the shape, porosity, surface morphology, and size of hydrogel scaffolds has created new opportunities to overcome various challenges in tissue engineering such as vascularization, tissue architecture and simultaneous seeding of multiple cells. This review provides an overview of the different types of hydrogels, the approaches that can be used to fabricate hydrogel matrices with specific features and the recent applications of hydrogels in tissue engineering. Special attention was given to the various design considerations for an efficient hydrogel scaffold in tissue engineering. Also, the challenges associated with the use of hydrogel scaffolds were described. PMID:24689032

  11. Differential Adipose Tissue Gene Expression Profiles in Abacavir Treated Patients That May Contribute to the Understanding of Cardiovascular Risk: A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahmanesh, Mohsen; Phillips, Kenneth; Boothby, Meg; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare changes in gene expression by microarray from subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV treatment naďve patients treated with efavirenz based regimens containing abacavir (ABC), tenofovir (TDF) or zidovidine (AZT). Design Subcutaneous fat biopsies were obtained before, at 6- and 18–24-months after treatment, and from HIV negative controls. Groups were age, ethnicity, weight, biochemical profile, and pre-treatment CD4 count matched. Microarray data was generated using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Microarray. Identification of differentially expressed genes and genomic response pathways was performed using limma and gene set enrichment analysis. Results There were significant divergences between ABC and the other two groups 6 months after treatment in genes controlling cell adhesion and environmental information processing, with some convergence at 18–24 months. Compared to controls the ABC group, but not AZT or TDF showed enrichment of genes controlling adherence junction, at 6 months and 18–24 months (adjusted p<0.05) and focal adhesions and tight junction at 6 months (p<0.5). Genes controlling leukocyte transendothelial migration (p<0.05) and ECM-receptor interactions (p = 0.04) were over-expressed in ABC compared to TDF and AZT at 6 months but not at 18–24 months. Enrichment of pathways and individual genes controlling cell adhesion and environmental information processing were specifically dysregulated in the ABC group in comparison with other treatments. There was little difference between AZT and TDF. Conclusion After initiating treatment, there is divergence in the expression of genes controlling cell adhesion and environmental information processing between ABC and both TDF and AZT in subcutaneous adipose tissue. If similar changes are also taking place in other tissues including the coronary vasculature they may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular events reported in patients recently started on abacavir-containing regimens. PMID:25617630

  12. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  13. Fiber-Based Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tamayol, Ali; Akbari, Mohsen; Annabi, Nasim; Paul, Arghya; Khademhosseini, Ali; Juncker, David

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to improve the function of diseased or damaged organs by creating biological substitutes. To fabricate a functional tissue, the engineered construct should mimic the physiological environment including its structural, topographical, and mechanical properties. Moreover, the construct should facilitate nutrients and oxygen diffusion as well as removal of metabolic waste during tissue regeneration. In the last decade, fiber-based techniques such as weaving, knitting, braiding, as well as electrospinning, and direct writing have emerged as promising platforms for making 3D tissue constructs that can address the above mentioned challenges. Here, we critically review the techniques used to form cell-free and cell-laden fibers and to assemble them into scaffolds. We compare their mechanical properties, morphological features and biological activity. We discuss current challenges and future opportunities of fiber-based tissue engineering (FBTE) for use in research and clinical practice. PMID:23195284

  14. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  15. Robotic multimodality stereotactic brain tissue identification: work in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R.; Mah, R.; Galvagni, A.; Guerrero, M.; Papasin, R.; Wallace, M.; Winters, J.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time identification of tissue would improve procedures such as stereotactic brain biopsy (SBX), functional and implantation neurosurgery, and brain tumor excision. To standard SBX equipment has been added: (1) computer-controlled stepper motors to drive the biopsy needle/probe precisely; (2) multiple microprobes to track tissue density, detect blood vessels and changes in blood flow, and distinguish the various tissues being penetrated; (3) neural net learning programs to allow real-time comparisons of current data with a normative data bank; (4) three-dimensional graphic displays to follow the probe as it traverses brain tissue. The probe can differentiate substances such as pig brain, differing consistencies of the 'brain-like' foodstuff tofu, and gels made to simulate brain, as well as detect blood vessels imbedded in these substances. Multimodality probes should improve the safety, efficacy, and diagnostic accuracy of SBX and other neurosurgical procedures.

  16. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Jason T.; Kinneberg, Kirsten R.C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products. PMID:21625053

  17. Tissue Engineering of Blood Vessels: Functional Requirements, Progress, and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Brewster, Luke P.; Caves, Jeffrey M.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease results in the decreased utility and decreased availability of autologus vascular tissue for small diameter (< 6 mm) vessel replacements. While synthetic polymer alternatives to date have failed to meet the performance of autogenous conduits, tissue-engineered replacement vessels represent an ideal solution to this clinical problem. Ongoing progress requires combined approaches from biomaterials science, cell biology, and translational medicine to develop feasible solutions with the requisite mechanical support, a non-fouling surface for blood flow, and tissue regeneration. Over the past two decades interest in blood vessel tissue engineering has soared on a global scale, resulting in the first clinical implants of multiple technologies, steady progress with several other systems, and critical lessons-learned. This review will highlight the current inadequacies of autologus and synthetic grafts, the engineering requirements for implantation of tissue-engineered grafts, and the current status of tissue-engineered blood vessel research. PMID:23181145

  18. Expression of SHP2 and related markers in non-small cell lung cancer: a tissue microarray study of 80 cases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlan; Luo, Dan; Yang, Heping; Wang, Qingliang; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Guoxiang; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between the expression of SHP2 and VEGF, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and microvessel density (MVD), as well as the clinicopathologic parameters of these markers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using a tissue microarray, the expression of these 8 markers in 80 NSCLC cases was detected by immunohistochemistry. The expression of the markers was higher in cancer tissues when compared with the surrounding tissues. The MVD was lower in the CD34-positive cancer tissues than in the surrounding tissues. Significantly higher positive rates of expression for SHP2, MMP-9, and MMP-2 were observed in patients with lymph node metastases. The later the clinical stage was, the higher the expression of MMP-9 and MMP-2. The expression of VEGF in patients with lung squamous cell carcinomas was significantly higher than in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. The positive expression of SHP2 correlated significantly with that of VEGFR-2 and the MVD and a survival disadvantage was noted in the patients with SHP2-positive tumors. Therefore, our data suggest that the expression of SHP2 in NSCLC has high specificity and sensitivity and is closely related to lymph node metastasis and the expression of VEGFR-2 and the MVD in patients with NSCLC. SHP2 expression may promote the invasion and metastasis of NSCLC through angiogenesis and the lymphatic system. PMID:23343958

  19. Pathomechanisms: homeostatic chemokines in health, tissue regeneration, and progressive diseases.

    PubMed

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Romagnani, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Homeostatic chemokines control stem and progenitor cell migration and activation during vasculogenesis and organ development. They orchestrate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homing to their bone marrow niches and direct immature lymphocytes to a series of maturation sites within lymphoid organs. Along these lines, homeostatic chemokines regulate the niches of peripheral committed progenitor cell populations for tissue renewal. These biological functions support neovascularization and wound healing, including the recruitment of endothelial and other progenitor cells from the bone marrow. Here, we summarize the roles of homeostatic chemokines, their signaling receptors, and atypical decoy receptors during homeostasis and tissue regeneration in order to better understand their pathogenic roles in disease, for example, in diabetes complications, cancer, autoimmunity, epithelial hyperplasia, or hypertrophic scarring and fibrosis. PMID:24440002

  20. Profiling and Verification of Gene Expression Patterns in Normal and Malignant Human Prostate Tissues by cDNA Microarray Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Chaib, Hassan; Cockrell, Erin K; Rubin, Mark A; Macoska, Jill A

    2001-01-01

    Abstract cDNA microarray technology allows the “profiling” of gene expression patterns for virtually any cellular material. In this study, we applied cDNA microarray technology to profile changes in gene expression associated with human prostate tumorigenesis. RNA prepared from normal and malignant prostate tissue was examined for the expression levels of 588 human genes. Four different methods for data normalization were utilized. Of these, normalization to ACTB expression proved to be the most rigorous technique with the least probability of producing spurious results. After normalization to ACTB expression, 15 of 588 (2.6%) genes examined by array analysis were differentially expressed by a factor of 2x or more in malignant compared to normal prostate tissues. The expression patterns for 8 of 15 genes have been reported previously in prostate tissues (TGF?3, TGFBR3, IGFII, IGFBP2, VEGF, FGF7, ERBB3, MYC), but those of seven genes are reported here for the first time (MLH1, CYP1B1, RFC4, EPHB3, MGST1, BTEB2, MLP). These genes describe at least four metabolic and signaling pathways likely disrupted in human prostate tumorigenesis. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot analyses quantitated with reference to ACTB expression levels verified the trends in gene expression levels observed by array analysis for 14/15 and 8/8 genes, respectively. However, RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses accurately verified the “fold” differences in expression levels for only 6/15 (40%) and 7/8 (88%) of genes examined, respectively, demonstrating the need to better validate quantitative differences in gene expression revealed by array-based techniques. PMID:11326315

  1. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  2. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  3. DNA microarray (spot) .

    E-print Network

    1. DNA microarray DNA (spot) . DNA probe , probe (hybridization) . DNA microarray cDNA oligonucleotide oligonucleotide cDNA probe . oligonucleotide microarray , DNA , probe . oligonucleotide microarray probe

  4. A Decade of Progress in Adipose Tissue Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Andrea A.; Bolus, W. Reid; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary One decade has passed since seminal publications described macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue (AT) as a key contributor to inflammation and obesity-related insulin resistance. Currently, a PubMed search for ‘adipose tissue inflammation’ reveals over 3500 entries since these original reports. We now know that resident macrophages in lean AT are alternatively activated, M2-like, and play a role in AT homeostasis. In contrast, the macrophages in obese AT are dramatically increased in number and are predominantly classically activated, M1-like, and promote inflammation and insulin resistance. Mediators of AT macrophage (ATM) phenotype include adipokines and fatty acids secreted from adipocytes as well as cytokines secreted from other immune cells in AT. There are several mechanisms that could explain the large increase in ATMs in obesity. These include recruitment-dependent mechanisms such as adipocyte death, chemokine release, and lipolysis of fatty acids. Newer evidence also points to recruitment-independent mechanisms such as impaired apoptosis, increased proliferation, and decreased egress. Although less is known about the homeostatic function of M2-like resident ATMs, recent evidence suggests roles in AT expansion, thermoregulation, antigen presentation, and iron homeostasis. The field of immunometabolism has come a long way in the past decade, and many exciting new discoveries are bound to be made in the coming years that will expand our understanding of how AT stands at the junction of immune and metabolic co-regulation. PMID:25319332

  5. Cell Microarrays for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, Mario; Charwat, Verena; Ertl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the state of the art of live cell microarrays for high-throughput biological assays are reviewed. The fabrication of novel microarrays with respect to material science and cell patterning methods is included. A main focus of the chapter is on various aspects of the application of cell microarrays by providing selected examples in research fields such as biomaterials, stem cell biology and neuroscience. Additionally, the importance of microfluidic technologies for high-throughput on-chip live-cell microarrays is highlighted for single-cell and multi-cell assays as well as for 3D tissue constructs. PMID:26614082

  6. Numerical and structural genomic aberrations are reliably detectable in tissue microarrays of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Horn, Heike; Bausinger, Julia; Staiger, Annette M; Sohn, Maximilian; Schmelter, Christopher; Gruber, Kim; Kalla, Claudia; Ott, M Michaela; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German

    2014-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the reliability of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), especially for chromosomal deletions, in high-throughput settings using tissue microarrays (TMAs). We performed a comprehensive FISH study for the detection of chromosomal translocations and deletions in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens arranged in TMA format. We analyzed 46 B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) specimens with known karyotypes for translocations of IGH-, BCL2-, BCL6- and MYC-genes. Locus-specific DNA probes were used for the detection of deletions in chromosome bands 6q21 and 9p21 in 62 follicular lymphomas (FL) and six malignant mesothelioma (MM) samples, respectively. To test for aberrant signals generated by truncation of nuclei following sectioning of FFPE tissue samples, cell line dilutions with 9p21-deletions were embedded into paraffin blocks. The overall TMA hybridization efficiency was 94%. FISH results regarding translocations matched karyotyping data in 93%. As for chromosomal deletions, sectioning artefacts occurred in 17% to 25% of cells, suggesting that the proportion of cells showing deletions should exceed 25% to be reliably detectable. In conclusion, FISH represents a robust tool for the detection of structural as well as numerical aberrations in FFPE tissue samples in a TMA-based high-throughput setting, when rigorous cut-off values and appropriate controls are maintained, and, of note, was superior to quantitative PCR approaches. PMID:24733537

  7. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  8. Discovery of Colorectal Cancer Biomarker Candidates by Membrane Proteomic Analysis and Subsequent Verification using Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) and Tissue Microarray (TMA) Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Hideaki; Muraoka, Satoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Watanabe, Shio; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kodera, Yoshio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Masuda, Takeshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Nomura, Fumio; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in quantitative proteomic technology have enabled the large-scale validation of biomarkers. We here performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of membrane fractions from colorectal cancer tissue to discover biomarker candidates, and then extensively validated the candidate proteins identified. A total of 5566 proteins were identified in six tissue samples, each of which was obtained from polyps and cancer with and without metastasis. GO cellular component analysis predicted that 3087 of these proteins were membrane proteins, whereas TMHMM algorithm predicted that 1567 proteins had a transmembrane domain. Differences were observed in the expression of 159 membrane proteins and 55 extracellular proteins between polyps and cancer without metastasis, while the expression of 32 membrane proteins and 17 extracellular proteins differed between cancer with and without metastasis. A total of 105 of these biomarker candidates were quantitated using selected (or multiple) reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) with stable synthetic isotope-labeled peptides as an internal control. The results obtained revealed differences in the expression of 69 of these proteins, and this was subsequently verified in an independent set of patient samples (polyps (n = 10), cancer without metastasis (n = 10), cancer with metastasis (n = 10)). Significant differences were observed in the expression of 44 of these proteins, including ITGA5, GPRC5A, PDGFRB, and TFRC, which have already been shown to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer, as well as proteins with unknown function, such as C8orf55. The expression of C8orf55 was also shown to be high not only in colorectal cancer, but also in several cancer tissues using a multicancer tissue microarray, which included 1150 cores from 14 cancer tissues. This is the largest verification study of biomarker candidate membrane proteins to date; our methods for biomarker discovery and subsequent validation using SRM/MRM will contribute to the identification of useful biomarker candidates for various cancers. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000851. PMID:24687888

  9. Discovery of colorectal cancer biomarker candidates by membrane proteomic analysis and subsequent verification using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and tissue microarray (TMA) analysis.

    PubMed

    Kume, Hideaki; Muraoka, Satoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Watanabe, Shio; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kodera, Yoshio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Masuda, Takeshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Nomura, Fumio; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in quantitative proteomic technology have enabled the large-scale validation of biomarkers. We here performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of membrane fractions from colorectal cancer tissue to discover biomarker candidates, and then extensively validated the candidate proteins identified. A total of 5566 proteins were identified in six tissue samples, each of which was obtained from polyps and cancer with and without metastasis. GO cellular component analysis predicted that 3087 of these proteins were membrane proteins, whereas TMHMM algorithm predicted that 1567 proteins had a transmembrane domain. Differences were observed in the expression of 159 membrane proteins and 55 extracellular proteins between polyps and cancer without metastasis, while the expression of 32 membrane proteins and 17 extracellular proteins differed between cancer with and without metastasis. A total of 105 of these biomarker candidates were quantitated using selected (or multiple) reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) with stable synthetic isotope-labeled peptides as an internal control. The results obtained revealed differences in the expression of 69 of these proteins, and this was subsequently verified in an independent set of patient samples (polyps (n = 10), cancer without metastasis (n = 10), cancer with metastasis (n = 10)). Significant differences were observed in the expression of 44 of these proteins, including ITGA5, GPRC5A, PDGFRB, and TFRC, which have already been shown to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer, as well as proteins with unknown function, such as C8orf55. The expression of C8orf55 was also shown to be high not only in colorectal cancer, but also in several cancer tissues using a multicancer tissue microarray, which included 1150 cores from 14 cancer tissues. This is the largest verification study of biomarker candidate membrane proteins to date; our methods for biomarker discovery and subsequent validation using SRM/MRM will contribute to the identification of useful biomarker candidates for various cancers. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000851. PMID:24687888

  10. Expression Microarray Meta-Analysis Identifies Genes Associated with Ras/MAPK and Related Pathways in Progression of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Jonathan A.; Downs, Tracy M.; Cetnar, Jeremy P.; Ricke, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC) continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta), superficial (T1) and muscle-invasive (?T2) bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C) whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and provide an integrated systems-level perspective of TCC pathobiology to inform future studies. PMID:23383328

  11. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:26614075

  12. Progressive Overgrowth of the Cerebriform Connective Tissue Nevus in Patients with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beachkofsky, Thomas M.; Sapp, Julie C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Darling, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteus syndrome is a rare overgrowth disorder that almost always affects the skin. Objective Our purpose was to evaluate progression of skin lesions in patients with Proteus syndrome. Methods Skin findings were documented in 36 patients with Proteus syndrome. Progression of skin lesions in 16 of these patients was assessed by comparing photographs obtained on repeat visits for an average total duration of 53 months. Results The skin lesion most characteristic of Proteus syndrome, the cerebriform connective tissue nevus showed progression in 13 children but not in 3 adults. The cerebriform connective tissue nevus progressed by expansion into previously uninvolved skin, increased thickness, and development of new lesions. Lipomas increased in size and/or number in 8/10 children with lipomas. In contrast, epidermal nevi and vascular malformations generally did not spread or increase in number. Limitations Only 3 adults with Proteus syndrome were evaluated longitudinally. Conclusion The cerebriform connective tissue nevus in Proteus syndrome grows throughout childhood but tends to remain stable in adulthood. PMID:20709429

  13. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  14. MOC-31 exhibits superior reactivity compared with Ber-EP4 in invasive lobular and ductal carcinoma of the breast: a tissue microarray study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Reetesh K; West, Robert B

    2009-05-01

    Distinguishing between reactive mesothelial proliferations and adenocarcinoma is often very difficult. Ancillary studies, in particular immunohistochemistry, are often critical in detecting malignant epithelial cells, especially in serous effusion specimens. MOC-31 and Ber-EP4 are antibodies which target the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM, TACSTD1) expressed in epithelial cells, and both are useful in distinguishing metastatic adenocarcinoma from reactive mesothelial cells. However, the reactivity of MOC-31 and Ber-EP4 with breast carcinoma, one of the more common carcinomas involving serous effusions, has not been extensively studied. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of MOC-31 and Ber-EP4 using tissue microarrays containing invasive ductal carcinoma (191 cases), invasive lobular carcinoma (44 cases), and 102 other carcinoma types comprising primary carcinomas of lung, gynecologic tract, pancreas, colon, gastric, esophageal, prostate, head and neck, hepatic, and renal origin. For MOC-31, 184 of 191 (96%) invasive ductal carcinomas and 39 of 44 (89%) invasive lobular carcinomas exhibited diffuse positive staining. In contrast, for Ber-EP4, 121 of 183 (66%) invasive ductal carcinomas and 11 of 40 (27.5%) invasive lobular carcinomas exhibited diffuse positive staining. With the exception of 1 case of esophageal adenocarcinoma, all other adenocarcinomas (86 of 87 cases) exhibited diffuse staining with both Ber-EP4 and MOC-31. MOC-31 and Ber-EP4 exhibited identical staining with all other carcinoma types. Our findings indicate that MOC-31 is superior to Ber-EP4 in detecting both invasive lobular and ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:19391212

  15. COMPARISON OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESONSES FROM AVIAN GUT TISSUES AFTER EIMERIA ACERVULINA AND E. MAXIMA INFECTIONS USING cDNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the host response during pathogen infection will extend our knowledge of pathogenesis and enhance the development of novel preventive methodologies against important infectious diseases. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to analyze host transcriptional responses. Coccidiosis re...

  16. Microarray analysis of thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Sachin S.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-04-01

    It is well known that diabetes imparts high sensitivity to numerous hepatotoxicants. Previously, we have shown that a normally non-lethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats due to inhibited tissue repair allowing progression of liver injury. On the other hand, DB rats exposed to 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed tissue repair and delayed recovery from injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of impaired tissue repair and progression of liver injury in TA-treated DB rats by using cDNA microarray. Gene expression pattern was examined at 0, 6, and 12 h after TA challenge, and selected mechanistic leads from microarray experiments were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and further investigated at protein level over the time course of 0 to 36 h after TA treatment. Diabetic condition itself increased gene expression of proteases and decreased gene expression of protease inhibitors. Administration of 300 mg TA/kg to DB rats further elevated gene expression of proteases and suppressed gene expression of protease inhibitors, explaining progression of liver injury in DB rats after TA treatment. Inhibited expression of genes involved in cell division cycle (cyclin D1, IGFBP-1, ras, E2F) was observed after exposure of DB rats to 300 mg TA/kg, explaining inhibited tissue repair in these rats. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed expression of genes involved in cell division cycle, explaining delayed tissue repair in these rats. In conclusion, impaired cyclin D1 signaling along with increased proteases and decreased protease inhibitors may explain impaired tissue repair that leads to progression of liver injury initiated by TA in DB rats.

  17. A gene expression bar code for microarray data

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    diseased from normal tissues. Thus far, microarray technology has been useful only for measuring relativeA gene expression bar code for microarray data Michael J Zilliox1,3 & Rafael A Irizarry2. A preliminary web-tool is available online (http://rafalab. jhsph.edu/barcode/). The ability of microarrays

  18. Polymer microarrays for cell based applications 

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Anne Klara Brigitte

    2012-11-28

    The development and identification of new biomaterials that can replace specific tissues and organs is desirable. In the presented PhD thesis polymer microarrays were applied for the screening of polyacrylates and ...

  19. Characteristic mTOR activity in Hodgkin-lymphomas offers a potential therapeutic target in high risk disease – a combined tissue microarray, in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Targeting signaling pathways is an attractive approach in many malignancies. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in a number of human neoplasms, accompanied by lower overall and/or disease free survival. mTOR kinase inhibitors have been introduced in the therapy of renal cell carcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma, and several trials are currently underway. However, the pathological characterization of mTOR activity in lymphomas is still incomplete. Methods mTOR activity and the elements of mTOR complexes were investigated by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays representing different human non-Hodgkin-lymphomas (81 cases) and Hodgkin-lymphomas (87 cases). The expression of phospho-mTOR, phospho-4EBP1, phospho-p70S6K, phospho-S6, Rictor, Raptor and Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin and NF-kappaB-p50 were evaluated, and mTOR activity was statistically analyzed along with 5-year survival data. The in vitro and in vivo effect of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin was also examined in human Hodgkin-lymphoma cell lines. Results The majority (>50%) of mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin-lymphoma cases showed higher mTOR activity compared to normal lymphoid tissues. Hodgkin-lymphoma was characterized by high mTOR activity in 93% of the cases, and Bcl-xL and NF-kappaB expression correlated with this mTOR activity. High mTOR activity was observed in the case of both favorable and unfavorable clinical response. Low mTOR activity was accompanied by complete remission and at least 5-year disease free survival in Hodgkin-lymphoma patients. However, statistical analysis did not identify correlation beetween mTOR activity and different clinical data of HL patients, such as survival. We also found that Rictor (mTORC2) was not overexpressed in Hodgkin-lymphoma biopsies and cell lines. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in Hodgkin-lymphoma cells both in vitro and in vivo, moreover, it increased the apoptotic effect of chemotherapeutic agents. Conclusions Targeting mTOR activity may be a potential therapeutic tool in lymphomas. The presence of mTOR activity probably indicates that the inclusion of mTOR inhibition in the therapy of Hodgkin-lymphomas may be feasible and beneficial, especially when standard protocols are ineffective, and it may also allow dose reduction in order to decrease late treatment toxicity. Most likely, the combination of mTOR inhibitors with other agents will offer the highest efficiency for achieving the best clinical response. PMID:23693095

  20. 1 Clustering of Microarray Data via Mixture Models 1 1.1 Introduction 1

    E-print Network

    McLachlan, Geoff

    of Microarray Data via Mixture Models 1.1 INTRODUCTION The widespread use of DNA microarray technology (EisenContents 1 Clustering of Microarray Data via Mixture Models 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Clustering of Microarray Data 5 1.3 Notation 6 1.4 Clustering of Tissue Samples 9 1.5 The EMMIX-GENE Clustering Procedure

  1. Role of mesenchymal stem cell-derived fibrinolytic factor in tissue regeneration and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Heissig, Beate; Dhahri, Douaa; Eiamboonsert, Salita; Salama, Yousef; Shimazu, Hiroshi; Munakata, Shinya; Hattori, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Tissue regeneration during wound healing or cancer growth and progression depends on the establishment of a cellular microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of this cellular microenvironment, where they functionally modulate cell homing, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. MSC recruitment involves detachment of these cells from their niche, and finally MSC migration into their preferred niches; the wounded area, the tumor bed, and the BM, just to name a few. During this recruitment phase, focal proteolysis disrupts the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, breaks cell-matrix interactions with receptors, and integrins, and causes the release of bioactive fragments from ECM molecules. MSC produce a broad array of proteases, promoting remodeling of the surrounding ECM through proteolytic mechanisms. The fibrinolytic system, with its main player plasmin, plays a crucial role in cell migration, growth factor bioavailability, and the regulation of other protease systems during inflammation, tissue regeneration, and cancer. Key components of the fibrinolytic cascade, including the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are expressed in MSC. This review will introduce general functional properties of the fibrinolytic system, which go beyond its known function of fibrin clot dissolution (fibrinolysis). We will focus on the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC biology, summarizing our current understanding of the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC recruitment and the functional consequences for tissue regeneration and cancer. Aspects of MSC origin, maintenance, and the mechanisms by which these cells contribute to altered protease activity in the microenvironment under normal and pathological conditions will also be discussed. PMID:26350342

  2. Microarray Technology BINF702 SPG 15 MICROARRAYS 1

    E-print Network

    Solka, Jeff

    Microarray BINF702 SPG 15 MICROARRAYS 3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA_microarray These slides are based2/1/2015 1 BINF702 Microarray Technology BINF702 SPG 15 MICROARRAYS 1 These slides are based · Microarrays ­ Genome expression analysis ­ CHIP-chip BINF702 SPG 15 MICROARRAYS 2 These slides are based

  3. Conditioned medium from amniotic mesenchymal tissue cells reduces progression of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cargnoni, Anna; Ressel, Lorenzo; Rossi, Daniele; Poli, Alessandro; Arienti, Davide; Lombardi, Guerino; Parolini, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims We have demonstrated recently that transplantation of placental membrane-derived cells reduces bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice, despite a limited presence of transplanted cells in host lungs. Because placenta-derived cells are known to release factors with potential immunomodulatory and trophic activities, we hypothesized that transplanted cells may promote lung tissue repair via paracrine-acting molecules. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether administration of conditioned medium (CM) generated from human amniotic mesenchymal tissue cells (AMTC) was able to reduce lung fibrosis in this same animal model. Methods Bleomycin-challenged mice were either treated with AMTC-CM or control medium, or were left untreated (Bleo group). After 9 and 14 days, the distribution and severity of lung fibrosis were assessed histologically with a scoring system. Collagen deposition was also evaluated by quantitative image analysis. Results At day 14, lung fibrosis scores in AMTC-CM-treated mice were significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with mice of the Bleo group, in terms of fibrosis distribution [1.0 (interquartile range, IQR 0.9) versus 3.0 (IQR 1.8)], fibroblast proliferation [0.8 (IQR 0.4) versus 1.6 (IQR 1.0)], collagen deposition [1.4 (IQR 0.5) versus 2.0 (IQR 1.2)] and alveolar obliteration [2.3 (IQR 0.8) versus 3.2 (IQR 0.5)]. No differences were observed between mice of the Bleo group and mice treated with control medium. Quantitative analysis of collagen deposition confirmed these findings. Importantly, AMTC-CM treatment significantly reduced the fibrosis progression between the two observation time-points. Conclusions This pilot study supports the notion that AMTC exert anti-fibrotic effects through release of yet unknown soluble factors. PMID:21954836

  4. Peripheral Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Provirus Levels Correlate with and Predict Histological Tissue Lesion Severity in Naturally Infected Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether host immune responses in the form of serum anti-ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) antibody responses or virus replication in the form of peripheral OPP provirus levels associate with the degree of histological tissue lesions in naturally OPPV infec...

  5. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  6. Outbreak of progressive inflammatory neuropathy following exposure to aerosolized porcine neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Deangelis, Tracy M; Shen, Liang

    2009-10-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of 11 cases of an unexplained neurological illness, all linked to a pork processing plant, Quality Pork Processors, Inc., in Austin, MN. The cluster of workers had been experiencing similar symptoms, including fatigue, pain, numbness, and tingling in their extremities as well as weakness. The symptoms were described as more sensory than motor, and all patients had evidence of polyradiculoneuropathy with signs of nerve root irritation. An epidemiological investigation revealed that the only commonality between cases was their exposure to a pork brain extraction procedure involving compressed air. As relatives of the cases remained asymptomatic and all cultures for known pathogens were negative, the etiology of the syndrome seemed not to be infectious. Clinically, the syndrome was most akin to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Laboratory tests corroborated the clinical findings, revealing inflammation of peripheral nerves and nerve roots; however, these cases also had features clinically distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as well as laboratory testing revealing a novel immunoglobulin G immunostaining pattern. This suggested that the observed inflammation was the result of 1 or more unidentified antigens. This syndrome was ultimately dubbed progressive inflammatory neuropathy and was theorized to be an autoimmune reaction to aerosolized porcine neural tissue. Since the investigation's outset, 18 cases of progressive inflammatory neuropathy have been identified at the Minnesota pork processing plant, with 5 similar cases at an Indiana plant and 1 case at a Nebraskan plant. The plants in which cases have been identified have since stopped the use of compressed air in removing pork brains. All cases have stabilized or improved, with some requiring immunosuppressive and analgesic treatment. The study of progressive inflammatory neuropathy is ongoing, and the details of this investigation highlight the value of epidemiological principles in the identification and containment of outbreaks while researchers attempt to uncover the unique pathophysiology and potential etiology of the illness. Mt Sinai J Med 76:442-447, 2009. (c) 2009 Mount Sinai School of Medicine. PMID:19787653

  7. Helicobacter pylori and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: Recent progress in pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shotaro; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in the research regarding the molecular pathogenesis and management of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is reviewed. In approximately 90% of cases, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays the causative role in the pathogenesis, and H. pylori eradication is nowadays the first-line treatment for this disease, which leads to complete disease remission in 50%-90% of cases. In H. pylori-dependent cases, microbe-generated immune responses, including interaction between B and T cells involving CD40 and CD40L co-stimulatory molecules, are considered to induce the development of MALT lymphoma. In H. pylori-independent cases, activation of the nuclear factor-?B pathway by oncogenic products of specific chromosomal translocations such as t(11;18)/API2-MALT1, or inactivation of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (A20) are considered to contribute to the lymphomagenesis. Recently, a large-scale Japanese multicenter study confirmed that the long-term clinical outcome of gastric MALT lymphoma after H. pylori eradication is excellent. Treatment modalities for patients not responding to H. pylori eradication include a “watch and wait” strategy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, rituximab immunotherapy, and a combination of these. Because of the indolent behavior of MALT lymphoma, second-line treatment should be tailored in consideration of the clinical stage and extent of the disease in each patient. PMID:24363507

  8. The PFA-AMeX method achieves a good balance between the morphology of tissues and the quality of RNA content in DNA microarray analysis with laser-capture microdissection samples.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Kato, Atsuhiko; Terashima, Hiromichi; Matsubara, Koichi; Chen, Yu Jau; Adachi, Kenji; Mizuno, Hideaki; Suzuki, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large-scale gene expression profiling is often performed using RNA extracted from unfixed frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples. However, both types of samples have drawbacks in terms of the morphological preservation and RNA quality. In the present study, we investigated 30 human prostate tissues using the PFA-AMeX method (fixation using paraformaldehyde (PFA) followed by embedding in paraffin by AMeX) with a DNA microarray combined with laser-capture microdissection. Morphologically, in contrast to the case of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, loss of basal cells in prostate adenocarcinomas was as obvious in PFA-AMeX samples as in FFPE samples. As for quality, the loss of rRNA peaks 18S and 28S on the capillary electropherograms from both FFPE and PFA-AMeX samples showed that the RNA was degraded equally during processing. However, qRT-PCR with 3' and 5' primer sets designed against human beta-actin revealed that, although RNA degradation occurred in both methods, it occurred more mildly in the PFA-AMeX samples. In conclusion, the PFA-AMeX method is good with respect to morphology and RNA quality, which makes it a promising tool for DNA microarrays combined with laser-capture microdissection, and if the appropriate RNA quality criteria are used, the capture of credible GeneChip data is well over 80% efficient, at least in human prostate specimens. PMID:26023261

  9. IMPROVING THE RELIABILITY OF MICROARRAYS FOR TOXICOLOGY RESEARCH: A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a critical tool to identify molecular biomarkers of specific chemical stressors. Although current microarray technologies have progressed from their infancy, biological and technical repeatability and reliability are often still limit...

  10. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  11. Early Prediction of Cancer Progression by Depth-Resolved Nanoscale Mapping of Nuclear Architecture from Unstained Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Uttam, Shikhar; Pham, Hoa V; LaFace, Justin; Leibowitz, Brian; Yu, Jian; Brand, Randall E; Hartman, Douglas J; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-15

    Early cancer detection currently relies on screening the entire at-risk population, as with colonoscopy and mammography. Therefore, frequent, invasive surveillance of patients at risk for developing cancer carries financial, physical, and emotional burdens because clinicians lack tools to accurately predict which patients will actually progress into malignancy. Here, we present a new method to predict cancer progression risk via nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) of unstained tissue sections based on the intrinsic density alteration of nuclear structure rather than the amount of stain uptake. We demonstrate that nanoNAM detects a gradual increase in the density alteration of nuclear architecture during malignant transformation in animal models of colon carcinogenesis and in human patients with ulcerative colitis, even in tissue that appears histologically normal according to pathologists. We evaluated the ability of nanoNAM to predict "future" cancer progression in patients with ulcerative colitis who did and did not develop colon cancer up to 13 years after their initial colonoscopy. NanoNAM of the initial biopsies correctly classified 12 of 15 patients who eventually developed colon cancer and 15 of 18 who did not, with an overall accuracy of 85%. Taken together, our findings demonstrate great potential for nanoNAM in predicting cancer progression risk and suggest that further validation in a multicenter study with larger cohorts may eventually advance this method to become a routine clinical test. Cancer Res; 75(22); 4718-27. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26383164

  12. Bone tissue engineering using silica-based mesoporous nanobiomaterials:Recent progress.

    PubMed

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Bone disorders are of significant concern due to increase in the median age of our population. It is in this context that tissue engineering has been emerging as a valid approach to the current therapies for bone regeneration/substitution. Tissue-engineered bone constructs have the potential to alleviate the demand arising from the shortage of suitable autograft and allograft materials for augmenting bone healing. Silica based mesostructured nanomaterials possessing pore sizes in the range 2-50 nm and surface reactive functionalities have elicited immense interest due to their exciting prospects in bone tissue engineering. In this review we describe application of silica-based mesoporous nanomaterials for bone tissue engineering. We summarize the preparation methods, the effect of mesopore templates and composition on the mesopore-structure characteristics, and different forms of these materials, including particles, fibers, spheres, scaffolds and composites. Also, the effect of structural and textural properties of mesoporous materials on development of new biomaterials for production of bone implants and bone cements was discussed. Also, application of different mesoporous materials on construction of manufacture 3-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was discussed. It begins by giving the reader a brief background on tissue engineering, followed by a comprehensive description of all the relevant components of silica-based mesoporous biomaterials on bone tissue engineering, going from materials to scaffolds and from cells to tissue engineering strategies that will lead to "engineered" bone. PMID:26117771

  13. Microarray and RNAi Analysis of P450s in Anopheles gambiae Male and Female Steroidogenic Tissues: CYP307A1 Is Required for Ecdysteroid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pondeville, Emilie; David, Jean-Philippe; Guittard, Emilie; Maria, Annick; Ranson, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    In insects, the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) coordinates major developmental transitions. While the first and the final steps of 20E biosynthesis are characterized, the pathway from 7-dehydrocholesterol to 5?-ketodiol, commonly referred as the “black box”, remains hypothetical and whether there are still unidentified enzymes is unknown. The black box would include some oxidative steps, which are believed to be mediated by P450 enzymes. To identify new enzyme(s) involved in steroid synthesis, we analyzed by small-scale microarray the expression of all the genes encoding P450 enzymes of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae in active steroidogenic organs of adults, ovaries from blood-fed females and male reproductive tracts, compared to inactive steroidogenic organs, ovaries from non-blood-fed females. Some genes encoding P450 enzymes were specifically overexpressed in female ovaries after a blood-meal or in male reproductive tracts but only three genes were found to be overexpressed in active steroidogenic organs of both females and males: cyp307a1, cyp4g16 and cyp6n1. Among these genes, only cyp307a1 has an expression pattern similar to other mosquito steroidogenic genes. Moreover, loss-of-function by transient RNAi targeting cyp307a1 disrupted ecdysteroid production demonstrating that this gene is required for ecdysteroid biosynthesis in Anopheles gambiae. PMID:24324583

  14. Prediction of healing progress of pressure ulcers by distribution analysis of protein markers on necrotic tissue: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Aya; Yoshida, Mikako; Minematsu, Takeo; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Fujita, Hideki; Naito, Ayumi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    Predicting the short-term healing progress of pressure ulcers is important for providing timely and appropriate intervention. Although there are some prediction methods available, these are unsuitable for ulcers with abundant necrotic tissue. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between necrotic tissue alteration and protein distributions on ulcers to establish a new prediction method. Thirty-eight pressure ulcers were retrospectively analyzed. Protein distributions on necrotic tissue were evaluated by the wound blotting at three levels: marker protein positivity, signal patterns (speckled, heterogeneous, or homogeneous), and the occupation of heterogeneous pattern. Peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase, tumor necrosis factor ?, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were used as marker proteins. One-week necrotic tissue alteration was classified as liquefaction or nonliquefaction, and associations with protein distributions were analyzed. The peroxidase positivity was significantly higher in the liquefaction than in the nonliquefaction (p?=?0.031). In peroxidase-positive samples, the proportion of nonliquefaction samples was significantly higher in the heterogeneous pattern (p?=?0.029). In the heterogeneous-patterned samples, the proportion of samples with an occupation values greater than the median value tended to be higher in the nonliquefaction (p?=?0.087). There was no significant relationship between liquefaction and other markers. Peroxidase positivity predicts 1-week liquefaction of necrotic tissue, while a heterogeneous pattern indicates nonliquefaction. PMID:25976913

  15. Surface Functionalization for Immobilization of Probes on Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Desmet, C; Marquette, C A

    2016-01-01

    The microarray technology has been a tremendous advance in molecular-based testing methods for biochemical and biomedical applications. As a result, the immobilization techniques and grafting chemistries of biochemical molecules have experienced great progress. The particularities of the grafting techniques adapted to the microarray development will be presented here. PMID:26614065

  16. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  17. Disease progression in iridocorneal angle tissues of BMP2-induced ocular hypertensive mice with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Farsiu, Sina; Qiu, Jianming; Dixon, Angela; Song, Chunwei; McKinnon, Stuart J.; Yuan, Fan; Gonzalez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the present study was to test for the first time whether glaucomatous-like disease progression in a mouse can be assessed morphologically and functionally with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods We monitored progressive changes in conventional outflow tissues of living mice overexpressing human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), a model for glaucoma. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and outflow tissue morphology/Young's modulus were followed in mice for 36 days with rebound tonometry and SD-OCT, respectively. Results were compared to standard histological methods. Outflow facility was calculated from flow measurements with direct cannulation of anterior chambers subjected to three sequential pressure steps. Results Overexpression of BMP2 significantly elevated IOP in a biphasic manner over time compared to mice that overexpressed green fluorescent protein in outflow cells and naďve controls. SD-OCT revealed changes in outflow tissues overexpressing BMP2 that corresponded with the timing of the IOP phases and decreased outflow facility. In the first phase, the angle was open, but the trabecular meshwork and the cornea were thickened. OCT detected increased trabecular meshwork stiffness after provocative IOP challenges of the BMP2 eyes, which corresponded to increased collagen deposition with transmission electron microscopy. In contrast, the angle was closed in the second phase. IOP elevation over 36 days due to BMP2 overexpression resulted in significant retinal ganglion cell and axon loss. Conclusions Although not a feasible open-angle glaucoma model, the BMP2 mice were useful for demonstrating the utility of SD-OCT in following disease progression and differentiating between two forms of ocular pathology over time that resulted in ocular hypertension. PMID:25558173

  18. Comparison of Hepatocellular Carcinoma miRNA Expression Profiling as Evaluated by Next Generation Sequencing and Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoshiki; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Okada, Rina; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Enomoto, Masaru; Tamori, Akihiro; Kawada, Norifumi; Taguchi, Y-h; Azuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling has proven useful in diagnosing and understanding the development and progression of several diseases. Microarray is the standard method for analyzing miRNA expression profiles; however, it has several disadvantages, including its limited detection of miRNAs. In recent years, advances in genome sequencing have led to the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, which significantly advance genome sequencing speed and discovery. In this study, we compared the expression profiles obtained by next generation sequencing (NGS) with the profiles created using microarray to assess if NGS could produce a more accurate and complete miRNA profile. Total RNA from 14 hepatocellular carcinoma tumors (HCC) and 6 matched non-tumor control tissues were sequenced with Illumina MiSeq 50-bp single-end reads. Micro RNA expression profiles were estimated using miRDeep2 software. As a comparison, miRNA expression profiles for 11 out of 14 HCCs were also established by microarray (Agilent human microRNA microarray). The average total sequencing exceeded 2.2 million reads per sample and of those reads, approximately 57% mapped to the human genome. The average correlation for miRNA expression between microarray and NGS and subtraction were 0.613 and 0.587, respectively, while miRNA expression between technical replicates was 0.976. The diagnostic accuracy of HCC, p-value, and AUC were 90.0%, 7.22×10?4, and 0.92, respectively. In summary, NGS created an miRNA expression profile that was reproducible and comparable to that produced by microarray. Moreover, NGS discovered novel miRNAs that were otherwise undetectable by microarray. We believe that miRNA expression profiling by NGS can be a useful diagnostic tool applicable to multiple fields of medicine. PMID:25215888

  19. Progress toward automatic classification of human brown adipose tissue using biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F.; Walker, Ronald C.; Avison, Malcom J.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a small but significant tissue, which may play an important role in obesity and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Interest in studying BAT in adult humans is increasing, but in order to quantify BAT volume in a single measurement or to detect changes in BAT over the time course of a longitudinal experiment, BAT needs to first be reliably differentiated from surrounding tissue. Although the uptake of the radiotracer 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in adipose tissue on positron emission tomography (PET) scans following cold exposure is accepted as an indication of BAT, it is not a definitive indicator, and to date there exists no standardized method for segmenting BAT. Consequently, there is a strong need for robust automatic classification of BAT based on properties measured with biomedical imaging. In this study we begin the process of developing an automated segmentation method based on properties obtained from fat-water MRI and PET-CT scans acquired on ten healthy adult subjects.

  20. A Cell-Regulatory Mechanism Involving Feedback between Contraction and Tissue Formation Guides Wound Healing Progression

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Javierre, Etelvina; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Gómez-Benito, María José

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound. PMID:24681636

  1. Revisiting the immune microenvironment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using a tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry: robust semi-automated analysis reveals CD3 and FoxP3 as potential predictors of response to R-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Rita; Clear, Andrew J.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Owen, Andrew; Greaves, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Matthews, Janet; Lee, Abigail; Alvarez, Rute; da Silva, Maria Gomes; Cabeçadas, José; Neuberg, Donna; Calaminici, Maria; Gribben, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies have identified the microenvironment as a prognostic player in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, there is a lack of simple immune biomarkers that can be applied in the clinical setting and could be helpful in stratifying patients. Immunohistochemistry has been used for this purpose but the results are inconsistent. We decided to reinvestigate the immune microenvironment and its impact using immunohistochemistry, with two systems of image analysis, in a large set of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diagnostic tissue from 309 patients was arrayed onto tissue microarrays. Results from 161 chemoimmunotherapy-treated patients were used for outcome prediction. Positive cells, percentage stained area and numbers of pixels/area were quantified and results were compared with the purpose of inferring consistency between the two semi-automated systems. Measurement cutpoints were assessed using a recursive partitioning algorithm classifying results according to survival. Kaplan-Meier estimators and Fisher exact tests were evaluated to check for significant differences between measurement classes, and for dependence between pairs of measurements, respectively. Results were validated by multivariate analysis incorporating the International Prognostic Index. The concordance between the two systems of image analysis was surprisingly high, supporting their applicability for immunohistochemistry studies. Patients with a high density of CD3 and FoxP3 by both methods had a better outcome. Automated analysis should be the preferred method for immunohistochemistry studies. Following the use of two methods of semi-automated analysis we suggest that CD3 and FoxP3 play a role in predicting response to chemoimmunotherapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25425693

  2. Tissue Array Research Program (TARP)

    Cancer.gov

    Multi-Tumor Tissue Microarrays A novel tool for high- throughput molecular profiling of tumor tissues Arrays Are Currently Available. Array Details To Order Slides Intramural Ordering Information: NCI/NIH personnel may directly contact Stephen M. Hewitt,

  3. LDRD Progress Report: Radioimmunotherapy using oxide nanoparticles: Radionuclide contaiment and mitigation of normal tissue toxicity.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinone, Adam Justin; Dai, Sheng; Mirzadeh, Saed; Kennel, Steve J

    2005-10-01

    Radionuclides with specific emission properties can be incorporated into metal-chalcogenide and metal-oxide nanoparticles. Coupled to antibodies, these conjugates could be injected into the bloodstream to target and destroy non-solid tumors or target organs for radioimaging. In the first year of this project, two types of radioactive nanoparticles, CdTe: {sup 125m}Te and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}: {sup 170}Tm were synthesized and coupled to antibodies specific to murine epithelial lung tissue. The nanoparticles successfully target the lung tissue in vivo. Some leaching of the radioisotope was observed. The coming year will explore other types of nanoparticles (other crystal chemistries) in order to minimize leaching.

  4. Mixed connective tissue disease presenting with progressive scleroderma symptoms in a 10-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Latu?kiewicz-Potemska, Joanna; Biernacka-Zieli?ska, Ma?gorzata; Sta?czyk, Jerzy; Smolewska, El?bieta

    2013-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting connective tissue with the underlying autoimmunological mechanism. The core of MCTD is an appearance of symptoms of several other inflammatory diseases of connective tissue – systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, poly- or dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis at the same time, accompanied by a high level of anti-ribonucleoprotein antibodies (anti-U1RNP). The disease was described more than 40 years ago by Sharp et al. During recent years, many efforts to better understand clinical and serological features of MCTD have been made. Diagnosis of MCTD can be difficult. Obligatory international diagnostic criteria are required to be fulfilled. Several versions of such criteria have been proposed, but the most widely used one was described by Kasukawa. There is no consensus about treatment – a choice of drugs depends on symptoms. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl with sclerodactyly and trophic damages of fingers accompanied by symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon. After an almost 2-year course of the disease, a diagnosis of MCTD has been established. PMID:24353496

  5. Magnetic Analysis of Post-mortem Hippocampal Tissue from Alzheimer's Patients: Changes with Progression of the Disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Zinin, P.; Favia, J.; Tatsumi, L.; Kletetschka, G.; Adachi, T.

    2007-12-01

    Increases of iron in the human brain with age have been observed and may be accompanied by the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's. We have measured the magnetic characteristics of several sets of slides of hippocampal tissue from deceased Alzheimer patients. The slides were made available by the Harvard Brain Bank. The pathology of the tissue was classified in the Braak stages I to VI used to describe the progression of the disease. In general, the slides from patients with higher Braak stages and development of fibrillary tangles and plaques had greater magnetic moments than did those with Braak stage II. However, the peak values were at stage IV and V. To mitigate errors due to the inevitable differences in masses of the tissue on individual slides and their precise location in the hippocampus, ratios of magnetic properties were also observed. Ratios of Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetizaton (ARM) to Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) were obtained and showed a decrease from Stage II to the more advanced stages, with the minimum values at stages IV and V. The acquisition and demagnetization of IRM are consistent with the presence of magnetite, but also indicate a magnetically harder phase.

  6. On-chip lectin microarray for glycoprofiling of different gastritis types and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bibhas; Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mishra, Debasish; Das, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Maiti, Tapas K.

    2014-01-01

    An on-chip lectin microarray based glycomic approach is employed to identify glyco markers for different gastritis and gastric cancer. Changes in protein glycosylation have impact on biological function and carcinogenesis. These altered glycosylation patterns in serum proteins and membrane proteins of tumor cells can be unique markers of cancer progression and hence have been exploited to diagnose various stages of cancer through lectin microarray technology. In the present work, we aimed to study the alteration of glycan structure itself in different stages of gastritis and gastric cancer thoroughly. In order to perform the study from both serum and tissue glycoproteins in an efficient and high-throughput manner, we indigenously developed and employed lectin microarray integrated on a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform. We analyzed serum and gastric biopsy samples from 8 normal, 15 chronic Type-B gastritis, 10 chronic Type-C gastritis, and 6 gastric adenocarcinoma patients and found that the glycoprofile obtained from tissue samples was more distinctive than that of the sera samples. We were able to establish signature glycoprofile for the three disease groups, that were absent in healthy normal individuals. In addition, our findings elucidated certain novel signature glycan expression in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. In silico analysis showed that glycoprofile of chronic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma formed close clusters, confirming the previously hypothesized linkage between them. This signature can be explored further as gastric cancer marker to develop novel analytical tools and obtain in-depth understanding of the disease prognosis. PMID:24959308

  7. Determination of the mechanism of action of repetitive halothane exposure on rat brain tissues using a combined method of microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiansheng; Yang, Xiaojun; Xiao, Huan; Kong, Jianqiang; Bing, Miao

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the gene expression profiles of rats brain tissues treated with halothane compared with untreated controls to improve current understanding of the mechanism of action of the inhaled anesthetic. The GSE357 gene expression profile was dowloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and included six gene chips of samples repeatedly exposed to halothane and 12 gene chips of untreated controls. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between these two groups were identified using the Limma package in R language. Subsequently, the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery was used to annotate the function of these DEGs. In addition, the most significantly upregulated gene and downregulated gene were annotated, to reveal the functional interactions with other associated genes, in FuncBase database. A total of 44 DEGs were obtained between The control and halothane exposure samples. Following Gene Ontology functional classification, these DEGs were found to be involved predominantly in the circulatory system, regulation of cell proliferation and response to endogenous stimulus and corticosteroid stimulus processes. KRT31 and HMGCS2, which were identified as the most significantly downregulated and upregulated DEGs, respectively, were associated with the lipid metabolic process and T cell activation, respectively. These results provided a basis for the development of improved inhalational anesthetics with minimal side effects and are essential for optimization of inhaled anesthetic techniques for advanced surgical procedures. PMID:26497548

  8. Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays in Basic and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput manner. It is viewed as a new tool that overcomes the limitation of DNA microarrays. On the basis of its application, protein microarrays fall into two major classes: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be directly spotted on a slide to form the so-called “reverse-phase” protein microarray. In the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function and construction of networks and pathways. In this chapter, we will review the recent advancements in the protein microarray technology, followed by presenting a series of examples to illustrate the power and versatility of protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:22989767

  9. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Rře, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC?=?0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  10. Expression of B7-H3 in cancer tissue during osteosarcoma progression in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, S J; Wang, W J; Zhang, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells might participate in the ontogenesis of osteosarcoma. B7-H3 is a new discovered T cell co-stimulatory molecule that was found to be overexpressed in malignant tumors. We aimed to investigate the dynamic expression level of B7-H3 in nude mice with osteosarcoma. A nude mouse osteosarcoma model was successfully established. B7-H3 expression and distribution changes in the early, middle, and late phases of osteosarcoma formation after tumor implantation were observed. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were applied to measure the B7-H3 mRNA and protein dynamic changes. Confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to determine B7-H3 localization and CD3+ T cell expression, respectively, in osteosarcoma tissue. B7-H3 mRNA and protein levels fluctuated during the process of osteosarcoma formation in the nude mouse model. Expression levels were lower in the early and middle phases, while B7-H3 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in the late stage. Accordingly, CD3+ T cell numbers in the early, middle, and late phases in osteosarcoma tissue were 93 ± 13, 92 ± 12, and 46 ± 15, respectively; they can be seen to have decreased significantly in the late stage (P < 0.05). Overall, our results indicated that the B7-H3 expression level is correlated with tumor volume and severity; therefore, it might serve as a tumor biomarker for osteosarcoma. PMID:26600483

  11. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  12. DNA Microarrays An R Tutorial

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    DNA Microarrays An R Tutorial Gene Expression Analysis & R Tutorial Weigang Qiu Department Expression Analysis & R Tutorial #12;DNA Microarrays An R Tutorial Outline 1 DNA Microarrays 2 An R Tutorial Weigang Qiu Gene Expression Analysis & R Tutorial #12;DNA Microarrays An R Tutorial Functional Genomics

  13. Neutron interactions with biological tissue. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    An attempt is made to obtain information about the physical stage of neutron interactions with tissue through secondary charged particles. The authors use theoretical calculations whose input includes neutron cross section data; range, stopping power, ion yield, and straggling information; and geometrical properties. Outputs are initial and slowing-down spectra of charged particles, kerma factors, average values of quality factors, microdosimetric spectra, and integral microdosimetric parameters such as {bar y}{sub F}, {bar y}{sub D}, y{sup *}. Since it has become apparent that nanometer site sizes are more relevant to radiobiological effects, the calculations of event size spectra and their parameters have been extended to these smaller diameters. This information is basic to radiological physics, radiation biology, radiation protection of workers, and standards for neutron dose measurement.

  14. Recent progresses in understanding of water interacting with biomolecules, and inside living cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. C.; Li, J.

    Recent inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements of water in cell preparations has provided information on the interfacial (or bound) water molecules. The experiments show that the interfacial water molecules can be readily distinguished from those in the bulk (bulk water), especially using inelastic neutron scattering data over the 20-130 meV range. Studies of intact biological systems - whole cells and tissues - demonstrated the feasibility of using these methods to assess the degree of interfacial water and their potential for monitoring physiological changes. Here we also describe the effect of heat shock and osmotic stress on yeast and E. coli cells, and show that the interfacial water content increases with elevated osmolarity and heat shock, and decreases under hypoosmotic conditions.

  15. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  16. Gene microarray analysis of lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jieyu; Li, Wenming; Jin, Tong; Xiang, Xuan; Li, Maocai; Wang, Juan; Li, Guojun; Pan, Xinliang; Lei, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the development and progression of many types of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which lncRNAs influence development and progression of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) are unclear. Method: We investigated differences in lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles between 3 pairs of HSCC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues by microarray analysis. Results: In HSCC tissues, 1299 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=669) or downregulated (n=630) compared to levels in adjacent nontumor tissues. Moreover, 1432 mRNAs were significantly upregulated (n=684) or downregulated (n=748) in HSCC tissues. We randomly selected 2 differentially expressed lncRNAs (AB209630, AB019562) and 2 differentially expressed mRNAs (SPP1, TJP2) for confirmation of microarray results using qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results matched well with the microarray data. The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were distributed on each of the chromosomes, including the X and Y chromosomes. Pathway analysis indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed mRNAs were related to 48 cellular pathways that may be associated with HSCC development. GO analysis revealed that 593 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 50 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 46 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were upregulated in the carcinomas; 280 mRNAs involved in biological processes, 58 mRNAs involved in cellular components, and 71 mRNAs involved in molecular functions were downregulated in the carcinomas. In addition, 8 enhancer-like lncRNAs and 21 intergenic lncRNAs with their adjacent mRNA pairs were identified as coregulated transcripts. Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying HSCC tumorigenesis and will facilitate identification of new therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for this disease. PMID:26131061

  17. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to single spots to release hybridized DNA. This work leverages LLNL expertise in optics, microfluids, and bioinformatics.

  18. Mouse tissues that undergo neoplastic progression after K-Ras activation are distinguished by nuclear translocation of phospho-Erk1/2 and robust tumor suppressor responses.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neha; Shuck, Ryan L; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai; Herron, Alan; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2012-06-01

    Mutation of K-Ras is a frequent oncogenic event in human cancers, particularly cancers of lungs, pancreas, and colon. It remains unclear why some tissues are more susceptible to Ras-induced transformation than others. Here, we globally activated a mutant oncogenic K-Ras allele (K-Ras(G12D)) in mice and examined the tissue-specific effects of this activation on cancer pathobiology, Ras signaling, tumor suppressor, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses. Within 5 to 6 weeks of oncogenic Ras activation, mice develop oral and gastric papillomas, lung adenomas, and hematopoietic hyperproliferation and turn moribund. The oral, gastric, and lung premalignant lesions display activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and NF-?B signaling as well as activated tumor suppressor and DNA damage responses. Other organs such as pancreas, liver, and small intestine do not exhibit neoplastic progression within 6 weeks following K-Ras(G12D) activation and do not show a potent tumor suppressor response. Even though robust Erk1/2 signaling is activated in all the tissues examined, the pErk1/2 distribution remains largely cytoplasmic in K-Ras(G12D)-refractory tissues (pancreas, liver, and intestines) as opposed to a predominantly nuclear localization in K-Ras(G12D)-induced neoplasms of lung, oral, and gastric mucosa. The downstream targets of Ras signaling, pElk-1 and c-Myc, are elevated in K-Ras(G12D)-induced neoplastic lesions but not in K-Ras(G12D)-refractory tissues. We propose that oncogenic K-Ras-refractory tissues delay oncogenic progression by spatially limiting the efficacy of Ras/Raf/Erk1/2 signaling, whereas K-Ras-responsive tissues exhibit activated Ras/Raf/Erk1/2 signaling, rapidly form premalignant tumors, and activate potent antitumor responses that effectively prevent further malignant progression. PMID:22532587

  19. Full Genome Microarrays Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    into the undergraduate curriculum. · Affordable DNA Microarrays · Student Friendly Protocols · GCAT-L Listserv · Free isolation, have high success rates and are inexpensive. #1394 Inexpensive DNA Microarrays and Analysis with Current Research Trends ¸ Make DNA Microarrays Affordable for All Students ¸ Develop Student-Friendly DNA

  20. Wavelet and multi-fractal based analysis on DIC images in epithelium region to detect and diagnose the cancer progress among different grades of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Das, Nandan K.; Pradhan, Asima; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2014-05-01

    DIC (Differential Interference Contrast Image) images of cervical pre-cancer tissues are taken from epithelium region, on which wavelet transform and multi-fractal analysis are applied. Discrete wavelet transform (DWT) through Daubechies basis are done for identifying fluctuations over polynomial trends for clear characterization and differentiation of tissues. A systematic investigation of denoised images is carried out through the continuous Morlet wavelet. The scalogram reveals the changes in coefficient peak values from grade-I to grade-III. Wavelet normalized energy plots are computed in order to show the difference of periodicity among different grades of cancerous tissues. Using the multi-fractal de-trended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA), it is observed that the values of Hurst exponent and width of singularity spectrum decrease as cancer progresses from grade-I to grade-III tissue.

  1. Tissue Array Research Program (TARP)

    Cancer.gov

    Objectives The TARP Lab’s objectives include development and distribution of multitumor tissue microarray slides and related technologies to cancer research investigators. This technology helps expedite discovery of the novel targets important in cancer t

  2. A microarray analysis of wheat grain hardness.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bryan; Rahman, Sadequr

    2005-05-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality characteristic of wheat grain, and considerable research effort has focused on characterising the genetic and biochemical basis underlying the hardness phenotype. Previous research has shown that the predominant difference between hard and soft seeds is linked to the puroindoline (PIN) proteins. In this study the near-isogenic lines of Heron and Falcon, which differ only in the grain hardness character, were compared using a cDNA microarray consisting of approximately 5,000 unique cDNA clones that were isolated from wheat and barley endosperm tissue. Our analysis showed that major differences in gene expression were evident for puroindoline-a (Pina), with a minor but not consistent change in the expression of puroindoline-b (Pinb). These observations were confirmed using a 16,000 unique cDNA microarray in a comparison of hard wheats with either the Pina null or Pinb mutation. PMID:15806348

  3. Progress in developing a living human tissue-engineered tri-leaflet heart valve assembled from tissue produced by the self-assembly approach.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Jean; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Lafrance, Hugues; Roberge, Charles J; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2014-08-01

    The aortic heart valve is constantly subjected to pulsatile flow and pressure gradients which, associated with cardiovascular risk factors and abnormal hemodynamics (i.e. altered wall shear stress), can cause stenosis and calcification of the leaflets and result in valve malfunction and impaired circulation. Available options for valve replacement include homograft, allogenic or xenogenic graft as well as the implantation of a mechanical valve. A tissue-engineered heart valve containing living autologous cells would represent an alternative option, particularly for pediatric patients, but still needs to be developed. The present study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of using a living tissue sheet produced by the self-assembly method, to replace the bovine pericardium currently used for the reconstruction of a stented human heart valve. In this study, human fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of sodium ascorbate to produce tissue sheets. These sheets were superimposed to create a thick construct. Tissue pieces were cut from these constructs and assembled together on a stent, based on techniques used for commercially available replacement valves. Histology and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the fibroblasts were embedded in a dense extracellular matrix produced in vitro. The mechanical properties measured were consistent with the fact that the engineered tissue was resistant and could be cut, sutured and assembled on a wire frame typically used in bioprosthetic valve assembly. After a culture period in vitro, the construct was cohesive and did not disrupt or disassemble. The tissue engineered heart valve was stimulated in a pulsatile flow bioreactor and was able to sustain multiple duty cycles. This prototype of a tissue-engineered heart valve containing cells embedded in their own extracellular matrix and sewn on a wire frame has the potential to be strong enough to support physiological stress. The next step will be to test this valve extensively in a bioreactor and at a later date, in a large animal model in order to assess in vivo patency of the graft. PMID:24813743

  4. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES GENES INVOLVED IN CROWN BUD DORMANCY IN LEAFY SPURGE (EUPHORBIA ESULA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge is a perennial rangeland weed that has become a model for weed genomics and cross-species research. Microarray analysis allows the simultaneous characterization of the expression from thousands of different genes from any given sampled tissue. We have used microarray analysis to follow ...

  5. Microarray image scanning.

    PubMed

    Ramdas, Latha; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Of the technologies available for measuring gene expression, microarrays using cDNA targets is one of the most common and well-developed high-throughput techniques. With this technique, the expression levels of thousands of genes are measured simultaneously. DNA probes are immobilized on solid surfaces, either membrane-based or chemically coated glass surfaces. On glass arrays, the probes are hybridized with fluorescent-labeled target samples. Fluorescence intensities, which reflect gene expression levels, are detected by imaging the array using a laser or white-light source and capturing the image using photomultiplier tube detection or a charge-coupled device camera. Different laser-based scanners are used in laboratories to scan microarray images. This chapter discusses the imaging process and the protocols being developed. PMID:16719360

  6. Pancreatic Tissue Microarray (TMA) - SEER Residual Tissue Repository Program

    Cancer.gov

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  7. A high-fat diet containing lard accelerates prostate cancer progression and reduces survival rate in mice: possible contribution of adipose tissue-derived cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Jin; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Park, Heesook; Song, Hyerim; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jung-In; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2015-04-01

    To examine the effects of high-fat diet (HFD) containing lard on prostate cancer development and progression and its underlying mechanisms, transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) and TRAMP-C2 allograft models, as well as in vitro culture models, were employed. In TRAMP mice, HFD feeding increased the incidence of poorly differentiated carcinoma and decreased that of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate, which was accompanied by increased expression of proteins associated with proliferation and angiogenesis. HFD feeding also led to increased metastasis and decreased survival rate in TRAMP mice. In the allograft model, HFD increased solid tumor growth, the expression of proteins related to proliferation/angiogenesis, the number of lipid vacuoles in tumor tissues, and levels of several cytokines in serum and adipose tissue. In vitro results revealed that adipose tissue-conditioned media from HFD-fed mice stimulated the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells and angiogenesis compared to those from control-diet-fed mice. These results indicate that the increase of adipose tissue-derived soluble factors by HFD feeding plays a role in the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer via endocrine and paracrine mechanisms. These results provide evidence that a HFD containing lard increases prostate cancer development and progression, thereby reducing the survival rate. PMID:25912035

  8. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  9. Integrated imaging instrument for self-calibrated fluorescence protein microarrays

    E-print Network

    a label-free method to quantify the probe density prior to target incubation to calibrate the fluorescence, and tissues.1­4 However, protein microarrays have been slow to receive Food and Drug Administration approval and label-free methods have been developed to eval- uate the spot morphology. Labeled techniques have inves

  10. Validation of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specificity and utility of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray, or Pigoligoarray (www.pigoligoarray.org), has been evaluated by profiling the expression of transcripts from four porcine tissues. Tools for comparative analyses of expression on the Pigoligoarray were developed i...

  11. Microarray Core Detection by Geometric Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Jimmy C.; Busch, Christer; Carlbom, Ingrid B.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-slide imaging of tissue microarrays (TMAs) holds the promise of automated image analysis of a large number of histopathological samples from a single slide. This demands high-throughput image processing to enable analysis of these tissue samples for diagnosis of cancer and other conditions. In this paper, we present a completely automated method for the accurate detection and localization of tissue cores that is based on geometric restoration of the core shapes without placing any assumptions on grid geometry. The method relies on hierarchical clustering in conjunction with the Davies-Bouldin index for cluster validation in order to estimate the number of cores in the image wherefrom we estimate the core radius and refine this estimate using morphological granulometry. The final stage of the algorithm reconstructs circular discs from core sections such that these discs cover the entire region of each core regardless of the precise shape of the core. The results show that the proposed method is able to reconstruct core locations without any evidence of localization. Furthermore, the algorithm is more efficient than existing methods based on the Hough transform for circle detection. The algorithm’s simplicity, accuracy, and computational efficiency allow for automated high-throughput analysis of microarray images. PMID:22684152

  12. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more »4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  13. Microarray expression profile analysis of long non-coding RNAs in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Gong, Bo; Jiang, Zhi-Lin; Zhong, Shan; Liu, Xing-Chao; Dong, Ke; Wu, He-Shui; Yang, Hong-Ji; Zhu, Shi-Kai

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a variety of the human transcriptome that does not code for proteins and plays an important role in the development and progression of multiple solid malignant tumors. However, the roles of lncRNAs in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of lncRNAs in three PDAC tumor samples (T) relative to those of matched adjacent non-tumor tissues (N) via a microarray with 30,586 lncRNA probes and 26,109 mRNA probes. The lncRNA microarray revealed 27,279 lncRNAs in PDAC samples, of which 2,331 were significantly upregulated (P<0.05; T/N>2.0) and 1,641 were downregulated (P<0.05; N/T>2.0) compared with matched adjacent non-tumor samples. In addition, 19,995 mRNAs were detected, of which 1,676 were significantly upregulated (P<0.05; T/N>2.0) and 1,981 were downregulated (P<0.05; N/T>2.0). Pathway analysis indicated that 41 pathways corresponded to upregulated transcripts and 25 pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts (P-value cut-off is 0.05). Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the highest enriched GOs targeted by upregulated and downregulated transcripts were tissue homeostasis. The validation results from quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis and microarray analysis were consistent. Furthermore, the expression level of long intergenic non-coding RNA HOTAIRM1 was upregulated in 12 PDAC tissues samples compared with matched adjacent non-tumor samples by qRT-PCR. The results showed that the lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles differed significantly between the PDAC tissues and their adjacent non-tumor tissues, and the revelation of an association between HOTAIRM1 expression and PDAC is especially noteworthy. These findings may provide new potential molecular markers for diagnosis and treatment of PDAC. PMID:26676849

  14. Three-dimensional lithographically-defined organotypic tissue arrays for quantitative analysis of morphogenesis and neoplastic progression

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Inman, Jamie L.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-02-13

    Here we describe a simple micromolding method to construct three-dimensional arrays of organotypic epithelial tissue structures that approximate in vivo histology. An elastomeric stamp containing an array of posts of defined geometry and spacing is used to mold microscale cavities into the surface of type I collagen gels. Epithelial cells are seeded into the cavities and covered with a second layer of collagen. The cells reorganize into hollow tissues corresponding to the geometry of the cavities. Patterned tissue arrays can be produced in 3-4 h and will undergo morphogenesis over the following one to three days. The protocol can easily be adapted to study a variety of tissues and aspects of normal and neoplastic development.

  15. Microarray Analysis of Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays provide a powerful tool to examine genome wide patterns of differential transcription. We are using microarrays to identify Fusarium verticillioides' structural and regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of fungal toxins, virulence factors, and other elements involved in plant pa...

  16. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natŕlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training. PMID:26363320

  17. Specific differences in gene expression profile revealed by cDNA microarray analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) immunohistochemically positive rat liver foci and surrounding tissue.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shugo; Asamoto, Makoto; Tsujimura, Kazunari; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2004-03-01

    Glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P), one of the glutathione S-transferases family of detoxification enzymes, is a very useful marker of rat liver pre-neoplastic lesions. We here investigated the gene expression profile in GST-P positive foci as compared with surrounding GST-P negative areas in the same liver of rats treated with diethylnitrosamine and then 2-acetylaminofluorene combined with partial hepatectomy. GST-P positive foci were harvested by laser microdissection and total RNAs were extracted to allow gene expression profiles to be assessed by cDNA microarray assays. Transaldolase, rat aflatoxin B1 aldehyde reductase and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase were found as up-regulated genes and regucalcin as a down-regulated gene, in line with findings for hepatocellular carcinomas. The results indicate that the approach adopted is useful for understanding mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis and identification of new markers for rat liver pre-neoplastic foci. PMID:14656948

  18. Genomic microarray analysis on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material for uveal melanoma prognostication.

    PubMed

    Minca, Eugen C; Tubbs, Raymond R; Portier, Bryce P; Wang, Zhen; Lanigan, Christopher; Aronow, Mary E; Triozzi, Pierre L; Singh, Arun; Cook, James R; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Plesec, Thomas P; Schoenfield, Lynn; Cawich, Victoria; Sulpizio, Scott; Schultz, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic alterations are strong outcome prognosticators in uveal melanoma (UVM). Monosomy 3 (-3) and MYC amplification at 8q24 are commonly tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Alternatively, microarray analysis provides whole genome data, detecting partial chromosome loss, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), or abnormalities unrepresented by FISH probes. Nonfixed frozen tissue is conventionally used for microarray analysis but may not always be available. We assessed the feasibility of genomic microarray analysis for high resolution interrogation of UVM using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) as an alternative to frozen tissue (FZT). Enucleations from 44 patients (clinical trial NCT00952939) yielded sufficient DNA from FFPET (n = 34) and/or frozen tissue (n = 41) for comparative genomic hybridization and select single nucleotide polymorphism analysis (CGH/SNP) on Roche-NimbleGen OncoChip arrays. CEP3 FISH analysis was performed on matched cytology ThinPrep material. CGH/SNP analysis was successful in 30 of 34 FFPET and 41 of 41 FZT samples. Of 27 paired FFPET/FZT samples, 26 (96.3%) were concordant for at least four of six major recurrent abnormalities (-3, +8q, -1p, +6p, -6q, -8p), and 25 of 27 (92.6%) were concordant for -3. Results of CGH/SNP were concordant with the CEP3 FISH results in 27 of 30 (90%) FFPET and 38 of 41 (92.6%) FZT cases; partial -3q was detected in two CEP3 FISH-negative cases and whole chromosome 3, 4, and 6 SNP-LOH in one case. CGH detection of -3, +8q, -8p on FFPET and FZT showed significant correlation with the clinical outcome measures (metastasis development, time to progression, survival). Results of the UVM genotyping by CGH/SNP on FFPET are highly concordant with those of the FZT analysis and with those of the CEP3 FISH analysis, and therefore CGH/SNP is a practical method for UVM prognostication. Genome-wide coverage provides additional data with potential relevance to UVM biology, diagnosis, and prognosis. PMID:25442074

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells in mammary adipose tissue stimulate progression of breast cancer resembling the basal-type

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Sachs, Patrick C.; Wang, Xu; Dumur, Catherine I.; Idowu, Michael O.; Robila, Valentina; Francis, Michael P.; Ware, Joy; Beckman, Matthew; Rizki, Aylin; Holt, Shawn E.; Elmore, Lynne W.

    2012-01-01

    Data are accumulating to support a role for adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in breast cancer progression; however, to date most studies have relied on adipose MSCs from non-breast sources. There is a particular need to investigate the role of adipose MSCs in the pathogenesis of basal-like breast cancer, which develops at a disproportionate rate in pre-menopausal African-American women with a gain in adiposity. The aim of this study was to better understand how breast adipose MSCs (bMSCs) contribute to the progression of basal-like breast cancers by relying on isogenic HMT-3255 S3 (pre-invasive) and T4-2 (invasive) human cells that upon transplantation into nude mice resemble this tumor subtype. In vitro results suggested that bMSCs may contribute to breast cancer progression in multiple ways. bMSCs readily penetrate extracellular matrix components in part through their expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, promote the invasion of T4-2 cells and efficiently chemoattract endothelial cells via a bFGF-independent, VEGF-A-dependent manner. As mixed xenografts, bMSCs stimulated the growth, invasion and desmoplasia of T4-2 tumors, yet these resident stem cells showed no observable effect on the progression of pre-invasive S3 cells. While bMSCs form vessel-like structures within Matrigel both in vitro and in vivo and chemoattract endothelial cells, there appeared to be no difference between T4-2/bMSC mixed xenografts and T4-2 xenografts with regard to intra- or peri-tumoral vascularity. Collectively, our data suggest that bMSCs may contribute to the progression of basal-like breast cancers by stimulating growth and invasion but not vasculogenesis or angiogenesis. PMID:22669576

  20. Waasil Kareem -Stanford University DNA Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    ©Waasil Kareem - Stanford University DNA Microarrays Benefits and Drawbacks Waasil Kareem) will provide clues about where to look for drugs. DNA microarrays are a fundamental tool for doing Kareem - Stanford University How does a DNA Microarray work? Microarray works by exploiting the property

  1. Can Zipf's law be adapted to normalize microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tim; Costello, Christine M; Croucher, Peter JP; Häsler, Robert; Deuschl, Günther; Schreiber, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Background Normalization is the process of removing non-biological sources of variation between array experiments. Recent investigations of data in gene expression databases for varying organisms and tissues have shown that the majority of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1 (i.e. obey Zipf's law). Based on the observation that our single channel and two channel microarray data sets also followed a power-law distribution, we were motivated to develop a normalization method based on this law, and examine how it compares with existing published techniques. A computationally simple and intuitively appealing technique based on this observation is presented. Results Using pairwise comparisons using MA plots (log ratio vs. log intensity), we compared this novel method to previously published normalization techniques, namely global normalization to the mean, the quantile method, and a variation on the loess normalization method designed specifically for boutique microarrays. Results indicated that, for single channel microarrays, the quantile method was superior with regard to eliminating intensity-dependent effects (banana curves), but Zipf's law normalization does minimize this effect by rotating the data distribution such that the maximal number of data points lie on the zero of the log ratio axis. For two channel boutique microarrays, the Zipf's law normalizations performed as well as, or better than existing techniques. Conclusion Zipf's law normalization is a useful tool where the Quantile method cannot be applied, as is the case with microarrays containing functionally specific gene sets (boutique arrays). PMID:15727680

  2. Recent progress in defining mechanisms and potential targets for prevention of normal tissue injury after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S. . E-mail: anscher@radonc.duke.edu; Chen, Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Kang Song; Larrier, Nicole; Huang Hong; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Brizel, David M.; Folz, Rodney J.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2005-05-01

    The ability to optimize treatments for cancer on the basis of relative risks for normal tissue injury has important implications in oncology, because higher doses of radiation might, in some diseases, improve both local control and survival. To achieve this goal, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced toxicity will be essential. Recent research has demonstrated that ionizing radiation triggers a series of genetic and molecular events, which might lead to chronic persistent alterations in the microenvironment and an aberrant wound-healing response. Disrupted epithelial-stromal cell communication might also be important. With the application of a better understanding of fundamental biology to clinical practice, new approaches to treating and preventing normal tissue injury can focus on correcting these disturbed molecular processes.

  3. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wage, Justin; Ma, Lili; Peluso, Michael; Lamont, Clare; Evens, Andrew M.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Beheshti, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to ‘hallmark’ processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age. PMID:26253138

  4. Noninvasive near-infrared fluorescent protein-based imaging of tumor progression and metastases in deep organs and intraosseous tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiguet-Jiglaire, Carine; Cayol, Mylčne; Mathieu, Sylvie; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Ouafik, L.'houcine; El-Battari, Assou

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body imaging of experimental tumor growth is more feasible within the near-infrared (NIR) optical window because of the highest transparency of mammalian tissues within this wavelength spectrum, mainly due to improved tissue penetration and lower autofluorescence. We took advantage from the recently cloned infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) together with a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-based lentiviral vector to produce virally transduced tumor cells that permanently express this protein. We then noninvasively explored metastatic spread as well as primary tumor growth in deep organs and behind bone barriers. Intrabone tumor growth was investigated through intracranial and intratibial injections of glioblastoma and osteosarcoma cells, respectively, and metastasis was assessed by tail vein injection of melanoma cells. We found that the emitted fluorescence is captured as sharp images regardless of the organ or tissue considered. Furthermore, by overlaying fluorescence spots with the white light, it was possible to afford whole-body images yet never observed before. This approach allowed us to continuously monitor the growth and dissemination of tumor cells with a small number of animals, minimal animal handling, and without the need for any additive. This iRFP-based system provides high-resolution readouts of tumorigenesis that should greatly facilitate preclinical trials with anticancer therapeutic molecules.

  5. Raman microprobe investigation of molecular structure and organization in the native state of woody tissue. Progress report, April 1, 1987--July 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Although the primary emphasis of our program has remained with the application of Raman spectroscopy to the study of native tissue, the scope of the work has been expanded to include a number of complementary approaches. These have included Solid State 13C NMR, autoradiography of radiolabeled woody tissue sections, and the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have resulted in progress in the areas of interpretation of the spectral features, and confirmation of the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. We have assembled and made operational our new microprobe and spectrometer systems acquired under the DOE-URIP program. We have also demonstrated that, operating with gated detection and pulsed laser excitation, we can discriminate against the laser-excited fluorescence characteristic of most woody tissue. Our studies of celluloses, which combine Raman spectroscopy and 13C NMR have shown that all native celluloses are composites of two forms which have the same secondary structure but different tertiary structures.

  6. Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and GeneExpression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work inProgress

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-08-01

    Almost three decades ago, we presented a model where theextracellular matrix (ECM) was postulated to influence gene expressionand tissue-specificity through the action of ECM receptors and thecytoskeleton. This hypothesis implied that ECM molecules could signal tothe nucleus and that the unit of function in higher organisms was not thecell alone, but the cell plus its microenvironment. We now know that ECMinvokes changes in tissue and organ architecture and that tissue, cell,nuclear, and chromatin structure are changed profoundly as a result ofand during malignant progression. Whereas some evidence has beengenerated for a link between ECM-induced alterations in tissuearchitecture and changes in both nuclear and chromatin organization, themanner by which these changes actively induce or repress gene expressionin normal and malignant cells is a topic in need of further attention.Here, we will discuss some key findings that may provide insights intomechanisms through which ECM could influence gene transcription and howtumor cells acquire the ability to overcome these levels ofcontrol.

  7. Microarray expression profile analysis of long non-coding RNAs in human breast cancer: a study of Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nan; Wang, Fengliang; Lv, Mingming; Cheng, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression. Numerous lncRNAs have performed critical roles in cancer biology including breast cancer (BC). The expression levels of certain lncRNAs are associated with tumor development, recurrence, metastasis, and prognosis. However, the potential roles that lncRNAs regulate breast cancer tumorigenesis and tumor progression are still poorly understood. To investigate the potential roles of lncRNAs in the breast cancer, we constructed BC related lncRNA libraries by using microarray. Microarray expression profiling suggests 790 up-regulated and 637 down-regulated (log fold-change>2.3) lncRNAs were differently expressed between BC tissues and its paired adjacent tissues. Furthermore, we found differently expressed lncRNAs associated with immune regulation. RP4-583P15.10, an up-regulated lncRNA, was found to be located downstream of the natural antisense of the ZBTB46 gene, which may regulated breast cancer through influence immune system. In conclusion, our results for the first time indicate that distinct lncRNAs expression profiles of BC, which related to the immune network, may provide information for further research on immune regulation during the BC process. PMID:25661361

  8. Tissue injury and hypoxia promote malignant progression of prostate cancer by inducing CXCL13 expression in tumor myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ammirante, Massimo; Shalapour, Shabnam; Kang, Youngjin; Jamieson, Christina A. M.; Karin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a slowly progressing malignancy that often responds to androgen ablation or chemotherapy by becoming more aggressive, acquiring a neuroendocrine phenotype, and undergoing metastatic spread. We found that B lymphocytes recruited into regressing androgen-deprived tumors by C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13), a chemokine whose expression correlates with clinical severity, play an important role in malignant progression and metastatic dissemination of PC. We now describe how androgen ablation induces CXCL13 expression. In both allografted and spontaneous mouse PC, CXCL13 is expressed by tumor-associated myofibroblasts that are activated on androgen ablation through a hypoxia-dependent mechanism. The same cells produce CXCL13 after chemotherapy. Myofibroblast activation and CXCL13 expression also occur in the normal prostate after androgen deprivation, and CXCL13 is expressed by myofibroblasts in human PC. Hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and induces autocrine TGF-? signaling that promotes myofibroblast activation and CXCL13 induction. In addition to TGF-? receptor kinase inhibitors, myofibroblast activation and CXCL13 induction are blocked by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Both inhibitor types and myofibroblast immunodepletion block the emergence of castration-resistant PC in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous metastatic PC with neuroendocrine differentiation. PMID:25267627

  9. JC papovavirus large tumor (T)-antigen expression in brain tissue of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and non-AIDS patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, G L; Ryschkewitsch, C F; Walker, D L; Webster, H D

    1986-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a JC papovavirus infection of the central nervous system in immunocompromised patients. It is well established that demyelination in PML is caused by JC virus infection of oligodendroglia, but whether the nonstructural regulatory protein, large tumor (T) antigen, is detectable in infected human tissue was not known. Using a modification of the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, we found T antigen expressed in the nuclei of cells in virus-infected sites in five cases of PML studied, including two with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PML occurs in AIDS at a much higher frequency than in other immunosuppressive disorders, and PML in AIDS may represent a more severe form of JC virus infection of the central nervous system. Images PMID:3008157

  10. Microarray expression profiling of dysregulated long non-coding RNAs in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Zhilu; Yang, Yuan; Xiang, Tingxiu; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a collection of malignant breast tumors that are often aggressive and have an increased risk of metastasis and relapse. Long non-coding RNAs are generally defined as RNA transcripts measuring 200 nucleotides or longer that do not encode for any protein. During the past decade, increasing evidence has shown that lncRNAs play important roles in oncogenesis and tumor suppression; however, the roles of lncRNAs in TNBC are poorly understood. To address this issue, we used Agilent human lncRNA microarray chips and bioinformatics tools, including Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), to assess lncRNA expression in 3 pairs of TNBC tissues. A dysregulated lncRNA expression profile was identified by microarray and verified by qRT-PCR in 48 pairs of breast cancer subtype tissues. Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, including those in TNBC, and the presence of dormant residual disseminated tumor cells (DTC) may be a key factor leading to metastasis. ANKRD30A, a potential target for breast cancer immunotherapy, is currently one of the most used DTC markers. Notably, we found the expression levels of the novel intergenic lncRNA LINC00993 to be associated with the expression levels of ANKRD30A. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR data indicated that the expression of LINC00993 was also associated with the expression of the estrogen receptor. In conclusion, our study identified a set of lncRNAs that were consistently aberrantly expressed in TNBC, and these dysregulated lncRNAs may be involved in the development and/or progression of TNBC. PMID:25996380

  11. Current Protocols in Chemical Biology Construction and Use of Glycan Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yalong; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification that influences many biological processes critical for development, normal physiologic function, and diseases. Unfortunately, progress towards understanding the roles of glycans in biology has been slow due to the challenges of studying glycans and the proteins that interact with them. Glycan microarrays provide a high-throughput approach for the rapid analysis of carbohydrate-macromolecule interactions. Protocols detailed here are intended to help laboratories with basic familiarity of DNA or protein microarrays to begin printing and performing assays using glycan microarrays. Basic and advanced data processing are also detailed, along with strategies for improving reproducibility of data collected with glycan arrays. PMID:23836542

  12. DNA microarrays: Types, Applications and their future

    PubMed Central

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which 1000’s of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. We first cover the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. We then discuss the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The chapter ends with a brief discussion of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies. PMID:23288464

  13. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  14. Components of the endocannabinoid and dopamine systems are dysregulated in Huntington's disease: analysis of publicly available microarray datasets

    PubMed Central

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Precious, Sophie V; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) and the dopaminergic system (DAS) are two major regulators of basal ganglia function. During Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis, the expression of genes in both the ECS and DAS is dysregulated. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes that were consistently observed in the ECS and DAS during HD progression in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the periphery in different models of HD and human HD tissue. To do this, we conducted a meta-analysis of differential gene expression in the ECS and DAS using publicly available microarray data. The consolidated data were summarized as observed changes in gene expression (OCGE) using a weighted sum for each gene. In addition, consolidated data were compared to previously published studies that were not available in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database. The resulting data confirm gene expression changes observed using different approaches and provide novel insights into the consistency between changes observed in human tissue and various models, as well as disease stage- and tissue-specific transcriptional dysregulation in HD. The major implication of the systems-wide data presented here is that therapeutic strategies targeting the ECS or DAS must consider the dynamic changes in gene expression over time and in different body areas, which occur during HD progression and the interconnectedness of the two systems. PMID:25692022

  15. Development and function of membrane systems in plant tissue. Annual technical progress report, 15 September 1981-15 August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J B

    1982-01-01

    Over the past 11 months we have continued investigation of ion transport mechanisms in corn roots and mitochondria. In mitochondria we find that only citrate and isocitrate are transported by the H/sup +//citrate symporter. However, the in vivo function of this carrier remains in doubt because citrate does not appear to be an effective substrate for corn mitochondria. Studies with roots have been directed to why various types of injury or shock all result in temporary blockage of the H/sup +/-efflux pump in the plasmamembrane. It appears this may be due to an injury-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ influx into the tissue, which by raising free Ca/sup 2 +/ in the cytosal activates calmodulin (CaM). In turn, the Ca.CaM complex appears to activate protein kinase, phosphorylating membrane proteins. It is possible that one of these phosphorylated proteins is responsible for inactivation of the H/sup +/-ATPase. Future work is planned around the consequences of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx into the root cell subsequent to injury, investigating the recovery of the H/sup +/-ATPase and the initiation of the biosyntheses which lead to augmented ion transport.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Rats Leads to Progressive Behavioral Deficits Coincident with Altered Tissue Properties in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, David O.; Pop, Viorela; Kamper, Joel E.; Adami, Arash; Rudobeck, Emil; Huang, Lei; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Hartman, Richard E.; Ashwal, Stephen; Obenaus, André

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects many infants and children, and results in enduring motor and cognitive impairments with accompanying changes in white matter tracts, yet few experimental studies in rodent juvenile models of TBI (jTBI) have examined the timeline and nature of these deficits, histologically and functionally. We used a single controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury to the parietal cortex of rats at post-natal day (P) 17 to evaluate behavioral alterations, injury volume, and morphological and molecular changes in gray and white matter, with accompanying measures of electrophysiological function. At 60 days post-injury (dpi), we found that jTBI animals displayed behavioral deficits in foot-fault and rotarod tests, along with a left turn bias throughout their early developmental stages and into adulthood. In addition, anxiety-like behaviors on the zero maze emerged in jTBI animals at 60?dpi. The final lesion constituted only ?3% of brain volume, and morphological tissue changes were evaluated using MRI, as well as immunohistochemistry for neuronal nuclei (NeuN), myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-200 (NF200), and oligodendrocytes (CNPase). White matter morphological changes were associated with a global increase in MBP immunostaining and reduced compound action potential amplitudes at 60?dpi. These results suggest that brain injury early in life can induce long-term white matter dysfunction, occurring in parallel with the delayed development and persistence of behavioral deficits, thus modeling clinical and longitudinal TBI observations. PMID:22697253

  17. DNA Microarrays: Sample Quality Control, Array Hybridization and Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Elva; Barisone, Gustavo A.

    2011-01-01

    Microarray expression profiling of the nervous system provides a powerful approach to identifying gene activities in different stages of development, different physiological or pathological states, response to therapy, and, in general, any condition that is being experimentally tested1. Expression profiling of neural tissues requires isolation of high quality RNA, amplification of the isolated RNA and hybridization to DNA microarrays. In this article we describe protocols for reproducible microarray experiments from brain tumor tissue2. We will start by performing a quality control analysis of isolated RNA samples with Agilent's 2100 Bioanalyzer "lab-on-a-chip" technology. High quality RNA samples are critical for the success of any microarray experiment, and the 2100 Bioanalyzer provides a quick, quantitative measurement of the sample quality. RNA samples are then amplified and labeled by performing reverse transcription to obtain cDNA, followed by in vitro transcription in the presence of labeled nucleotides to produce labeled cRNA. By using a dual-color labeling kit, we will label our experimental sample with Cy3 and a reference sample with Cy5. Both samples will then be combined and hybridized to Agilent's 4x44 K arrays. Dual-color arrays offer the advantage of a direct comparison between two RNA samples, thereby increasing the accuracy of the measurements, in particular for small changes in expression levels, because the two RNA samples are hybridized competitively to a single microarray. The arrays will be scanned at the two corresponding wavelengths, and the ratio of Cy3 to Cy5 signal for each feature will be used as a direct measurement of the relative abundance of the corresponding mRNA. This analysis identifies genes that are differentially expressed in response to the experimental conditions being tested. PMID:21445042

  18. Gene expression differences in adipose tissue associated with breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sturtz, Lori A; Deyarmin, Brenda; van Laar, Ryan; Yarina, William; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    Long thought to function only as an inert energy storage depot, the role of adipose tissue in breast tumorigenesis has been largely ignored. In light of increasing rates of obesity and use of breast conserving therapy and autologous fat grafting, improved understanding of the role of adipose tissue in tumor etiology is crucial. Thus, adipose tissue adjacent to and distant from invasive breast tumors (n = 20), or adjacent to non-malignant diagnoses (n = 20) was laser microdissected from post-menopausal women. Gene expression data were generated using microarrays and data analyzed to identify significant patterns of differential expression between adipose tissue groups at the individual gene and molecular pathway level. Pathway analysis revealed significant differences in immune response between non-malignant, distant, and tumor-adjacent adipose tissue, with the highest response in tumor-adjacent and lowest in non-malignant adipose tissue. Adipose tissue from invasive breasts exhibits increased expression of anti-inflammatory genes such as MARCO and VSIG4 while genes differentially expressed between tumor-adjacent and distant adipose tissue such as SPP1, RRM2, and MMP9, are associated with increased cellular proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. These data suggest that molecular profiles of adipose tissue differ depending on presence of or proximity to tumor cells. Heightened immunotolerance in adipose tissue from invasive breasts provides a microenvironment favorable to tumorigenesis. In addition, tumor-adjacent adipose tissue demonstrates expression of genes associated with tumor growth and progression. Thus, adipose tissue is not an inert component of the breast microenvironment but plays an active role in tumorigenesis. PMID:24719783

  19. Identifying differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments via statistic synthesis

    E-print Network

    Yang, Yee Hwa

    expression information on a whole genome level. There are several types of microarray technology including to the biology and technology underlying microarrays. Microarray experiments generate large and complexIdentifying differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments via statistic synthesis Yee

  20. Image microarrays (IMA): Digital pathology's missing tool

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Cheng, Jerome; Pantanowitz, Liron; Hewitt, Stephen; Yagi, Yukako; Monaco, James; Madabhushi, Anant; Rodriguez-canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Filie, Armando C.; Feldman, Michael D.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Shih, Natalie NC.; Brodsky, Victor; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Balis, Ulysses J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI) data sets (digital slides) from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE) to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs). IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs) are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA) of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development. PMID:22200030

  1. Predicting Microarray Signals by Physical Modeling

    E-print Network

    Deutsch, Josh

    -mRNA Which is spliced to get rid of junk Predicting Microarray Signals by Physical Modeling ­ p.4/39 #12;Gene transcription and regulation What are microarrays Example application: Cancer diagnosis The problem: how

  2. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    West, Jay A. A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hukari, Kyle W. (San Ramon, CA); Hux, Gary A. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  3. Appendix A: Microarray Methodology Overview DNA microarrays allow an investigator to measure simultaneously the relative activity

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Appendix A: Microarray Methodology Overview DNA microarrays allow an investigator to measure simultaneously the relative activity of every gene in a genome. A microarray consists of a glass slide with DNA. The single-stranded DNA printed on the microarray is the target bound by fluorescently labeled cDNA probe

  4. Extrapolating Traditional DNA Microarray Statistics to the Tiling and Protein Microarray

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    Extrapolating Traditional DNA Microarray Statistics to the Tiling and Protein Microarray for analyzing traditional gene-centric DNA microarrays, so the rst challenge in analyzing the advanced- anistic aspects with the traditional DNA microarrays, but in several respects, are quite dierent

  5. 1. What is a microarray? 2. Describe one use of a microarray.

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    WHY you chose these gene sequences. Put the following microarray technology steps in order. Write1. What is a microarray? 2. Describe one use of a microarray. 3. Dr. Flora is studying the effects a soybean gene microarray: Circle the dots for gene sequences that do not show a difference in gene

  6. Collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator production in developing rat calvariae: normal progression despite fetal exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. A.; Sipe, B.; Gershan, L. A.; Fiacco, G. J.; Lorenz, T. C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to zero gravity has been shown to cause a decrease in bone formation. This implicates osteoblasts as the gravity-sensing cell in bone. Osteoblasts also are known to produce neutral proteinases, including collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which are thought to be important in bone development and remodeling. The present study investigated the effects of zero gravity on development of calvariae and their expression of collagenase and tPA. After in utero exposure to zero gravity for 9 days on the NASA STS-70 space shuttle mission, the calvariae of rat pups were examined by immunohistochemistry for the presence and location of these two proteinases. The ages of the pups were from gestational day 20 (G20) to postnatal (PN) day 35. Both collagenase and tPA were found to be present at all ages examined, with the greatest amount of both proteinases present in the PN14 rats. At later ages, high amounts were maintained for tPA but collagenase decreased substantially between ages PN21 to PN35. The location of collagenase was found to be associated with bone-lining cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and in the matrix along cement lines. In contrast, tPA was associated with endothelial cells lining the blood vessels entering bone. The presence and developmental expression of these two proteinases appeared to be unaffected by the exposure to zero gravity. The calvarial thickness of the pups was also examined; again the exposure to zero gravity showed little to no effect on the growth of the calvariae. Notably, from G20 to PN14, calvarial thickness increased dramatically, reaching a plateau after this age. It was apparent that elevated collagenase expression correlated with rapid bone growth in the period from G20 to PN14. To conclude, collagenase and tPA are present during the development of rat calvariae. Despite being produced by the same cell in vitro, i.e., the osteoblast, they are located in distinctly different places in bone in vivo. Their presence, developmental expression, and quantity do not seem to be affected by a brief exposure to zero gravity in utero.

  7. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  8. Interactive Visualization of DNA Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Kalpathi R.

    Interactive Visualization of DNA Microarray Data Matt T. Miller Advisors: Dr. K.R. Subramanian VISUALIZATION OF DNA MICROARRAY DATA Matt T. Miller Advisors: Dr. K.R. Subramanian and Dr. Xintao Wu December ........................................................................... p. 10 2.1 -- Microarray Data...................................................... p. 10 2.1.1 What

  9. Approximating Border Length for DNA Microarray Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Wong, Prudence W.H.

    Approximating Border Length for DNA Microarray Synthesis Cindy Y. Li1 Prudence W.H. Wong1 Qin Xin2 Introduction DNA microarrays [9] have become a very important research tool which have proved to benefit areas about the pres- ence or absence of biological target sequences in a sample. A DNA microarray ("chip

  10. APPLICATIONS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA TO DNA MICROARRAYS

    E-print Network

    Friedland, Shmuel

    APPLICATIONS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA TO DNA MICROARRAYS Amir Niknejad Shmuel Friedland #12;In memory, and in gene expression data imbedded in DNA microarrays in particular. The second motivation is to complete first some biological background for gene expressions and DNA microarrays. Next we introduce

  11. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bańuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  12. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    HU, PENG; FENG, BO; WANG, GUANGLIN; NING, BIN; JIA, TANGHONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down- and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA-target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA-target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA-222 and microRNA-589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA-target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  13. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  14. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manu facturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthe-sized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microar-rays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  15. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S.

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  16. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that "accidental" tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  17. Tissue Array Research Program (TARP)

    Cancer.gov

    The following suggested protocols may be used when using the multi-tumor tissue microarray slides. H&E Protocol For Array Slides On Tape Section Slides The following suggested protocol was provided by David E. Kleiner M.D., Ph.D and Stephen M. Hewitt, M.D

  18. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  19. Protein Microarrays and Biomarkers of Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Mohan; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools that are widely used in systems biology research. For infectious diseases, proteome microarrays assembled from proteins of pathogens will play an increasingly important role in discovery of diagnostic markers, vaccines, and therapeutics. Distinct formats of protein microarrays have been developed for different applications, including abundance-based and function-based methods. Depending on the application, design issues should be considered, such as the need for multiplexing and label or label free detection methods. New developments, challenges, and future demands in infectious disease research will impact the application of protein microarrays for discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:21614200

  20. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The ?2 test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (< 5 cm) compared with large tumors (? 5 cm), with a statistically significant difference respectively (P = 0.016, P = 0.009). A decline linear trend appeared when analyzing the statistical difference of VDR expression among normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26722516

  1. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  2. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  3. Systematic review of accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, H B; Yang, H; Liu, G; Chen, H

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by chromosome microarray technology and karyotyping were compared. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE database with the keywords "chromosome" and "karyotype" and "genetic testing" and "prenatal diagnosis" and "oligonucleotide array sequence". The studies obtained were filtered by using the QUADAS tool, and studies conforming to the quality standard were fully analyzed. There was one paper conforming to the QUADAS standards including 4406 gravidas with adaptability syndromes of prenatal diagnosis including elderly parturient women, abnormal structure by type-B ultrasound, and other abnormalities. Microarray technology yielded successful diagnoses in 4340 cases (98.8%), and there was no need for tissue culture in 87.9% of the samples. All aneuploids and non-parallel translocations in 4282 cases of non-chimera identified by karyotyping could be detected using microarray analysis technology, whereas parallel translocations and fetal triploids could not be detected by microarray analysis technology. In the samples with normal karyotyping results, type-B ultrasound showed that 6% of chromosomal deficiencies or chromosome duplications could be detected by microarray technology, and the same abnormal chromosomes were detected in 1.7% of elderly parturient women and samples with positive serology screening results. In the prenatal diagnosis test, compared with karyotyping, microarray technology could identify the extra cell genetic information with clinical significance, aneuploids, and non-parallel translocations; however, its disadvantage is that it could not identify parallel translocations and triploids. PMID:25366803

  4. A Computational Approach Using Ratio Statistics for Identifying Housekeeping Genes from cDNA Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, T; Bhushan, M; Wangikar, P P

    2015-01-01

    We predict housekeeping genes from replicate microarray gene expression data of human lymphoblastoid cells and liver tissue with outliers removed using a scoring scheme, by an algorithm based on statistical hypothesis testing, assuming that such genes are constitutively expressed. A few predicted genes were examined and found to be housekeeping. PMID:26671815

  5. The development of common data elements for a multi-institute prostate cancer tissue bank: The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) experience

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashokkumar A; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Berman, Jules J; Bosland, Maarten; Datta, Milton W; Dhir, Rajiv; Gilbertson, John; Melamed, Jonathan; Orenstein, Jan; Tai, Kuei-Fang; Becich, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Background The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) is a consortium of four geographically dispersed institutions that are funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to provide clinically annotated prostate cancer tissue samples to researchers. To facilitate this effort, it was critical to arrive at agreed upon common data elements (CDEs) that could be used to collect demographic, pathologic, treatment and clinical outcome data. Methods The CPCTR investigators convened a CDE curation subcommittee to develop and implement CDEs for the annotation of collected prostate tissues. The draft CDEs were refined and progressively annotated to make them ISO 11179 compliant. The CDEs were implemented in the CPCTR database and tested using software query tools developed by the investigators. Results By collaborative consensus the CPCTR CDE subcommittee developed 145 data elements to annotate the tissue samples collected. These included for each case: 1) demographic data, 2) clinical history, 3) pathology specimen level elements to describe the staging, grading and other characteristics of individual surgical pathology cases, 4) tissue block level annotation critical to managing a virtual inventory of cases and facilitating case selection, and 5) clinical outcome data including treatment, recurrence and vital status. These elements have been used successfully to respond to over 60 requests by end-users for tissue, including paraffin blocks from cases with 5 to 10 years of follow up, tissue microarrays (TMAs), as well as frozen tissue collected prospectively for genomic profiling and genetic studies. The CPCTR CDEs have been fully implemented in two major tissue banks and have been shared with dozens of other tissue banking efforts. Conclusion The freely available CDEs developed by the CPCTR are robust, based on "best practices" for tissue resources, and are ISO 11179 compliant. The process for CDE development described in this manuscript provides a framework model for other organ sites and has been used as a model for breast and melanoma tissue banking efforts. PMID:16111498

  6. Application of Singular Value Decomposition to DNA Microarray

    E-print Network

    Friedland, Shmuel

    Application of Singular Value Decomposition to DNA Microarray Amir Niknejad M.S. Claremont Graduate.1 Missing gene imputation in DNA microarrays . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2 Some biological background and Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2.3 DNA microarrays (chips

  7. Protein-Based Microarray for the Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been used for gene expression and protein interaction studies, but recently, multianalyte diagnostic assays have employed the microarray platform. We developed a microarray immunoassay for bacteria, with biotinylated capture antibodies on streptavidin slides. To complete the fluor...

  8. Integrated imaging instrument for self-calibrated fluorescence protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, A. P.; Monroe, M. R.; Ünlü, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarrays, or multiplexed and high-throughput assays, monitor multiple protein binding events to facilitate the understanding of disease progression and cell physiology. Fluorescence imaging is a popular method to detect proteins captured by immobilized probes with high sensitivity and specificity. Reliability of fluorescence assays depends on achieving minimal inter- and intra-assay probe immobilization variation, an ongoing challenge for protein microarrays. Therefore, it is desirable to establish a label-free method to quantify the probe density prior to target incubation to calibrate the fluorescence readout. Previously, a silicon oxide on silicon chip design was introduced to enhance the fluorescence signal and enable interferometric imaging to self-calibrate the signal with the immobilized probe density. In this paper, an integrated interferometric reflectance imaging sensor and wide-field fluorescence instrument is introduced for sensitive and calibrated microarray measurements. This platform is able to analyze a 2.5 mm × 3.4 mm area, or 200 spots (100 ?m diameter with 200 ?m pitch), in a single field-of-view. PMID:24182114

  9. BOS TAURUS 60MER OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine high-density long oligonucleotide microarrays were developed, tested and optimized. The bovine microarray with ~345,000 features (60mer oligonucleotides) representing 45,383 cattle unique sequences was designed and produced with Maskless Array Synthesizer technology. The 45,383 unique sequenc...

  10. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  11. Competitive Immunoassays Using Antigen Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Qi; Li, Peiwu; Li, Changming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a non-fouling antigen competitive immunoassay microarray based on the polymer brush is reported to detect multiple mycotoxins. The detection is achieved by utilizing highly specific monoclonal antibodies produced in our laboratory. The polymer brush, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate] (POEGMA-co-GMA), is synthesized via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on standard glass slides. In the polymer brush, the epoxy groups of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) residues provide covalent binding sites for spotted antigens. Moreover, the abundant poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains in the brush are able to ultimately suppress the nonspecific protein adsorption in solution (non-fouling). The polymer brush shows a high and uniform protein loading, along with a high resistance to nonspecific protein absorption that are both important to achieve a highly sensitive immunoassay. As a demonstration of a multiplex assay, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), ochratoxin A (OTA), and zearalenone (ZEN) are selected as antigen targets for simultaneous detections using the microarray. PMID:26614080

  12. Real-time DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  13. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  14. Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined and defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long¬ term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-¬based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  16. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Progressive osseous heteroplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and muscle tissue. Bone that forms outside the skeleton is called heterotopic or ectopic bone. In progressive ... preventing bony tissue from being produced outside the skeleton. The GNAS gene mutations that cause progressive osseous ...

  18. Assembly of ordered microsphere arrays: Platforms for microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanling

    Microarrays are powerful tools in gene expression assessment, protein profiling, and protein function screening, as well as cell and tissue analysis. With thousands of small array spots assembled in an ordered array, these small devices makes it possible to screen for multiple targets in a fast, parallel, high-throughput manner. The well-developed technology of DNA microarrays, also called DNA chips, has proved successful in all kinds of biological experiments, including the human genome-sequencing project. The development of protein arrays has lagged behind that of DNA arrays mainly because of the greater complexity of proteins. Some parts of the microarray technology can be transplanted into the realm of protein arrays, while others cannot. The challenges from the complexity of protein targets demand more robust and powerful devices. Traditional planar arrays, in which proteins bind directly to a planar surface, have a drawback in that some proteins will be denatured or cluster together after immobilization. Microsphere-based microarrays represent a more advanced strategy. The functional proteins are first attached to microspheres; these microspheres are then immobilized in arrays on a planar surface. In this dissertation, two approaches to assembling arrays of microspheres will be discussed. The hydrodynamic approach uses surface micromachining and Deep Reactive Ion Etching techniques to form an array of channels through a silicon wafer. By drawing fluid containing the microspheres through the channels they become trapped in the channels and thereby immobilized. In the magnetic approach, permalloy films are deposited on a silicon substrate and subsequently patterned to form magnetic attachment sites. An external magnetic field is then applied and the magnetic microspheres then assemble on these sites. Both devices are able to immobilize microspheres in an ordered array, as opposed to coarsely grouping them in array spots. The assembled arrays are robust in that they ensure a resolution rate of almost 100%. In addition, different patterns of array spots with various spacings and diameters can be fabricated to satisfy different requirements. Moreover, the devices are easy to clean and reuse, and the experimental set-ups are relatively simple and portable. All these features make them good platforms for all kinds of microarrays.

  19. FGF23 promotes prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shu; Wang, Jianghua; Zhang, Yiqun; Creighton, Chad J.; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in US men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an endocrine FGF, normally expressed by osteocytes, which plays a critical role in phosphate homeostasis via a feedback loop involving the kidney and vitamin D. We now show that FGF23 is expressed as an autocrine growth factor in all prostate cancer cell lines tested and is present at increased levels in prostate cancer tissues. Exogenous FGF23 enhances proliferation, invasion and anchorage independent growth in vitro while FGF23 knockdown in prostate cancer cell lines decreases these phenotypes. FGF23 knockdown also decreases tumor growth in vivo. Given that classical FGFs and FGF19 are also increased in prostate cancer, we analyzed expression microarrays hybridized with RNAs from of LNCaP cells stimulated with FGF2, FGF19 or FGF23. The different FGF ligands induce overlapping as well as unique patterns of gene expression changes and thus are not redundant. We identified multiple genes whose expression is altered by FGF23 that are associated with prostate cancer initiation and progression. Thus FGF23 can potentially also act as an autocrine, paracrine and/or endocrine growth factor in prostate cancer that can promote prostate cancer progression. PMID:26019137

  20. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  1. Metric learning for DNA microarray data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Masao; Seto, Masao

    2009-12-01

    In many microarray studies, gene set selection is an important preliminary step for subsequent main task such as tumor classification, cancer subtype identification, etc. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using metric learning as an alternative to gene set selection. We develop a simple metric learning algorithm aiming to use it for microarray data analysis. Exploiting a property of the algorithm, we introduce a novel approach for extending the metric learning to be adaptive. We apply the algorithm to previously studied microarray data on malignant lymphoma subtype identification.

  2. Enhancing Results of Microarray Hybridizations Through Microagitation

    PubMed Central

    Toegl, Andreas; Kirchner, Roland; Gauer, Christoph; Wixforth, Achim

    2003-01-01

    Protein and DNA microarrays have become a standard tool in proteomics/genomics research. In order to guarantee fast and reproducible hybridization results, the diffusion limit must be overcome. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) micro-agitation chips efficiently agitate the smallest sample volumes (down to 10 ?L and below) without introducing any dead volume. The advantages are reduced reaction time, increased signal-to-noise ratio, improved homogeneity across the microarray, and better slide-to-slide reproducibility. The SAW micromixer chips are the heart of the Advalytix ArrayBooster, which is compatible with all microarrays based on the microscope slide format. PMID:13678150

  3. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  4. Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Protein Array Data

    E-print Network

    Cabrera, Javier

    1 Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Protein Array Data Dhammika Amaratunga Senior. Multivariate methods (JC) 5. Computational issues and software (JC) Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray microarrays DNA microarrays are the most widely used tool to monitor the expression levels of many thousands

  5. In Situ-Synthesized Novel Microarray Optimized for Mouse Stem Cell and Early Developmental Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Mark G.; Hamatani, Toshio; Sharov, Alexei A.; Carmack, Condie E.; Qian, Yong; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Ko, Naomi T.; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Brzoska, Pius M.; Hwang, S. Stuart; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Applications of microarray technologies to mouse embryology/genetics have been limited, due to the nonavailability of microarrays containing large numbers of embryonic genes and the gap between microgram quantities of RNA required by typical microarray methods and the miniscule amounts of tissue available to researchers. To overcome these problems, we have developed a microarray platform containing in situ-synthesized 60-mer oligonucleotide probes representing approximately 22,000 unique mouse transcripts, assembled primarily from sequences of stem cell and embryo cDNA libraries. We have optimized RNA labeling protocols and experimental designs to use as little as 2 ng total RNA reliably and reproducibly. At least 98% of the probes contained in the microarray correspond to clones in our publicly available collections, making cDNAs readily available for further experimentation on genes of interest. These characteristics, combined with the ability to profile very small samples, make this system a resource for stem cell and embryogenomics research. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org and at the NIA Mouse cDNA Project Web site, http://lgsun.grc.nia.nih.gov/cDNA/cDNA.html.] PMID:12727912

  6. Photopatterning of Hydrogel Microarrays in Closed Microchips.

    PubMed

    Gumuscu, Burcu; Bomer, Johan G; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-12-14

    To date, optical lithography has been extensively used for in situ patterning of hydrogel structures in a scale range from hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. The two main limitations which prevent smaller feature sizes of hydrogel structures are (1) the upper glass layer of a microchip maintains a large spacing (typically 525 ?m) between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, leading to diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns, (2) diffusion of free radicals and monomers results in irregular polymerization near the illumination interface. In this work, we present a simple approach to enable the use of optical lithography to fabricate hydrogel arrays with a minimum feature size of 4 ?m inside closed microchips. To achieve this, we combined two different techniques. First, the upper glass layer of the microchip was thinned by mechanical polishing to reduce the spacing between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, and thereby the diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns. The polishing process reduces the upper layer thickness from ?525 to ?100 ?m, and the mean surface roughness from 20 to 3 nm. Second, we developed an intermittent illumination technique consisting of short illumination periods followed by relatively longer dark periods, which decrease the diffusion of monomers. Combination of these two methods allows for fabrication of 0.4 × 10(6) sub-10 ?m sized hydrogel patterns over large areas (cm(2)) with high reproducibility (?98.5% patterning success). The patterning method is tested with two different types of photopolymerizing hydrogels: polyacrylamide and polyethylene glycol diacrylate. This method enables in situ fabrication of well-defined hydrogel patterns and presents a simple approach to fabricate 3-D hydrogel matrices for biomolecule separation, biosensing, tissue engineering, and immobilized protein microarray applications. PMID:26558488

  7. [Typing of Salmonella by DNA-microarrays].

    PubMed

    Malorny, Burkhard; Guerra, Beatriz; Zeltz, Patric; Rissler, Katharina; Helmuth, Reiner

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays (DNA-Chips) are miniaturized carriers on which many nucleic acid molecule probes such as oligonucleotides or PCR products are immobilized in a high density, and compactness. Homologue DNA hybridises with the immobilized complementary nucleic acid probes. This study gives after a short general introduction in the principle of DNA-microarrays an overview about published data on the field of typing of Salmonella by microarrays. An onset of a DNA-microarray developed by the National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella (NRL-Salm) will be introduced. By this new technique, it is possible to answer epidemiological questions as well as to find genes involved in certain biochemical processes, such as pathogenicity or resistance of salmonellae. PMID:14655626

  8. Genome-Wide Microarray Expression and Genomic Alterations by Array-CGH Analysis in Neuroblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Soto, Soledad; Legarra, Sheila; Pata-Merci, Noémie; Guegan, Justine; Danglot, Giselle; Bernheim, Alain; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.; Castresana, Javier S.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma has a very diverse clinical behaviour: from spontaneous regression to a very aggressive malignant progression and resistance to chemotherapy. This heterogeneous clinical behaviour might be due to the existence of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC), a subpopulation within the tumor with stem-like cell properties: a significant proliferation capacity, a unique self-renewal capacity, and therefore, a higher ability to form new tumors. We enriched the CSC-like cell population content of two commercial neuroblastoma cell lines by the use of conditioned cell culture media for neurospheres, and compared genomic gains and losses and genome expression by array-CGH and microarray analysis, respectively (in CSC-like versus standard tumor cells culture). Despite the array-CGH did not show significant differences between standard and CSC-like in both analyzed cell lines, the microarray expression analysis highlighted some of the most relevant biological processes and molecular functions that might be responsible for the CSC-like phenotype. Some signalling pathways detected seem to be involved in self-renewal of normal tissues (Wnt, Notch, Hh and TGF-?) and contribute to CSC phenotype. We focused on the aberrant activation of TGF-? and Hh signalling pathways, confirming the inhibition of repressors of TGF-? pathway, as SMAD6 and SMAD7 by RT-qPCR. The analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway showed overexpression of PTCH1, GLI1 and SMO. We found overexpression of CD133 and CD15 in SIMA neurospheres, confirming that this cell line was particularly enriched in stem-like cells. This work shows a cross-talk among different pathways in neuroblastoma and its importance in CSC-like cells. PMID:25392930

  9. Multidimensional analysis of gene expression reveals TGFB1I1-induced EMT contributes to malignant progression of astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuanyu; Zhang, Chuanbao; Wang, Yinyan; Yao, Kun; Yang, Pei; Han, Lei; Kang, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Malignant progression of astrocytoma is a multistep process with the integration of genetic abnormalities including grade progression and subtypes transition. Established biomarkers of astrocytomas, like IDH1 and TP53 mutation, were not associated with malignant progression. To identify new biomarker(s) contributing to malignant progression, we collected 252 samples with whole genome mRNA expression profile [34 normal brain tissue (NBT), 136 grade II astrocytoma (AII) and 82 grade III astrocytoma (AIII)]. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that EMT-associated pathways were most significantly altered along with tumor grades progress with up-regulation of 17 genes. Up-regulation of these genes was further confirmed by RNA-sequencing in 128 samples. Survival analysis revealed that high expression of these genes indicates a poor survival outcome. We focused on TGFB1I1 (TGF-?1 induced transcript 1) whose expression correlation with WHO grades was further validated by qPCR in 6 cell lines of different grades and 49 independent samples (36 AIIs and 13 AIIIs). High expression of TGFB1I1 was found associated with subtype transition and EMT pathways activation. The conclusion was confirmed using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays. Studies in vitro and in vivo using TGF-?1 and TGFB1I1 shRNA demonstrated that TGFB1I1 is required for TGF-? stimulated EMT that contributes to malignant progression of astrocytomas. PMID:25333259

  10. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  11. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  12. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner's laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube's voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  13. A longitudinal study of MARS MRI scanning of soft-tissue lesions around metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Briant-Evans, T W; Lyle, N; Barbur, S; Hauptfleisch, J; Amess, R; Pearce, A R; Conn, K S; Stranks, G J; Britton, J M

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the changes seen on serial metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging scans (MARS-MRI) of metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (MoM THAs). In total 155 THAs, in 35 male and 100 female patients (mean age 70.4 years, 42 to 91), underwent at least two MRI scans at a mean interval of 14.6 months (2.6 to 57.1), at a mean of 48.2 months (3.5 to 93.3) after primary hip surgery. Scans were graded using a modification of the Oxford classification. Progression of disease was defined as an increase in grade or a minimum 10% increase in fluid lesion volume at second scan. A total of 16 hips (30%) initially classified as 'normal' developed an abnormality on the second scan. Of those with 'isolated trochanteric fluid' 9 (47%) underwent disease progression, as did 7 (58%) of 'effusions'. A total of 54 (77%) of hips initially classified as showing adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) progressed, with higher rates of progression in higher grades. Disease progression was associated with high blood cobalt levels or an irregular pseudocapsule lining at the initial scan. There was no association with changes in functional scores. Adverse reactions to metal debris in MoM THAs may not be as benign as previous reports have suggested. Close radiological follow-up is recommended, particularly in high-risk groups. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1328-37. PMID:26430006

  14. Development and validation of a flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) gene expression oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) has been cultivated for around 9,000 years and is therefore one of the oldest cultivated species. Today, flax is still grown for its oil (oil-flax or linseed cultivars) and its cellulose-rich fibres (fibre-flax cultivars) used for high-value linen garments and composite materials. Despite the wide industrial use of flax-derived products, and our actual understanding of the regulation of both wood fibre production and oil biosynthesis more information must be acquired in both domains. Recent advances in genomics are now providing opportunities to improve our fundamental knowledge of these complex processes. In this paper we report the development and validation of a high-density oligo microarray platform dedicated to gene expression analyses in flax. Results Nine different RNA samples obtained from flax inner- and outer-stems, seeds, leaves and roots were used to generate a collection of 1,066,481 ESTs by massive parallel pyrosequencing. Sequences were assembled into 59,626 unigenes and 48,021 sequences were selected for oligo design and high-density microarray (Nimblegen 385K) fabrication with eight, non-overlapping 25-mers oligos per unigene. 18 independent experiments were used to evaluate the hybridization quality, precision, specificity and accuracy and all results confirmed the high technical quality of our microarray platform. Cross-validation of microarray data was carried out using quantitative qRT-PCR. Nine target genes were selected on the basis of microarray results and reflected the whole range of fold change (both up-regulated and down-regulated genes in different samples). A statistically significant positive correlation was obtained comparing expression levels for each target gene across all biological replicates both in qRT-PCR and microarray results. Further experiments illustrated the capacity of our arrays to detect differential gene expression in a variety of flax tissues as well as between two contrasted flax varieties. Conclusion All results suggest that our high-density flax oligo-microarray platform can be used as a very sensitive tool for analyzing gene expression in a large variety of tissues as well as in different cultivars. Moreover, this highly reliable platform can also be used for the quantification of mRNA transcriptional profiling in different flax tissues. PMID:20964859

  15. Hippo transducer TAZ promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition and supports pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Jia, Zhiliang; Wang, Liang; Wei, Wenfei; Zhu, Anna; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping; Quan, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is a transducer of the Hippo pathway and promotes cancer development and progression. In the present study, we sought to determine the roles and underlying mechanisms of elevated expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer development and progression. The mechanistic role of TAZ and Hippo signaling in promotion of pancreatic cancer development and progression was examined using cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse models. The relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings was validated using human pancreatic tumor specimens. We found that TAZ expression was markedly higher in pancreatic tumors than in normal pancreatic tissue. Further analysis of the correlation of TAZ expression with tissue microarray clinicopathologic parameters revealed that this expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation. Also, TAZ expression was higher in pancreatic cancer cell lines than in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAZ activation in pancreatic cancer cells promoted their proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that aberrant expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells resulted from suppression of the expression of Merlin, a positive regulator upstream of the Hippo pathway, and that the oncogenic function of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells was mediated by TEA/ATTS domain transcription factors. Therefore, TAZ functioned as an oncogene and promoted pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression. TAZ thus may be a target for effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26416426

  16. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  17. DNA methylation changes in ovarian cancer are cumulative with disease progression and identify tumor stage

    PubMed Central

    Watts, George S; Futscher, Bernard W; Holtan, Nicholas; DeGeest, Koen; Domann, Frederick E; Rose, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands with associated loss of gene expression, and hypomethylation of CpG-rich repetitive elements that may destabilize the genome are common events in most, if not all, epithelial cancers. Methods The methylation of 6,502 CpG-rich sequences spanning the genome was analyzed in 137 ovarian samples (ten normal, 23 low malignant potential, 18 stage I, 16 stage II, 54 stage III, and 16 stage IV) ranging from normal tissue through to stage IV cancer using a sequence-validated human CpG island microarray. The microarray contained 5' promoter-associated CpG islands as well as CpG-rich satellite and Alu repetitive elements. Results Results showed a progressive de-evolution of normal CpG methylation patterns with disease progression; 659 CpG islands showed significant loss or gain of methylation. Satellite and Alu sequences were primarily associated with loss of methylation, while promoter CpG islands composed the majority of sequences with gains in methylation. Since the majority of ovarian tumors are late stage when diagnosed, we tested whether DNA methylation profiles could differentiate between normal and low malignant potential (LMP) compared to stage III ovarian samples. We developed a class predictor consisting of three CpG-rich sequences that was 100% sensitive and 89% specific when used to predict an independent set of normal and LMP samples versus stage III samples. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed the NKX-2-3 promoter CpG island was hypermethylated with disease progression. In addition, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of the ES2 and OVCAR ovarian cancer cell lines re-expressed NKX-2-3. Finally, we merged our CpG methylation results with previously published ovarian expression microarray data and identified correlated expression changes. Conclusion Our results show that changes in CpG methylation are cumulative with ovarian cancer progression in a sequence-type dependent manner, and that CpG island microarrays can rapidly discover novel genes affected by CpG methylation in clinical samples of ovarian cancer. PMID:18826610

  18. Microarrayed recombinant allergens for diagnosis of allergy.

    PubMed

    Harwanegg, C; Laffer, S; Hiller, R; Mueller, M W; Kraft, D; Spitzauer, S; Valenta, R

    2003-01-01

    We suggest that the coapplication of recombinant allergens and microarray technology can lead to the development of new forms of multi-allergen tests which allow the determining and monitoring of complex sensitization profiles of allergic patients in single assays. The allergen extracts which have so far been used for diagnosis only allowed the determining of whether an allergic patient is sensitized against a particular allergen source, but the disease-eliciting allergens could not be identified. Through the application of recombinant DNA technology a rapidly growing panel of recombinant allergen molecules has become available which meanwhile comprises the epitope spectrum of most of the important allergen sources. We demonstrate that microarray technology can be used to establish multi-allergen tests consisting of microarrayed recombinant allergen molecules. Microarrayed recombinant allergens can be used to determine and monitor the profile of disease-eliciting allergens using single tests that require minute amounts of serum from allergic patients. The wealth of diagnostic information gained through microarray-based allergy testing will likely improve diagnosis, prevention and treatment of allergy. PMID:12534543

  19. Tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Katari, Ravi S; Peloso, Andrea; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Ultimately much work remains to be done in the companion fields of biomaterials and stem cells. Nonetheless, the monumental progress in TE that has been reported in the studies summarized here demonstrates that regenerative approaches to problems in general surgery need to be explored in more depth. Furthermore, the surgical disciplines of reconstruction and transplantation need to recognize their research counterparts in TE, given its potential to actualize freedom from immunosuppression, one of the most elusive goals in modern surgery. The engineering and proliferation of autologous cells, tissues, and organs ex vivo before surgical operation can significantly reduce the obstacles current practitioners are intimately familiar with: donor site morbidity and immunologic rejection. Therefore, in addition to the truly exciting research and development prospects and implications for the commercial sector, patients with end-stage diseases and debilitating injury stand to gain the most from clinically adapted TE therapies. PMID:25293612

  20. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the ?-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in ?-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power Tools), (ii) the manual loading of preprocessing libraries, and (iii) the management of intermediate files, such as results and metadata. Micro-Analyzer users can directly manage Affymetrix binary data without worrying about locating and invoking the proper preprocessing tools and chip-specific libraries. Moreover, users of the Micro-Analyzer tool can load the preprocessed data directly into the well-known TM4 platform, extending in such a way also the TM4 capabilities. Consequently, Micro Analyzer offers the following advantages: (i) it reduces possible errors in the preprocessing and further analysis phases, e.g. due to the incorrect choice of parameters or due to the use of old libraries, (ii) it enables the combined and centralized pre-processing of different arrays, (iii) it may enhance the quality of further analysis by storing the workflow, i.e. information about the preprocessing steps, and (iv) finally Micro-Analzyer is freely available as a standalone application at the project web site http://sourceforge.net/projects/microanalyzer/. PMID:23731720

  1. Critical Review of Methods available for Microarray Data Analysis Krithika Ramamoorthy

    E-print Network

    microarray techniques include the use of the high density oligonucleotide microarray technology as provided1 Critical Review of Methods available for Microarray Data Analysis Krithika Ramamoorthy Introduction The invention of DNA microarrays has triggered numerous efforts to analyze relative m

  2. Loss of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 in mice leads to progressive ectopic mineralization of spinal tissues resembling diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Warraich, Sumeeta; Bone, Derek B J; Quinonez, Diana; Ii, Hisataka; Choi, Doo-Sup; Holdsworth, David W; Drangova, Maria; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Séguin, Cheryle A; Hammond, James R

    2013-05-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a noninflammatory spondyloarthropathy, characterized by ectopic calcification of spinal tissues. Symptoms include spine pain and stiffness, and in severe cases dysphagia and spinal cord compression. The etiology of DISH is unknown and there are no specific treatments. Recent studies have suggested a role for purine metabolism in the regulation of biomineralization. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) transfers hydrophilic nucleosides, such as adenosine, across the plasma membrane. In mice lacking ENT1, we observed the development of calcified lesions resembling DISH. By 12 months of age, ENT1(-/-) mice exhibited signs of spine stiffness, hind limb dysfunction, and paralysis. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) revealed ectopic mineralization of paraspinal tissues in the cervical-thoracic region at 2 months of age, which extended to the lumbar and caudal regions with advancing age. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of lesions revealed a high content of calcium and phosphorus with a ratio similar to that of cortical bone. At 12 months of age, histological examination of ENT1(-/-) mice revealed large, irregular accumulations of eosinophilic material in paraspinal ligaments and entheses, intervertebral discs, and sternocostal articulations. There was no evidence of mineralization in appendicular joints or blood vessels, indicating specificity for the axial skeleton. Plasma adenosine levels were significantly greater in ENT1(-/-) mice than in wild-type, consistent with loss of ENT1--a primary adenosine uptake pathway. There was a significant reduction in the expression of Enpp1, Ank, and Alpl in intervertebral discs from ENT1(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Elevated plasma levels of inorganic pyrophosphate in ENT1(-/-) mice indicated generalized disruption of pyrophosphate homeostasis. This is the first report of a role for ENT1 in regulating the calcification of soft tissues. Moreover, ENT1(-/-) mice may be a useful model for investigating pathogenesis and evaluating therapeutics for the prevention of mineralization in DISH and related disorders. PMID:23184610

  3. Identification of Differentially-expressed Genes in Intestinal Gastric Cancer by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shizhu; Guo, Ruifang; Xing, Rui; Zhang, Liang; Li, Wenmei; Zhao, Min; Fang, Jingyuan; Hu, Fulian; Kang, Bin; Ren, Yonghong; Zhuang, Yonglong; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Rong; Li, Xianghong; Yu, Yingyan; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Youyong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant tumors. In order to systematically characterize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of intestinal GC development, in this study, we used 22 K oligonucleotide microarrays and bioinformatics analysis to evaluate the gene expression profiles of GC in 45 tissue samples, including 20 intestinal GC tissue samples, 20 normal appearing tissues (NATs) adjacent to tumors and 5 noncancerous gastric mucosa tissue samples. These profiles allowed us to explore the transcriptional characteristics of GC and determine the change patterns in gene expression that may be of clinical significance. 1519 and 1255 differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in intestinal GC tissues and NATs, respectively, as determined by Bayesian analysis (P < 0.001). These genes were associated with diverse functions such as mucosa secretion, metabolism, proliferation, signaling and development, which occur at different stages of GC development. PMID:25500430

  4. Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response

    E-print Network

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response Virginia Goss a previously unrecognized role in repairing DNA damaged by ionizing radiation. DNA microarrays contain important problem: the transcriptional response of lymphoblastoid cells to ionizing radiation (IR

  5. ENSEMBLE GENETIC PROGRAMMING CLASSIFIER FOR MICROARRAY DATA Mr. Supoj Hengpraprohm

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    COMPUTER ENGINEERING KEYWORDS : CLASSIFICATION / GENETIC PROGRAMMING / ENSEMBLE METHOD / MICROARRAY DATA 2551 #12;ENSEMBLE GENETIC PROGRAMMING CLASSIFIER FOR MICROARRAY DATA Mr. Supoj of Philosophy Program in Computer Engineering Department of Computer Engineering Faculty of Engineering

  6. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  7. Photoelectromechanical synthesis of low-cost DNA microarrays

    E-print Network

    Chow, Brian, 1978-

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in de novo gene synthesis, library construction, and genomic selection for target sequencing using DNA from custom microarrays have demonstrated that microarrays can effectively be used as the world's ...

  8. Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes

    E-print Network

    Wardle, Fiona C.; Odom, Duncan T.; Bell, George W.; Yuan, Bingbing; Danford, Timothy W.; Wiellette, Elizabeth L.; Herbolsheimer, Elizabeth; Sive, Hazel L.; Young, Richard A.; Smith, James C.

    2006-08-04

    Abstract We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with an antibody...

  9. Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes

    E-print Network

    Wardle, Fiona C

    We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation ...

  10. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer oligonucleotide probes and covers more than 10,000 gene sequences in 150 gene categories involved in carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus cycling, metal resistance and reduction, and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip can be used as a generic tool for microbial community analysis, and also link microbial community structure to ecosystem functioning. Examples of the application of both arrays in different environmental samples will be described in the two subsequent sections.

  11. It's easy to build your own microarrayer!

    PubMed

    Thompson, A; Lucchini, S; Hinton, J C

    2001-04-01

    DNA microarrays are becoming the tool of choice for microbial gene-expression profiling and genotypic analysis. The construction of a gridding robot for the 'in-house' production of microarrays is a choice worth considering, and offers distinct advantages over other options in terms of cost effectiveness and scale. Having built our own robot, we want to dispel some of the myths that might be associated with such a project, as well as provide practical advice for potential builders in the UK and Europe. PMID:11286865

  12. Gene expression profiling in Barrett’s esophagus and cardia intestinal metaplasia: A comparative analysis using cDNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying; Gong, Jun; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Dai, Fei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the difference of gene expression profile changes in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) and cardia intestinal metaplasia (CIM) and to screen the novel genes in the early stage by cDNA microarray. METHODS: cDNA retrotranscribed from an equal amount of mRNA from BE and CIM epithelial tissues was labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probe was hybridized with three pieces of BiostarH-40 s double dot human whole gene chip. The chips were scanned with a ScanArray 4000. The acquired images were analyzed using GenePix Pro 3.0 software. RESULTS: A total of 141 genes were screened out that exhibited different expression in all three chips. There were 74 upregulated and 67 downregulated genes in gene expression profiles of BE which were two times of that in CIM. CONCLUSION: There is a difference in gene expression level between BE and CIM epithelia. These 141 genes probably relate to the occurrence and development of BE and the progression to adenocarcinoma. PMID:15457573

  13. High-Throughput Nano-Biofilm Microarray for Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Anand; Leung, Kai P.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Micro- and nanoscale technologies have radically transformed biological research from genomics to tissue engineering, with the relative exception of microbial cell culture, which is still largely performed in microtiter plates and petri dishes. Here, we present nanoscale culture of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans on a microarray platform. The microarray consists of 1,200 individual cultures of 30 nl of C. albicans biofilms (“nano-biofilms”) encapsulated in an inert alginate matrix. We demonstrate that these nano-biofilms are similar to conventional macroscopic biofilms in their morphological, architectural, growth, and phenotypic characteristics. We also demonstrate that the nano-biofilm microarray is a robust and efficient tool for accelerating the drug discovery process: (i) combinatorial screening against a collection of 28 antifungal compounds in the presence of immunosuppressant FK506 (tacrolimus) identified six drugs that showed synergistic antifungal activity, and (ii) screening against the NCI challenge set small-molecule library identified three heretofore-unknown hits. This cell-based microarray platform allows for miniaturization of microbial cell culture and is fully compatible with other high-throughput screening technologies. PMID:23800397

  14. Analysis of discordant Affymetrix probesets casts serious doubt on idea of microarray data reutilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Affymetrix microarray technology allows one to investigate expression of thousands of genes simultaneously upon a variety of conditions. In a popular U133A microarray platform, the expression of 37% of genes is measured by more than one probeset. The discordant expression observed for two different probesets that match the same gene is a widespread phenomenon which is usually underestimated, ignored or disregarded. Results Here we evaluate the prevalence of discordant expression in data collected using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray platform. In U133A, about 30% of genes annotated by two different probesets demonstrate a substantial correlation between independently measured expression values. To our surprise, sorting the probesets according to the nature of the discrepancy in their expression levels allowed the classification of the respective genes according to their fundamental functional properties, including observed enrichment by tissue-specific transcripts and alternatively spliced variants. On another hand, an absence of discrepancies in probesets that simultaneously match several different genes allowed us to pinpoint non-expressed pseudogenes and gene groups with highly correlated expression patterns. Nevertheless, in many cases, the nature of discordant expression of two probesets that match the same transcript remains unexplained. It is possible that these probesets report differently regulated sets of transcripts, or, in best case scenario, two different sets of transcripts that represent the same gene. Conclusion The majority of absolute gene expression values collected using Affymetrix microarrays may not be suitable for typical interpretative downstream analysis. PMID:25563078

  15. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse (strain 129) embryonic stem cells after typical synthetic musk exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Jiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used in personal-care products and can readily accumulate in the adipose tissue, breast milk, and blood of humans. In this study, the Affymetrix Mouse Genome GeneChip was used to identify alterations in gene expression of embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse after treatment with the synthetic musk tonalide (AHTN). Among the 45,037 transcripts in the microarray, 2,879 genes were differentially expressed. According to the microarray analysis, the potential influence of AHTN on the development to embryo should be of concern, and the toxicological effects of it and related musk compounds should be studied further. PMID:23099888

  16. Computer Simulation Study of Molecular Recognition in Model DNA Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Jayaraman, Arthi

    Computer Simulation Study of Molecular Recognition in Model DNA Microarrays Arthi Jayaraman, Carol University, Raleigh, North Carolina ABSTRACT DNA microarrays have been widely adopted by the scientific of the probe. INTRODUCTION DNA microarrays have revolutionized the way biological research is done, enabling

  17. DNA microarray technologies for measuring proteinDNA interactions

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    DNA microarray technologies for measuring protein­DNA interactions Martha L Bulyk DNA approach to analyse the in vitro binding of proteins directly to double-stranded DNA microarrays (protein binding microarrays; PBMs), permits rapid characterization of their DNA binding site sequence

  18. Improved Sensitivity of DNA Microarrays Using Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    E-print Network

    Cunningham, Brian

    Improved Sensitivity of DNA Microarrays Using Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence Patrick C, Illinois 61801 DNA microarrays are used to profile changes in gene expression between samples in a high substrates. The DNA microarray is a valuable tool for high-throughput quantification of gene expression

  19. Comparing microarrays and next-generation sequencing technologies

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    of DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the field of microbial ecology-generation sequencing (NGS) and DNA microarrays, it is apparent that the diversity and population density of microbial and largely unexplored [2] and could represent the key to ecosystem resilience. DNA microarrays comprising

  20. DNA MICROARRAY DATA CLUSTERING USING GROWING SELF ORGANIZING NETWORKS

    E-print Network

    Koprinska, Irena

    DNA MICROARRAY DATA CLUSTERING USING GROWING SELF ORGANIZING NETWORKS Kim Jackson and Irena}@it.usyd.edu.au ABSTRACT Recent advances in DNA microarray technology have allowed biologists to simultaneously monitor Neural Gas) for clustering DNA microarray data, comparing them with traditional algorithms. 1

  1. Viral Discovery and Sequence Recovery Using DNA Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Wang, David

    Viral Discovery and Sequence Recovery Using DNA Microarrays David Wang1 , Anatoly Urisman1 , Yu, there is a great demand for new technological methods for viral discovery. We describe herein a DNA microarray-based platform for novel virus identification and characterization. Central to this approach was a DNA microarray

  2. A Review of DNA Microarray Data Analysis Background

    E-print Network

    A Review of DNA Microarray Data Analysis Background: The mystery of life for a living organism on one gene at a time, which is time consuming and costly. The ingenuous idea of DNA microarrays created a solution to this problem. DNA microarrays are a new technology that allows the whole genome to be monitored

  3. A Simultaneous Reconstruction of Missing Data in DNA Microarrays

    E-print Network

    A Simultaneous Reconstruction of Missing Data in DNA Microarrays Shmuel Friedland , Amir Niknejad, imputation. 1 Introduction In the last decade, molecular biologists have been using DNA microarrays as a tool. More recently, microarray gene expression data have been formulated as a gene expres- sion matrix E

  4. Oligonucleotide Microarrays for the Study of Coastal Microbial Communities

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    -Oldenburg and Bess B. Ward Summary DNA microarrays are well suited as a tool for analyzing functional gene diversity and sensitivity are determined by the probe design. In their current implementation, environmental DNA microarrays the environment by analyzing many different genes at once, DNA microarrays now afford an ideal tool

  5. Development of Microbial Genome-Probing Microarrays Using

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    without PCR biases (7). DNA microarrays, originally devel- oped for exploring genome-wide transcriptional sensitivity of the DNA microarrays currently in use (8, 9). Thus, additional high-throughput and hybridizationDevelopment of Microbial Genome-Probing Microarrays Using Digital Multiple Displacement

  6. Modeling and Estimation for Real-Time Microarrays HARIS VIKALOa

    E-print Network

    Vikalo, Haris

    , and to understanding their fundamental limitations. Index Terms: DNA microarrays, real-time, cross Genetics and Genomics Laboratory at Caltech. 1 #12;1 Introduction DNA microarrays [1]-[8] are affinity-based biosensors capable of testing tens of thousands of different genes simultaneously. Sensing in DNA microarrays

  7. Clustering methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data

    E-print Network

    Hastie, Trevor

    Clustering methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data Robert Tibshirani, Trevor Hastie, Mike cellular differentiation and response, through the use of DNA microarrays. A major statistical task clustering approaches. 1 Introduction DNA microarrays and other high­throughput methods for analyzing complex

  8. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site microarray (PBM) experiments1 that represents all possible DNA sequence variants of a given length k (that is to double-stranded (ds) DNA arrays. Using these microarrays we comprehensively determined the binding

  9. Microarray Data Analysis Methods Comparison : A Review Biochemistry 218 Project

    E-print Network

    a specific set of conditions, we can use DNA microarrays to capture an image of the genome's instructions DNA microarrays and one of the #12;immediate challenges is to develop tools and interpretive framework with DNA microarrays are systematic and quantitative, powerful mathematical and statistical methods can

  10. Wavelet-Based Feature Extraction for Microarray Data Classification

    E-print Network

    Kwok, James Tin-Yau

    Wavelet-Based Feature Extraction for Microarray Data Classification Shutao Li, Chen Liao, James T. Kwok Abstract-- Microarray data typically have thousands of genes, and thus feature extraction to humans, it has become one of the top life threats. In recent years, the study of DNA microarray has

  11. A Biomimetic Algorithm for the Improved Detection of Microarray Features

    E-print Network

    Maini, Philip K.

    , Brownlow Hill L69 3GJ, Liverpool, UK ABSTRACT One the major difficulties of microarray technology relate. INTRODUCTION The introduction of microarray technology in the late 1990s has been the workhorse of genomics throughput screening techniques. Microarray technology is based on the large parallel testing of biomolecular

  12. Gene clustering methods for time series microarray data Laney Kuenzel

    E-print Network

    1 Introduction The development of advanced microarray technology over the past two decades conGene clustering methods for time series microarray data Laney Kuenzel Biochemistry 218 June 6, 2010- stitutes a revolution in genomics. To- day, microarrays can measure expression levels for thousands

  13. Data Models for Exploratory Analysis of Heterogeneous Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    of the particular gene in the particular sample. Application of microarray technology to biological problems, ranges, technology and protocols used in different labs, leads to difficulties in integrating microarray data acrossData Models for Exploratory Analysis of Heterogeneous Microarray Data Jaewoo Kang NC State

  14. Functional Bioinformatics of Microarray Data: From Expression to Regulation

    E-print Network

    years, microarray technology has emerged as Manuscript received March 15, 2002; revised July 15, 2002Functional Bioinformatics of Microarray Data: From Expression to Regulation YVES MOREAU, FRANK DE Paper Using microarrays is a powerful technique to monitor the expression of thousands of genes

  15. DESIGN AND MICROFABRICATION OF 3D CARBON MEMS ELECTRODE MICROARRAY

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    -MEMS technology is utilized for the microfabrication of a 3D electrode microarray due to carbon materials havingDESIGN AND MICROFABRICATION OF 3D CARBON MEMS ELECTRODE MICROARRAY This chapter discusses the design of 3D C-MEMS electrode microarray and its microfabrication process. First the design starts

  16. SHORT COMMUNICATION Microarray analysis and establishment of drug

    E-print Network

    Lee, H.C. Paul

    Z 5-fluorouracil. 22 A.H. Tseng et al. #12;Microarray technology and the associated databasesSHORT COMMUNICATION Microarray analysis and establishment of drug screening platform using 5 Available online 5 May 2012 KEYWORDS chemoresistance; colorectal cancer; gene expression microarray Abstract

  17. Physically grounded approach for estimating gene expression from microarray data

    E-print Network

    Morimoto, Richard

    microarray technology. In spite of the 15-year history of the field, those manuscripts still describe a wide and reproducibility of microarray experiments have dogged the technology since its inception. There are two possible explanations for these shortcomings: (i) inherent limitations of the microarray technology that constrain its

  18. Novel markers for differentiation of lobular and ductal invasive breast carcinomas by laser microdissection and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Bouchal, Jan; Baumforth, Karl; Wei, Wenbin; Dziechciarkova, Marta; Ehrmann, Jiri; Klein, Jiri; Fridman, Eduard; Skarda, Jozef; Srovnal, Josef; Hajduch, Marian; Murray, Paul; Kolar, Zdenek

    2007-01-01

    Background Invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas (IDC and ILC) are the most common histological types of breast cancer. Clinical follow-up data and metastatic patterns suggest that the development and progression of these tumors are different. The aim of our study was to identify gene expression profiles of IDC and ILC in relation to normal breast epithelial cells. Methods We examined 30 samples (normal ductal and lobular cells from 10 patients, IDC cells from 5 patients, ILC cells from 5 patients) microdissected from cryosections of ten mastectomy specimens from postmenopausal patients. Fifty nanograms of total RNA were amplified and labeled by PCR and in vitro transcription. Samples were analysed upon Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The expression of seven differentially expressed genes (CDH1, EMP1, DDR1, DVL1, KRT5, KRT6, KRT17) was verified by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Expression of ASPN mRNA was validated by in situ hybridization on frozen sections, and CTHRC1, ASPN and COL3A1 were tested by PCR. Results Using GCOS pairwise comparison algorithm and rank products we have identified 84 named genes common to ILC versus normal cell types, 74 named genes common to IDC versus normal cell types, 78 named genes differentially expressed between normal ductal and lobular cells, and 28 named genes between IDC and ILC. Genes distinguishing between IDC and ILC are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, TGF-beta and Wnt signaling. These changes were present in both tumor types but appeared to be more prominent in ILC. Immunohistochemistry for several novel markers (EMP1, DVL1, DDR1) distinguished large sets of IDC from ILC. Conclusion IDC and ILC can be differentiated both at the gene and protein levels. In this study we report two candidate genes, asporin (ASPN) and collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) which might be significant in breast carcinogenesis. Besides E-cadherin, the proteins validated on tissue microarrays (EMP1, DVL1, DDR1) may represent novel immunohistochemical markers helpful in distinguishing between IDC and ILC. Further studies with larger sets of patients are needed to verify the gene expression profiles of various histological types of breast cancer in order to determine molecular subclassifications, prognosis and the optimum treatment strategies. PMID:17389037

  19. Patterns of gene expression in pig adipose tissue: transforming growth factors, interferons, interleukins and apolipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer s.c. adipose tissue (OSQ), middle s.c. adipose tissue (MSQ), ovary, uterus, hypothalamus, and pituitary tissues samples from gilts at 90, 150, and 210 d ( n =5 / age). Dye labeled cDNA probes were hybridized to custom microarrays (70 mer oligonucleotid...

  20. Gene expression profiling in developing pig adipose tissue: non-secreted regulatory proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of many genes encoding secreted and non-secreted factors have been studied in human and rodent adipose tissue with cDNA microarrays, but few such studies in adipose tissue from growing pigs have been reported. Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer subcutaneous adipose tissue...

  1. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  2. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  3. Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Cabrera, Javier

    ;4 The central dogma of molecular biology A gene is a segment of DNA whose sequence of bases (nucleotides) codes Amaratunga 1. A very brief intro to molecular biology 2. Microarrays: experimental procedure 3. Preprocessing: biological pathways and disease processes functions of specific genes and proteins drug targets

  4. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  5. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  6. Cluster analysis of microarray data Qizheng Sheng

    E-print Network

    into biological meaningful groups according to their pattern of expression. Comparing with the full data itself-organizing maps (SOM) [30]) applied to gene expression profiles were mostly developed outside biological researchCluster analysis of microarray data Qizheng Sheng , Yves Moreau§ , Frank De Smet , Kathleen Marchal

  7. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  8. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  9. PARALLEL EXPRESSION ANALYSIS USING BARLEY MICROARRAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In small grain Triticeae crops, the molecular characterization of genes coincident with disease, response to biotic or abiotic stresses, or cellular development has traditionally followed a "one-gene-at-a-time" approach. However, recent advances in microarray technology now allow the parallel inves...

  10. ANNOTATION OF THE AFFYMETRIX PORCINE GENOME MICROARRAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Affymetrix Porcine Genome Microarray is minimally annotated. Less than 10% of the probe sets on this array are described with gene names, posing a challenge to biological interpretation of data. Lack of annotation is likely due to limited availability of full-length porcine cDNA sequence. Pr...

  11. NIH Neuroscience Microarray The NIH Neuroscience Microarray Consortium is a group of four facilities chosen for their outstanding

    E-print Network

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    NIH Neuroscience Microarray Consortium The NIH Neuroscience Microarray Consortium is a group. The Consortium gives NIH-funded neuroscience researchers cost-effective access to state-of-the-art microarray, technical procedures, and data analysis techniques specific to neuroscience research · Manuscript assistance

  12. BioVLAB-Microarray: Microarray Data Analysis in Virtual Environment Youngik Yang, Jong Youl Choi, Kwangmin Choi

    E-print Network

    @indiana.edu Abstract--Microarray technology is a high-throughput experimental technique that can measure of hundreds of thousands genes simultaneously using microarray technology. Analysis of data from high- throughput microarray technology remains a big challenge in the field of bioinformatics for its huge volume

  13. microRNAs in Cancer Chemoprevention: Method to Isolate Them from Fresh Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ganci, Federica; Blandino, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs are 22-nucleotide-long double-strand small RNAs, able to modulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level, degrading mRNA and/or impairing translation. They have been shown to regulate mRNA and protein abundance and to participate in many regulatory circuits controlling developmental timing, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and stress response. Notably, microRNA activity has been correlated to the pathogenesis of cancer; they are aberrantly expressed in solid and hematological tumors, suggesting that they could function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. The emerging role of miRNAs in the carcinogenesis and tumor progression has provided opportunities for their clinical application in the capacity of cancer detection, diagnosis, and prognosis prediction. Here, we describe the experimental protocol used to isolate microRNAs from human tissues coming from head and neck, mesothelioma, and thymoma tumors in order to perform microarray and RT-qPCR experiments. PMID:26608287

  14. Methods in molecular cardiology: microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, B.; Doevendans, P.A.; Lips, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    It has become more and more evident that changes in expression levels of genes can play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. Specific gene expression profiles may explain, for example, the pathophysiology of myocardial hypertrophy and pump failure and may provide clues for therapeutic interventions. Knowledge of gene expression patterns can also be applied for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, in which differences in gene activity can be used for classification. DNA microarray technology has become the method of choice to simultaneously study the expression of many different genes in a single assay. Each microarray contains many thousands of different DNA sequences attached to a glass slide. The amount of messenger RNA, which is a measure of gene activity, is compared for each gene on the microarray by labelling the mRNA with different fluorescently labelled nucleotides (Cy3 or Cy5) for the test and reference samples. After hybridisation to the microarray the relative amounts of a particular gene transcript in the two samples can be determined by measuring the signal intensities for the fluorescent groups (Cy3 and Cy5) and calculating signal ratios. This paper describes the development of in-house microarray technology, using commercially available cDNA collections. Several technical approaches will be compared and an overview of the pitfalls and possibilities will be presented. The technology will be explained in the context of our project to determine gene expression differences between normal, hypertrophic and failing heart. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9 PMID:25696214

  15. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID:20838643

  16. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mure?an, Leila; Jacak, Jaros?aw; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  17. The Quantum of Initial Transformed Cells Potentially Modulates the Type of Local Inflammation Mechanism Elicited by Surrounding Normal Epithelial Tissues and Systemic Immune Pattern for Tumor Arrest or Progression

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Lawrence; Wang, Bo; Du, Yue; Li, Weiling; Xin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The immune/ inflammation system potentially serves to arrest, eliminate or promote tumor development. Nonetheless, factors that dictate the choice are not comprehensively known yet. Using a B16/F1 syngeneic wild type model, we evaluated the essentiality of initial transformed cells' density for overt tumor development, the molecular trends of inflammatory mediators in the normal tumor-adjacent epithelial tissues (NTAT), and how such local events may reflect systematically in the host. Overt tumors developed, within an observatory period of at least 45 days and 90 days at most, only in mice inoculated with cancer cells above a limiting threshold of 1× 103 cells. Immunoblots showed early, intense and transient presence of IL-1?, IFN-?, and both the all-thiol and disulfide forms of HMGB1 in the NTAT of non-tumor bearing mice. However, all-thiol form of HMGB1 and delayed but aberrant IL-6 expression characterized chronic inflammation in tumor bearing hosts. These local epithelial tissue events uniquely reflected in host's systemic cytokines dynamics where stable Th1/Th2 signature (IFN-?/ IL-4) coupled with early Th1 cells polarization (IL-12/ IL-4) evidenced in non-tumor hosts but highly fluctuating Th1/ Th2 profile in tumor hosts, even before tumors became overt. This hypothesizes that the physical quantum of transformed cells that may either spontaneously arise or accrue at a locus may be crucial in orchestrating the mechanism for the type of local epithelial tissue and systemic immune/ inflammatory responses essential for tumor progression or arrest. PMID:25561977

  18. The quantum of initial transformed cells potentially modulates the type of local inflammation mechanism elicited by surrounding normal epithelial tissues and systemic immune pattern for tumor arrest or progression.

    PubMed

    Owusu, Lawrence; Wang, Bo; Du, Yue; Li, Weiling; Xin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The immune/ inflammation system potentially serves to arrest, eliminate or promote tumor development. Nonetheless, factors that dictate the choice are not comprehensively known yet. Using a B16/F1 syngeneic wild type model, we evaluated the essentiality of initial transformed cells' density for overt tumor development, the molecular trends of inflammatory mediators in the normal tumor-adjacent epithelial tissues (NTAT), and how such local events may reflect systematically in the host. Overt tumors developed, within an observatory period of at least 45 days and 90 days at most, only in mice inoculated with cancer cells above a limiting threshold of 1× 10(3) cells. Immunoblots showed early, intense and transient presence of IL-1?, IFN-?, and both the all-thiol and disulfide forms of HMGB1 in the NTAT of non-tumor bearing mice. However, all-thiol form of HMGB1 and delayed but aberrant IL-6 expression characterized chronic inflammation in tumor bearing hosts. These local epithelial tissue events uniquely reflected in host's systemic cytokines dynamics where stable Th1/Th2 signature (IFN-?/ IL-4) coupled with early Th1 cells polarization (IL-12/ IL-4) evidenced in non-tumor hosts but highly fluctuating Th1/ Th2 profile in tumor hosts, even before tumors became overt. This hypothesizes that the physical quantum of transformed cells that may either spontaneously arise or accrue at a locus may be crucial in orchestrating the mechanism for the type of local epithelial tissue and systemic immune/ inflammatory responses essential for tumor progression or arrest. PMID:25561977

  19. Stroma-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor Maintains Cell Cycle Progression and Repopulation Activity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Istvánffy, Rouzanna; Vilne, Baiba; Schreck, Christina; Ruf, Franziska; Pagel, Charlotta; Grziwok, Sandra; Henkel, Lynette; Prazeres da Costa, Olivia; Berndt, Johannes; Stümpflen, Volker; Götze, Katharina S.; Schiemann, Matthias; Peschel, Christian; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are preserved in co-cultures with UG26-1B6 stromal cells or their conditioned medium. We performed a genome-wide study of gene expression changes of UG26-1B6 stromal cells in contact with Lineage? SCA-1+ KIT+ (LSK) cells. This analysis identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to be upregulated in response to LSK cells. We found that co-culture of HSCs on CTGF knockdown stroma (shCtgf) shows impaired engraftment and long-term quality. Further experiments demonstrated that CD34? CD48? CD150+ LSK (CD34? SLAM) cell numbers from shCtgf co-cultures increase in G0 and senescence and show delayed time to first cell division. To understand this observation, a CTGF signaling network model was assembled, which was experimentally validated. In co-culture experiments of CD34? SLAM cells with shCtgf stromal cells, we found that SMAD2/3-dependent signaling was activated, with increasing p27Kip1 expression and downregulating cyclin D1. Our data support the view that LSK cells modulate gene expression in the niche to maintain repopulating HSC activity. PMID:26527384

  20. Stroma-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor Maintains Cell Cycle Progression and Repopulation Activity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Istvánffy, Rouzanna; Vilne, Baiba; Schreck, Christina; Ruf, Franziska; Pagel, Charlotta; Grziwok, Sandra; Henkel, Lynette; Prazeres da Costa, Olivia; Berndt, Johannes; Stümpflen, Volker; Götze, Katharina S; Schiemann, Matthias; Peschel, Christian; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Oostendorp, Robert A J

    2015-11-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are preserved in co-cultures with UG26-1B6 stromal cells or their conditioned medium. We performed a genome-wide study of gene expression changes of UG26-1B6 stromal cells in contact with Lineage(-) SCA-1(+) KIT(+) (LSK) cells. This analysis identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to be upregulated in response to LSK cells. We found that co-culture of HSCs on CTGF knockdown stroma (shCtgf) shows impaired engraftment and long-term quality. Further experiments demonstrated that CD34(-) CD48(-) CD150(+) LSK (CD34(-) SLAM) cell numbers from shCtgf co-cultures increase in G0 and senescence and show delayed time to first cell division. To understand this observation, a CTGF signaling network model was assembled, which was experimentally validated. In co-culture experiments of CD34(-) SLAM cells with shCtgf stromal cells, we found that SMAD2/3-dependent signaling was activated, with increasing p27(Kip1) expression and downregulating cyclin D1. Our data support the view that LSK cells modulate gene expression in the niche to maintain repopulating HSC activity. PMID:26527384

  1. High tissue density of FOXP3+ T cells is associated with clinical outcome in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Flammiger, Anna; Weisbach, Lars; Huland, Hartwig; Tennstedt, Pierre; Simon, Ronald; Minner, Sarah; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Trepel, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Cell-mediated immunity may impact prostate cancer progression and has great therapeutic potential. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of the numeric density of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in prostate cancer as the presence of such cells in the tumour microenvironment has been linked to clinical outcome in other tumour entities. We detected Tregs by FOXP3 immunohistochemistry in 88.8% of 2002 prostate cancer specimens in tissue microarray format, the largest cohort so far in which Tregs have been quantified. The density of Tregs in tumour tissue was compared with pathological parameters and clinical outcome. The number of Tregs identified per 0.6mm tissue spot ranged from 1 to 10 in normal and 1 to 103 FOXP3+ cells in tumour samples. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence-free survival was significantly reduced in patients with higher numbers of Tregs (p=0.0151). Further, a higher number of intratumoural FOXP3+ Tregs was associated with a more advanced tumour stage (p=0.0355) and higher Ki67 labelling index (p<0.0001). The tissue density of Tregs was unrelated to other clinical parameters such as spread to lymph nodes, preoperative PSA level and Gleason score. Our study suggests that the intratumoural presence of regulatory T cells may have substantial functional impact and may confer an adverse clinical course in prostate cancer. PMID:23266046

  2. Microarray Meta-Analysis of RNA-Binding Protein Functions in Alternative Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Yuting; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate diverse mRNA transcripts with different 3?UTRs from the same gene. In this study, we systematically searched for the APA events with differential expression in public mouse microarray data. Hundreds of genes with over-represented differential APA events and the corresponding experiments were identified. We further revealed that global APA differential expression occurred prevalently in tissues such as brain comparing to peripheral tissues, and biological processes such as development, differentiation and immune responses. Interestingly, we also observed widespread differential APA events in RNA-binding protein (RBP) genes such as Rbm3, Eif4e2 and Elavl1. Given the fact that RBPs are considered as the main regulators of differential APA expression, we constructed a co-expression network between APAs and RBPs using the microarray data. Further incorporation of CLIP-seq data of selected RBPs showed that Nova2 represses and Mbnl1 promotes the polyadenylation of closest poly(A) sites respectively. Altogether, our study is the first microarray meta-analysis in a mammal on the regulation of APA by RBPs that integrated massive mRNA expression data under a wide-range of biological conditions. Finally, we present our results as a comprehensive resource in an online website for the research community. PMID:24622240

  3. Individual variation of adipose gene expression and identification of covariated genes by cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Stéphane; Keijer, Jaap; Franssen-Van Hal, Nicole L W; Klaus, Susanne

    2002-10-01

    Gene expression profiling through the application of microarrays provides comprehensive assessment of gene expression levels in a given tissue or cell population, as well as information on changes of gene expression in altered physiological or pathological situations. Microarrays are particularly suited to study interactions in the regulation of large numbers of different genes, since their expression is analyzed simultaneously. For improved understanding of the physiology of adipose tissue, and consequently obesity and diabetes, identification of covariability in gene expression was attempted by analysis of the individual variability of gene expression in subcutaneous white and brown fat of the Siberian dwarf hamster using microarrays containing approximately 300 cDNA fragments of adipose genes. No sex-dependant variability in gene expression could be found, and overall individual variability was rather low, with more than 80% of clones showing a coefficient of variation lower than 30%. Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) displayed a high variability of gene expression in brown fat, which was negatively correlated with the gene expression of complement factor B (FactB), implying a possible functional relationship. PMID:12361988

  4. Rapid Characterization of Candidate Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer Using Cell Microarrays (CMAs)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Sik; Kuppireddy, Sarada V.; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Singal, Mukul; Getnet, Derese; Harsha, H. C.; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Jacob, Harrys K. C.; Kashyap, Manoj K.; Tankala, Shantal G.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Goggins, Michael G.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    Tissue microarrays have become a valuable tool for high-throughput analysis using immunohistochemical labeling. However, the large majority of biochemical studies are carried out in cell lines to further characterize candidate biomarkers or therapeutic targets with subsequent studies in animals or using primary tissues. Thus, cell line-based microarrays could be a useful screening tool in some situations. Here, we constructed a cell microarray (CMA) containing a panel of 40 pancreatic cancer cell lines available from American Type Culture Collection in addition to those locally available at Johns Hopkins. As proof of principle, we performed immunocytochemical labeling of an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM), a molecule generally expressed in the epithelium, on this pancreatic cancer CMA. In addition, selected molecules that have been previously shown to be differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer in the literature were validated. For example, we observed strong labeling of CA19-9 antigen, a prognostic and predictive marker for pancreatic cancer. We also carried out a bioinformatics analysis of a literature curated catalog of pancreatic cancer biomarkers developed previously by our group and identified two candidate biomarkers, HLA class I and transmembrane protease, serine 4 (TMPRSS4), and examined their expression in the cell lines represented on the pancreatic cancer CMAs. Our results demonstrate the utility of CMAs as a useful resource for rapid screening of molecules of interest and suggest that CMAs can become a universal standard platform in cancer research. PMID:22985314

  5. Investigating the biochemical progression of liver disease through fibrosis, cirrhosis, dysplasia, and hepatocellular carcinoma using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhar, Hari; Pant, Mamta; Ronquillo, Nemencio R.; Davidson, Bennett; Nguyen, Peter; Chennuri, Rohini; Choi, Jacqueline; Herrera, Joaquin A.; Hinojosa, Ana C.; Jin, Ming; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Walsh, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of primary hepatic carcinoma. HCC ranks the fourth most prevalent malignant tumor and the third leading cause of cancer related death in the world. Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in the context of chronic liver disease and its evolution is characterized by progression through intermediate stages to advanced disease and possibly even death. The primary sequence of hepatocarcinogenesis includes the development of cirrhosis, followed by dysplasia, and hepatocellular carcinoma.1 We addressed the utility of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging, both as a diagnostic tool of the different stages of the disease and to gain insight into the biochemical process associated with disease progression. Tissue microarrays were obtained from the University of Illinois at Chicago tissue bank consisting of liver explants from 12 transplant patients. Tissue core biopsies were obtained from each explant targeting regions of normal, liver cell dysplasia including large cell change and small cell change, and hepatocellular carcinoma. We obtained FT-IR images of these tissues using a modified FT-IR system with high definition capabilities. Firstly, a supervised spectral classifier was built to discriminate between normal and cancerous hepatocytes. Secondly, an expanded classifier was built to discriminate small cell and large cell changes in liver disease. With the emerging advances in FT-IR instrumentation and computation there is a strong drive to develop this technology as a powerful adjunct to current histopathology approaches to improve disease diagnosis and prognosis.

  6. Role of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) in generating an aerobic metabolic phenotype and in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Airley, R E; McHugh, P; Evans, A R; Harris, B; Winchester, L; Buffa, F M; Al-Tameemi, W; Leek, R; Harris, A L

    2014-01-01

    Background: The lipogenic transcription factor carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) may play a key role in malignant progression of breast cancer by allowing metabolic adaptations to take place in response to changes in oxygenation. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis of ChREBP was carried out in human breast tumour tissue microarrays representative of malignant progression from normal breast through to metastatic cancer. The ChREBP protein and mRNA expressions were then analysed in a series of breast cancers for correlative analysis with common and breast-specific hypoxia signatures, and survival. Results: In invasive ductal carcinoma, ChREBP correlated significantly with mean ‘downregulated' hypoxia scores (r=0.3, P<0.015, n=67) and in two distinct breast progression arrays, ChREBP protein also increased with malignant progression (P<0.001). However, bioinformatic analysis of a large data set (2136 cases) revealed an apparent reversal in the relationship between ChREBP mRNA level and clinical outcome – not only being significantly correlated with increased survival (log rank P<0.001), but also downregulated in malignant tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Conclusion: The ChREBP expression may be reflective of an aerobic metabolic phenotype that may conflict with hypoxia-induced signalling but provide a mechanism for growth at the oxygenated edge of the tumours. PMID:24366300

  7. Detection of pathogenic Vibrio spp. in shellfish by using multiplex PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R; Krug, Melissa J; Bej, Asim K

    2004-12-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50 degrees C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  8. Combined mass quantitation and phenotyping of intact extracellular vesicles by a microarray platform.

    PubMed

    Gagni, Paola; Cretich, Marina; Benussi, Luisa; Tonoli, Elisa; Ciani, Miriam; Ghidoni, Roberta; Santini, Benedetta; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Prosperi, Davide; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    The interest towards extracellular vesicles (EVs) has grown exponentially over the last few years; being involved in intercellular communication and serving as reservoirs for biomarkers for tumors, they have a great potential for liquid biopsy development, possibly replacing many costly and invasive tissue biopsies. Here we propose, for the first time, the use of a Si/SiO2 interferometric, microarray platform for multiparametric intact EVs analysis combining label-free EVs mass quantitation and high sensitivity fluorescence based phenotyping. Label free interferometric measurement allows to quantify the amount of vesicles captured by printed antibodies while, on the same chip, EVs are also detected by fluorescence in a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method simultaneously detects, quantify and phenotype intact EVs in a microarray format. PMID:26703266

  9. Microarray Technology and Its Applications for Detecting Plasma microRNA Biomarkers in Digestive Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Hirotaka; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Arita, Tomohiro; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Many cancers are known to be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), and the relationships between tissue miRNA expression levels and the amounts of miRNA circulating in the plasma (or plasma miRNA) have been examined in many types of cancers, including digestive tract cancers. The role of plasma miRNAs has yet to be elucidated in detail; therefore a comprehensive analysis of plasma miRNAs using microarrays should assist in establishing the utility of liquid biopsy or companion diagnosis. We here described the 3D-Gene(®) miRNA microarray (TORAY) currently used in our laboratory and introduced a trial application in digestive tract cancer diagnosis. PMID:26614071

  10. A study of performance on microarray data sets for a classifier based on information theoretic learning.

    PubMed

    Porto-Díaz, Iago; Bolón-Canedo, Verónica; Alonso-Betanzos, Amparo; Fontenla-Romero, Oscar

    2011-10-01

    Gene-expression microarray is a novel technology that allows the examination of tens of thousands of genes at a time. For this reason, manual observation is not feasible and machine learning methods are progressing to face these new data. Specifically, since the number of genes is very high, feature selection methods have proven valuable to deal with these unbalanced-high dimensionality and low cardinality-data sets. In this work, the FVQIT (Frontier Vector Quantization using Information Theory) classifier is employed to classify twelve DNA gene-expression microarray data sets of different kinds of cancer. A comparative study with other well-known classifiers is performed. The proposed approach shows competitive results outperforming all other classifiers. PMID:21703822

  11. Laser capture microdissection of embryonic cells and preparation of RNA for microarray assays.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Latasha C; Pang, Christopher J; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L; Lloyd, Joyce A

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice-isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure(®) LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  12. Expression Pattern of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Renal Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Meiling; Li, Pu; Ju, Xiaobing; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shuang; Cao, Qiang; Lu, Qiang; Li, Jie; Shao, Pengfei; Meng, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent large-scale transcriptome analyses have found large numbers of transcripts, including that of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are aberrant in various diseases, especially cancers. However, it is not clear whether lncRNAs are involved specifically in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We investigated the expression patterns of lncRNAs in five RCC tumor samples (T) relative to those of matched adjacent non-tumor tissues (N) via microarray. Methods A microarray with 33,045 lncRNA probes and 30,215 mRNA probes was used to identify deregulated lncRNAs in five RCC patients. Furthermore, we confirmed the relative expression levels of AK096725 and ENST00000453068 in 70 paired samples by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results The lncRNA microarray revealed 27,279 lncRNAs in RCC samples, of which 480 were significantly upregulated (P<0.05; T/N>1.5) and 417 were significantly downregulated (P<0.05; N/T>1.5) compared with the matched non-tumor samples. In addition, 19,995 mRNAs were detected, of which 458 were significantly upregulated (P<0.05; T/N>1.5) and 413 were significantly downregulated (P<0.05; N/T>1.5). The expression level changes of AK096725 (P?=?0.043) and ENST00000453068 (P<0.001) in 70 paired samples were in accord with the microarray data. Conclusions The study uncovered expression patterns of lncRNAs in 5 RCC patients, as well as a number of aberrant lncRNAs and mRNAs in tumor samples compared with the non-tumor tissues. The revelation of an association between AK096725 expression and RCC is especially noteworthy. These findings may help to find new biomarkers in RCC. PMID:24905231

  13. Laser Capture Microdissection of Embryonic Cells and Preparation of RNA for Microarray Assays

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Latasha C.; Pang, Christopher J.; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice–isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure® LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  14. [Undifferentiated connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Bodolay, Edit; Szegedi, Gyula

    2009-05-10

    Evolution of immunopathological diseases is usually slow and progressive. Non-differentiated collagen disease (NDC) or the term "undifferentiated connective tissue disease" (UCTD) represents a stage of disease where clinical symptoms and serological abnormalities suggest autoimmune disease, but they are not sufficient to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of any well-established connective tissue disease (CTD) such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/ dermatomyositis (PM/DM) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 30-40 percent of patients presenting undifferentiated profile develops and reaches the stage of a well defined systemic autoimmune disease during five years follow up, while 60 percent remains in an undifferentiated stage.In the stage of NDC, immunoregulatory abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction are present. In conclusion, NDC represents a dynamic state, and it is important to recognize the possibility of a progression to a definite systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:19403430

  15. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  16. Immobilization Techniques for Microarray: Challenges and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Song, Keumsoo; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2014-01-01

    The highly programmable positioning of molecules (biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanobeads, nanocomposites materials) on surfaces has potential applications in the fields of biosensors, biomolecular electronics, and nanodevices. However, the conventional techniques including self-assembled monolayers fail to position the molecules on the nanometer scale to produce highly organized monolayers on the surface. The present article elaborates different techniques for the immobilization of the biomolecules on the surface to produce microarrays and their diagnostic applications. The advantages and the drawbacks of various methods are compared. This article also sheds light on the applications of the different technologies for the detection and discrimination of viral/bacterial genotypes and the detection of the biomarkers. A brief survey with 115 references covering the last 10 years on the biological applications of microarrays in various fields is also provided. PMID:25429408

  17. Application of DNA Microarray to Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2016-01-01

    Microarray-based technology to conduct array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has made a significant impact on the diagnosis of human genetic diseases. Such diagnoses, previously undetectable by traditional G-banding chromosome analysis, are now achieved by identifying genomic copy number variants (CNVs) using the microarray. Not only can hundreds of well-characterized genetic syndromes be detected in a single assay, but new genomic disorders and disease-causing genes can also be discovered through the utilization of aCGH technology. Although other platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays can be used for detecting CNVs, in this chapter we focus on describing the methods for performing aCGH using Agilent oligonucleotide arrays for both prenatal (e.g., amniotic fluid and chorionic villus sample) and postnatal samples (e.g., blood). PMID:26614072

  18. Contrasting breast cancer molecular subtypes across serial tumor progression stages: biological and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Kimbung, Siker; Kovács, Anikó; Danielsson, Anna; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Lövgren, Kristina; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Tobin, Nicholas P; Lindström, Linda; Bergh, Jonas; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Fernö, Mĺrten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-10-20

    The relevance of the intrinsic subtypes for clinical management of metastatic breast cancer is not comprehensively established. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic significance of drifts in tumor molecular subtypes during breast cancer progression. A well-annotated cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Tissue microarrays of primary tumors and synchronous lymph node metastases were constructed. Conventional biomarkers were centrally assessed and molecular subtypes were assigned following the 2013 St Gallen guidelines. Fine-needle aspirates of asynchronous metastases were transcriptionally profiled and subtyped using PAM50. Discordant expression of individual biomarkers and molecular subtypes was observed during tumor progression. Primary luminal-like tumors were relatively unstable, frequently adopting a more aggressive subtype in the metastases. Notably, loss of ER expression and a luminal to non-luminal subtype conversion was associated with an inferior post-recurrence survival. In addition, ER and molecular subtype assessed at all tumor progression stages were independent prognostic factors for post-recurrence breast cancer mortality in multivariable analyses. Our results demonstrate that drifts in tumor molecular subtypes may occur during tumor progression, conferring adverse consequences on outcome following breast cancer relapse. PMID:26375671

  19. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Kocaba?, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  20. Microarray analysis in gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Giovanna; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Ojetti, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. Although several treatment options have been developed, the mortality rate is increasing. Lymph node involvement is considered the most reliable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Early diagnosis improves the survival rate of patients and increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The most reliable diagnostic method is endoscopic examination, however, it is expensive and not feasible in poorer countries. Therefore, many innovative techniques have been studied to develop a new non-invasive screening test and to identify specific serum biomarkers. DNA microarray analysis is one of the new technologies able to measure the expression levels of a large number of genes simultaneously. It is possible to define the gene expression profile of the tumor and to correlate it with the prognosis and metastasis formation. Several studies in the literature have been published on the role of microarray analysis in gastric cancer and the mechanisms of proliferation and metastasis formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the importance of microarray analysis and its clinical applications to better define the genetic characteristics of gastric cancer and its possible implications in a more decisive treatment. PMID:25232233

  1. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  2. Probe Design Strategies for Oligonucleotide Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Nicolas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Mahul, Antoine; Peyret, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays have been widely used for gene detection and/or quantification of gene expression in various samples ranging from a single organism to a complex microbial assemblage. The success of a microarray experiment, however, strongly relies on the quality of designed probes. Consequently, probe design is of critical importance and therefore multiple parameters should be considered for each probe in order to ensure high specificity, sensitivity, and uniformity as well as potentially quantitative power. Moreover, to assess the complete gene repertoire of complex biological samples such as those studied in the field of microbial ecology, exploratory probe design strategies must be also implemented to target not-yet-described sequences. To design such probes, two algorithms, KASpOD and HiSpOD, have been developed and they are available via two user-friendly web services. Here, we describe the use of this software necessary for the design of highly effective probes especially in the context of microbial oligonucleotide microarrays by taking into account all the crucial parameters. PMID:26614069

  3. Systems-wide chicken DNA microarrays, gene expression profiling, and discovery of functional genes.

    PubMed

    Cogburn, L A; Wang, X; Carre, W; Rejto, L; Porter, T E; Aggrey, S E; Simon, J

    2003-06-01

    The goal of our current consortium project is to launch a new era--functional genomics of poultry--by providing genomic resources [expressed sequence tags (EST) and DNA microarrays] and by examining global gene expression in target tissues of chickens. DNA microarray analysis has been a fruitful strategy for the identification of functional genes in several model organisms (i.e., human, rodents, fruit fly, etc.). We have constructed and normalized five tissue-specific or multiple-tissue chicken cDNA libraries [liver, fat, breast, and leg muscle/epiphyseal growth plate, pituitary/hypothalamus/pineal, and reproductive tract (oviduct/ovary/testes)] for high-throughput DNA sequencing of EST. DNA sequence clustering was used to build contigs of overlapping sequence and to identify unique, non-redundant EST clones (unigenes), which permitted printing of systems-wide chicken DNA microarrays. One of the most promising genetic resources for gene exploration and functional gene mapping is provided by two sets of experimental lines of broiler-type chickens developed at INRA, France, by divergent selection for extremes in growth traits (fast-growing versus slow-growing; fatness versus leanness at a similar growth rate). We are using DNA microarrays for global gene expression profiling to identify candidate genes and to map growth, metabolic, and regulatory pathways that control important production traits. Candidate genes will be used for functional gene mapping and QTL analysis of F2 progeny from intercrosses made between divergent genetic lines (fat x lean lines; fast-growing x slow-growing lines). Using our first chicken liver microarray, we have already identified several interesting differentially expressed genes in commercial broilers and in divergently selected broiler lines. Many of these candidate genes are involved in the lipogenic pathway and are controlled in part by the thyrotropic axis. Thus, genome-wide transcriptional profiling is a powerful tool used to visualize the cascade of genetic circuits that govern complex biological responses. Global gene expression profiling and QTL scans should enable us to functionally map the genetic pathways that control growth, development, and metabolism of chickens. This emerging technology will have broad applications for poultry breeding programs (i.e., use of molecular markers) and for future production systems (i.e., the health and welfare of birds and the quality of poultry products). PMID:12817449

  4. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant virus. The microarray described in this work should help in understanding the etiology of gastroenteritis in humans and animals. PMID:25355758

  5. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant virus. The microarray described in this work should help in understanding the etiology of gastroenteritis in humans and animals. PMID:25355758

  6. Chemokine CXCL13 is overexpressed in the tumour tissue and in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Panse, J; Friedrichs, K; Marx, A; Hildebrandt, Y; Luetkens, T; Bartels, K; Horn, C; Stahl, T; Cao, Y; Milde-Langosch, K; Niendorf, A; Kröger, N; Wenzel, S; Leuwer, R; Bokemeyer, C; Hegewisch-Becker, S; Atanackovic, D

    2008-01-01

    The abilities of chemokines in orchestrating cellular migration are utilised by different (patho-)biological networks including malignancies. However, except for CXCR4/CXCL12, little is known about the relation between tumour-related chemokine expression and the development and progression of solid tumours like breast cancer. In this study, microarray analyses revealed the overexpression of chemokine CXCL13 in breast cancer specimens. This finding was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in a larger set of samples (n=34) and cell lines, and was validated on the protein level performing Western blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry. Levels of CXCR5, the receptor for CXCL13, were low in malignant and healthy breast tissues, and surface expression was not detected in vitro. However, we observed a strong (P=0.0004) correlation between the expressions of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in breast cancer tissues, indicating a biologically relevant role of CXCR5 in vivo. Finally, we detected significantly elevated serum concentrations of CXCL13 in patients with metastatic disease (n=54) as compared with controls (n=44) and disease-free patients (n=48). In conclusion, CXCL13 is overexpressed within breast cancer tissues, and increased serum levels of this cytokine can be found in breast cancer patients with metastatic disease pointing to a role of CXCL13 in the progression of breast cancer, suggesting that CXCL13 might serve as a useful therapeutic target and/or diagnostic marker in this malignancy. PMID:18781150

  7. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue ...

  8. Re-Annotator: Annotation Pipeline for Microarray Probe Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Röh, Simone; Altmann, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are established approaches for high throughput gene expression, methylation and genotyping analysis. An accurate mapping of the array probes is essential to generate reliable biological findings. However, manufacturers of the microarray platforms typically provide incomplete and outdated annotation tables, which often rely on older genome and transcriptome versions that differ substantially from up-to-date sequence databases. Here, we present the Re-Annotator, a re-annotation pipeline for microarray probe sequences. It is primarily designed for gene expression microarrays but can also be adapted to other types of microarrays. The Re-Annotator uses a custom-built mRNA reference database to identify the positions of gene expression array probe sequences. We applied Re-Annotator to the Illumina Human-HT12 v4 microarray platform and found that about one quarter (25%) of the probes differed from the manufacturer’s annotation. In further computational experiments on experimental gene expression data, we compared Re-Annotator to another probe re-annotation tool, ReMOAT, and found that Re-Annotator provided an improved re-annotation of microarray probes. A thorough re-annotation of probe information is crucial to any microarray analysis. The Re-Annotator pipeline is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/reannotator along with re-annotated files for Illumina microarrays HumanHT-12 v3/v4 and MouseRef-8 v2. PMID:26426330

  9. Identification and Validation of a Potential Marker of Tissue Quality Using Gene Expression Analysis of Human Colorectal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Nicole; Unger, Florian T.; Schöppler, Monika; Pursche, Katja; Juhl, Hartmut; David, Kerstin A.

    2015-01-01

    Correlative studies have identified numerous biomarkers that are individualizing therapy across many medical specialties, including oncology. Accurate interpretation of these studies requires the collection of tissue samples of sufficient quality. Tissue quality can be measured by changes in levels of gene expression and can be influenced by many factors including pre-analytical conditions, ischemic effects and the surgical collection procedure itself. However, as yet there are no reliable biomarkers of tissue quality at researchers’ disposal. The aim of the current study was to identify genes with expression patterns that fluctuated reproducibly in response to typical post-surgical stress (ischemia) in order to identify a specific marker of tissue quality. All tissue samples were obtained from patients with primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (N = 40) either via colonoscopy prior to surgery, or by surgical resection. Surgically resected tissue samples were divided into three groups and subjected to cold ischemia for 10, 20 or 45 minutes. Normal colorectal tissue and CRC tissue was analyzed using microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Comparing changes in gene expression between pre- and post-surgical tissue using microarray analysis identified a list of potential tissue quality biomarkers and this list was validated using qPCR. Results revealed that post-operative ischemia significantly alters gene expression in normal and CRC tissue samples. Both microarray analysis and qPCR revealed regulator of G-protein signaling 1 (RGS1) as a potential marker of CRC tissue quality and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EEF1A1) as a potential reference gene of post-operative tissue quality. Larger studies with additional time points and endpoints will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:26222051

  10. Identification and functional analysis of light-responsive unique or paralogous gene family members in rice using a near genomic gene microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a NSF45K-gene-microarray, we performed expression-profiling experiments on 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue to identify mutants of light-responsive genes. We identified 356 genes that were at least 8-fold light induced genes at FDR of 1.00E-06. Then, we screened rice T-DNA i...

  11. A New Way to Introduce Microarray Technology in a Lecture/Laboratory Setting by Studying the Evolution of This Modern Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland-Goldsmith, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray is an ordered grid containing known sequences of DNA, which represent many of the genes in a particular organism. Each DNA sequence is unique to a specific gene. This technology enables the researcher to screen many genes from cells or tissue grown in different conditions. We developed an undergraduate lecture and laboratory…

  12. Histopathology of melanosis coli and determination of its associated genes by comparative analysis of expression microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-?n; Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Shu-?ian; Liu, Hai-Rong; Xu, Jin-Mei; Gao, Long; Yu, Xian-Jing; Li, Xiao-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Melanosis coli (MC) refers to the condition characterized by abnormal brown or black pigmentation deposits on the colonic mucosa. However, the histopathological findings and genes associated with the pathogenesis of melanosis coli remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the histopathological features and differentially expressed genes of MC. This involved performing hematoxylin and eosin staining, specific staining and immunohistochemistry on tissues sections, which were isolated from patients diagnosed with MC. DNA expression microarray analysis, western blotting and immunofluorescence assays were performed to analyze the differentially expressed genes of melanosis coli. The results demonstrated that the pigment deposits in MC consisted of lipofuscin. A TUNEL assay revealed that a substantial number of apoptotic cells were present within the macrophages and superficial lamina propria of the colonic epithelium. Expression microarray analysis revealed that the significantly downregulated genes were CYP3A4, CYP3A7, UGT2B11 and UGT2B15 in melanosis coli. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays indicated that the expression of CYP3A4 in the normal tissue was higher than in the MC tissue. The results of the present study provided a comprehensive description of the histopathological characteristics and pathogenesis of MC and for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, demonstrated that the cytochrome P450?associated genes were significantly downregulated in melanosis coli. This novel information can be used to assist in further investigations of melanosis coli. PMID:26238215

  13. Histopathology of melanosis coli and determination of its associated genes by comparative analysisof expression microarrays

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAO-AN; ZHOU, YAN; ZHOU, SHU-XIAN; LIU, HAI-RONG; XU, JIN-MEI; GAO, LONG; YU, XIAN-JING; LI, XIAO-HUI

    2015-01-01

    Melanosis coli (MC) refers to the condition characterized by abnormal brown or black pigmentation deposits on the colonic mucosa. However, the histopathological findings and genes associated with the pathogenesis of melanosis coli remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the histopathological features and differentially expressed genes of MC. This involved performing hematoxylin and eosin staining, specific staining and immunohistochemistry on tissues sections, which were isolated from patients diagnosed with MC. DNA expression microarray analysis, western blotting and immunofluorescence assays were performed to analyze the differentially expressed genes of melanosis coli. The results demonstrated that the pigment deposits in MC consisted of lipofuscin. A TUNEL assay revealed that a substantial number of apoptotic cells were present within the macrophages and superficial lamina propria of the colonic epithelium. Expression microarray analysis revealed that the significantly downregulated genes were CYP3A4, CYP3A7, UGT2B11 and UGT2B15 in melanosis coli. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays indicated that the expression of CYP3A4 in the normal tissue was higher than in the MC tissue. The results of the present study provided a comprehensive description of the histopathological characteristics and pathogenesis of MC and for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, demonstrated that the cytochrome P450-associated genes were significantly downregulated in melanosis coli. This novel information can be used to assist in further investigations of melanosis coli. PMID:26238215

  14. TissueInfo: high-throughput identification of tissue expression profiles and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Skrabanek, Lucy; Campagne, Fabien

    2001-01-01

    We describe TissueInfo, a knowledge-based method for the high-throughput identification of tissue expression profiles and tissue specificity. TissueInfo defines a set of tissue information calculations that can be computed for large numbers of genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) or proteins. Tissue information records that result from the TissueInfo calculations are used to generate tables suitable for data mining and for the selection of genes according to a given expression profile or specificity. When benchmarked against a test set of 116 proteins and literature information, TissueInfo was found to be accurate for 69% of identified tissue specificities and for 80% of expression profiles. The accuracy of the identifications can be increased if query sequences for which little information is available from dbEST are ignored. Thus, with 80% coverage, TissueInfo achieves an accuracy of 76% for specificity and 89% for expression. For the same set of proteins, the curated tissue specificity offered in SWISS-PROT was accurate in 78% of cases. TissueInfo can be useful for the selection of clones for custom microarrays, selection of training sets for ab initio identification of tissue information, gene discovery and genome-wide predictions. Further information about the program can be found at http://icb.mssm.edu/tissueinfo. PMID:11691939

  15. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  16. Comparing the Performance of Clusters, Hadoop, and Active Disks on Microarray Correlation

    E-print Network

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    is pairwise correlation. However, the high resolution of today's microarray technology requiresComparing the Performance of Clusters, Hadoop, and Active Disks on Microarray Correlation Corporation Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo Abstract--Microarray-based comparative

  17. Empirical Bayes ranking and selection methods via semiparametric hierarchical mixture models in microarray studies.

    PubMed

    Noma, Hisashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2013-05-20

    The main purpose of microarray studies is screening of differentially expressed genes as candidates for further investigation. Because of limited resources in this stage, prioritizing genes are relevant statistical tasks in microarray studies. For effective gene selections, parametric empirical Bayes methods for ranking and selection of genes with largest effect sizes have been proposed (Noma et al., 2010; Biostatistics 11: 281-289). The hierarchical mixture model incorporates the differential and non-differential components and allows information borrowing across differential genes with separation from nuisance, non-differential genes. In this article, we develop empirical Bayes ranking methods via a semiparametric hierarchical mixture model. A nonparametric prior distribution, rather than parametric prior distributions, for effect sizes is specified and estimated using the "smoothing by roughening" approach of Laird and Louis (1991; Computational statistics and data analysis 12: 27-37). We present applications to childhood and infant leukemia clinical studies with microarrays for exploring genes related to prognosis or disease progression. PMID:23281021

  18. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  19. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  20. COMMENT Linking probe thermodynamics to microarray quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuzhao; Pozhitkov, Alexander; Brouwer, Marius

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the difference in probe properties holds the key to absolute quantification of DNA microarrays. So far, Langmuir-like models have failed to link sequence-specific properties to hybridization signals in the presence of a complex hybridization background. Data from washing experiments indicate that the post-hybridization washing has no major effect on the specifically bound targets, which give the final signals. Thus, the amount of specific targets bound to probes is likely determined before washing, by the competition against nonspecific binding. Our competitive hybridization model is a viable alternative to Langmuir-like models.

  1. Microarray analysis of metallothioneins in human diseases-A review.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Kepinska, Marta; Emri, Gabriella; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Tmejova, Katerina; Nerudova, Danuse; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs), low molecular mass cysteine-rich proteins, which are able to bind up to 20 monovalent and up to 7 divalent heavy metal ions are widely studied due to their functions in detoxification of metals, scavenging free radicals and cells protection against the oxidative stress. It was found that the loss of the protective effects of MT leads to an escalation of pathogenic processes and carcinogenesis. The most extensive area is MTs expression for oncological applications, where the information about gene patterns is helpful for the identification biological function, resistance to drugs and creating the correct chemotherapy. In other medical applications the effect of oxidative stress to cell lines exposed to heavy metals and hydrogen peroxide is studied as well as influence of drugs and cytokines on MTs expression and MTs expression in the adipose tissue. The precise detection of low metallothionein concentrations and its isoforms is necessary to understand the connection between quantity and isoforms of MTs to size, localization and type of cancer. This information is necessary for well-timed therapy and increase the chance to survival. Microarray chips appear as good possibility for finding all information about expression of MTs genes and isoforms not only in cancer, but also in other diseases, especially diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, ageing, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders and as the effects of toxic drugs and pollutants, which is discussed in this review. PMID:26454339

  2. Microarray analysis of distinct gene transcription profiles in non-eosinophilic chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Spencer C.; Han, Joseph K.; Huyett, Phillip; Negri, Julie; Kropf, Elizabeth Z.; Borish, Larry; Steinke, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent literature has indicated the feasibility of microarray analysis in the characterization of chronic sinusitis. We hypothesized that previously unexplored inflammatory mechanisms would be involved in the pathophysiology of noneosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (NE-CRSwNP) and that this technology could be used to identify the gene expression of these novel and previously known mediators. Methods Patients with CRSwNP failing medical therapy were prospectively enrolled and NP tissue was removed at time of surgery. NE-CRSwNP was diagnosed based on clinical parameters including absence of allergic disease and confirmed with histopathology showing lack of eosinophilic infiltration. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts extracted from study and control patients were then subjected to microarray analysis using Affymatrix based chips. Validation of findings was then confirmed via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Microarray analysis revealed activation of pathways involved in antigen presentation, cellular movement, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, apoptosis, and cell signaling. Previously unexplored genes of interest were identified and their differential regulation was validated via qRT-PCR. Our data showed up-regulation of innate inflammation genes (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), hypoxia-induced inflammation 1?, and fibrosis (tenascin) and lack of up-regulation of genes associated with allergic, eosinophilic inflammation (IL-4 and IL-13). Additionally, the genes for CXCL1 and autocrine motility factor receptor were novelly identified to be up-regulated Conclusion This study explores the utility of gene microarray technology in identifying unexplored targets of immune dysregulation in NE-CRSwNP. Furthermore, the data characterize the immunologic profile of NE-CRSwNP as it differs from other forms of CRSwNP, in particular, those known to be associated with eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:19178793

  3. Design and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Mehlen, André; Vetter, Guillaume; Yatskou, Mikalai; Muller, Arnaud; Chalmel, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier; Friederich, Evelyne; Vallar, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI) allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that Actichip is a powerful alternative to commercial high density microarrays for cytoskeleton gene profiling in normal or pathological samples. Actichip is available upon request. PMID:17727702

  4. Induction in myeloid leukemic cells of genes that are expressed in different normal tissues

    E-print Network

    Domany, Eytan

    that are expressed in different normal tissues and how expression of such genes can be regulated under differentInduction in myeloid leukemic cells of genes that are expressed in different normal tissues Joseph Contributed by Leo Sachs, September 20, 2004 Using DNA microarray and cluster analysis of expressed genes

  5. Transcription Networks, Microarray Chips and Sparse Linear Methods

    E-print Network

    Hernández Lobato, José Miguel

    of these steps. However, transcriptional control is the most common regulatory mechanism. 2 Gene Expression GeneTranscription Networks, Microarray Chips and Sparse Linear Methods Jos´e Miguel Hern´andez Lobato Abstract This paper is an introduction to some basic concepts on transcription networks, microarray chips

  6. Experimental Approaches to Microarray Analysis of Tumor Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furge, Laura Lowe; Winter, Michael B.; Meyers, Jacob I.; Furge, Kyle A.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive measurement of gene expression using high-density nucleic acid arrays (i.e. microarrays) has become an important tool for investigating the molecular differences in clinical and research samples. Consequently, inclusion of discussion in biochemistry, molecular biology, or other appropriate courses of microarray technologies has…

  7. Graphical Modeling Based Gene Interaction Analysis for Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yongge

    -gene interactions. We have constructed a prototype system that permits rapid interactive exploration of gene.org ABSTRACT DNA Microarray provides a powerful basis for analysis of gene expression. Data mining methods, Microarray Data Analysis 1. INTRODUCTION With the completion of the human DNA sequence as part of the Human

  8. Detailed insights from microarray and crystallographic studies into carbohydrate

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    Detailed insights from microarray and crystallographic studies into carbohydrate recognition of the parasite can be explained by carbohydrate microarray screening analyses that have demonstrated the ability of TgMIC1 to 2-3- and 2-6-linked sialyl carbohydrates. Interestingly, two novel synthetic fluorinated

  9. Selecting Informative Genes from Microarray Dataset by Incorporating Gene Ontology

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    Selecting Informative Genes from Microarray Dataset by Incorporating Gene Ontology Xian Xu Aidong 14224, USA xianxu,azhang@cse.buffalo.edu Abstract Selecting informative genes from microarray experi, namely large num- ber of genes and limited number of samples, the statistical soundness of gene selection

  10. Electrodeposition of Polydopamine Thin Films for DNA Patterning and Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Electrodeposition of Polydopamine Thin Films for DNA Patterning and Microarrays Gabriel Loget, the application of electrodeposited PDA thin films to fabricate ssDNA microarrays is reported using SPR imaging electrodes and used for attaching amino-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). After hybridization

  11. Estimating Dataset Size Requirements for Classifying DNA Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Estimating Dataset Size Requirements for Classifying DNA Microarray Data S. Mukherjee*+#1 , P methodology for estimating dataset size requirements for classifying microarray data using learning curves is introduced. The goal is to use existing classification results to estimate dataset size requirements

  12. Compressed Sensing DNA Microarrays ECE, Rice University TREE0706

    E-print Network

    Compressed Sensing DNA Microarrays ECE, Rice University TREE0706 Mona A. Sheikh, Olgica Milenkovic Sensing (CS) - a Compressed Sensing Microarray - would require fewer "intelligently chosen" sensors to identify the same number of organisms [2]. Compressed sensing is an emerging signal-processing technique

  13. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been developed for the study of various aspects of Salmonella, which is a model system for investigating pathogenesis. Microarrays were used to analyze the gene expression of Salmonella in various environments that mimic the host environment and these studies have helped to elucidat...

  14. Application of Statistical Learning Theory to DNA Microarray Analysis

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Application of Statistical Learning Theory to DNA Microarray Analysis by Sayan Mukherjee B INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY July 2001 c Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2001. All rights reserved. Author Learning Theory to DNA Microarray Analysis by Sayan Mukherjee Submitted to the Department of Brain Sciences

  15. Introduction to Statistical Methods for Microarray Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Giraud, Christophe

    Introduction to Statistical Methods for Microarray Data Analysis T. Mary-Huard, F. Picard, S. Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 A new technology for transcriptome studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 The potential of transcriptome studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 The basis of microarray

  16. The Importance of Normalization on Large and Heterogeneous Microarray Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA microarray technology is a powerful functional genomics tool increasingly used for investigating global gene expression in environmental studies. Microarrays can also be used in identifying biological networks, as they give insight on the complex gene-to-gene interactions, ne...

  17. Robotic spotting of cDNA and oligonucleotide microarrays

    E-print Network

    Kreil, David

    Robotic spotting of cDNA and oligonucleotide microarrays Richard P. Auburn1 , David P. Kreil1 recent techno- logical advances with a focus on spotted arrays. Robotic spotting still poses numerous popular one, micro- arrays for gene expression analysis. Microarrays can be manufactured using robotic

  18. Stable Gene Selection from Microarray Data via Sample Weighting

    E-print Network

    Yu, Lei

    Stable Gene Selection from Microarray Data via Sample Weighting Lei Yu, Yue Han, and Michael E. Berens Abstract--Feature selection from gene expression microarray data is a widely used technique for selecting candidate genes in various cancer studies. Besides predictive ability of the selected genes

  19. Modeling background intensity in DNA microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K. M.; Barkema, G. T.; Carlon, E.

    2008-06-01

    DNA microarrays are devices that are able, in principle, to detect and quantify the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences in complex biological mixtures. The measurement consists in detecting fluorescence signals from several spots on the microarray surface onto which different probe sequences are grafted. One of the problems of the data analysis is that the signal contains a noisy background component due to nonspecific binding. We present a physical model for background estimation in Affymetrix Genechips. It combines two different approaches. The first is based on the sequence composition, specifically its sequence-dependent hybridization affinity. The second is based on the strong correlation of intensities from locations which are the physical neighbors of a specific spot on the chip. Both effects are incorporated in a background estimator which contains 24 free parameters, fixed by minimization on a training data set. In all data analyzed the sequence-specific parameters, obtained by minimization, are found to strongly correlate with empirically determined stacking free energies for RNA-DNA hybridization in solution. Moreover, there is an overall agreement with experimental background data and we show that the physics-based model that we propose performs on average better than purely statistical approaches for background calculations. The model thus provides an interesting alternative method for background subtraction schemes in Affymetrix Genechips.

  20. cDNA Microarray Screening in Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    ROY, SASHWATI; SEN, CHANDAN K

    2009-01-01

    The cDNA microarray technology and related bioinformatics tools presents a wide range of novel application opportunities. The technology may be productively applied to address food safety. In this mini-review article, we present an update highlighting the late breaking discoveries that demonstrate the vitality of cDNA microarray technology as a tool to analyze food safety with reference to microbial pathogens and genetically modified foods. In order to bring the microarray technology to mainstream food safety, it is important to develop robust user-friendly tools that may be applied in a field setting. In addition, there needs to be a standardized process for regulatory agencies to interpret and act upon microarray-based data. The cDNA microarray approach is an emergent technology in diagnostics. Its values lie in being able to provide complimentary molecular insight when employed in addition to traditional tests for food safety, as part of a more comprehensive battery of tests. PMID:16466843

  1. Microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in HepG2 cells cultured in simulated microgravity: preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaoustov, V. I.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Yoffe, B.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Developed at NASA, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS) allows the creation of unique microgravity environment of low shear force, high-mass transfer, and enables three-dimensional (3D) cell culture of dissimilar cell types. Recently we demonstrated that a simulated microgravity is conducive for maintaining long-term cultures of functional hepatocytes and promote 3D cell assembly. Using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microarray technology, it is now possible to measure the levels of thousands of different messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in a single hybridization step. This technique is particularly powerful for comparing gene expression in the same tissue under different environmental conditions. The aim of this research was to analyze gene expression of hepatoblastoma cell line (HepG2) during early stage of 3D-cell assembly in simulated microgravity. For this, mRNA from HepG2 cultured in the RCCS was analyzed by deoxyribonucleic acid microarray. Analyses of HepG2 mRNA by using 6K glass DNA microarray revealed changes in expression of 95 genes (overexpression of 85 genes and downregulation of 10 genes). Our preliminary results indicated that simulated microgravity modifies the expression of several genes and that microarray technology may provide new understanding of the fundamental biological questions of how gravity affects the development and function of individual cells.

  2. On the Statics for Micro-Array Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushibara, Tomoko; Akasaka, Shizu; Ito, Makiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Recently after human genome sequence has been determined almost perfectly, more and more researchers have been studying genes in detail. Therefore, we are sure that accumulated gene information for human will be getting more important in the near future to develop customized medicine and to make gene interactions clear. Among plenty of information, micro array might be one of the most important analysis method for genes because it is the technique that can get big amount of the gene expressions data from one time experiment and also can be used for DNA isolation. To get the novel knowledge from micro array data, we need to enrich statistical tools for its data analysis. So far, many mathematical theories and definition have been proposing. However, many of those proposals are tested with strict conditions or customized to data for specific species. In this paper, we reviewed existing typical statistical methods for micro array analysis and discussed the repeatability of the analysis, construction the guideline with more general procedure. First we analyzed the micro array data for TG rats, with statistical methods of family-wise error rate (FWER) control approach and False Discovery Rate (FDR) control approach. As existing report, no significantly different gene could be detected with FWER control approach. On the other hand, we could find several genes significantly with FDR control approach even q=0.5. To find out the reliability of FDR control approach with micro array conditions, we have analyzed 2 more pieces of data from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public database on the web site with SAM in addition to FWER and FDR control approaches. We could find a certain number of significantly different genes with BH method and SAM in the case of q=0.05. However, we have to note that the number and kinds of detected genes are different when we compare our result with the one from the published paper. Even if the same approach is used to analyze the same micro array data, we might get a different result because the distinct definition for micro array data has not been set yet. It means that from the same data we will get different results depending on researchers. We are afraid that this problem will have a big effect on developing new medicines and to progress the next step, like a 2nd screening. So, we suggest that we should have certain guidelines to analyze Micro-Array data validly with statistic method and it will surely be helpful for Micro-Array analysis for medical studies in the future.

  3. Advances in allergen-microarray technology for diagnosis and monitoring of allergy: The MeDALL allergen-chip

    PubMed Central

    Lupinek, Christian; Wollmann, Eva; Baar, Alexandra; Banerjee, Srinita; Breiteneder, Heimo; Broecker, Barbara M.; Bublin, Merima; Curin, Mirela; Flicker, Sabine; Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Mittermann, Irene; Pahr, Sandra; Resch, Yvonne; Roux, Kenneth H.; Srinivasan, Bharani; Stentzel, Sebastian; Vrtala, Susanne; Willison, LeAnna N.; Wickman, Magnus; Lřdrup-Carlsen, Karin C.; Antó, Josep Maria; Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Ebner, Daniel; Schlederer, Thomas; Harwanegg, Christian; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Allergy diagnosis based on purified allergen molecules provides detailed information regarding the individual sensitization profile of allergic patients, allows monitoring of the development of allergic disease and of the effect of therapies on the immune response to individual allergen molecules. Allergen microarrays contain a large variety of allergen molecules and thus allow the simultaneous detection of allergic patients’ antibody reactivity profiles towards each of the allergen molecules with only minute amounts of serum. In this article we summarize recent progress in the field of allergen microarray technology and introduce the MeDALL allergen-chip which has been developed for the specific and sensitive monitoring of IgE and IgG reactivity profiles towards more than 170 allergen molecules in sera collected in European birth cohorts. MeDALL is a European research program in which allergen microarray technology is used for the monitoring of the development of allergic disease in childhood, to draw a geographic map of the recognition of clinically relevant allergens in different populations and to establish reactivity profiles which are associated with and predict certain disease manifestations. We describe technical advances of the MeDALL allergen-chip regarding specificity, sensitivity and its ability to deliver test results which are close to in vivo reactivity. In addition, the usefulness and numerous advantages of allergen microarrays for allergy research, refined allergy diagnosis, monitoring of disease, of the effects of therapies, for improving the prescription of specific immunotherapy and for prevention are discussed. PMID:24161540

  4. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    SciTech Connect

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in EST library sequencing approaches, and thus represent a rich resource for studies of environmental genomics.

  5. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    PubMed Central

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-01

    Background With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings A set of ?30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ?19K clusters were generated from ?98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66% of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases. Conclusions/Significance The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in EST library sequencing approaches, and thus represent a rich resource for studies of environmental genomics. PMID:20174471

  6. Transcriptome architecture across tissues in the pig

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, André LJ; Ojeda, Ana; López-Béjar, Manel; Fernandes, Lana T; Castelló, Anna; Folch, Josep M; Pérez-Enciso, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Background Artificial selection has resulted in animal breeds with extreme phenotypes. As an organism is made up of many different tissues and organs, each with its own genetic programme, it is pertinent to ask: How relevant is tissue in terms of total transcriptome variability? Which are the genes most distinctly expressed between tissues? Does breed or sex equally affect the transcriptome across tissues? Results In order to gain insight on these issues, we conducted microarray expression profiling of 16 different tissues from four animals of two extreme pig breeds, Large White and Iberian, two males and two females. Mixed model analysis and neighbor – joining trees showed that tissues with similar developmental origin clustered closer than those with different embryonic origins. Often a sound biological interpretation was possible for overrepresented gene ontology categories within differentially expressed genes between groups of tissues. For instance, an excess of nervous system or muscle development genes were found among tissues of ectoderm or mesoderm origins, respectively. Tissue accounted for ~11 times more variability than sex or breed. Nevertheless, we were able to confidently identify genes with differential expression across tissues between breeds (33 genes) and between sexes (19 genes). The genes primarily affected by sex were overall different than those affected by breed or tissue. Interaction with tissue can be important for differentially expressed genes between breeds but not so much for genes whose expression differ between sexes. Conclusion Embryonic development leaves an enduring footprint on the transcriptome. The interaction in gene × tissue for differentially expressed genes between breeds suggests that animal breeding has targeted differentially each tissue's transcriptome. PMID:18416811

  7. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m?3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  8. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  9. Tissue Processing

    Cancer.gov

    Tissue samples, also called biospecimens, are tissue and fluid samples taken from the human body that can be used for research. Biospecimens from cancer patients are critical to cancer research because they contain an extraordinary amount of biological information, written in the language of cells. Genes and proteins in biospecimens can identify the biological characteristics of cancer cells.

  10. Normalization of Reverse Phase Protein Microarray Data: Choosing the Best Normalization Analyte.

    PubMed

    Chiechi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Reverse phase protein microarray (RPMA) are a relatively recent but widely used approach to measure a large number of proteins, in their original and posttranslational modified forms, in a small clinical sample. Data normalization is fundamental for this technology, to correct for the sample-to-sample variability in the many possible confounding factors: extracellular proteins, red blood cells, different number of cells in the sample. To address this need, we adopted gene microarray algorithms to tailor the RPMA processing and analysis to the specific study set. Using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, we screened seven normalization analytes (ssDNA, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ?/?-tubulin, mitochondrial ribosomal protein L11 (MRPL11), ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13a), ?-actin, and total protein) across different sample sets, including cell lines, blood contaminated tissues, and tissues subjected to laser capture microdissection (LCM), to identify the analyte with the lowest variability. Specific normalization analytes were found to be advantageous for different classes of samples, with ssDNA being the optimal analyte to normalize blood contaminated samples. PMID:26519170

  11. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26363896

  12. Digital microarray analysis for digital artifact genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger; Handley, James; Williams, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    We implement a Spatial Voting (SV) based analogy of microarray analysis for digital gene marker identification in malware code sections. We examine a famous set of malware formally analyzed by Mandiant and code named Advanced Persistent Threat (APT1). APT1 is a Chinese organization formed with specific intent to infiltrate and exploit US resources. Manidant provided a detailed behavior and sting analysis report for the 288 malware samples available. We performed an independent analysis using a new alternative to the traditional dynamic analysis and static analysis we call Spatial Analysis (SA). We perform unsupervised SA on the APT1 originating malware code sections and report our findings. We also show the results of SA performed on some members of the families associated by Manidant. We conclude that SV based SA is a practical fast alternative to dynamics analysis and static analysis.

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Colorectal Tumors and Normal Mucosa by Microarrays Meta-Analysis Using Prediction Analysis of Microarray, Artificial Neural Network, Classification, and Regression Trees

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chi-Ming; Yao, Chung-Tay; Chang, Yu-Tien; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Kang-Hua; Terng, Harn-Jing; Huang, Chi-Shuan; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Su, Sui-Lun; Liu, Yao-Chi; Lin, Fu-Gong; Wetter, Thomas; Chang, Chi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Microarray technology shows great potential but previous studies were limited by small number of samples in the colorectal cancer (CRC) research. The aims of this study are to investigate gene expression profile of CRCs by pooling cDNA microarrays using PAM, ANN, and decision trees (CART and C5.0). Methods. Pooled 16 datasets contained 88 normal mucosal tissues and 1186 CRCs. PAM was performed to identify significant expressed genes in CRCs and models of PAM, ANN, CART, and C5.0 were constructed for screening candidate genes via ranking gene order of significances. Results. The first screening identified 55 genes. The test accuracy of each model was over 0.97 averagely. Less than eight genes achieve excellent classification accuracy. Combining the results of four models, we found the top eight differential genes in CRCs; suppressor genes, CA7, SPIB, GUCA2B, AQP8, IL6R and CWH43; oncogenes, SPP1 and TCN1. Genes of higher significances showed lower variation in rank ordering by different methods. Conclusion. We adopted a two-tier genetic screen, which not only reduced the number of candidate genes but also yielded good accuracy (nearly 100%). This method can be applied to future studies. Among the top eight genes, CA7, TCN1, and CWH43 have not been reported to be related to CRC. PMID:24959000

  14. Alignment of gene expression profiles from test samples against a reference database: New method for context-specific interpretation of microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarray data have been organized and made available as public databases, but the utilization of such highly heterogeneous reference datasets in the interpretation of data from individual test samples is not as developed as e.g. in the field of nucleotide sequence comparisons. We have created a rapid and powerful approach for the alignment of microarray gene expression profiles (AGEP) from test samples with those contained in a large annotated public reference database and demonstrate here how this can facilitate interpretation of microarray data from individual samples. Methods AGEP is based on the calculation of kernel density distributions for the levels of expression of each gene in each reference tissue type and provides a quantitation of the similarity between the test sample and the reference tissue types as well as the identity of the typical and atypical genes in each comparison. As a reference database, we used 1654 samples from 44 normal tissues (extracted from the Genesapiens database). Results Using leave-one-out validation, AGEP correctly defined the tissue of origin for 1521 (93.6%) of all the 1654 samples in the original database. Independent validation of 195 external normal tissue samples resulted in 87% accuracy for the exact tissue type and 97% accuracy with related tissue types. AGEP analysis of 10 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) samples provided quantitative description of the key pathogenetic events, such as the extent of inflammation, in individual samples and pinpointed tissue-specific genes whose expression changed (SAMD4A) in DMD. AGEP analysis of microarray data from adipocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and from normal myeloid cell types and leukemias provided quantitative characterization of the transcriptomic changes during normal and abnormal cell differentiation. Conclusions The AGEP method is a widely applicable method for the rapid comprehensive interpretation of microarray data, as proven here by the definition of tissue- and disease-specific changes in gene expression as well as during cellular differentiation. The capability to quantitatively compare data from individual samples against a large-scale annotated reference database represents a widely applicable paradigm for the analysis of all types of high-throughput data. AGEP enables systematic and quantitative comparison of gene expression data from test samples against a comprehensive collection of different cell/tissue types previously studied by the entire research community. PMID:21453538

  15. A perspective on microarrays: current applications, pitfalls, and potential uses

    PubMed Central

    Jaluria, Pratik; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Betenbaugh, Michael; Shiloach, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    With advances in robotics, computational capabilities, and the fabrication of high quality glass slides coinciding with increased genomic information being available on public databases, microarray technology is increasingly being used in laboratories around the world. In fact, fields as varied as: toxicology, evolutionary biology, drug development and production, disease characterization, diagnostics development, cellular physiology and stress responses, and forensics have benefiting from its use. However, for many researchers not familiar with microarrays, current articles and reviews often address neither the fundamental principles behind the technology nor the proper designing of experiments. Although, microarray technology is relatively simple, conceptually, its practice does require careful planning and detailed understanding of the limitations inherently present. Without these considerations, it can be exceedingly difficult to ascertain valuable information from microarray data. Therefore, this text aims to outline key features in microarray technology, paying particular attention to current applications as outlined in recent publications, experimental design, statistical methods, and potential uses. Furthermore, this review is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather substantive; highlighting important concepts and detailing steps necessary to conduct and interpret microarray experiments. Collectively, the information included in this text will highlight the versatility of microarray technology and provide a glimpse of what the future may hold. PMID:17254338

  16. Analysis of environmental transcriptomes by DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; González-Toril, Elena

    2007-02-01

    In this work we investigated the correlations between global gene expression patterns and environmental parameters in natural ecosystems. We studied the preferential gene expression of the iron oxidizer bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans to adapt its physiology to changes in the physicochemical parameters in its natural medium. Transcriptome analysis by DNA microarrays can proportionate an instant picture about the preferential gene expression between two different environmental samples. However, this type of analysis is very difficult and complex in natural ecosystems, mainly because of the broad biodiversity and multiple environmental parameters that may affect gene expression. The necessity of high-quality RNA preparations as well as complicated data analysis are also technological limitations. The low prokaryotic diversity of the extremely acidic and iron-rich waters of the Tinto River (Spain) ecosystem, where L. ferrooxidans is abundant, allows the opportunity to achieve global gene expression studies and to associate gene function with environmental parameters. We applied a total RNA amplification protocol validated previously for the amplification of the environmental transcriptome (meta-transcriptome). The meta-transcriptome of two sites from the Tinto River mainly differing in the salt and oxygen contents were amplified and analysed by a L. ferrooxidans DNA microarray. The results showed a clear preferential induction of genes involved in certain physicochemical parameters like: high salinity (ectAB, otsAB), low oxygen concentration (cydAB), iron uptake (fecA-exbBD-tonB), oxidative stress (carotenoid synthesis, oxyR, recG), potassium (kdpBAC) or phosphate concentrations (pstSCAB), etc. We conclude that specific gene expression patterns can be useful indicators for the physiological conditions in a defined ecosystem. Also, the upregulation of certain genes and operons reveals information about the environmental conditions (nutrient limitations, stresses, etc.). PMID:17222143

  17. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  18. Proteomics. Tissue-based map of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Oksvold, Per; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Ĺsa; Kampf, Caroline; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Asplund, Anna; Olsson, IngMarie; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Navani, Sanjay; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Odeberg, Jacob; Djureinovic, Dijana; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia; Alm, Tove; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Rockberg, Johan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hamsten, Marica; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Persson, Lukas; Johansson, Fredric; Zwahlen, Martin; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-01-23

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body. PMID:25613900

  19. Data Analysis Methods for DNA Microarrays: A Critical Review of Applications to Breast Cancer Research

    E-print Network

    Data Analysis Methods for DNA Microarrays: A Critical Review of Applications to Breast Cancer 2 I. Overview of Microarray Data Analysis A. Introduction: In a single assay, DNA microarrays allow explaining a common protocol for generating data using a DNA microarray, this paper describes the three major

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. ??, NO. ??, ?? 2005 1 Mixture Model Analysis of DNA Microarray

    E-print Network

    Likas, Aristidis

    and demonstrate its advantages. Keywords: DNA microarray image analysis, microarray gridding, Gaussian mixture algorithm, cross-validated likelihood I. INTRODUCTION DNA microarrays [1] are used to measure the expression. In microarray exper- iments, the two mRNA samples to be compared are reverse transcripted into cDNA

  1. A CMOS Image Sensor for DNA Microarrays Samir Parikh, Glenn Gulak, Paul Chow

    E-print Network

    Chow, Paul

    A CMOS Image Sensor for DNA Microarrays Samir Parikh, Glenn Gulak, Paul Chow University of Toronto-to-digital converter. I. INTRODUCTION DNA microarrays are commonly used to search for DNA sequences. A DNA microarray containing the target ssDNA is introduced to the DNA microarray leading to a pairing or unpairing process

  2. Expresso and Chips: Creating a Next Generation Microarray Experiment Management System

    E-print Network

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    , 11]). 2. Microarray Technology Two main approaches to preparing microarrays are basedExpresso and Chips: Creating a Next Generation Microarray Experiment Management System Allan Sioson that is de- signed to assist biologists in planning, executing, and in- terpreting microarray experiments

  3. M@CBETH: Optimizing Clinical Microarray Classification Nathalie L.M.M. Pochet1

    E-print Network

    to select and train an optimal model for each microarray dataset. 1. Introduction Microarray technology hasM@CBETH: Optimizing Clinical Microarray Classification Nathalie L.M.M. Pochet1 , Frizo A.Pochet@esat.kuleuven.be Abstract The M@CBETH (MicroArray Classification BEnch- marking Tool on Host server) web service, available

  4. Gridding and Compression of Microarray Images Stefano Lonardi and Yu Luo

    E-print Network

    Lonardi, Stefano

    proce- dure of the image. 1. Introduction Microarray is a technology which allows biologistsGridding and Compression of Microarray Images Stefano Lonardi and Yu Luo Department of Computer With the recent explosion of interest in microarray tech- nology, massive amounts of microarray images are cur

  5. Fabrication and characterization of RNA aptamer microarrays for the study of proteinaptamer

    E-print Network

    Fabrication and characterization of RNA aptamer microarrays for the study of protein of reproducibly fabricating and maintaining stable and uniform RNA microarrays. Since RNA molecules are more developed for DNA microarrays cannot be directly trans- ferred to RNA microarray fabrication. Currently

  6. Development of the first marmoset-specific DNA microarray (EUMAMA): a new genetic tool for large-scale expression profiling in a non-human primate

    PubMed Central

    Datson, Nicole A; Morsink, Maarten C; Atanasova, Srebrena; Armstrong, Victor W; Zischler, Hans; Schlumbohm, Christina; Dutilh, Bas E; Huynen, Martijn A; Waegele, Brigitte; Ruepp, Andreas; de Kloet, E Ronald; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    Background The common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus), a small non-endangered New World primate native to eastern Brazil, is becoming increasingly used as a non-human primate model in biomedical research, drug development and safety assessment. In contrast to the growing interest for the marmoset as an animal model, the molecular tools for genetic analysis are extremely limited. Results Here we report the development of the first marmoset-specific oligonucleotide microarray (EUMAMA) containing probe sets targeting 1541 different marmoset transcripts expressed in hippocampus. These 1541 transcripts represent a wide variety of different functional gene classes. Hybridisation of the marmoset microarray with labelled RNA from hippocampus, cortex and a panel of 7 different peripheral tissues resulted in high detection rates of 85% in the neuronal tissues and on average 70% in the non-neuronal tissues. The expression profiles of the 2 neuronal tissues, hippocampus and cortex, were highly similar, as indicated by a correlation coefficient of 0.96. Several transcripts with a tissue-specific pattern of expression were identified. Besides the marmoset microarray we have generated 3215 ESTs derived from marmoset hippocampus, which have been annotated and submitted to GenBank [GenBank: EF214838 – EF215447, EH380242 – EH382846]. Conclusion We have generated the first marmoset-specific DNA microarray and demonstrated its use to characterise large-scale gene expression profiles of hippocampus but also of other neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. In addition, we have generated a large collection of ESTs of marmoset origin, which are now available in the public domain. These new tools will facilitate molecular genetic research into this non-human primate animal model. PMID:17592630

  7. Gaucher Disease: Transcriptome Analyses Using Microarray or mRNA Sequencing in a Gba1 Mutant Mouse Model Treated with Velaglucerase alfa or Imiglucerase

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sunghee; Sun, Ying; Jia, Li; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase) function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig) or velaglucerase alfa (vela) improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq) of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela) were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray), and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq). While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (?3-fold) than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8–20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT biopharmaceuticals. PMID:24124461

  8. Cell-Cycle Control in Urothelial Carcinoma: Large-scale Tissue Array Analysis of Tumor Tissue from Maine and Vermont

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Petra; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Baris, Dalsu; Schned, Alan R.; Takikita, Mikiko; Poscablo, M. Cristina; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Jones, Michael; Kida, Masatoshi; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Moore, Lee E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell-cycle proteins are important predictive markers in urothelial carcinoma but may also exhibit exposure-specific heterogeneity. Methods Tumor tissue from 491 bladder cancer cases enrolled in the Maine and Vermont component of the New England Bladder Cancer Study was assembled as tissue microarrays and examined for aberrant expression of p53, p63, p16, cyclin D1, Rb, and Ki-67. The association between expression and histopathology, demographics, and cigarette smoking was examined using ?2 tests, multivariable Poisson, and multinomial regression models. Results We found that overexpression of p53 and Ki-67 was associated with high-stage/grade tumors [relative risk (RR), 1.26; Ptrend = 0.003; and RR, 3.21; Ptrend < 0.0001, respectively], whereas expression of p63 and p16 was decreased in high-stage/grade tumors (RR, 0.52; Ptrend < 0.0001; and RR, 0.88; Ptrend = 0.04, respectively). No significant aberrations of cell-cycle proteins were identified using various smoking variables and multiple statistical models. Conclusion The results of this population-based study of histologically confirmed urothelial carcinomas show significant aberration of cell-cycle proteins p53, p63, p16, and Ki-67, but not Rb or cyclin D1. p53 showed the most significant heterogeneity with respect to tumor stage and grade, especially when stratified for different staining intensities using novel digital image analysis techniques. Our findings do not support that smoking modifies expression of cell-cycle proteins. Impact Our study shows significant heterogeneity in the expression of key cell-cycle proteins that are associated with disease progression in bladder cancer. Further studies may lead to the identification of biomarkers and their multiplexed interactions as useful prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:22761304

  9. Overexpression of E2F mRNAs Associated with Gastric Cancer Progression Identified by the Transcription Factor and miRNA Co-Regulatory Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XiaoTian; Ni, ZhaoHui; Duan, ZiPeng; Xin, ZhuoYuan; Wang, HuaiDong; Tan, JiaYi; Wang, GuoQing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at the transcription and translation levels; thus, both transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNA) play roles in regulation of gene expression. This study profiled differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues to construct a TF and miRNA co-regulatory network in order to identify altered genes in gastric cancer progression. A total of 70 cases gastric cancer and paired adjacent normal tissues were subjected to cDNA and miRNA microarray analyses. We obtained 887 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes and 41 down-regulated and 4 up-regulated miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues. Using the Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, we obtained 105 genes that are regulated by the E2F family of genes and using Targetscan, miRanda, miRDB and miRWalk tools, we predicted potential targeting genes of these 45 miRNAs. We then built up the E2F-related TF and miRNA co-regulatory gene network and identified 9 hub-genes. Furthermore, we found that levels of E2F1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 mRNAs associated with gastric cancer cell invasion capacity, and has associated with tumor differentiation. These data showed Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression. PMID:25646628

  10. Analysis of Temporal-spatial Co-variation within Gene Expression Microarray Data in an Organogenesis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, Martin; Rajapakse, Vinodh; Zeeberg, Barry; Brooks, Brian; Brown, Jacob; Czaja, Wojciech; Bonner, Robert F.

    The gene networks underlying closure of the optic fissure during vertebrate eye development are poorly understood. We used a novel clustering method based on Laplacian Eigenmaps, a nonlinear dimension reduction method, to analyze microarray data from laser capture microdissected (LCM) cells at the site and developmental stages (days 10.5 to 12.5) of optic fissure closure. Our new method provided greater biological specificity than classical clustering algorithms in terms of identifying more biological processes and functions related to eye development as defined by Gene Ontology at lower false discovery rates. This new methodology builds on the advantages of LCM to isolate pure phenotypic populations within complex tissues and allows improved ability to identify critical gene products expressed at lower copy number. The combination of LCM of embryonic organs, gene expression microarrays, and extracting spatial and temporal co-variations appear to be a powerful approach to understanding the gene regulatory networks that specify mammalian organogenesis.

  11. MERAV: a tool for comparing gene expression across human tissues and cell types.

    PubMed

    Shaul, Yoav D; Yuan, Bingbing; Thiru, Prathapan; Nutter-Upham, Andy; McCallum, Scott; Lanzkron, Carolyn; Bell, George W; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic transformation of normal cells into malignant, rapidly proliferating cells requires major alterations in cell physiology. For example, the transformed cells remodel their metabolic processes to supply the additional demand for cellular building blocks. We have recently demonstrated essential metabolic processes in tumor progression through the development of a methodological analysis of gene expression. Here, we present the Metabolic gEne RApid Visualizer (MERAV, http://merav.wi.mit.edu), a web-based tool that can query a database comprising ?4300 microarrays, representing human gene expression in normal tissues, cancer cell lines and primary tumors. MERAV has been designed as a powerful tool for whole genome analysis which offers multiple advantages: one can search many genes in parallel; compare gene expression among different tissue types as well as between normal and cancer cells; download raw data; and generate heatmaps; and finally, use its internal statistical tool. Most importantly, MERAV has been designed as a unique tool for analyzing metabolic processes as it includes matrixes specifically focused on metabolic genes and is linked to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway search. PMID:26626150

  12. MERAV: a tool for comparing gene expression across human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    Shaul, Yoav D.; Yuan, Bingbing; Thiru, Prathapan; Nutter-Upham, Andy; McCallum, Scott; Lanzkron, Carolyn; Bell, George W.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic transformation of normal cells into malignant, rapidly proliferating cells requires major alterations in cell physiology. For example, the transformed cells remodel their metabolic processes to supply the additional demand for cellular building blocks. We have recently demonstrated essential metabolic processes in tumor progression through the development of a methodological analysis of gene expression. Here, we present the Metabolic gEne RApid Visualizer (MERAV, http://merav.wi.mit.edu), a web-based tool that can query a database comprising ?4300 microarrays, representing human gene expression in normal tissues, cancer cell lines and primary tumors. MERAV has been designed as a powerful tool for whole genome analysis which offers multiple advantages: one can search many genes in parallel; compare gene expression among different tissue types as well as between normal and cancer cells; download raw data; and generate heatmaps; and finally, use its internal statistical tool. Most importantly, MERAV has been designed as a unique tool for analyzing metabolic processes as it includes matrixes specifically focused on metabolic genes and is linked to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway search. PMID:26626150

  13. Gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data from Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque), a non-mammalian model organism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods for gene-class testing, such as Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), incorporate biological knowledge into the analysis and interpretation of microarray data by comparing gene expression patterns to pathways, systems and emergent phenotypes. However, to use GSEA to its full capability with non-mammalian model organisms, a microarray platform must be annotated with human gene symbols. Doing so enables the ability to relate a model organism's gene expression, in response to a given treatment, to potential human health consequences of that treatment. We enhanced the annotation of a microarray platform from a non-mammalian model organism, and then used the GSEA approach in a reanalysis of a study examining the biological significance of acute and chronic methylmercury exposure on liver tissue of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Using GSEA, we tested the hypothesis that fathead livers, in response to methylmercury exposure, would exhibit gene expression patterns similar to diseased human livers. Results We describe an enhanced annotation of the fathead minnow microarray platform with human gene symbols. This resource is now compatible with the GSEA approach for gene-class testing. We confirmed that GSEA, using this enhanced microarray platform, is able to recover results consistent with a previous analysis of fathead minnow exposure to methylmercury using standard analytical approaches. Using GSEA to compare fathead gene expression profiles to human phenotypes, we also found that fathead methylmercury-treated livers exhibited expression profiles that are homologous to human systems & pathways and results in damage that is similar to those of human liver damage associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis B. Conclusions This study describes a powerful resource for enabling the use of non-mammalian model organisms in the study of human health significance. Results of microarray gene expression studies involving fathead minnow, typically used for aquatic ecological toxicology studies, can now be used to generate hypotheses regarding consequences of contaminants and other stressors on humans. The same approach can be used with other model organisms with microarray platforms annotated in a similar manner. PMID:21269471

  14. Bioconductor Course in Practical Microarray Analysis

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    : ­ technology development and validation, data pre- processing, estimation, testing, clustering, prediction, etc, LocusLink) ­ graphical (pathways, chromosome maps) ­ patient data, tissue banks Statistical computing;Bioconductor · Bioconductor is an open source project to design and provide high quality software

  15. Analysis of layered assays and volume microarrays in stratified media.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Homanaz; Hanley, Quentin S

    2012-12-01

    Changing traditional microarray methods by using both sides of a substrate or stacking microarrays combined with optical sectioning enables the detection of more than one assay along the z-axis. Here we demonstrate two sided substrates, multilayer arrays with up to 5 substrates, and 2- and 3-dimensional antigen microarrays. By replacing standard substrates with multiple 30 ?m layers of glass or mica, high density multilayer and 3-dimensional volume arrays were created within a stratified medium. Although a decrease in fluorescence intensity with increasing number of substrate layers was observed together with a concomitant broadening of the axial resolution, quantitative results were obtained from this stratified system using calibrated intensities. Two- and three-dimensional antigen microarrays were generated via microcontact printing and detected as indirect immunoassays with quantum dot conjugated antibodies. Volume arrays were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy producing clear patterns, even when the assays were overlapped spatially. PMID:22911003

  16. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  17. IDENTIFYING AND MONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY USING CERIODAPHNIA MICROARRAYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SBIR solicitation states that “technology is needed to better identify and monitor sources of pollution and protect water quality.” Microarrays may be particularly well suited to identifying environmental toxic...

  18. Epitope Mapping Using Peptide Microarray in Autoantibody Profiling.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Sebastian; Wellhausen, Robert; Woitalla, Dirk; Marcus, Katrin; May, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The use of peptide microarrays for epitope mapping of autoantibodies greatly facilitates the early diagnosis of allergic, cytotoxin-associated diseases and especially inflammatory diseases. A common approach to create the microarrays utilizes nitrocellulose-coated glass slides for peptide probe binding, which is based on surface adsorption. Advantages of this method include excellent peptide binding capacity and long-term stability. To ensure equal accessibility to all antibodies on the peptide microarray during epitope mapping, all probes are immobilized in a random manner, thus avoiding concentration-dependent effects on signal intensity.In this chapter, we provide a step-by-step protocol on how to construct the peptide microarrays and perform epitope mapping of autoantibodies using them. Finally we present a comparative approach for the evaluation of the data. PMID:26614078

  19. A Hybrid Approach to Feature Ranking for Microarray Data Classification

    E-print Network

    , finding functional associations of corresponding genes with cancer. Keywords. genetic algorithms, Random forest, feature ranking, feature selec- tion, gene prioritization, microarrays, classification, cancer 1 diseases that display complex patterns of molecular changes, such as cancer. These issues eventually pro

  20. Normalization of cDNA microarray data using wavelet regressions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Ma, Jennie Z; Li, Ming D

    2004-12-01

    Normalization is an essential step in microarray data mining and analysis. For cDNA microarray data, the primary purpose of normalization is removing the intensity-dependent bias across different slides within an experimental group or between multiple groups. The locally weighted regression (lowess) procedure has been widely used for this purpose but can be comparatively time consuming when the dataset becomes relatively large. In this study, we applied wavelet regressions, a new smoothing method for recovering a regression function from data that is supposed to outperform other methods in many cases, such as spline or local polynomial fitting, to normalize two cDNA microarray datasets. Relative to the lowess procedure, we found that wavelet regressions not only produced reliable normalization results but also ran much faster. The computing speed represents one of the most important advantages over other algorithms, especially when one is interested in analyzing a large microarray experiment involving hundreds of slides. PMID:15578940

  1. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening 

    E-print Network

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-11-25

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant ...

  2. Unraveling the ischemic brain transcriptome in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion mouse model by DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Motohide; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Nakamura, Keisuke; Wada, Yoshihiro; Tsuchikawa, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Akira; Tamaki, Keiji; Shioda, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Brain ischemia, also termed cerebral ischemia, is a condition in which there is insufficient blood flow to the brain to meet metabolic demand, leading to tissue death (cerebral infarction) due to poor oxygen supply (cerebral hypoxia). Our group is interested in the protective effects of neuropeptides for alleviating brain ischemia, as well as the underlying mechanisms of their action. The present study was initiated to investigate molecular responses at the level of gene expression in ischemic brain tissue. To achieve this, we used a mouse permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO) model in combination with high-throughput DNA microarray analysis on an Agilent microarray platform. Briefly, the right (ipsilateral) and left (contralateral) hemispheres of PMCAO model mice were dissected at two time points, 6 and 24 hours post-ischemia. Total RNA from the ischemic (ipsilateral) hemisphere was subjected to DNA microarray analysis on a mouse whole genome 4x44K DNA chip using a dye-swap approach. Functional categorization using the gene ontology (GO, MGD/AMIGO) of numerous changed genes revealed expression pattern changes in the major categories of cellular process, biological regulation, regulation of biological process, metabolic process and response to stimulus. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis on randomly selected highly up- or downregulated genes validated, in general, the microarray data. Using two time points for this analysis, major and minor trends in gene expression and/or functions were observed in relation to early- and late-response genes and differentially regulated genes that were further classified into specific pathways or disease states. We also examined the expression of these genes in the contralateral hemisphere, which suggested the presence of bilateral effects and/or differential regulation. This study provides the first ischemia-related transcriptome analysis of the mouse brain, laying a strong foundation for studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms regulating ischemia and to explore the neuroprotective effects of agents such as target neuropeptides. PMID:22015461

  3. Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering: Preclinical Validation to Bedside Application.

    PubMed

    Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Pepper, Victoria; Sams, Malik; Breuer, Jake; Breuer, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in biomaterial science and available cell sources have spurred the translation of tissue-engineering technology to the bedside, addressing the pressing clinical demands for replacement cardiovascular tissues. Here, the in vivo status of tissue-engineered blood vessels, heart valves, and myocardium is briefly reviewed, illustrating progress toward a tissue-engineered heart for clinical use. PMID:26661524

  4. Peptide Microarrays for Medical Applications in Autoimmunity, Infection, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grötzinger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the antigen-specific humoral immune response reflects the interaction of the immune system with pathogens and autoantigens. Peptide microarray analysis opens up new perspectives for the use of antibodies as diagnostic biomarkers and provides unique access to a more differentiated serological diagnosis. This review focusses on latest applications of peptide microarrays for the serologic medical diagnosis of autoimmunity, infectious diseases, and cancer. PMID:26490478

  5. Stimuli-responsive hydrogel patterns for smart microfluidics and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kang, Do Hyun; Kim, Sang Moon; Lee, Byungjun; Yoon, Hyunsik; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the properties, functions and applications of stimuli-responsive hydrogel patterns in bioanalytical applications. Stimuli-responsive hydrogel patterns can be realized by well-established micro- and nanofabrication technologies such as photolithography and micromolding, and are currently adopted as active components for manipulation of flow and biosamples in microchannel and microarray systems. We overview the properties of stimuli-responsive hydrogel materials and their fabrication methods along with some representative examples in microfluidics and microarrays. PMID:24029824

  6. Where statistics and molecular microarray experiments biology meet.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana M

    2013-01-01

    This review chapter presents a statistical point of view to microarray experiments with the purpose of understanding the apparent contradictions that often appear in relation to their results. We give a brief introduction of molecular biology for nonspecialists. We describe microarray experiments from their construction and the biological principles the experiments rely on, to data acquisition and analysis. The role of epidemiological approaches and sample size considerations are also discussed. PMID:23385529

  7. Application of wavelet modulus maxima in microarray spots recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, X H; Istepanian, Robert S H; Song, Yong Hua

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to recognize the microarray image spots. The approach is based on the detection of wavelet modulus maxima in the microarray images. The detected maxima is actually the contour of the spots and thus the spots are recognized precisely. Then, the intensities within the contour of the spots can be obtained with low error rate. The test results on example image show this is an effective approach, especially for those spots with low intensities. PMID:15376908

  8. Breakdown of thermodynamic equilibrium for DNA hybridization in microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooyberghs, J.; Baiesi, M.; Ferrantini, A.; Carlon, E.

    2010-01-01

    Test experiments of hybridization in DNA microarrays show systematic deviations from the equilibrium isotherms. We argue that these deviations are due to the presence of a partially hybridized long-lived state, which we include in a kinetic model. Experiments confirm the model predictions for the intensity vs free-energy behavior. The existence of slow relaxation phenomena has important consequences for the specificity of microarrays as devices for the detection of a target sequence from a complex mixture of nucleic acids.

  9. Breakdown of thermodynamic equilibrium for DNA hybridization in microarrays

    E-print Network

    J. Hooyberghs; M. Baiesi; A. Ferrantini; E. Carlon

    2010-01-14

    Test experiments of hybridization in DNA microarrays show systematic deviations from the equilibrium isotherms. We argue that these deviations are due to the presence of a partially hybridized long-lived state, which we include in a kinetic model. Experiments confirm the model predictions for the intensity vs. free energy behavior. The existence of slow relaxation phenomena has important consequences for the specificity of microarrays as devices for the detection of a target sequence from a complex mixture of nucleic acids.

  10. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology weremore »selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry.« less

  11. DNA Microarray Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Eyster, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarray is a powerful, non-biased discovery technology that allows the analysis of the expression of thousands of genes at a time. The technology can be used for the identification of differential gene expression, genetic mutations associated with diseases, DNA methylation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and microRNA expression, to name a few. This chapter describes microarray technology for the analysis of differential gene expression in response to estrogen treatment. PMID:26585131

  12. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen set with synthetic peptide sequences should reveal the shared bacterial/human epitopes involved.

  13. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator–detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  14. Protein microarrays for gene expression and antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Lueking, A; Horn, M; Eickhoff, H; Büssow, K; Lehrach, H; Walter, G

    1999-05-15

    Proteins translate genomic sequence information into function, enabling biological processes. As a complementary approach to gene expression profiling on cDNA microarrays, we have developed a technique for high-throughput gene expression and antibody screening on chip-size protein microarrays. Using a picking/spotting robot equipped with a new transfer stamp, protein solutions were gridded onto polyvinylidene difluoride filters at high density. Specific purified protein was detected on the filters with high sensitivity (250 amol or 10 pg of a test protein). On a microarray made from bacterial lysates of 92 human cDNA clones expressed in a microtiter plate, putative protein expressors could be reliably identified. The rate of false-positive clones, expressing proteins in incorrect reading frames, was low. Product specificity of selected clones was confirmed on identical microarrays using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivities of some antibodies with unrelated proteins imply the use of protein microarrays for antibody specificity screening against whole libraries of proteins. Because this application would not be restricted to antigen-antibody systems, protein microarrays should provide a general resource for high-throughput screens of gene expression and receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:10328771

  15. DNA Microarray Characterization of Pathogens Associated with Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Suwei; Tian, Zhenyang; Hu, Pinliang; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study established a multiplex PCR-based microarray to detect simultaneously a diverse panel of 17 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)-associated pathogens including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 54 and 58. The target genes are 16S rRNA gene for N. gonorrhoeae, M. genitalium, M. hominism, and Ureaplasma, the major outer membrane protein gene (ompA) for C. trachomatis, the glycoprotein B gene (gB) for HSV; and the L1 gene for HPV. A total of 34 probes were selected for the microarray including 31 specific probes, one as positive control, one as negative control, and one as positional control probe for printing reference. The microarray is specific as the commensal and pathogenic microbes (and closely related organisms) in the genitourinary tract did not cross-react with the microarray probes. The microarray is 10 times more sensitive than that of the multiplex PCR. Among the 158 suspected HPV specimens examined, the microarray showed that 49 samples contained HPV, 21 samples contained Ureaplasma, 15 contained M. hominis, four contained C. trachomatis, and one contained N. gonorrhoeae. This work reports the development of the first high through-put detection system that identifies common pathogens associated with STDs from clinical samples, and paves the way for establishing a time-saving, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic tool for STDs. PMID:26208181

  16. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Ron; Smith, Andrew M; Heisler, Lawrence E; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density), but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarray platform. The barcodes used in this study are the well-characterized set derived from the Yeast KnockOut (YKO) collection used for screens of pooled yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) deletion mutants. We treated these pools with the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin as a test compound. Three generations of barcode microarrays at 30, 8 and 5 ?m features sizes independently identified the primary target of tunicamycin to be ALG7. Conclusion We show that the data obtained with 5 ?m feature size is of comparable quality to the 30 ?m size and propose that further shrinking of features could yield barcode microarrays with equal or greater resolving power and, more importantly, higher density. PMID:19825181

  17. Inferring gene regulatory networks from asynchronous microarray data with AIRnet

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modern approaches to treating genetic disorders, cancers and even epidemics rely on a detailed understanding of the underlying gene signaling network. Previous work has used time series microarray data to infer gene signaling networks given a large number of accurate time series samples. Microarray data available for many biological experiments is limited to a small number of arrays with little or no time series guarantees. When several samples are averaged to examine differences in mean value between a diseased and normal state, information from individual samples that could indicate a gene relationship can be lost. Results Asynchronous Inference of Regulatory Networks (AIRnet) provides gene signaling network inference using more practical assumptions about the microarray data. By learning correlation patterns for the changes in microarray values from all pairs of samples, accurate network reconstructions can be performed with data that is normally available in microarray experiments. Conclusions By focussing on the changes between microarray samples, instead of absolute values, increased information can be gleaned from expression data. PMID:21047387

  18. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  19. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  20. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-11-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen's maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes. PMID:21379402

  1. Confirming microarray data--is it really necessary?

    PubMed

    Rockett, John C; Hellmann, Gary M

    2004-04-01

    The generation of corroborative data has become a commonly used approach for ensuring the veracity of microarray data. Indeed, the need to conduct corroborative studies has now become official editorial policy for at least 2 journals, and several more are considering introducing such a policy. The issue of corroborating microarray data is a challenging one-there are good arguments for and against conducting such experiments. However, we believe that the introduction of a fixed requirement to corroborate microarray data, especially if adopted by more journals, is overly burdensome and may, in at least several applications of microarray technology, be inappropriate. We also believe that, in cases in which corroborative studies are deemed essential, a lack of clear guidance leaves researchers unclear as to what constitutes an acceptable corroborative study. Guidelines have already been outlined regarding the details of conducting microarray experiments. We propose that all stakeholders, including journal editorial boards, reviewers, and researchers, should undertake concerted and inclusive efforts to address properly and clarify the specific issue of corroborative data. In this article we highlight some of the thorny and vague areas for discussion surrounding this issue. We also report the results of a poll in which 76 life science journals were asked about their current or intended policies on the inclusion of corroborative studies in papers containing microarray data. PMID:15028276

  2. Microintaglio Printing of In situ Synthesized Proteins Enables Rapid Printing of High-Density Protein Microarrays Directly from DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyani, Manish; Moriyasu, Junpei; Tanaka, Yoko; Sato, Shusuke; Ueno, Shingo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-08-01

    A simple and versatile approach to the simultaneous on-chip synthesis and printing of proteins has been studied for high-density protein microarray applications. The method used is based on the principle of intaglio printing using microengraved plates. Unlike conventional approaches that require multistep reactions for synthesizing proteins off the chip followed by printing using a robotic spotter, our approach demonstrates the following: (i) parallel and spotter-free printing of high-density protein microarrays directly from a type of DNA microarray and (ii) microcompartmentalization of cell-free coupled transcription/translation reaction and direct transferring of picoliter protein solution per spot to pattern microarrays of 25-100 µm features.

  3. Cell microarrays on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Mikulikova, Regina; Moritz, Sieglinde; Gumpenberger, Thomas; Olbrich, Michael; Romanin, Christoph; Bacakova, Lucie; Svorcik, Vaclav; Heitz, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    We studied the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) on modified spots at polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surfaces. The viability of the cells was assessed using an aqueous non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Round spots with a diameter of 100 microm were modified by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) light of a Xe(2)(*)-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere employing a contact mask. The spots were arranged in a quadratic pattern with 300 microm center-to-center spot distances. With optimized degree of modification, the cells adhered to the modified spots with a high degree of selectivity (70-90%). The adhered cells on the spots proliferated. This resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering HUVECS or HEK cells after seeding and in the formation of confluent cell clusters after 3-4 days. With higher start seeding density, these clusters were not only confined to the modified spots but extended several micrometer to the neighborhood. The high potential of the cell microarrays for gene analysis in living cells was demonstrated with HEK cells transfected by yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). PMID:15860214

  4. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE. PMID:26415621

  5. BRMS1 Suppresses Glioma Progression by Regulating Invasion, Migration and Adhesion of Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinghua; Li, Zhonglin; Fan, Yuechao; Zheng, Junnian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) is a metastasis suppressor gene in several solid tumors. However, the expression and function of BRMS1 in glioma have not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether BRMS1 play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Using the tissue microarray technology, we found that BRMS1 expression is significantly decreased in glioma compared with tumor adjacent normal brain tissue (P<0.01, ?2 test) and reduced BRMS1 staining is associated with WHO stages (P<0.05, ?2 test). We also found that BRMS1 was significantly downregulated in glioma cell lines compared to normal human astrocytes (P<0.01, ?2 test). Furthermore, we demonstrated that BRMS1 overexpression inhibited glioma cell invasion by suppressing uPA, NF-?B, MMP-2 expression and MMP-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, our data showed that overexpression of BRMS1 inhibited glioma cell migration and adhesion capacity compared with the control group through the Src-FAK pathway. Taken together, this study suggested that BRMS1 has a role in glioma development and progression by regulating invasion, migration and adhesion activities of cancer cells. PMID:24879377

  6. A new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature of melanoma revealed by integrated microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanting

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray technology has facilitated the systematic discovery of diagnostic biomarkers of cancers and other pathologies. However, meta-analyses of published arrays often uncover significant inconsistencies that hinder advances in clinical practice. Here we present an integrated microarray analysis framework, based on a genome-wide relative significance (GWRS) and genome-wide global significance (GWGS) model. When applied to five microarray datasets on melanoma published between 2000 and 2011, this method revealed a new signature of 200 genes. When these were linked to so-called ‘melanoma driver’ genes involved in MAPK, Ca2+, and WNT signaling pathways we were able to produce a new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature for melanoma (i.e., EGFR, FGFR2, FGFR3, IL8, PTPRF, TNC, CXCL13, COL11A1, CHP2, SHC4, PPP2R2C, and WNT4). We have begun to experimentally validate a subset of these genes involved in MAPK signaling at the protein level, including CXCL13, COL11A1, PTPRF and SHC4 and found these to be over-expressed in metastatic and primary melanoma cells in vitro and in situ compared to melanocytes cultured from healthy skin epidermis and normal healthy human skin. While SHC4 has been reported previously to be associated to melanoma, this is the first time CXCL13, COL11A1, and PTPRF have been associated with melanoma on experimental validation. Our computational evaluation indicates that this 12-gene biomarker signature achieves excellent diagnostic power in distinguishing metastatic melanoma from normal skin and benign nevus. Further experimental validation of the role of these 12 genes in a new signaling network may provide new insights into the underlying biological mechanisms driving the progression of melanoma. PMID:23638386

  7. 16:960:690:02 -#35086 Special Topics: Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Protein Array Data

    E-print Network

    Cabrera, Javier

    16:960:690:02 - #35086 Special Topics: Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Protein Array. Amaratunga J. Cabrera. Exploration and Analysis of DNA. Microarray and Protein Array Data. Wiley 2003. (The experiments. A typical microarray experiment. Multi-channel cDNA microarrays. Oligonucleotide microarrays

  8. High levels of carbonic anhydrase IX in tumour tissue and plasma are biomarkers of poor prognostic in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ?lie, M; Mazure, N M; Hofman, V; Ammadi, R E; Ortholan, C; Bonnetaud, C; Havet, K; Venissac, N; Mograbi, B; Mouroux, J; Pouysségur, J; Hofman, P

    2010-01-01

    Background: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is an enzyme upregulated by hypoxia during tumour development and progression. This study was conducted to assess if the expression of CAIX in tumour tissue and/or plasma can be a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Tissue microarrays containing 555 NSCLC tissue samples were generated for quantification of CAIX expression. The plasma level of CAIX was determined by ELISA in 209 of these NSCLC patients and in 58 healthy individuals. The CAIX tissue immunostaining and plasma levels were correlated with clinicopathological factors and patient outcome. Results: CAIX tissue overexpression correlated with shorter overall survival (OS) (P=0.05) and disease-specific survival (DSS) of patients (P=0.002). The CAIX plasma level was significantly higher in patients with NSCLC than in healthy individuals (P<0.001). A high level of CAIX in the plasma of patients was associated with shorter OS (P<0.001) and DSS (P<0.001), mostly in early stage I+II NSCLC. Multivariate Cox analyses revealed that high CAIX tissue expression (P=0.002) was a factor of poor prognosis in patients with resectable NSCLC. In addition, a high CAIX plasma level was an independent variable predicting poor OS (P<0.001) in patients with NSCLC. Conclusion: High expression of CAIX in tumour tissue is a predictor of worse survival, and a high CAIX plasma level is an independent prognostic biomarker in patients with NSCLC, in particular in early-stage I+II carcinomas. PMID:20461082

  9. Microarray-based characterization of differential gene expression during vocal fold wound healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Ling, Changying; Dawson, John A.; Kendziorski, Christina; Thibeault, Susan L.; Yamashita, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The vocal fold (VF) mucosa confers elegant biomechanical function for voice production but is susceptible to scar formation following injury. Current understanding of VF wound healing is hindered by a paucity of data and is therefore often generalized from research conducted in skin and other mucosal systems. Here, using a previously validated rat injury model, expression microarray technology and an empirical Bayes analysis approach, we generated a VF-specific transcriptome dataset to better capture the system-level complexity of wound healing in this specialized tissue. We measured differential gene expression at 3, 14 and 60 days post-injury compared to experimentally naďve controls, pursued functional enrichment analyses to refine and add greater biological definition to the previously proposed temporal phases of VF wound healing, and validated the expression and localization of a subset of previously unidentified repair- and regeneration-related genes at the protein level. Our microarray dataset is a resource for the wider research community and has the potential to stimulate new hypotheses and avenues of investigation, improve biological and mechanistic insight, and accelerate the identification of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25592437

  10. Establishment of new predictive markers for distant recurrence of colorectal cancer using lectin microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kentaro; Inomata, Masafumi; Iha, Hidekatsu; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Shiraishi, Norio; Kashima, Kenji; Kitano, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical benefits of novel predictive markers for distant recurrence with colorectal cancer using lectin microarray analysis of cell surface glycan modifications. Glycoproteins were extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens and normal epithelium from 53 consecutive curatively resected stage I–III colorectal cancer cases and then subjected to lectin microarray to obtain lectin–glycan interaction (LGI) values. In addition, clinicopathological factors associated with distant recurrence were identified. LGI values that were associated with distant recurrence were validated with an additional 55 curatively resected stage II colorectal cancer cases. LGI values for Agaricus bisporus (ABA) lectin, prominent in cancer tissues, were statistically associated with distant recurrence. ABA lectin staining exhibited strikingly intense signals in the cytoplasm and apical surfaces of cancer cells, while weak staining was observed in the supranuclear regions of normal epithelium. This ABA tumor/normal LGI ratio may be a new predictive biomarker for distant recurrence of curatively resected colorectal cancer. PMID:25355679

  11. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Denong; Tang, Jin; Liu, Shaoyi; Huang, Jiaoti

    2015-01-01

    Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation. PMID:26539555

  12. Microengineering Methods for Cell Based Microarrays and High-Throughput Drug Screening Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, JinHui; Wang, ShuQi; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Screening for effective therapeutic agents from millions of drug candidates is costly, time-consuming and often face ethical concerns due to extensive use of animals. To improve cost-effectiveness, and to minimize animal testing in pharmaceutical research, in vitro monolayer cell microarrays with multiwell plate assays have been developed. Integration of cell microarrays with microfluidic systems have facilitated automated and controlled component loading, significantly reducing the consumption of the candidate compounds and the target cells. Even though these methods significantly increased the throughput compared to conventional in vitro testing systems and in vivo animal models, the cost associated with these platforms remains prohibitively high. Besides, there is a need for three-dimensional (3D) cell based drug-screening models, which can mimic the in vivo microenvironment and the functionality of the native tissues. Here, we present the state-of-the-art microengineering approaches that can be used to develop 3D cell based drug screening assays. We highlight the 3D in vitro cell culture systems with live cell-based arrays, microfluidic cell culture systems, and their application to high-throughput drug screening. We conclude that among the emerging microengineering approaches, bioprinting holds a great potential to provide repeatable 3D cell based constructs with high temporal, spatial control and versatility. PMID:21725152

  13. Segment and fit thresholding: a new method for image analysis applied to microarray and immunofluorescence data.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Elliot; Sinha, Jessica; Sinha, Arkadeep; Tang, Huiyuan; Calderone, Heather M; Hostetter, Galen; Winter, Jordan; Cherba, David; Brand, Randall E; Allen, Peter J; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Haab, Brian B

    2015-10-01

    Experiments involving the high-throughput quantification of image data require algorithms for automation. A challenge in the development of such algorithms is to properly interpret signals over a broad range of image characteristics, without the need for manual adjustment of parameters. Here we present a new approach for locating signals in image data, called Segment and Fit Thresholding (SFT). The method assesses statistical characteristics of small segments of the image and determines the best-fit trends between the statistics. Based on the relationships, SFT identifies segments belonging to background regions; analyzes the background to determine optimal thresholds; and analyzes all segments to identify signal pixels. We optimized the initial settings for locating background and signal in antibody microarray and immunofluorescence data and found that SFT performed well over multiple, diverse image characteristics without readjustment of settings. When used for the automated analysis of multicolor, tissue-microarray images, SFT correctly found the overlap of markers with known subcellular localization, and it performed better than a fixed threshold and Otsu's method for selected images. SFT promises to advance the goal of full automation in image analysis. PMID:26339978

  14. Microarray Discovery of New OGT Substrates: The Medulloblastoma Oncogene OTX2 Is O-GlcNAcylated

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is a serine/threonine glycosyltransferase that is essential for development and continues to be critically important throughout life. Understanding OGT’s complex biology requires identifying its substrates. Here we demonstrate the utility of a microarray approach for discovering novel OGT substrates. We also report a rapid method to validate OGT substrates that combines in vitro transcription-translation with O-GlcNAc mass tagging. Among the validated new OGT targets is Orthodenticle homeobox 2 (OTX2), a transcription factor critical for brain development, which is primarily expressed only during early embryogenesis and in medulloblastomas, where it functions as an oncogene. We show that endogenous OTX2 from a medulloblastoma cell line is O-GlcNAcylated at several sites. Our results demonstrate that protein microarray technology, combined with the target validation strategy we report, is useful for identifying biologically important OGT substrates, including substrates not present in most tissue types or cell lines. PMID:24580054

  15. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Pituitary Adenomas by Integrating Analysis of Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Hu, Wei; Wang, Hongyun; Yu, Shengyuan; Li, Chuzhong; Bai, Jiwei; Gui, Songbai; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas, monoclonal in origin, are the most common intracranial neoplasms. Altered gene expression as well as somatic mutations is detected frequently in pituitary adenomas. The purpose of this study was to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and biological processes during tumor formation of pituitary adenomas. We performed an integrated analysis of publicly available GEO datasets of pituitary adenomas to identify DEGs between pituitary adenomas and normal control (NC) tissues. Gene function analysis including Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks analysis was conducted to interpret the biological role of those DEGs. In this study we detected 3994 DEGs (2043 upregulated and 1951 downregulated) in pituitary adenoma through an integrated analysis of 5 different microarray datasets. Gene function analysis revealed that the functions of those DEGs were highly correlated with the development of pituitary adenoma. This integrated analysis of microarray data identified some genes and pathways associated with pituitary adenoma, which may help to understand the pathology underlying pituitary adenoma and contribute to the successful identification of therapeutic targets for pituitary adenoma. PMID:25642247

  16. Long oligonucleotide microarrays for African green monkey gene expression profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Jacquelin, Béatrice; Mayau, Véronique; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Regnault, Béatrice; Diop, Ousmane M; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Rogge, Lars; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Benecke, Arndt; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C

    2007-10-01

    Nonhuman primates, including African green monkey (AGM), are important models for biomedical research. The information on monkey genomes is still limited and no versatile gene expression screening tool is available. We tested human whole genome microarrays for cross-species reactivity with AGM transcripts using both long oligonucleotide arrays (60-mer probes) and short oligonucleotide arrays (25-mer). Using the long oligonucleotide arrays, we detected 4-fold more AGM transcripts than with the short oligonucleotide technology. The number of detected transcripts was comparable to that detected using human RNA, with 87% of the detected genes being shared between both species. The specificity of the signals obtained with the long oligonucleotide arrays was determined by analyzing the transcriptome of concanavalin A-activated CD4+ T cells vs. nonactivated T cells of two monkey species AGM and macaque. For both species, the genes showing the most significant changes in expression, such as IL-2R, were those known to be regulated in human CD4+ T cell activation. Finally, tissue specificity of the signals was established by comparing the transcription profiles of AGM brain and tonsil cells. In conclusion, the ABI human microarray platform provides a highly valuable tool for the assessment of AGM gene expression profiles. PMID:17507667

  17. Microarray analysis of gene expression in chondrosarcoma cells treated with bee venom.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Hee Jae; Hong, Seung-Jae; Chung, Joo-Ho; Koh, Hyeong-Gyun

    2005-01-01

    Bee venom (BV) has a broad array of clinical applications in Korean medicine, including treatment of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. The final common pathway of many arthropathies is the destruction of articular cartilage and consequent loss of articular function. Chondrocyte dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of such disorders. To explore the global gene expression profiles in a human chondrocyte-like cell line treated with BV, microarray analysis was performed. The HTB-94 human chondrosarcoma cells were treated with BV, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or both. Of the 344 genes profiled in this study, with a cut-off level of 4-fold change in the expression, (1) 35 were downregulated following BV treatment, (2) 16 were upregulated and 7 downregulated following LPS treatment, and (3) 32 were downregulated following co-stimulation of BV and LPS. The results of the present study shows that treatment of BV reversed the LPS-induced upregulation of such genes as interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 15 (MMP-15), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily-10, caspase-6 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). It is thought that microarrays will play an ever-growing role in the advance of our understanding of the pharmacologic actions of BV in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:15581686

  18. ELISA microarray technology as a high-throughput system for cancer biomarker validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Daly, Don S.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-01

    A large gap currently exists between the ability to discover potential biomarkers and the ability to assess the real value of these proteins for cancer screening. One major challenge in biomarker validation is the inherent variability in biomarker levels. This variability stems from the diversity across the human population and the considerable molecular heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those that originate from a single tissue. Another major challenge with cancer screening is that most cancers are rare in the general population, meaning that the specificity of an assay must be very high if the number of false positive is not going to be much greater than the number of true positives. Because of these challenges with biomarker validation, it is necessary to analysis of thousands of samples before a clear idea of the utility of a screening assay can be determined. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray technology can simultaneously quantify levels of multiple proteins and has the potential to accelerate biomarker validation. In this review, we discuss current ELISA microarray technology and the enabling advances needed to achieve the reproducibility and throughput that are required to evaluate cancer biomarkers.

  19. Transcriptome profiling of Lilium longiflorum generative cells by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2007-07-01

    The generative cell, which is produced by asymmetric division of the unicellular microspore, undergoes further mitotic division to produce two sperm cells that take part in double fertilization. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of Lilium longiflorum (lily) generative cell cDNA library has shown that a diverse complement of genes is transcribed in these cells. Here we address the cell specificity of genes expressed in lily generative cell by using spotted cDNA microarray. Microarray slides were hybridized with labeled probes prepared from transcripts originating from generative cells and other tissues (mature pollen, uninucleate microspore, ovary, root tip, and shoot). The hierarchical clustering revealed that 356 of 430 gene transcripts (83%) of generative-cell genes were up regulated in generative cells. Thirty-eight percent of generative-cell-enriched transcripts were assigned their putative functions, with an abundance of genes involved in protein destination and signal transduction. These results suggest that the expression of a subset of flowering plant genes is tightly controlled and up-regulated in generative cells in order to implement their specialized function. These data thus represent a significant increase in the genes identified as being up-regulated in generative cells and would allow functional analysis of a large number of flowering plant male gamete expressed genes. PMID:17245599

  20. Design Strategies and Applications of Tissue Bioadhesives

    E-print Network

    Yang, Jian

    engineering, and dental and bone applications.[3,4] Tissue adhesives and sealants are parti- cularly important of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019, USA of previous and ongoing researches in developing new tissue adhesive materials and recent progresses

  1. Differential phosphoprotein mapping in cancer cells using protein microarrays produced from 2-D liquid fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Manoj; Moffa, Allison; Sreekumar, Arun; Ethier, Stephen P; Barder, Timothy J; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lubman, David M

    2006-02-01

    A combination of protein microarrays and two-dimensional liquid-phase separation of proteins has been used for global profiling of the phosphoproteome in human breast cancer cells. This method has been applied to study changes in phosphorylation profile resulting from treatment of the cancer cells with PD173074, a known receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The proteins separated by 2-D liquid-phase separation were arrayed on epoxy-coated glass slides and first screened for phosphorylation using fluorescent Pro-Q Diamond stain. The candidate proteins were then identified using MALDI/ESI MS/MS analysis. Further, validation was achieved by immunoblot analysis using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. A dynamic range of approximately 100 was achieved on the microarray when beta-casein was used as a standard protein for obtaining quantitative data. Importantly, the power of this method lies in its ability to identify a large group of proteins in a single experiment that are coregulated in their posttranslational modifications, upon treatment with the inhibitor. Since proteins are known to form interacting circuits that eventually lead to various signaling events, detection of such global phosphorylation profiles might enable delineation of functional pathways that play an important role during cancer initiation and progression. PMID:16448042

  2. Profiling receptor tyrosine kinase activation by using Ab microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Ulrik B.; Cardone, Mike H.; Sinskey, Anthony J.; MacBeath, Gavin; Sorger, Peter K.

    2003-08-01

    Signal transduction in mammalian cells is mediated by complex networks of interacting proteins. Understanding these networks at a circuit level requires devices to measure the amounts and activities of multiple proteins in a rapid and accurate manner. Ab microarrays have previously been applied to the quantification of labeled recombinant proteins and proteins in serum. The development of methods to analyze intracellular signaling molecules on microarrays would make Ab arrays widely useful in systems biology. Here we describe the fabrication of multiplex Ab arrays sensitive to the amounts and modification states of signal transduction proteins in crude cell lysates and the integration of these arrays with 96-well microtiter plate technology to create microarrays in microplates. We apply the Ab arrays to monitoring the activation, uptake, and signaling of ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases in human tumor cell lines. Data obtained from multicolor ratiometric microarrays correlate well with data obtained by using traditional approaches, but the arrays are faster and simpler to use. The integration of microplate and microarray methods for crude cell lysates should make it possible to identify and analyze small molecule inhibitors of signal transduction processes with unprecedented speed and precision. We demonstrate the future potential of this approach by characterizing the action of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor PD153035 on cells by using Ab arrays; direct scale-up to array-based screening in 96- and 384-well plates should allow small molecules to be identified with specific inhibitory profiles against a signaling network.

  3. Microarray image enhancement by denoising using stationary wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Wang, X H; Istepanian, Robert S H; Song, Yong Hua

    2003-12-01

    Microarray imaging is considered an important tool for large scale analysis of gene expression. The accuracy of the gene expression depends on the experiment itself and further image processing. It's well known that the noises introduced during the experiment will greatly affect the accuracy of the gene expression. How to eliminate the effect of the noise constitutes a challenging problem in microarray analysis. Traditionally, statistical methods are used to estimate the noises while the microarray images are being processed. In this paper, we present a new approach to deal with the noise inherent in the microarray image processing procedure. That is, to denoise the image noises before further image processing using stationary wavelet transform (SWT). The time invariant characteristic of SWT is particularly useful in image denoising. The testing result on sample microarray images has shown an enhanced image quality. The results also show that it has a superior performance than conventional discrete wavelet transform and widely used adaptive Wiener filter in this procedure. PMID:15376907

  4. The use of Microarrays to Elucidate Biomarkers for use in Site Assessment and Monitoring of Reductive Dechlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, A. S.; Edwards, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    Background and Objectives: Chlorinated solvents are prevalent groundwater contaminants that often exist as DNAPLs, and as such serve as long-term sources of contamination. Bioaugmentation with Dehalococcoides- containing mixed cultures is an effective remediation strategy that can significantly increase DNAPL dissolution rates and thus mass flux, or can be used in conjunction with other physical and chemical remediation technologies to constrain the remaining DNAPL mass. Molecular biological tools are being used to assess the need for, and to monitor the progress of, bioaugmentation. Unfortunately, the current tools have limitations and provide an incomplete picture of the reductively dechlorinating bacterial community. To overcome these limitations and more accurately assess, predict, monitor and manage reductive dechlorination processes at contaminated sites, our research is focused on identifying novel reductive dechlorination biomarker genes and developing tools that improve our understanding of target gene presence, abundance, and expression, and thus, contaminant detoxification. Methods. To accomplish this, microarrays were used to investigate transcription within the Dehalococcoides- containing microbial community KB1. A 19,200 feature Shotgun Metagenome Microarray was created by amplifying and spotting random DNA fragments from a KB1 clone library, as well as 100 known reductive dehalogenase genes. In initial experiments the microarrays were used to investigate differential gene expression during dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. Statistical analysis indicated differential expression of about 500 spots which were then sequenced. Subsequently, all of the spots on the microarray were sequenced. Differential expression was also verified using reverse transcriptase -quantitative PCR. Results: The KB1 Shotgun Metagenome Microarrays were used to identify genes within the community which are functionally important during dechlorination. Dehalococcoides-respiratory genes were identified such as hydrogenases and reductive dehalogenases. In addition, experiments with different chlorinated ethenes revealed that a different suite of reductive dehalogenase genes is important for each step of dechlorination, and has identified specific reductive dehalogenase genes as indicators for degradation of specific compounds. Furthermore, transcription of genes from non-dechlorinating organisms has revealed the importance of many other microorganisms, and highlighted the dynamic interaction between phage and other microorganism in the community. Moreover, analyses indicated possible inter-organism interactions including the transfer of cofactors. Conclusions: These microarrays provided important transcription and gene sequence information for this uncultivated and remediation-relevant microbial culture. This has allowed for the development of quantitative PCR techniques that can track different dehalogenase genes, micro-organisms, and even strains, within a dechlorinating community. New molecular biology tools will describe the dechlorinating community in much greater resolution, and will allow science-based site management decisions to achieve contaminant removal and plume control in the most efficient manner.

  5. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  6. Correcting for selection bias via cross-validation in the classification of microarray data

    E-print Network

    McLachlan, G J; Zhu, J

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of diagnostic rules based on microarray data. These rules are formed by considering the expression levels of thousands of genes in tissue samples taken on patients of known classification with respect to a number of classes, representing, say, disease status or treatment strategy. As the final versions of these rules are usually based on a small subset of the available genes, there is a selection bias that has to be corrected for in the estimation of the associated error rates. We consider the problem using cross-validation. In particular, we present explicit formulae that are useful in explaining the layers of validation that have to be performed in order to avoid improperly cross-validated estimates.

  7. Microarray-Based Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Genes Involved in Chicken Reproductive Tract Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Raspoet, R.; Appia-Ayme, C.; Shearer, N.; Martel, A.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has developed the potential to contaminate table eggs internally, by colonization of the chicken reproductive tract and internalization in the forming egg. The serotype Enteritidis has developed mechanisms to colonize the chicken oviduct more successfully than other serotypes. Until now, the strategies exploited by Salmonella Enteritidis to do so have remained largely unknown. For that reason, a microarray-based transposon library screen was used to identify genes that are essential for the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis inside primary chicken oviduct gland cells in vitro and inside the reproductive tract in vivo. A total of 81 genes with a potential role in persistence in both the oviduct cells and the oviduct tissue were identified. Major groups of importance include the Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2, genes involved in stress responses, cell wall, and lipopolysaccharide structure, and the region-of-difference genomic islands 9, 21, and 40. PMID:25281378

  8. [Connective tissue diseases in childhood].

    PubMed

    Gensch, K; Gudowius, S; Niehues, T; Kuhn, A

    2005-10-01

    Connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of chronic multisystem inflammatory disorders including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), dermato- (DM) and polymyositis (PM), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Patients can present with similar clinical features, particularly during the first onset of symptoms, which frequently makes the diagnosis of a specific disease difficult. The incidence of connective tissue diseases is much lower in children than adults; however, the clinical picture is more variable. Clinical signs, such as fatigue, fever, or weight loss, may precede any systemic organ involvement and in children, mucocutaneous manifestations develop most frequently during the varying disease course. This review summarizes recent information on epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment strategies of the different connective tissue diseases, concentrating on specific problems in childhood. PMID:16160808

  9. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies the physical, chemical, and biological properties of a protein, and plays a fundamental role in various biological processes1-6. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases 7-12. In fact, most current cancer biomarkers, such as the L3 fraction of ?-1 fetoprotein (AFP) for hepatocellular carcinoma 13-15, and CA199 for pancreatic cancer 16, 17 are all aberrant glycan moieties on glycoproteins. However, methods to study protein glycosylation have been complicated, and not suitable for routine laboratory and clinical settings. Chen et al. has recently invented a chemically blocked antibody microarray with a glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection method for high-throughput and multiplexed profile glycosylation of native glycoproteins in a complex sample 18. In this affinity based microarray method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies capture and isolate glycoproteins from the complex mixture directly on the microarray slide, and the glycans on each individual captured protein are measured by GBPs. Because all normal antibodies contain N-glycans which could be recognized by most GBPs, the critical step of this method is to chemically block the glycans on the antibodies from binding to GBP. In the procedure, the cis-diol groups of the glycans on the antibodies were first oxidized to aldehyde groups by using NaIO4 in sodium acetate buffer avoiding light. The aldehyde groups were then conjugated to the hydrazide group of a cross-linker, 4-(4-N-MaleimidoPhenyl)butyric acid Hydrazide HCl (MPBH), followed by the conjugation of a dipeptide, Cys-Gly, to the maleimide group of the MPBH. Thus, the cis-diol groups on glycans of antibodies were converted into bulky none hydroxyl groups, which hindered the lectins and other GBPs bindings to the capture antibodies. This blocking procedure makes the GBPs and lectins bind only to the glycans of captured proteins. After this chemically bl

  10. Microarrayed allergen molecules: diagnostic gatekeepers for allergy treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Reinhard; Laffer, Sylvia; Harwanegg, Christian; Huber, Martin; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Twardosz, Anna; Barletta, Bianca; Becker, Wolf M; Blaser, Kurt; Breiteneder, Heimo; Chapman, Martin; Crameri, Reto; Duchęne, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima; Fiebig, Helmut; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; King, Te Piao; Kleber-Janke, Tamara; Kurup, Viswanath P; Lehrer, Samuel B; Lidholm, Jonas; Müller, Ulrich; Pini, Carlo; Reese, Gerald; Scheiner, Otto; Scheynius, Annika; Shen, Horng-Der; Spitzauer, Susanne; Suck, Roland; Swoboda, Ines; Thomas, Wayne; Tinghino, Raffaela; Van Hage-Hamsten, Marianne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Kraft, Dietrich; Müller, Manfred W; Valenta, Rudolf

    2002-03-01

    Type I allergy is an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Currently, diagnosis of allergy is performed by provocation testing and IgE serology using allergen extracts. This process defines allergen-containing sources but cannot identify the disease-eliciting allergenic molecules. We have applied microarray technology to develop a miniaturized allergy test containing 94 purified allergen molecules that represent the most common allergen sources. The allergen microarray allows the determination and monitoring of allergic patients' IgE reactivity profiles to large numbers of disease-causing allergens by using single measurements and minute amounts of serum. This method may change established practice in allergy diagnosis, prevention, and therapy. In addition, microarrayed antigens may be applied to the diagnosis of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:11790727

  11. DNA microarray data and contextual analysis of correlation graphs

    PubMed Central

    Rougemont, Jacques; Hingamp, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used to produce large sets of expression measurements from which specific biological information is sought. Their analysis requires efficient and reliable algorithms for dimensional reduction, classification and annotation. Results We study networks of co-expressed genes obtained from DNA microarray experiments. The mathematical concept of curvature on graphs is used to group genes or samples into clusters to which relevant gene or sample annotations are automatically assigned. Application to publicly available yeast and human lymphoma data demonstrates the reliability of the method in spite of its simplicity, especially with respect to the small number of parameters involved. Conclusions We provide a method for automatically determining relevant gene clusters among the many genes monitored with microarrays. The automatic annotations and the graphical interface improve the readability of the data. A C++ implementation, called Trixy, is available from . PMID:12720549

  12. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs)?–?about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  13. IgE Epitope Mapping Using Peptide Microarray Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Gustavo; Benedé, Sara; Lin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    IgE epitope mapping of food allergens contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of food allergy and may become an additional tool for food allergy diagnosis/prognosis. Microarray platforms which allow for simultaneous screening of a large number of peptides corresponding to the sequences of food allergens are ideally suited for large-scale IgE epitope mapping. Here we describe the method of performing a reliable and sensitive peptide microarray immunoassay, which was developed in our lab and results in the identification of candidate IgE epitope biomarkers useful in determining allergic disease severity and prognosis, as well as in the prediction of treatment outcomes. A gastric digestion model that can be applied to prescreen peptides and reduce costs in the peptide microarray is also described in this chapter. PMID:26490481

  14. Identification of spots in rotated and skewed microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brese, Christopher; Zou, Ju Jia

    2009-12-01

    DNA microarray image processing has vast potential in the measurement of mass gene expression. A common approach to processing microarrays consists of spot identification, spot segmentation, and information extraction. We are concerned with spot identification. We aim to tackle the problem of identifying spots in rotated and skewed arrays via an automated process. The method proposed is composed of three steps, namely, array orientation calculation based on the Hough transform, affine calculation and correction, and gridding. The method is able to correctly identify spots in a microarray that has been rotated or skewed at an angle between 0 and +/-30 deg and corrupted by various types of noise such as high-intensity streaks, Gaussian noise, and salt-and-pepper noise.

  15. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs)?–?about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  16. Hydrogel micro-arrays for multi-analyte detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounds, Rebecca M.; Lee, Seungjoon; Jeffords, Sarah; Ibey, Bennett L.; Pishko, Michael V.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescent microarrays have the ability to detect and monitor multiple analytes simultaneously and noninvasively, following initial placement. This versatility is advantageous for several biological applications including drug discovery, biohazard detection, transplant organ preservation and cell culture monitoring. In this work, poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microarrays are described that can be used to measure multiple analytes, including H+ and dissolved oxygen. The array elements are created by filling micro-channels with a hydrogel precursor solution containing analyte specific fluorescent sensors. A photomask is used to create the microarray through UV polymerization of the PEG precursor solution. A compact imaging system composed of a CCD camera, high powered LED, and two optical filters is used to measure the change in fluorescence emission corresponding to analyte concentration. The proposed system was tested in aqueous solution by altering relevant analyte concentrations across their biological ranges.

  17. Emergent FDA biodefense issues for microarray technology: process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Sandy

    2004-11-01

    A successful biodefense strategy relies upon any combination of four approaches. A nation can protect its troops and citizenry first by advanced mass vaccination, second, by responsive ring vaccination, and third, by post-exposure therapeutic treatment (including vaccine therapies). Finally, protection can be achieved by rapid detection followed by exposure limitation (suites and air filters) or immediate treatment (e.g., antibiotics, rapid vaccines and iodine pills). All of these strategies rely upon or are enhanced by microarray technologies. Microarrays can be used to screen, engineer and test vaccines. They are also used to construct early detection tools. While effective biodefense utilizes a variety of tactical tools, microarray technology is a valuable arrow in that quiver. PMID:15525220

  18. CLUM: a cluster program for analyzing microarray data.

    PubMed

    Irigoien, I; Fernandez, E; Vives, S; Arenas, C

    2008-08-01

    Microarray technology is increasingly being applied in biological and medical research to address a wide range of problems. Cluster analysis has proven to be a very useful tool for investigating the structure of microarray data. This paper presents a program for clustering microarray data, which is based on the so call path-distance. The algorithm gives in each step a partition in two clusters and no prior assumptions on the structure of clusters are required. It assigns each object (gene or sample) to only one cluster and gives the global optimum for the function that quantifies the adequacy of a given partition of the sample into k clusters. The program was tested on experimental data sets, showing the robustness of the algorithm. PMID:18825964

  19. Performance comparison of SLFN training algorithms for DNA microarray classification.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hieu Trung; Kim, Jung-Ja; Won, Yonggwan

    2011-01-01

    The classification of biological samples measured by DNA microarrays has been a major topic of interest in the last decade, and several approaches to this topic have been investigated. However, till now, classifying the high-dimensional data of microarrays still presents a challenge to researchers. In this chapter, we focus on evaluating the performance of the training algorithms of the single hidden layer feedforward neural networks (SLFNs) to classify DNA microarrays. The training algorithms consist of backpropagation (BP), extreme learning machine (ELM) and regularized least squares ELM (RLS-ELM), and an effective algorithm called neural-SVD has recently been proposed. We also compare the performance of the neural network approaches with popular classifiers such as support vector machine (SVM), principle component analysis (PCA) and fisher discriminant analysis (FDA). PMID:21431554

  20. Challenges of microarray applications for microbial detection and gene expression profiling in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology represents one of the latest advances in molecular biology. The diverse types of microarrays have been applied to clinical and environmental microbiology, microbial ecology, and in human, veterinary, and plant diagnostics. Since multiple genes can be analyzed simultaneously, ...

  1. DNA Microarray-based Ecotoxicological Biomarker Discovery in a Small Fish Model Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses several issues critical to use of zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays for computational toxicology research on endocrine disrupting chemicals using small fish models, and more generally, the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology.

  2. Hierarchical Multi-Bottleneck Classification Method And Its Application to DNA Microarray Expression Data

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Xuejian

    The recent development of DNA microarray technology is creating a wealth of gene expression data. Typically these datasets have high dimensionality and a lot of varieties. Analysis of DNA microarray expression data is a ...

  3. THE MAQC PROJECT: ESTABLISHING QC METRICS AND THRESHOLDS FOR MICROARRAY QUALITY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarrays represent a core technology in pharmacogenomics and toxicogenomics; however, before this technology can successfully and reliably be applied in clinical practice and regulatory decision-making, standards and quality measures need to be developed. The Microarray Qualit...

  4. Unravelling Microbial Communities with DNA-Microarrays: Challengesand Future Directions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Michael; Smidt, Hauke; Loy, Alexander; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-03-08

    High-throughput technologies are urgently needed formonitoring the formidable biodiversity and functional capabilities ofmicroorganisms in the environment. Ten years ago, DNA microarrays,miniaturized platforms for highly parallel hybridization reactions, foundtheir way into environmental microbiology and raised great expectationsamong researchers in the field. In this article, we briefly summarize thestate-of-the-art of microarray approaches in microbial ecology researchand discuss in more detail crucial problems and promising solutions.Finally, we outline scenarios for an innovative combination ofmicroarrays with other molecular tools for structure-function analysis ofcomplex microbial communities.

  5. Hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Deanna Lynn; Coleman, Matthew A; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Albala, Joanna; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-04-23

    A hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection includes a microarray reader engineered to be small enough for portable applications. The invention includes a high-powered light-emitting diode that emits excitation light, an excitation filter positioned to receive the excitation light, a slide, a slide holder assembly for positioning the slide to receive the excitation light from the excitation filter, an emission filter positioned to receive the excitation light from the slide, a lens positioned to receive the excitation light from the emission filter, and a CCD camera positioned to receive the excitation light from the lens.

  6. High-Throughput Microarray Incubations Using Multi-Well Chambers.

    PubMed

    Zerweck, Johannes; Reimer, Ulf; Jansong, Janina; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Tersch, Christoph; Eckey, Maren; Knaute, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Peptide microarrays are ideal tools for a variety of applications ranging from epitope mapping to immune monitoring. Here we present a method for high-throughput screening of biological samples using only standard microtiter plate equipment. Parallel incubation of a large number of samples with a small library of peptides is enabled by printing multiple identical mini-arrays on one microarray slide and further combining four slides to yield an incubation frame possessing the dimensions of a 96-well microtiter plate. Applying conventional lab equipment such as ELISA washers, hundreds of samples can be processed in 1 day yielding approx. 200 data points in triplicates per sample. PMID:26490464

  7. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  8. NUTRIENT REGULATION OF CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell replication is tightly controlled in normal tissues and aberrant during disease progression, such as in tumorigenesis. The replication of cells can be divided into four distinct phases: Gap 1 (G1), synthesis (S), gap 2 (G2), and mitosis (M). The progression from one phase to the next is intrica...

  9. ELECTRICALLY ACTIVE MICROARRAY OF 3D CARBON MEMS ELECTRODES FOR PATHOGEN DETECTION SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    ELECTRICALLY ACTIVE MICROARRAY OF 3D CARBON MEMS ELECTRODES FOR PATHOGEN DETECTION SYSTEMS: Electrically Active Microarray of 3D Carbon MEMS Electrodes for Pathogen Detection Systems OF THE THESIS ELECTRICALLY ACTIVE MICROARRAY OF 3D CARBON MEMS ELECTRODES FOR PATHOGEN DETECTION SYSTEMS by Jiae

  10. DNA microarray SNP associations with clinical efficacy and side effects of domperidone treatment for gastroparesis

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    DNA microarray SNP associations with clinical efficacy and side effects of domperidone treatment effects. DNA microarray single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis may help to elucidate the role treated with domperidone were analyzed using Affymetrix 6.0 SNP microarrays. Then least angle regression

  11. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays Martha L. Bulyk microarray-based method to char- acterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Therefore, we have taken advantage of DNA microarray technologies

  12. Robust-Linear-Model Normalization To Reduce Technical Variability in Functional Protein Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    are similar to DNA microarrays; both enabling the parallel interrogation of thousands of probes immobilized on a surface. Consequently, they have benefited from technologies previously developed for DNA microarrays. However, assumptions for the analysis of DNA microarrays do not always translate to protein arrays

  13. SPR Imaging Measurements of 1-D and 2-D DNA Microarrays Created from Microfluidic Channels on

    E-print Network

    SPR Imaging Measurements of 1-D and 2-D DNA Microarrays Created from Microfluidic Channels on Gold have recently demon- strated that SPR imaging measurements of DNA microarrays fabricated on gold concentrations.1-3 In those initial sets of measurements, the DNA microarrays consisted of 60 500 µm × 500 µm

  14. NUMERICAL MODELING OF DNA HYBRIDIZATION IN ELECTRONICALLY ACTIVE MICROARRAYS WITH PARTIAL

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    NUMERICAL MODELING OF DNA HYBRIDIZATION IN ELECTRONICALLY ACTIVE MICROARRAYS WITH PARTIAL MATCH, the kinetics of DNA hybridization in electronically active microarrays within a limited pH range. In particular-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) in active microarrays within an environment of continuous generation of H+ ions

  15. Optimized detection of sequence variation in heterozygous genomes using DNA microarrays with

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Optimized detection of sequence variation in heterozygous genomes using DNA microarrays, 2009 (sent for review October 6, 2009) The use of DNA microarrays to identify nucleotide variation strains, we studied the effect of SNPs on hybridization efficiency to DNA microarray probes of different

  16. Significance and statistical errors in the analysis of DNA microarray data

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Significance and statistical errors in the analysis of DNA microarray data James P. Brody* , Brian, Princeton, NJ, August 5, 2002 (received for review May 21, 2001) DNA microarrays are important devices of statistical errors in DNA microarray measure- ments. Using the common ``ratio of medians'' method, we find

  17. Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference and Fluorescence Imaging of Oligonucleotide and IgG Protein Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    -incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) microscope for fluorescent label-free imaging of DNA and protein microarrays processing. INTRODUCTION Microarrays are microscopic spots of biomolecules (such as DNA or protein) arrangedG Protein Microarrays James P. Landry1 , X. D. Zhu1 , X. W. Guo1 , and J. P. Gregg2 1 Department of Physics

  18. Large-scale detection of ubiquitination substrates using cell extracts and protein microarrays

    E-print Network

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    of identifying modified proteins, but this kind of biochemical assay, unlike DNA microarrays, dependsLarge-scale detection of ubiquitination substrates using cell extracts and protein microarrays in biology. Protein microarrays exposed to cellular extracts could offer a rapid and convenient means

  19. Improved direct LDA and its application to DNA microarray gene expression data Kuldip K. Paliwal a

    E-print Network

    Improved direct LDA and its application to DNA microarray gene expression data Kuldip K. Paliwal and propose an improvement of the DLDA technique. The experiment is conducted on several DNA microarray gene regulating matrices. The proposed improvement has been experimented on several DNA microarray gene expression

  20. Universal protein-binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA-binding

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    Universal protein-binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA-stranding a commercially synthesized DNA oligonucleotide array, binding a TF directly to the double-stranded DNA microarray@receptor.med.harvard.edu). Published online 5 March 2009; doi:10.1038/nprot.2008.195 Protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology

  1. Graphical methods for class prediction using dimension reduction techniques on DNA microarray data

    E-print Network

    Bura, Efstathia

    Graphical methods for class prediction using dimension reduction techniques on DNA microarray data estimated from the plots are used to predict tumour classes in cDNA microarrays and the performance). All samples are correctly classi- fied. Contact: ebura@gwu.edu INTRODUCTION DNA microarrays belong

  2. A Statistical Model for Investigating Binding Probabilities of DNA Nucleotide Sequences Using Microarrays

    E-print Network

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    -specific transcription factor will bind to a given DNA sequence. Microarray methods provide an effective means) in their study of the DNA-binding specificities of Zif268 zinc fingers using microarray technology. In a follow statistical methodology for analyzing microarray intensity measurements reflecting DNA-protein interactions

  3. Extraction of Human DNA Replication Timing Patterns from Discrete Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Robins, Gabriel

    Extraction of Human DNA Replication Timing Patterns from Discrete Microarray Data Anindya Dutta1 Microarrays are utilized to assay discrete pools of DNA replicated during different parts of the replication replication timing, DNA tiling microarrays 1 Introduction and Related Work DNA replication is a crucial step

  4. Recovering sparse signals using sparse measurement matrices in compressed DNA microarrays

    E-print Network

    Vikalo, Haris

    Recovering sparse signals using sparse measurement matrices in compressed DNA microarrays HARIS of Technology, Kanpur, India e-mail: hvikalo@ece.utexas.edu,farzad,hassibi@caltech.edu Abstract Microarrays (DNA of the sensing resources in comparative DNA microarray experiments, where a test sample is measured relative

  5. AN ALGORITHM FOR MISSING VALUE ESTIMATION FOR DNA MICROARRAY DATA Shmuel Friedland, Amir Niknejad

    E-print Network

    Friedland, Shmuel

    AN ALGORITHM FOR MISSING VALUE ESTIMATION FOR DNA MICROARRAY DATA Shmuel Friedland, Amir Niknejad and widely used methods for reconstructing missing entries for DNA microarray gene expression data missing DNA microarray gene expression data, or any other noisy data matrices that are effectively low

  6. On the Application of Principal Component Analysis to DNA Microarray Time Series Data

    E-print Network

    Chu, Kevin T.

    On the Application of Principal Component Analysis to DNA Microarray Time Series Data Kevin Chu December 20, 2001 1 Introduction Advances in DNA microarray and gene chip technologies have made it pos Source of experimental data DNA microarray technology is based on the the unique matching between

  7. Microarray Image Compression: SLOCO and the E ect of Information Loss

    E-print Network

    Yu, Bin

    of California, Berkeley Abstract Microarray image technology is a powerful tool for monitoring the expression. 4 The proven and potential scienti#12;c value of microarray image technology is enormousMicroarray Image Compression: SLOCO and the E#11;ect of Information Loss R. Jornsten a;1 W. Wang b

  8. Finding Informative Genes from Multiple Microarray Experiments: A Graph-based Consensus

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    @cse.buffalo.edu Abstract--With the rapid advancement of biology technology, many microarray experiments are conducted experiments. I. Introduction As the advancement of microarray analysis technology, many experimentsFinding Informative Genes from Multiple Microarray Experiments: A Graph-based Consensus

  9. Discovering temporal patterns of differential gene expression in microarray time series

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    measurement in each condition. Recent advances in microarray technology and falling costs have ledDiscovering temporal patterns of differential gene expression in microarray time series Oliver of Cambridge Abstract: A wealth of time series of microarray measurements have become available over recent

  10. M@CBETH: a microarray classification benchmarking tool Nathalie L.M.M. Pochet

    E-print Network

    and metastatic phe- notype of an individual patient. Microarray technology has shown to be useful in supportingM@CBETH: a microarray classification benchmarking tool Nathalie L.M.M. Pochet , Frizo A.L. Janssens.pochet,frizo.janssens,frank.desmet,kathleen.marchal, johan.suykens,bart.demoor}@esat.kuleuven.ac.be Abstract Summary: Microarray classification can be useful

  11. Gene Aging Nexus: a web database and data mining platform for microarray data on aging

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    September 20, 2006; Accepted October 2, 2006 ABSTRACT The recent development of microarray technology of genomic data to understand the genetic basis of aging. Among those, the microarray technology allows usGene Aging Nexus: a web database and data mining platform for microarray data on aging Fei Pan1

  12. Pattern Recognition Techniques in Microarray Data Analysis Miao Li, Biao Wang, Zohreh Momeni, and Faramarz Valafar

    E-print Network

    Valafar, Faramarz

    level data produced by microarray technology on the genomic scale, sequencing genes on the genomic scale, clustering, expression level data Introduction Microarray technology relies on the hybridization properties to properly comprehend and interpret expression data produced by microarray technology, new computational

  13. Abstract. Microarrays are now established technologies which are considered as key to gene expression analysis. Their

    E-print Network

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    Abstract. Microarrays are now established technologies which are considered as key to gene. In this paper, we present a comparative analysis of two genomic signal processing methods for robust microarray, these classifiers don't require any prior training procedures I. INTRODUCTION t is well known that microarray

  14. Optimal Shrinkage Estimation of Variances with Applications to Microarray Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuedong

    and Yuedong WANG May 27, 2005 Abstract Microarray technology allows a scientist to study genome-wide patterns. Instead of working on a gene-by-gene basis, microarray technology allows the scientists to viewOptimal Shrinkage Estimation of Variances with Applications to Microarray Data Analysis Tiejun TONG

  15. A Hybrid GA/SVM Approach for Gene Selection and Classification of Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Hao, Jin-Kao

    data. 1 Introduction The DNA Microarray technology allows measuring simultaneously the expres- sion]. The Microarray technology typically pro- duces large datasets with expression values for thousands of genesA Hybrid GA/SVM Approach for Gene Selection and Classification of Microarray Data Edmundo Bonilla

  16. Tilescope: online analysis pipeline for high-density tiling microarray data Zhengdong D. Zhang1

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    for further analysis. Rationale Microarray technology is now more accessible than ever before. Thanks to its1 Tilescope: online analysis pipeline for high-density tiling microarray data Zhengdong D. Zhang1: michael.snyder@yale.edu Mark Gerstein: mark.gerstein@yale.edu Running title: microarray data analysis

  17. IntClust: A Software Package for Clustering Replicated Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Li, Tao

    Introduction Gene-expression microarray technology is a widely applied high-throughput means for understandingIntClust: A Software Package for Clustering Replicated Microarray Data Wei Peng and Tao Li School analysis. By utilizing interval data for representing replicated microarray data, IntClust is able to take

  18. Lossless Bit-plane Compression of Microarray Images Using 3D Context Models

    E-print Network

    Paiva, António R. C.

    growth of interest in microarray technol- ogy and the improvement of the technology responsible The DNA microarray technology is a new and effective tool for biomedical research. It allowsLossless Bit-plane Compression of Microarray Images Using 3D Context Models Ant´onio J. R. Neves

  19. Evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted lectin microarray: a new strategy for glycan profiling

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted lectin microarray: a new strategy for glycan profiling no versatile method for glycan profiling. Here we describe a new microarray procedure based on an evanescent by frontal affinity chromatography, another profiling method. Thus, the developed lectin microarray should

  20. Glutamate Receptor GRIA3—Target of CUX1 and Mediator of Tumor Progression in Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, Stefanie; Riedel, Jan; Neesse, Albrecht; Griesmann, Heidi; Buchholz, Malte; Ellenrieder, Volker; Moeller, Franz; Barth, Peter; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we identified the transcription factor CUX1 as an important modulator of invasion and resistance to apoptosis. Expression profiles suggested that CUX1 regulates a complex transcriptional program mediating tumor progression. We aimed to identify functionally relevant targets of CUX1 by using RNA interference (RNAi)-based loss-of-function screens. Therefore, we generated an RNAi library containing putative transcriptional targets of CUX1 identified by microarrays and performed cell viability screens. Using this approach, several CUX1 targets with effect on tumor cell viability were identified, including the glutamate receptor GRIA3, which was validated in detail for its effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and cell migration using RNAi knock-down and overexpression strategies in vitro, as well as xenograft models in vivo. The expression of GRIA3 was evaluated in human pancreatic cancer tissues. We found that knock-down of GRIA3 significantly reduced proliferation and migration and enhanced apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of GRIA3 significantly reduced apoptosis and enhanced both proliferation and tumor cell migration. GRIA3 could be confirmed as a downstream effector of CUX1 and was expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. In vivo, GRIA3 significantly enhanced the growth of subcutaneous xenografts. Inhibitors of glutamate receptors such as GYKI52466 and SYM2206 significantly decreased survival of pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting the presence of glutamate signaling in pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, GRIA3 plays a role as a mediator of tumor progression in pancreatic cancer downstream CUX1. To our knowledge, this is the first report to identify a glutamate receptor as a modulator of tumor progression in a solid cancer outside the brain. PMID:20689760