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Sample records for progressive neurovascular inflammatory

  1. Neurovascular development

    PubMed Central

    James, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    Neurovascular development in the central nervous system has a rich history and compelling significance. The developing central nervous system (CNS) does not produce vascular progenitor cells, and so ingression of blood vessels is required for continued CNS development and function. Classic studies provide elegant descriptions of formation of the vascular plexus that surrounds the embryonic brain and spinal cord, and the subsequent ingression of blood vessels into the neural tissue. Recent work has focused on the molecular pathways responsible for neurovascular cross-talk and development of the blood-brain barrier. Here we review neurovascular development in the central nervous system, with emphasis on the spinal cord. We discuss the historical work, the current status of our knowledge and unanswered questions. The importance of neurovascular development to diseases of the cerebral vasculature and the neural stem cell niche are discussed. PMID:19363295

  2. [Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy with Inflammatory Reactions].

    PubMed

    Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Uchihara, Toshiki; Sanjo, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disorder caused by reactivation of the JC virus associated with impaired host immunity. However, PML may occur even without an evident cause of immunosuppression. In such cases, JC virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may not be detectable with polymerase chain reactions (PCR), and a brain biopsy may be performed. Pathology may exhibit marked inflammatory reactions around the JC virus-infected cells, although typical intranuclear viral inclusions would rarely be seen. Atypical inflammation in patients with PML likely an indication of the host's immune-response against the virus. this is usually observed in those with relatively-mild immunosuppression with favorable prognosis. Here, we describe cases of PML that exhibited inflammatory reactions; a recent topic, PML with immune reconstruction inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), will also be discussed. PMID:27056866

  3. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Pu, Chuanqiang; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Cong, Lu; Liu, Jiexiao; Luo, Hongyu; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Yu, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia is one of mitochondrial disorders, characterized by ptosis, limitation of eye movement, variably severe bulbar muscle weakness and proximal limb weakness. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with acquired disease is extremely rare. We report a 44 years old male patient with more than 20 years of chronic progressive bilateral ptosis and limitation of eye movements manifested dysarthria, dysphagia and neck muscle weakness for 3 years. The first muscle biopsy showed red-ragged fibers and cytochrome c oxidase negative fibers as well as inflammatory cells infiltration. Electron microscopy revealed paracrystalline inclusions. Mitochondrial genetic analysis demonstrated a large-scale mtDNA deletion of m.8470_13446del4977. The patient was treated with prednisone. In a three-year follow-up study, the second biopsy was performed. Before the treatment, except bilateral ptosis and external ophthalmopelgia, this patient presented bulbar muscle weakness and neck muscle weakness. After treated with prednisone, the symptoms of dysphagia, dysarthria and neck muscle weakness were significantly improved, and the second biopsy showed only mitochondrial myopathy pathology but the inflammations disappeared. Here, we report a patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia complicated with inflammatory myopathy and after treated with prednisone as myositis, he had a significant therapeutic effect. PMID:25674260

  4. [Progress in PDE4 targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Song, Shun-de; Tang, Hui-fang

    2014-05-01

    cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) is one of the hot targets for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PDE4 inhibitors can suppress inflammation by increasing the concentration of cAMP in inflammatory cells. The efficacy and safety evaluations of several PDE4 inhibitors are currently carried on in clinical trials, for example GSK256066 in asthma, roflumilast and GSK256066 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tetomilast in inflammatory bowel disease, and apremilast in dermatitis and arthritis etc. This article reviews the recent progress on PDE4-targeted therapy for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24998661

  5. Progress in inflammatory neuropathy -the legacy of Dr Jack Griffin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard A C; Willison, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    The past quarter of a century has brought incredible advances in our understanding of inflammatory neuropathies, and the insights into Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) began in the 1990s with the seminal work of Dr Jack Griffin and his colleagues. In this essay, we provide a tribute to Jack, and review the recent progress in a field that he termed his personal favourite. In particular, we discuss the new developments in our understanding and diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies, the recent emergence of the node of Ranvier and the paranode as sites of intensive investigation, and the mechanistic evidence that is providing a platform for therapeutic development studies. PMID:26458287

  6. Anti-inflammatory agents from plants: progress and potential.

    PubMed

    Recio, M C; Andujar, I; Rios, J L

    2012-01-01

    The identification of substances that can promote the resolution of inflammation in a way that is homeostatic, modulatory, efficient, and well-tolerated by the body is of fundamental importance. Traditional medicines have long provided front-line pharmacotherapy for many millions of people worldwide. Medicinal extracts are a rich source of therapeutic leads for the pharmaceutical industry. The use of medicinal plant therapies to treat chronic illness, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is thus widespread and on the rise.The aim of this review is to present recent progress in clinical anti-inflammatory studies of plant extracts and compound leads such as green tea polyphenols, curcumin, resveratrol, boswellic acid, and cucurbitacins, among others, against chronic inflammatory diseases, mainly RA and IBD. In this context, the present paper also highlights the most promising experimental data on those plant extracts and pure compounds active in animal models of the aforementioned diseases. PMID:22414101

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Progress and Prospect with Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Ali, Asif; Ghosh, Rituparna; Das, Shaileyee; Mandal, Subhash C; Pal, Mahadeb

    2016-01-01

    Diseases associated with chronic inflammatory pathology claim a major share of worldwide deaths each year. A principal reason behind the huge number of casualties is associated with mild or unnoticed symptoms for long period of time since the outset, and that specific treatment options for these diseases have not yet emerged. Current anti-inflammatory drugs essentially have become ineffective for long term protection from these diseases as they also interfere with essential cellular pathways and associated toxicities. Notably, recent studies with a number of phytochemicals have shown promising results. These compounds isolated from various medicinal plants express their anti-inflammatory activities by down regulating expression of several crucial pro-inflammatory mediators. These are mostly antioxidants; inhibit induction of key transcription factors like nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) that are responsible for expression of proinflammatory mediators, and other growth regulators. Definitely, some of these compounds have the potential to be developed into new therapeutic agents to better control inflammation associated diseases in near future. This review summarizes recent findings on the molecular mechanisms through which various inflammatory activities are linked to disease progression and a group of natural products that have shown promise in controlling these processes. PMID:26561064

  8. Immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive asthma progression to remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Broide, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Although histologic features of airway remodeling have been well characterized in asthma, the immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive progression of asthma to remodeling are still incompletely understood. Conceptually, airway remodeling may be due to persistent inflammation and/or aberrant tissue repair mechanisms. It is likely that several immune and inflammatory cell types and mediators are involved in mediating airway remodeling. In addition, different features of airway remodeling are likely mediated by different inflammatory pathways. Several important candidate mediators of remodeling have been identified including TGF-β and Th2 cytokines (including IL-5 and IL-13), as well as VEGF, ADAM-33, and MMP-9. Mouse models of airway remodeling have provided important insight into potential mechanisms by which TGF-β activation of the Smad 2/3 signaling pathway may contribute to airway remodeling. Human studies have demonstrated that anti-IL-5 reduces levels of airway eosinophils expressing TGF-β, as well as levels of airway remodeling as assessed by bronchial biopsies. Further such studies confirming these observations, as well as alternate studies targeting additional individual cell types, cytokines, and mediators are needed in human subjects with asthma to determine the role of candidate mediators of inflammation on the development and progression of airway remodeling. PMID:18328887

  9. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Bramanti, Placido; Osculati, Francesco; Flonta, Maria-Luisa; Radu, Mihai; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU) has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23840097

  10. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Gold, Ralf; Adams, Ortwin; Lassmann, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a viral encephalitis induced by the John Cunningham (JC) virus, an ubiquitous neurotropic papovavirus of the genus polyomavirus that in healthy people in latency resides in kidney and bone marrow cells. Activation and entry into the CNS were first seen in patients with malignancies of the hematopoietic system and an impaired immune system. During the 1980 and the 1990s with the appearance of human immunodeficiency virus infection in humans, PML was found to be the most important opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. As a result of highly efficient immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatments, in recent years, the number of PML cases again increased. PML is prevented by an intact cellular immune response and accordingly immune reconstitution can terminate established disease in the CNS. However, forced immune reconstitution can lead to massive destruction of virus-infected cells. This may result in clinical exacerbation associated with high morbidity and mortality and referred to as PML with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS). In the present review, we discuss virological properties and routes of infection in the CNS, but mostly focus on the pathology of PML and PML-IRIS and on the role of the immune system in these disorders. We show that PML and PML-IRIS result from predominant JC virus infection of oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, of infected neurons. Inflammation in these encephalitides seems to be driven by a dominant cytotoxic T cell response which is massively exaggerated during IRIS. PMID:26323992

  11. Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs. PMID:19786744

  12. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  13. APOE Stabilization by Exercise Prevents Aging Neurovascular Dysfunction and Complement Induction

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana; Graham, Leah C.; Richter, Hannah J.; Simeone, Stephen N.; Radell, Jake E.; Grabowska, Weronika; Funkhouser, W. Keith; Howell, Megan C.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the processes that lead to age-related decline of brain structures and function. Here we use RNA-seq in combination with high resolution histological analyses to show that aging leads to a significant deterioration of neurovascular structures including basement membrane reduction, pericyte loss, and astrocyte dysfunction. Neurovascular decline was sufficient to cause vascular leakage and correlated strongly with an increase in neuroinflammation including up-regulation of complement component C1QA in microglia/monocytes. Importantly, long-term aerobic exercise from midlife to old age prevented this age-related neurovascular decline, reduced C1QA+ microglia/monocytes, and increased synaptic plasticity and overall behavioral capabilities of aged mice. Concomitant with age-related neurovascular decline and complement activation, astrocytic Apoe dramatically decreased in aged mice, a decrease that was prevented by exercise. Given the role of APOE in maintaining the neurovascular unit and as an anti-inflammatory molecule, this suggests a possible link between astrocytic Apoe, age-related neurovascular dysfunction and microglia/monocyte activation. To test this, Apoe-deficient mice were exercised from midlife to old age and in contrast to wild-type (Apoe-sufficient) mice, exercise had little to no effect on age-related neurovascular decline or microglia/monocyte activation in the absence of APOE. Collectively, our data shows that neurovascular structures decline with age, a process that we propose to be intimately linked to complement activation in microglia/monocytes. Exercise prevents these changes, but not in the absence of APOE, opening up new avenues for understanding the complex interactions between neurovascular and neuroinflammatory responses in aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26512759

  14. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Methods Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler technique applying a visual stimulation paradigm. Resting EEG frequencies, visual evoked potentials as well as resting and stimulated hemodynamic responses were obtained. Disease severity was characterized by laboratory and cognitive parameters as well as related scoring systems. Data were compared to a control group. Results Whereas visually evoked potentials (VEP) remained stable a significant slowing and therefore uncoupling of the hemodynamic responses were found in the acute phase of pneumonia (Rate time: control group: 3.6 ± 2.5 vs. acute pneumonia: 1.6 ± 2.4 s; P < 0.0005). In the initial investigation, patients who deteriorated showed a decreased hemodynamic response as compared with those who recovered (gain: recovered: 15% ± 4% vs. deteriorated: 9% ± 3%, P < 0.05; control: 14% ± 5%). After recovery the coupling normalized. Conclusions Our study underlines the role of an early microcirculatory dysfunction in inflammatory syndromes that become evident in pre-septic conditions with a gradual decline according to disease severity. PMID:22520083

  15. Hyperperfusion in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is associated with disease progression and absence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Michael N.; Gheuens, Sarah; Ngo, Long; Wang, Xiaoen; Alsop, David C.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to characterize perfusion patterns of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions by arterial spin labelling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and to analyse their association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and survival. A total of 22 patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy underwent a clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain within 190 days of symptom onset. The presence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was determined based on clinical and laboratory criteria. Perfusion within progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions was determined by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging. We observed intense hyperperfusion within and at the edge of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions in a subset of subjects. This hyperperfusion was quantified by measuring the fraction of lesion volume showing perfusion in excess of twice normal appearing grey matter. Hyperperfused lesion fraction was significantly greater in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy progressors than in survivors (12.8% versus 3.4% P = 0.02) corresponding to a relative risk of progression for individuals with a hyperperfused lesion fraction ≥ 4.0% of 9.1 (95% confidence interval of 1.4–59.5). The presence of hyperperfusion was inversely related to the occurrence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome at the time of scan (P = 0.03). Indeed, within 3 months after symptom onset, hyperperfusion had a positive predictive value of 88% for absence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging recognized regions of elevated perfusion within lesions of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These regions might represent virologically active areas operating in the absence of an effective adaptive immune response and correspond with a worse prognosis. PMID:24088807

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase8 has a central role in inflammatory disorders and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Dejonckheere, Eline; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Libert, Claude

    2011-04-01

    The predominant role of matrix metalloproteinase 8 in extracellular matrix turnover, modulation of inflammatory responses and other physiological processes is well documented. Several recent studies highlight the involvement of MMP8 in a wide range of pathologies. This review will shed light on the putative role of MMP8 as a drug target or disease marker in some inflammatory disorders and in cancer progression. PMID:21388856

  17. Progressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child with central nervous system involvement and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barisić, Nina; Horvath, Rita; Grković, Lana; Mihelcić, Dina; Luetić, Tomislav

    2006-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic disorder, manifesting with monophasic or relapsing course. Progressive course is rare in children. The article presents a boy with progressive generalized muscle weakness and areflexia since the age of two, developed after viral infection. Electromyoneurography showed severe neurogenic lesion, with myopathic pattern in proximal muscles. Increased serum ganglioside antibody titers (anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b) were registered. Sural nerve biopsy revealed demyelination and onion bulbs. Inflammatory perivascular CD3 positive infiltrates were present in muscle and nerve biopsies. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy, hyperintensities of the white matter and gray matter hypointensities. Improvement occurred on intravenous immune globulins and methylprednisolone treatment. Demyelination might develop in central and peripheral nervous system associated with inflammatory myopathy in patients with progressive course of CIDP. PMID:17243577

  18. Inflammatory infratentorial progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lach, Boleslaw; Connolly, Barbara; Wüthrich, Christian; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-02-01

    An 84-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate, developed progressive confusion and cerebellar symptoms, and died approximately 2 months later. Neuropathological examination revealed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) involving the cerebellum and brainstem. The affected tissues displayed intense infiltrations by CD8+ T-cells and microglia. JC virus was localized in oligodendroglia and cerebellar granule cells. This case illustrates unusual localization of inflammatory PML in a patient with RA treated with methotrexate. PMID:23683127

  19. Neurovascular coupling: a parallel implementation

    PubMed Central

    Dormanns, Katharina; Brown, Richard G.; David, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) is presented based on neuronal activity coupled to vasodilation/contraction models via the astrocytic mediated perivascular K+ and the smooth muscle cell (SMC) Ca2+ pathway termed a neurovascular unit (NVU). Luminal agonists acting on P2Y receptors on the endothelial cell (EC) surface provide a flux of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) into the endothelial cytosol. This concentration of IP3 is transported via gap junctions between EC and SMC providing a source of sarcoplasmic derived Ca2+ in the SMC. The model is able to relate a neuronal input signal to the corresponding vessel reaction (contraction or dilation). A tissue slice consisting of blocks, each of which contain an NVU is connected to a space filling H-tree, simulating a perfusing arterial tree (vasculature) The model couples the NVUs to the vascular tree via a stretch mediated Ca2+ channel on both the EC and SMC. The SMC is induced to oscillate by increasing an agonist flux in the EC and hence increased IP3 induced Ca2+ from the SMC stores with the resulting calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) oscillation inhibiting NVC thereby relating blood flow to vessel contraction and dilation following neuronal activation. The coupling between the vasculature and the set of NVUs is relatively weak for the case with agonist induced where only the Ca2+ in cells inside the activated area becomes oscillatory however, the radii of vessels both inside and outside the activated area oscillate (albeit small for those outside). In addition the oscillation profile differs between coupled and decoupled states with the time required to refill the cytosol with decreasing Ca2+ and increasing frequency with coupling. The solution algorithm is shown to have excellent weak and strong scaling. Results have been generated for tissue slices containing up to 4096 blocks. PMID:26441619

  20. Neurovascular coupling: a parallel implementation.

    PubMed

    Dormanns, Katharina; Brown, Richard G; David, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) is presented based on neuronal activity coupled to vasodilation/contraction models via the astrocytic mediated perivascular K(+) and the smooth muscle cell (SMC) Ca(2+) pathway termed a neurovascular unit (NVU). Luminal agonists acting on P2Y receptors on the endothelial cell (EC) surface provide a flux of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) into the endothelial cytosol. This concentration of IP3 is transported via gap junctions between EC and SMC providing a source of sarcoplasmic derived Ca(2+) in the SMC. The model is able to relate a neuronal input signal to the corresponding vessel reaction (contraction or dilation). A tissue slice consisting of blocks, each of which contain an NVU is connected to a space filling H-tree, simulating a perfusing arterial tree (vasculature) The model couples the NVUs to the vascular tree via a stretch mediated Ca(2+) channel on both the EC and SMC. The SMC is induced to oscillate by increasing an agonist flux in the EC and hence increased IP3 induced Ca(2+) from the SMC stores with the resulting calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) oscillation inhibiting NVC thereby relating blood flow to vessel contraction and dilation following neuronal activation. The coupling between the vasculature and the set of NVUs is relatively weak for the case with agonist induced where only the Ca(2+) in cells inside the activated area becomes oscillatory however, the radii of vessels both inside and outside the activated area oscillate (albeit small for those outside). In addition the oscillation profile differs between coupled and decoupled states with the time required to refill the cytosol with decreasing Ca(2+) and increasing frequency with coupling. The solution algorithm is shown to have excellent weak and strong scaling. Results have been generated for tissue slices containing up to 4096 blocks. PMID:26441619

  1. Neurovascular dysfunction and neurodegeneration in dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amy R; Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-01

    Vascular insults can initiate a cascade of molecular events leading to neurodegeneration, cognitive impairment, and dementia. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms in cerebral blood vessels and the pathophysiological events leading to cerebral blood flow dysregulation and disruption of the neurovascular unit and the blood-brain barrier, which all may contribute to the onset and progression of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Particularly, we examine the link between neurovascular dysfunction and neurodegeneration including the effects of AD genetic risk factors on cerebrovascular functions and clearance of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide toxin, and the impact of vascular risk factors, environment, and lifestyle on cerebral blood vessels, which in turn may affect synaptic, neuronal, and cognitive functions. Finally, we examine potential experimental treatments for dementia and AD based on the neurovascular model, and discuss some critical questions to be addressed by future studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26705676

  2. Brain imaging of neurovascular dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Axel; Nation, Daniel A; Pa, Judy; Sweeney, Melanie D; Toga, Arthur W; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-01

    Neurovascular dysfunction, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and cerebral blood flow (CBF) dysregulation and reduction, are increasingly recognized to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial and temporal relationships between different pathophysiological events during preclinical stages of AD, including cerebrovascular dysfunction and pathology, amyloid and tau pathology, and brain structural and functional changes remain, however, still unclear. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, i.e., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), offer new possibilities to understand how the human brain works in health and disease. This includes methods to detect subtle regional changes in the cerebrovascular system integrity. Here, we focus on the neurovascular imaging techniques to evaluate regional BBB permeability (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), regional CBF changes (arterial spin labeling- and functional-MRI), vascular pathology (structural MRI), and cerebral metabolism (PET) in the living human brain, and examine how they can inform about neurovascular dysfunction and vascular pathophysiology in dementia and AD. Altogether, these neuroimaging approaches will continue to elucidate the spatio-temporal progression of vascular and neurodegenerative processes in dementia and AD and how they relate to each other. PMID:27038189

  3. Progressive inflammatory pathology in the retina of aluminum-fed 5xFAD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pogue, A I; Dua, P; Hill, J M; Lukiw, W J

    2015-11-01

    At least 57 murine transgenic models for Alzheimer's disease (Tg-AD) have been developed to overexpress the 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptide in the central nervous system (CNS). These 'humanized murine Tg-AD models' have greatly expanded our understanding of the contribution of Aβ42 peptide-mediated pro-inflammatory neuropathology to the AD process. A number of independent laboratories using different amyloid-overexpressing Tg-AD models have shown that supplementation of murine Tg-AD diets and/or drinking water with aluminum significantly enhances Aβ42 peptide-mediated inflammatory pathology and AD-type cognitive change compared to animals receiving control diets. In humans AD-type pathology appears to originate in the limbic system and progressively spreads into primary processing and sensory regions such as the retina. In these studies, for the first time, we assess the propagation of Aβ42 and inflammatory signals into the retina of 5xFAD Tg-AD amyloid-overexpressing mice whose diets were supplemented with aluminum. The two most interesting findings were (1) that similar to other Tg-AD models, there was a significantly accelerated development of Aβ42 and inflammatory pathology in 5xFAD Tg-AD mice fed aluminum; and (2) in aluminum-supplemented animals, markers for inflammatory pathology appeared in both the brain and the retina as evidenced by an evolving presence of Aβ42 peptides, and accompanied by inflammatory markers - cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicate that in the 5xFAD Tg-AD model aluminum not only enhances an Aβ42-mediated inflammatory degeneration of the brain but also appears to induce AD-type pathology in an anatomically-linked primary sensory area that involves vision. PMID:26213226

  4. Inflammatory Leukocyte Phenotypes Correlate with Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bethany B.; Fry, Chris; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Han, MeiLan K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Flaherty, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive deposition of extracellular matrix, worsening dyspnea, and eventual mortality. Pathogenesis of IPF is poorly understood and the role inflammation and activated leukocytes play in the disease process is controversial. Previous studies demonstrated that activated leukocyte subsets characterize IPF patients. We sought to validate this observation in a well-defined cohort of 35 IPF patients and to correlate the observed leukocyte phenotypes with robust parameters of disease progression. We demonstrate that in univariate and multivariate analyses, increases in the CD14hi, CD16hi subset of monocytes measured at baseline correlated with disease progression, with a threshold value >0.5% of the total peripheral blood mononuclear cells being a significant predictor for worse outcome. In addition, several T cell subsets, including CD25 expressing CD4 cells, and CXCR3 expressing CD4 and CD8 subsets correlated with disease progression when found in increased percentages in the peripheral blood of IPF patients when sampled at baseline. Somewhat surprising in comparison to previous literature, the CD4 T cells did not appear to have lost expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, but the CD8 T cells did. Taken together, these results are consistent with the presence of an inflammatory process in IPF patients who eventually progress. However, when longitudinal measurements of these same markers were examined, there was significant heterogeneity of expression and these biomarkers did not necessarily remain elevated in IPF patients with progressive disease. We interpret this heterogeneity to suggest that IPF patients experience episodic inflammatory events that once triggered, may lead to disease progression. This longitudinal heterogeneity in biomarker analyses may explain why such markers are not consistently measured in all IPF cohorts. PMID:25580363

  5. Biphasic Mechanisms of Neurovascular Unit Injury and Protection In CNS Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Pham, Loc-Duyen D.; Xing, Changhong; Lo, Eng H.; Arai, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, evidence has emerged that there is a variety of bidirectional cell-cell and/or cell-extracellular matrix interactions within the neurovascular unit (NVU), which is composed of neuronal, glial, and vascular cells along with extracellular matrix. Many central nervous system (CNS) diseases, which lead to NVU dysfunction, have common features such as glial activation/transformation and vascular/blood-brain-barrier alteration. These phenomena show dual opposite roles, harmful at acute phase and beneficial at chronic phase. This diverse heterogeneity may induce biphasic clinical courses, i.e. degenerative and regenerative processes in the context of a dynamically coordinated cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions in the NVU. A deeper understanding of the seemingly contradictory actions in cellular levels is essential for NVU protection or regeneration to suppress the deleterious inflammatory reactions and promote adaptive remodeling after CNS injury. This mini-review will present an overview of recent progress in the biphasic roles of the NVU and discuss the clinical relevance of NVU responses associated with CNS diseases, such as stroke and other chronic neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23469847

  6. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25713992

  7. Investigating the Limits of Neurovascular Coupling.

    PubMed

    Denfield, George H; Fahey, Paul G; Reimer, Jacob; Tolias, Andreas S

    2016-09-01

    O'Herron et al. (2016) perform two-photon imaging of vascular and neural responses in cat and rodent primary visual cortex to investigate the limits of neurovascular coupling. Their results suggest important constraints on making inferences about neuronal responses from hemodynamic activity. PMID:27608758

  8. Progressive Mitral Stenosis After MitraClip Implantation in a Patient With Systemic Inflammatory Disease.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Ailawadi, Gorav; Fowler, Dale E; LaPar, Damien J; Dent, John M; Ragosta, Michael; Lim, D Scott

    2016-08-01

    We describe a patient at high surgical risk who was successfully treated with a MitraClip (Abbott Vascular, Menlo Park, CA) without transmitral gradient. She received corticosteroid therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus, and progressive mitral stenosis developed late after MitraClip implantation. It gradually increased and reached 23 mm Hg at 28 months after the procedure; during the same period, her dose of prednisone had to be increased owing to lupus flare. Systemic inflammatory disease has the potential to result in mitral valve inflammation and fibrosis, ultimately causing thickening of the tissue bridge and worsening of the mitral valve obstruction. Preprocedural counseling regarding durability may help in this population. PMID:27449466

  9. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  10. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  11. Anti-inflammatory therapies in TRAMP mice: delay in PCa progression.

    PubMed

    Kido, Larissa Akemi; Montico, Fabio; Sauce, Rafael; Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Minatel, Elaine; Costa, Débora Barbosa Vendramini; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Pilli, Ronaldo Aloise; Cagnon, Valeria Helena Alves

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the structural and molecular biology as well as evaluate the immediate and late responses of prostatic cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model after treatment with goniothalamin (GTN) and celecoxib. The treated mice received GTN (150 mg/kg, gavage) or celecoxib (10 mg/kg, gavage) from 8 to 12 weeks of age. They were killed at different ages: the immediate-response groups at 12 weeks and the late-response groups at 22 weeks. The ventral prostate was collected for light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, TUNEL, and ELISA. Morphological analyses indicated that GTN treatment delayed the progression of prostatic adenocarcinoma, leading to a significant decrease of prostatic lesion frequency in both experimental period responses to this treatment, mainly high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Also, the celecoxib treatment showed a particular decrease in the proliferative processes (PCNA) in both the experimental periods. Despite celecoxib diminishing the COX2 and IGFR1 levels, GTN presented higher action spectrum considering the decrease of a greater molecular number involved in the proliferative and inflammatory processes in prostatic cancer. Goniothalamin attenuated the pro-inflammatory response in TRAMP prostatic microenvironment, delaying prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Celecoxib treatment was efficient in the regulation of COX2 in the TRAMP mice, mainly in the advanced disease grade. Finally, we concluded that inflammatory process control in early grades of PCa was crucial for the downregulation of the signaling pathways involved in the proliferative processes in advanced cancer grades. PMID:26772819

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Neurovascular Dysfunction Induced by Intracerebral Administered Homocysteine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip K.; Kalani, Anuradha; Givvimani, Srikanth; Sathnur, PB; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) are associated with neurovascular diseases. H2S, a metabolite of Hcy, has a potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, the effect of H2S has not been explored in Hcy (IC) induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction in mice. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of H2S on Hcy induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. To test this hypothesis we employed wild type (WT) males ages 8–10 weeks, WT+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), WT+ Hcy (0.5μmol/μl) intracerebral injection (I.C., one time only prior to NaHS treatment), WT+Hcy +NaHS (sodium hydrogen sulfide, precursor of H2S, 30 μmol/kg, body weight). NaHS was injected intra-peritoneally (I.P.) once daily for the period of 7 days after the Hcy (IC) injection. Hcy treatment significantly increased MDA, nitrite level, acetylcholinestrase activity, TNFα, IL1β, GFAP, iNOS, eNOS and decreased glutathione level indicating oxidative-nitrosative stress and neuroinflammation as compared to control and aCSF treated groups. Further, increased expression of NSE, S100B and decreased expression of (PSD95, SAP97) synaptic protein indicated neurodegeneration. Brain sections of Hcy treated mice showed damage in the cortical area and periventricular cells. TUNEL positive cells and Fluro Jade-C staining indicated apoptosis and neurodegeneration. The increased expression of MMP9, MMP2 and decreased expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2, tight junction proteins (ZO1, Occuldin) in Hcy treated group indicate neurovascular remodeling. Interestingly, NaHS treatment significantly attenuated Hcy induced oxidative stress, memory deficit, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation and cerebrovascular remodeling. The results indicate that H2S is effective in providing protection against neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. PMID:23912038

  13. Involvement of astrocytes in neurovascular communication.

    PubMed

    Nuriya, M; Hirase, H

    2016-01-01

    The vascular interface of the brain is distinct from that of the peripheral tissue in that astrocytes, the most numerous glial cell type in the gray matter, cover the vasculature with their endfeet. This morphological feature of the gliovascular junction has prompted neuroscientists to suggest possible functional roles of astrocytes including astrocytic modulation of the vasculature. Additionally, astrocytes develop an intricate morphology that intimately apposes neuronal synapses, making them an ideal cellular mediator of neurovascular coupling. In this article, we first introduce the classical anatomical and physiological findings that led to the proposal of various gliovascular interaction models. Next, we touch on the technological advances in the past few decades that enabled investigations and evaluations of neuro-glio-vascular interactions in situ. We then review recent experimental findings on the roles of astrocytes in neurovascular coupling from the viewpoints of intra- and intercellular signalings in astrocytes. PMID:27130410

  14. The Multiple Sclerosis Degradome: Enzymatic Cascades in Development and Progression of Central Nervous System Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scarisbrick, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    An array of studies implicate different classes of protease and their endogenous inhibitors in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis based on expression patterns in MS lesions, sera, and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Growing evidence exists regarding their mechanistic roles in inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of this disease. Proteolytic events participate in demyelination, axon injury, apoptosis, and development of the inflammatory response including immune cell activation and extravasation, cytokine and chemokine activation/inactivation, complement activation, and epitope spreading. The potential significance of proteolytic activity to MS therefore relates not only to their potential use as important biomarkers of disease activity, but additionally as prospective therapeutic targets. Experimental data indicate that understanding the net physiological consequence of altered protease levels in MS development and progression necessitates understanding protease activity in the context of substrates, endogenous inhibitors, and proteolytic cascade interactions, which together make up the MS degradome. This review will focus on evidence regarding the potential physiologic role of those protease families already identified as markers of disease activity in MS; that is, the metallo-, serine, and cysteine proteases. PMID:18219817

  15. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh; Shah, Minal; Tavakoli-Tabasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. A 52-year-old man with HIV infection, recently started on antiretroviral therapy, presented with symptoms of mental cloudiness, blurry vision and ataxia. MRI of the brain showed nodular perivascular space enhancement with surrounding vasogenic oedema and midline shift. A lumbar puncture revealed non-inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid and was positive for JC virus. As the patient developed worsening symptoms in the setting of initiation of antiretroviral therapy with immune recovery, a diagnosis of JC virus-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was made. With recent literature on the use of CCR5 antagonist maraviroc in PML, our patient was started on maraviroc and noted to have improvement in PML IRIS. This is the first case of an HIV-positive patient successfully treated for PML IRIS with maraviroc, as verified by our literature review; also, our case has clinical implications in improving outcome in PML IRIS. PMID:26063110

  16. 21 CFR 882.5950 - Neurovascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... embolization device. (a) Identification. A neurovascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to permanently occlude blood flow to cerebral aneurysms and cerebral ateriovenous...

  17. Pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy: focus on neurovascular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sytze Van Dam, P; Cotter, Mary A; Bravenboer, Bert; Cameron, Norman E

    2013-11-01

    Neuropathies of the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems affect up to half of all people with diabetes, and are major risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation. The aetiology is multifactorial: metabolic changes in diabetes may directly affect neural tissue, but importantly, neurodegenerative changes are precipitated by compromised nerve vascular supply. Experiments in animal models of diabetic neuropathy suggest that similar metabolic sequelae affect neurons and vasa nervorum endothelium. These include elevated polyol pathway activity, oxidative stress, the formation of advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products, and various pro-inflammatory changes such as elevated protein kinase C, nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase signalling. These mechanisms do not work in isolation but strongly interact in a mutually facilitatory fashion. Nitrosative stress and the induction of the enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase form one important link between physiological stressors such as reactive oxygen species and the pro-inflammatory mechanisms. Recently, evidence points to endoplasmic stress and the unfolded protein response as forming another crucial link. This review focuses on the aetiopathogenesis of neurovascular changes in diabetic neuropathy, elucidated in animal studies, and on putative therapeutic targets the majority of which have yet to be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. PMID:23872412

  18. Surgical management of malignant cerebral edema secondary to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome from natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2015-10-01

    We report a rare multiple sclerosis (MS) patient who developed malignant cerebral edema related to progressive multifocal encephalopathy (PML) immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after natalizumab discontinuation. The patient subsequently required a decompressive hemicraniectomy to reduce intracranial pressure and to avoid uncal herniation. PML is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which affects oligodendrocytes and is caused by reactivation of latent John Cunningham virus. Natalizumab is a known risk factor (1 in 1000) for MS patients treated with this drug. Discontinuation of natalizumab treatment decreases the risk of PML progression, but a massive inflammatory response can occur after cell-mediated immune surveillance is reestablished in the CNS, causing immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Treatment of IRIS usually consists of steroids and plasma exchange to lessen the immune response, however, mortality has been reported at up to 29.4%, despite aggressive medical treatment. We discuss our management strategy with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:26115897

  19. Low level arsenic promotes progressive inflammatory angiogenesis and liver blood vessel remodeling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Adam C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Vin, Harina; Ross, Mark A.; Soucy, Nicole V.; Klei, Linda R.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2007-08-01

    The vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water are global health concerns contributing to human disease worldwide. Arsenic targets the endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and endothelial cell activation or dysfunction may underlie the pathogenesis of both arsenic-induced vascular diseases and arsenic-enhanced tumorigenesis. The purpose of the current studies was to demonstrate that exposing mice to drinking water containing environmentally relevant levels of arsenic promoted endothelial cell dysfunction and pathologic vascular remodeling. Increased angiogenesis, neovascularization, and inflammatory cell infiltration were observed in Matrigel plugs implanted in C57BL/6 mice following 5-week exposures to 5-500 ppb arsenic [Soucy, N.V., Mayka, D., Klei, L.R., Nemec, A.A., Bauer, J.A., Barchowsky, A., 2005. Neovascularization and angiogenic gene expression following chronic arsenic exposure in mice. Cardiovasc.Toxicol 5, 29-42]. Therefore, functional in vivo effects of arsenic on endothelial cell function and vessel remodeling in an endogenous vascular bed were investigated in the liver. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) became progressively defenestrated and underwent capillarization to decrease vessel porosity following exposure to 250 ppb arsenic for 2 weeks. Sinusoidal expression of PECAM-1 and laminin-1 proteins, a hallmark of capillarization, was also increased by 2 weeks of exposure. LSEC caveolin-1 protein and caveolae expression were induced after 2 weeks of exposure indicating a compensatory change. Likewise, CD45/CD68-positive inflammatory cells did not accumulate in the livers until after LSEC porosity was decreased, indicating that inflammation is a consequence and not a cause of the arsenic-induced LSEC phenotype. The data demonstrate that the liver vasculature is an early target of pathogenic arsenic effects and that the mouse liver vasculature is a sensitive model for investigating vascular health effects of arsenic.

  20. Persistent trigeminal artery causing "double" neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Merlo, Paola; Rognone, Felice; Noce, Monica; Rognone, Elisa; Bono, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with right VI nerve palsy and homolateral atypical trigeminal neuralgia; standard neuroradiological investigation of orbital/retroorbital regions and intracranial arteries excluded the most commonly demonstrable underlying causes while brain magnetic resonance (T1-weighted fat suppression; T2-weighted thin-section) and magnetic resonance angiography disclosed the evidence of "double" neurovascular conflict because of persistent trigeminal artery with aneurysmal dilation. A role of this almost rare vascular condition in causing painful ophthalmoplegia is discussed. PMID:19267790

  1. Major neurovascular complications of clavicle fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clitherow, Harry DS

    2014-01-01

    Clavicle fracture fixation is becoming an increasingly common operation, with good clinical outcomes and a low rate of significant complications. However, there are several reports of rare but potentially life or limb threatening, neurovascular complications. Arterial injuries are usually pseudoaneurysms associated with prominent screws. These may be clinically silent for several years before presenting as subcritical upper limb ischaemia. Venous injuries are a result of tearing of the vessel wall by fracture manipulation, drills or implants. This produces intra-operative haemorrhage and potentially air embolism, which can be fatal if not rapidly recognized and managed. Brachial plexopathy is the result of traction on adherent plexus or impingement by fracture fragments or callus. It presents as severe arm pain and paralysis immediately postoperatively. Neurovascular injuries can be avoided by a combination of pre-operative planning, communication with anaesthetic staff and strategic surgical technique. The plane of the surgical exposure, release of the soft tissues, drill direction and depth and screw length are all important factors.

  2. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation in Neurovascular Headaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the SPG in 'nasal headaches', which are now part of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and cluster headache (ICHD-III-beta). Since then various interventions with blocking or lesional properties have targeted the SPG (transnasal injection of lidocaine and other agents, alcohol or steroid injections, radiofrequency lesions, or even ganglionectomy); success rates vary, but benefit is usually transient. Here we briefly review some anatomophysiological characteristics of the SPG and hypotheses about its pathophysiological role in neurovascular headaches before describing recent therapeutic results obtained with electrical stimulation of the SPG. Based on results of a prospective randomized controlled study, SPG stimulation appears to be an effective treatment option for patients with chronic cluster headaches; efficacy data indicate that acute electrical stimulation of the SPG provides significant attack pain relief and in many cases pain freedom compared to sham stimulation. Moreover, in some patients SPG stimulation has been associated with a significant and clinically meaningful reduction in cluster headache attack frequency; this preventive effect of SPG stimulation warrants further investigation. For migraine attacks, the outcome of a proof-of-concept study using a temporary electrode implanted in the pterygopalatine fossa was less encouraging; however, an ongoing multicenter trial is evaluating the efficacy of long-term SPG stimulation against sham stimulation for acute and preventive treatment in patients with frequent migraine. PMID:26394372

  3. THE ROLE OF TUMOR PROGRESSION LOCUS 2 (TPL-2) PROTEIN KINASE IN GLIAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Hirschhorn, Joshua; Mohanty, Sangeeta; Bhat, Narayan R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2)/Cot kinase is a newer member of MAP3K family that is now known for its essential role in TNFα expression in macrophages, but its proinflammatory signaling, if any, in glia is unknown. When cultures of murine microglia and astrocytes were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, there was a rapid activation (i.e., phosphorylation) of Tpl2 in parallel to the activation of down-stream effector MAPKs i.e., ERK, p38 MAPK and JNK. Pre-incubation of the cultures with a Tpl2 inhibitor selectively suppressed the activation of the primary down-stream target i.e., ERK relative to p38 MAPK and JNK. That Tpl2 activation was functionally involved in glial inflammatory response was indicated by a reduced release of the cytokines i.e., TNFα and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the presence of the kinase inhibitor. Further, overexpression of a wild-type Tpl2 construct in C-6 glia resulted in an enhanced transcriptional activation of iNOS while transfection with a dominant negative form of Tpl-2 had the opposite effect. The findings assign an important proinflammatory signaling function for Tpl2 pathway in glial cells. PMID:24188160

  4. Plant-Derived Anti-Inflammatory Compounds: Hopes and Disappointments regarding the Translation of Preclinical Knowledge into Clinical Progress

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Robert; Zündorf, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Many diseases have been described to be associated with inflammatory processes. The currently available anti-inflammatory drug therapy is often not successful or causes intolerable side effects. Thus, new anti-inflammatory substances are still urgently needed. Plants were the first source of remedies in the history of mankind. Since their chemical characterization in the 19th century, herbal bioactive compounds have fueled drug development. Also, nowadays, new plant-derived agents continuously enrich our drug arsenal (e.g., vincristine, galantamine, and artemisinin). The number of new, pharmacologically active herbal ingredients, in particular that of anti-inflammatory compounds, rises continuously. The major obstacle in this field is the translation of preclinical knowledge into evidence-based clinical progress. Human trials of good quality are often missing or, when available, are frequently not suitable to really prove a therapeutical value. This minireview will summarize the current situation of 6 very prominent plant-derived anti-inflammatory compounds: curcumin, colchicine, resveratrol, capsaicin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and quercetin. We will highlight their clinical potential and/or pinpoint an overestimation. Moreover, we will sum up the planned trials in order to provide insights into the inflammatory disorders that are hypothesized to be beneficially influenced by the compound. PMID:24987194

  5. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  6. Long term follow up of neurovascular island flaps.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H P; Reid, D A

    1980-06-01

    The results of a ten year mean follow up of twenty Neurovascular Island Flaps and two Radial Nerve Innervated Cross Finger Flaps are presented. Sensory acuity sufficient for tactile gnosis was achieved in nineteen cases. In only one case had sensory acuity deteriorated since operation. Use of the flap was hampered in one patient by a pre-existing neuroma. Complete sensory reorientation occurred in five patients. Sensory misreference persisted more commonly on dominant hands. It was our impression that Porter's Letter Test revealed the patients making most use of their neurovascular island flaps. The place of neurovascular island flaps in the management of the mutilated hand is discussed. PMID:7409615

  7. The Neurovascular Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Anne B.; Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Akula, James D.

    2009-01-01

    The continuing worldwide epidemic of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a leading cause of childhood visual impairment, strongly motivates further research into mechanisms of the disease. Although the hallmark of ROP is abnormal retinal vasculature, a growing body of evidence supports a critical role for the neural retina in the ROP disease process. The age of onset of ROP coincides with the rapid developmental increase in rod photoreceptor outer segment length and rhodopsin content of the retina with escalation of energy demands. Using a combination of non-invasive electroretinographic (ERG), psychophysical, and image analysis procedures, the neural retina and its vasculature have been studied in prematurely born human subjects, both with and without ROP, and in rats that model the key vascular and neural parameters found in human ROP subjects. These data are compared to comprehensive numeric summaries of the neural and vascular features in normally developing human and rat retina. In rats, biochemical, anatomical, and molecular biological investigations are paired with the non-invasive assessments. ROP, even if mild, primarily and persistently alters the structure and function of photoreceptors. Post-receptor neurons and retinal vasculature, which are intimately related, are also affected by ROP; conspicuous neurovascular abnormalities disappear, but subtle structural anomalies and functional deficits may persist years after clinical ROP resolves. The data from human subjects and rat models identify photoreceptor and post-receptor targets for interventions that promise improved outcomes for children at risk for ROP. PMID:19563909

  8. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  9. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound in neurovascular diseases: diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, M Akif

    2012-11-01

    Albeit no direct anatomical information can be obtained, neurosonological methods provide real-time determination of velocity, and spectral waveform of blood flow in basal intracranial arteries adds significant benefit to the care of the patients with neurovascular diseases. Several features, such as relative simplicity in terms of interpretation and performance, significantly low cost, totally non-invasiveness, portability, and excellent temporal resolution, make neurosonology increasingly popular tool for evaluation, planning, and monitoring of treatment, and for determining prognosis in various neurovascular diseases. Usefulness of transcranial Doppler in diagnosing/monitoring subarachnoid hemorrhage related vasospasm and sickle cell vasculopathy is already well known. Utility in diagnosis of intracranial arterial stenosis, acute occlusion and recanalization, intracranial hemodynamic effect of the cervical arterial pathologies, intracranial pressure increase, and cerebral circulatory arrest are also well established. Neurosonological determination of vasomotor reactivity, cerebral autoregulation, neurovascular coupling, and micro-embolic signals detection are useful in the assessment of stroke risk, diagnosis of right-to-left shunting, and monitoring during surgery and interventional procedures. Transcranial Doppler is also an evolving ultrasound method with a therapeutic potential such as augmentation of clot lysis and cerebral delivery of thrombolytic or neuroprotective agent loaded nanobubbles in neurovascular diseases. The aim of this study is to give an overview of current usage of the different ultrasound modalities in different neurovascular diseases. PMID:23050641

  10. Andrographolide Ameliorates Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression by Inhibiting Inflammatory Cell Infiltration through Downregulation of Cytokine and Integrin Expression.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Liu, Zhenjie; Wang, Qiwei; Giles, Jasmine; Greenberg, Jason; Sheibani, Nader; Kent, K Craig; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), characterized by exuberant inflammation and tissue deterioration, is a common aortic disease associated with a high mortality rate. There is currently no established pharmacological therapy to treat this progressive disease. Andrographolide (Andro), a major bioactive component of the herbaceous plant Andrographis paniculata, has been found to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activity in several disease models. In this study, we investigated the ability of Andro to suppress inflammation associated with aneurysms, and whether it may be used to block the progression of AAA. Whereas diseased aortae continued to expand in the solvent-treated group, daily administration of Andro to mice with small aneurysms significantly attenuated aneurysm growth, as measured by the diminished expansion of aortic diameter (165.68 ± 15.85% vs. 90.62 ± 22.91%, P < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that Andro decreased infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and T cells. Mechanistically, Andro inhibited arterial NF-κB activation and reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines [CCL2, CXCL10, tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon-γ] in the treated aortae. Furthermore, Andro suppressed α4 integrin expression and attenuated the ability of monocytes/macrophages to adhere to activated endothelial cells. These results indicate that Andro suppresses progression of AAA, likely through inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration via downregulation of NF-κB-mediated cytokine production and α4 integrin expression. Thus, Andro may offer a pharmacological therapy to slow disease progression in patients with small aneurysms. PMID:26483397

  11. Neurovascular anatomy of the embryonic quail hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Matthew T; Poole, Thomas J

    2009-10-01

    Blood vessel and nerve development in the vertebrate embryo possess certain similarities in pattern and molecular guidance cues. To study the specific influence of shared guidance molecules on nervous and vascular development, an understanding of the normal neurovascular anatomy must be in place. The present study documents the pattern of nervous and vascular development in the Japanese quail hindlimb using immunohistochemistry and fluorescently labeled intravital injection combined with confocal and epifluorescent microscopy. The developmental patterns of major nerves and blood vessels of embryonic hindlimbs between stages E2.75 (HH18) and E6.0 (HH29) are described. By E2.75, the dorsal aortae have begun to fuse into a single vessel at the level of the hindlimb, and have completely fused by E3 (HH20). The posterior cardinal vein is formed at the level of the hindlimb by E3, as is the main artery of the early hindlimb, the ischiadic artery, as an offshoot of the dorsal aorta. Our data suggest that eight spinal segments, versus seven as reported by others (Tanaka and Landmesser,1986a; Tyrrell et al.,1990), contribute to innervation of the quail hindlimb. Lumbosacral neurites reach the plexus region by E3.5 (HH21 & 22), pause for approximately 24 hr, and then enter the hindlimb along with the ischiadic and crural arteries through shared foramina in the pelvic anlage. The degree of anterior-posterior spatial congruency between major nerves and blood vessels of the quail hindlimb was found to be highest medial to the pelvic girdle precursor, versus in the hindlimb proper. PMID:19685501

  12. Anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Trotta, Vincenzo; Mennella, Ilario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ettorre, Michele; Graverini, Antonio; De Santis, Alessandro; Di Monte, Elisabetta; Coniglio, Maria Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of nutritional intervention on inflammatory status and wellness in people with multiple sclerosis. To this end, in a seven-month pilot study we investigated the effects of a calorie-restricted, semi-vegetarian diet and administration of vitamin D and other dietary supplements (fish oil, lipoic acid, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, resveratrol and multivitamin complex) in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. At 0/3/6 months, patients had neurological examination, filled questionnaires and underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. Serum fatty acids and vitamin D levels were measured as markers of dietary compliance and nutritional efficacy of treatment, whereas serum gelatinase levels were analyzed as markers of inflammatory status. All patients had insufficient levels of vitamin D at baseline, but their values did not ameliorate following a weekly administration of 5000  IU, and rather decreased over time. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increased already after three months, even under dietary restriction only. Co-treatment with interferon-beta in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis was irrelevant to vitamin D levels. After six months nutritional treatment, no significant changes in neurological signs were observed in any group. However, serum levels of the activated isoforms of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 decreased by 59% in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis and by 51% in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients under nutritional intervention, including dietary supplements. This study indicates that a healthy nutritional intervention is well accepted by people with multiple sclerosis and may ameliorate their physical and inflammatory status. PMID:26785711

  13. Fulminant inflammatory leukoencephalopathy associated with HAART-induced immune restoration in AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vendrely, Aurélie; Bienvenu, Boris; Gasnault, Jacques; Thiebault, Jean Baptiste; Salmon, Dominique; Gray, Françoise

    2005-04-01

    HAART-induced immune restoration is beneficial for patients with AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). However, in rare instances, an immune-reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) may cause paradoxical clinical deterioration. We report the neuropathological study of an AIDS patient who presented with progressive cognitive deterioration; CD4(+) count was 117 and the HIV viral load >10(4); imaging showed non-enhancing lesions consistent with PML. Following initiation of HAART, CD4(+) was 300 and HIV viral load <10(3), but his neurological symptoms continued to deteriorate. Imaging revealed an increase in the size and number of lesions and enhancement of all the lesions. A stereotactic biopsy showed severe inflammatory and demyelinating lesions with marked infiltration by macrophages and T lymphocytes in the absence of a detectable infectious agent. Despite high doses of steroids, the patient died 3 months after admission. Autopsy showed two types of lesions: (1) active inflammatory PML changes with abundant JC virus, and intraparenchymal and perivascular infiltration by T lymphocytes, and (2) acute perivenous leukoencephalitis devoid of JC virus. Most lymphocytes were CD8(+) lymphocytes; CD4(+) lymphocytes were virtually absent. Two pathological reactions were associated with the paradoxical clinical deterioration related to dysregulation of the immune response characteristic of IRIS in PML: (1) an accentuation of JCV infection, and (2) a nonspecific acute perivenous leukoencephalitis. We suggest that both these types of lesions are due to an imbalance of CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cells, with massive infiltration of the cerebral parenchyma by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the absence of sufficient CD4(+) response. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the IRIS may enable prevention or cure of this severe, sometimes fatal complication of HAART. PMID:15739098

  14. Antioxidant modulation of skin inflammation: preventing inflammatory progression by inhibiting neutrophil influx

    PubMed Central

    McGilvray, Ian D.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that antioxidants might affect local inflammation by impairing inflammatory cell influx. Design A laboratory study using a Swiss–Webster mouse model of local inflammation. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Methods Intradermal injection of 30 μg of S. minnesota endotoxin (LPS) to Swiss–Webster mice initiates a local inflammatory reaction characterized by an early rise in vascular permeability and a later influx of neutrophils. Animals were pretreated intraperitoneally with either pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 2 mmol/kg), which inhibits free radical generation, or dimethylthiourea (DMTU, 450 mg/kg), a free radical scavenger. Main outcome measures Histologic findings of tissue samples taken at sites of injection; local changes in tissue vascular permeability (PI) determined by iodine-125 albumin injection before sacrifice; neutrophil accumulation quantified by tissue myeloperoxidase levels; tissue levels of the endothelial adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 protein (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 protein (VCAM-1) assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. Results Neither antioxidant had a significant effect on the early increase in PI, but both decreased the late rise in PI and reduced neutrophil influx. Both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were upregulated in response to LPS; however, only the increase in VCAM-1 was attenuated by antioxidant pretreatment. Conclusion These data suggest that antioxidants disrupt the propagation phase of an inflammatory response, possibly by altering neutrophil migration. PMID:10223071

  15. Inflammatory monocytes promote progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be therapeutically targeted via CCR2

    PubMed Central

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Liang, Feng; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Danialou, Gawiyou; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Bourdon, Johanne; Rafei, Moutih; Galipeau, Jacques; Divangahi, Maziar; Petrof, Basil J

    2014-01-01

    Myofiber necrosis and fibrosis are hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), leading to lethal weakness of the diaphragm. Macrophages (MPs) are required for successful muscle regeneration, but the role of inflammatory monocyte (MO)-derived MPs in either promoting or mitigating DMD is unclear. We show that DMD (mdx) mouse diaphragms exhibit greatly increased expression of CCR2 and its chemokine ligands, along with inflammatory (Ly6Chigh) MO recruitment and accumulation of CD11bhigh MO-derived MPs. Loss-of-function of CCR2 preferentially reduced this CD11bhigh MP population by impeding the release of Ly6Chigh MOs from the bone marrow but not the splenic reservoir. CCR2 deficiency also helped restore the MP polarization balance by preventing excessive skewing of MPs toward a proinflammatory phenotype. These effects were linked to amelioration of histopathological features and increased muscle strength in the diaphragm. Chronic inhibition of CCR2 signaling by mutated CCL2 secreted from implanted mesenchymal stem cells resulted in similar improvements. These data uncover a previously unrecognized role of inflammatory MOs in DMD pathogenesis and indicate that CCR2 inhibition could offer a novel strategy for DMD management. PMID:25312642

  16. Mechanisms of Neurovascular Dysfunction in Acute Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Y.; Liu, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Pham, L.D.; Lo, E.H.; Ji, X.; Arai, K.

    2014-01-01

    The neurovascular unit is now well accepted as a conceptual framework for investigating the mechanisms of ischemic stroke. From a molecular and cellular perspective, three broad mechanisms may underlie stroke pathophysiology – excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation. To date, however, most investigations of these basic mechanisms have focused on neuronal responses. In this mini-review, we ask whether these mechanisms of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation can also be examined in terms of non-neuronal interactions in the neurovascular unit, including the release of extracellular vesicles for cell-cell signaling. PMID:24372202

  17. Immune-inflammatory Dysregulation Modulates the Incidence of Progressive Fibrosis and Diastolic Stiffness in the Aging Heart

    PubMed Central

    Cieslik, Katarzyna A.; Taffet, George E.; Carlson, Signe; Hermosillo, Jesus; Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in the aging heart is a grave condition that challenges the life and lifestyle of a growing segment of our population. This report seeks to examine the role and interrelationship of inflammatory dysregulation in interstitial myocardial fibrosis and progressive diastolic dysfunction in aging mice. We studied a population of C57BL/6 mice that developed progressive diastolic dysfunction over 30 months of life. This progressive dysfunction was associated with increasing infiltration of CD45+ fibroblasts of myeloid origin. In addition, increased rates of collagen expression as measured by cellular procollagen were apparent in the heart as a function of age. These cellular and functional changes were associated with progressive increases in mRNA for MCP-1 and IL-13 which correlated both temporally and quantitatively with changes in fibrosis and cellular procollagen levels. MCP-1 protein was also increased and found to be primarily in the venular endothelium. Protein assays also demonstrated elevation of IL-4 and IL-13 suggesting a shift to a Th2 phenotype in the aging heart. In vitro studies demonstrated that IL-13 markedly enhanced monocyte fibroblast transformation. Our results indicate that immunoinflammatory dysregulation in the aging heart induces progressive MCP-1 production and an increased shift to a Th2 phenotype paralleled by an associated increase in myocardial interstitial fibrosis, cellular collagen synthesis, and increased numbers of CD45+ myeloid-derived fibroblasts that contain procollagen. The temporal association and functional correlations suggests a causative relationship between age-dependent immunoinflammatory dysfunction, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. PMID:20974150

  18. Prospective Association Between Inflammatory Markers and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alman, Amy C.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Tracy, Russell P.; Maahs, David M.; Hokanson, John E.; Rewers, Marian J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of inflammation in the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes is unclear. We examined the association of inflammation and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC)—a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis—in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A nested case-control study was performed within the prospective cohort of the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study. Participants underwent two CAC measurements ∼2.5 years apart. Case subjects (n = 204) were those with significant progression of CAC. Control subjects (n = 258) were frequency-matched to case subjects on diabetes status, sex, age, and baseline CAC status. Inflammatory marker assessments were performed on stored blood samples from baseline. A principal components analysis (PCA) was performed and a composite score derived from that analysis. The composite score was constructed by assigning a value of 1 for each PCA component where at least one of the markers exceeded the 75th percentile (range 0–4). Conditional logistic regression was used for the matching strategy. RESULTS The first two components of the PCA were modestly (odds ratio 1.38 [95% CI 1.08–1.77] and 1.27 [1.02–1.59], respectively) associated with CAC progression after adjustment for other risk factors. The composite score was more strongly associated with CAC progression for those with elevated markers in three or four of the principal components compared with those with none. CONCLUSIONS Measures of inflammation were associated with progression of CAC in a population of adults with and without type 1 diabetes. PMID:23340891

  19. Modulation of glioma risk and progression by dietary nutrients and anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Kyritsis, Athanassios P.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Levin, Victor A.

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are tumors of glial origin formed in the central nervous system and exhibit profound morphological and genetic heterogeneity. The etiology of this heterogeneity involves an interaction between genetic alterations and environmental risk factors. Scientific evidence suggests that certain natural dietary components, such as phytoestrogens, flavonoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamins may exert a protective effect against gliomas by changing the nature of the interaction between genetics and environment. Similarly, certain anti-inflammatory drugs and dietary modifications, such as methionine restriction and the adoption of low-calorie or ketogenic diets, may take advantage of glioma and normal glial cells’ differential requirements for glucose, methionine, and ketone bodies and may therefore be effective as part of preventive or treatment strategies for gliomas. Treatment trials of glioma patients and chemoprevention trials of individuals with a known genetic predisposition to glioma using the most promising of these agents, such as the anti-inflammatory drugs curcumin and gamma-linolenic acid, are needed to validate or refute these agents’ putative role in gliomas. PMID:21302177

  20. Lipid-lowering drugs prevent neurovascular and cognitive consequences of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Thavarak; Amr, Gilles; Azzaoui, Richard; Delassus, Laëtitia; Fossaert, Emilie; Tailleux, Anne; Bordet, Régis; Modine, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory injury and hypoperfusion following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are associated with potential brain injury in relationship between CPB, memory impairment, changes in cerebral vascular reactivity and both systemic and cerebral inflammatory reaction. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of a pretreatment with simvastatin or fenofibrate on neurovascular and cognitive consequences of CPB. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated by control diet, simvastatin 10mg/kg/day or fenofibrate 200mg/kg/day for 14days before CPB surgery and were sacrificed immediately after surgery or 24h later. Cognitive function, vascular reactivity, neuronal counts in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, and inflammatory markers were assessed. CPB induced memory impairment and endothelial dysfunction 24h after surgery associated with neuronal loss. Neuronal loss was reduced by simvastatin or fenofibrate treatment in parallel to memory alteration prevention. Pretreatment by simvastatin and fenofibrate prevented CPB-induced endothelial dysfunction. CPB led to early and marked release of TNFα and overexpression of ICAM-1. Both inflammatory marker expression was decreased in the pretreated groups by lipid-lowering drugs. In a rat model of CPB, we demonstrated that simvastatin and fenofibrate protected against CPB-induced endothelial dysfunction, cerebral and systemic inflammation in parallel to memory impairment prevention. PMID:26779598

  1. Telmisartan inhibits hyperalgesia and inflammatory progression in a diabetic neuropathic pain model of Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Abuohashish, Hatem M.; Ahmed, Mohammed M.; Arrejaie, Aws S.; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; AlSharari, Shakir D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential therapeutic value of telmisartan (TMT) against diabetic neuropathy (DN) and associated pain in Wistar rats. Methods: Peripheral DN was induced by a single intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection (55 mg/kg), and 3 weeks later TMT treatment was started (5 and 10 mg/kg/day), and continued for 4 weeks. Mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold tests were performed before and after TMT treatment. In serum, glucose, pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 were assessed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels and histopathological changes were estimated in the sciatic nerve. This study was conducted at the Experimental Animal Care Center, Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and May 2014. Results: We observed a significant reduction in mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold in diabetic animals. The TMT treatment significantly enhanced the reduced mechanical nociceptive threshold. The untreated diabetic animals revealed a significant decrease in sciatic NGF, which was markedly attenuated by TMT. The elevated serum levels of cytokines in diabetic animals were inhibited by the TMT treatments. Histopathological evaluation showed obvious nerve degeneration in the diabetic group that was eliminated in the TMT treated diabetic groups. Conclusion: Telmisartan has a potential neuro-protective effect on peripheral DN; this is mediated through its anti-inflammatory effects and its dual properties as an angiotensin receptor blocker, and a partial peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-g ligand. PMID:25864063

  2. Houshiheisan compound prescription protects neurovascular units after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2014-04-01

    Houshiheisan is composed of wind-dispelling (chrysanthemun flower, divaricate saposhnikovia root, Manchurian wild ginger, cassia twig, Szechwan lovage rhizome, and platycodon root) and deficiency-nourishing (ginseng, Chinese angelica, large-head atractylodes rhizome, Indian bread, and zingiber) drugs. In this study, we assumed these drugs have protective effects against cerebral ischemia, on neurovascular units. Houshiheisan was intragastrically administered in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence staining, and western blot assays showed that Houshiheisan reduced pathological injury to the ischemic penumbra, protected neurovascular units, visibly up-regulated neuronal nuclear antigen expression, and down-regulated amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-β 42 expression. Wind-dispelling and deficiency-nourishing drugs maintained NeuN expression to varying degrees, but did not affect amyloid precursor protein or amyloid-β 42 expression in the ischemic penumbra. Our results suggest that the compound prescription Houshiheisan effectively suppresses abnormal amyloid precursor protein accumulation, reduces amyloid substance deposition, maintains stabilization of the internal environment of neurovascular units, and minimizes injury to neurovascular units in the ischemic penumbra. PMID:25206882

  3. Imaging of Neurovascular Compression Syndromes: Trigeminal Neuralgia, Hemifacial Spasm, Vestibular Paroxysmia, and Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Haller, S; Etienne, L; Kövari, E; Varoquaux, A D; Urbach, H; Becker, M

    2016-08-01

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are usually caused by arteries that directly contact the cisternal portion of a cranial nerve. Not all cases of neurovascular contact are clinically symptomatic. The transition zone between the central and peripheral myelin is the most vulnerable region for symptomatic neurovascular compression syndromes. Trigeminal neuralgia (cranial nerve V) has an incidence of 4-20/100,000, a transition zone of 4 mm, with symptomatic neurovascular compression typically proximal. Hemifacial spasm (cranial nerve VII) has an incidence of 1/100,000, a transition zone of 2.5 mm, with symptomatic neurovascular compression typically proximal. Vestibular paroxysmia (cranial nerve VIII) has an unknown incidence, a transition zone of 11 mm, with symptomatic neurovascular compression typically at the internal auditory canal. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (cranial nerve IX) has an incidence of 0.5/100,000, a transition zone of 1.5 mm, with symptomatic neurovascular compression typically proximal. The transition zone overlaps the root entry zone close to the brain stem in cranial nerves V, VII, and IX, yet it is more distal and does not overlap the root entry zone in cranial nerve VIII. Although symptomatic neurovascular compression syndromes may also occur if the neurovascular contact is outside the transition zone, symptomatic neurovascular compression syndromes are more common if the neurovascular contact occurs at the transition zone or central myelin section, in particular when associated with nerve displacement and atrophy. PMID:26892985

  4. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  5. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  6. Dynamic changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in microglia after PPAR-γ agonist neuroprotective treatment in the MPTPp mouse model of progressive Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Augusta; Lecca, Daniela; Mulas, Giovanna; Wardas, Jadwiga; Simbula, Gabriella; Spiga, Saturnino; Carta, Anna R

    2014-11-01

    Neuroinflammatory changes play a pivotal role in the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recent findings have suggested that activated microglia may polarize similarly to peripheral macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS), assuming a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype or the alternative anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype via cytokine production. A skewed M1 activation over M2 has been related to disease progression in Alzheimer disease, and modulation of microglia polarization may be a therapeutic target for neuroprotection. By using the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-probenecid (MPTPp) mouse model of progressive PD, we investigated dynamic changes in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-10, within Iba-1-positive cells in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc). In addition, to further characterize changes in the M2 phenotype, we measured CD206 in microglia. Moreover, in order to target microglia polarization, we evaluated the effect of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist rosiglitazone, which has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects on nigral dopaminergic neurons in PD models, and acts as a modulator of cytokine production and phenotype in peripheral macrophages. Chronic treatment with MPTPp induced a progressive degeneration of SNc neurons. The neurotoxin treatment was associated with a gradual increase in both TNF-α and IL-1β colocalization with Iba-1-positive cells, suggesting an increase in pro-inflammatory microglia. In contrast, TGF-β colocalization was reduced by the neurotoxin treatment, while IL-10 was mostly unchanged. Administration of rosiglitazone during the full duration of MPTPp treatment reverted both TNF-α and IL-1β colocalization with Iba-1 to control levels. Moreover, rosiglitazone induced an increase in TGF-β and IL-10

  7. White adipose tissue cells and the progression of cachexia: inflammatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Rodrigo X.; Rosa‐Neto, José Cesar; Yamashita, Alex S.; Matos‐Neto, Emidio M.; Riccardi, Daniela M. R.; Lira, Fabio S.; Batista, Miguel L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Cachexia is a systemic syndrome leading to body wasting, systemic inflammation, and to metabolic chaos. It is a progressive condition, and little is known about its dynamics. Detection of the early signs of the disease may lead to the attenuation of the associated symptoms. The white adipose tissue is an organ with endocrine functions, capable of synthesising and secreting a plethora of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and adipokines. It is well established that different adipose tissue depots demonstrate heterogeneous responses to physiological and pathological stimuli. The present study aimed at providing insight into adipocyte involvement in inflammation along the progression of cachexia. Methods Eight‐weeks‐old male rats were subcutaneously inoculated with a Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cell suspension (2 × 107 cells in 1.0 mL; tumour‐bearing, T) or Phosphate‐buffered saline (control, C). The retroperitoneal, epididymal, and mesenteric adipose pads were excised on Days 0, 7, and 14 post‐tumour cell injection, and the adipocytes were isolated. Results Mesenteric and epididymal adipocytes showed up‐regulation of IL‐1β protein expression and activation of the inflammasome pathway, contributing for whole tissue inflammation. The stromal vascular fraction of the retroperitoneal adipose tissue, on the other hand, seems to be the major contributor for the inflammation in this specific pad. Conclusion Adipocytes seem to play a relevant role in the establishment of white adipose tissue inflammation, through the activation of the NF‐κB and inflammasome pathways. In epididymal adipocytes, induction of the inflammasome may be detected already on Day 7 post‐tumour cell inoculation.

  8. Nuclear export inhibitors avert progression in preclinical models of inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Haines, Jeffery D; Herbin, Olivier; de la Hera, Belén; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Moy, Gregory A; Sun, Qingxiang; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Albrecht, Stefanie; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; McCauley, Dilara; Chook, Yuh Min; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Kidd, Grahame J; Shacham, Sharon; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    Axonal damage has been associated with aberrant protein trafficking. We examined a newly characterized class of compounds that target nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling by binding to the catalytic groove of the nuclear export protein XPO1 (also known as CRM1, chromosome region maintenance protein 1). Oral administration of reversible CRM1 inhibitors in preclinical murine models of demyelination significantly attenuated disease progression, even when started after the onset of paralysis. Clinical efficacy was associated with decreased proliferation of immune cells, characterized by nuclear accumulation of cell cycle inhibitors, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity even in demyelinated axons. Neuroprotection was not limited to models of demyelination, but was also observed in another mouse model of axonal damage (that is, kainic acid injection) and detected in cultured neurons after knockdown of Xpo1, the gene encoding CRM1. A proteomic screen for target molecules revealed that CRM1 inhibitors in neurons prevented nuclear export of molecules associated with axonal damage while retaining transcription factors modulating neuroprotection. PMID:25706475

  9. Treatment of complex neurovascular lesions: an interdisciplinary angio suite approach

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Tobias; Wrede, Karsten H.; Stein, Klaus-Peter; Wanke, Isabel; Grams, Astrid E.; Gizewski, Elke R.; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Sandalcioglu, I. Erol; Sure, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse our initial experience using an interdisciplinary angio suite approach to neurosurgical treatment of complex neurovascular lesions and expound technical feasibility and possible applications. Subjects: Six out of 451 patients with cranial or spinal neurovascular lesions were surgically treated in the angio suite (biplane angiographic system) during a 28-month observation period. Clinical baseline data, radiological and intraoperative findings as well as clinical and radiological outcome were assessed. Results: A ventral spinal perimedullary arteriovenous malformation, a ventral spinal perimedullary fistula, two diffuse frontal dural arteriovenous fistulas, a multifocal temporal arteriovenous malformation and a partially embolized fronto-temporo-basal dural arteriovenous fistula were successfully treated with angiographically confirmed complete occlusion and unimpaired neurological condition of the patients at the 12-month follow up. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this approach and points out possible indications, namely ventrally located spinal lesions and diffuse, deep seated cranial lesions. PMID:24409203

  10. Pericytes of the neurovascular unit: key functions and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Ayyadurai, Shiva; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-26

    Pericytes are vascular mural cells embedded in the basement membrane of blood microvessels. They extend their processes along capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles and post-capillary venules. CNS pericytes are uniquely positioned in the neurovascular unit between endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons. They integrate, coordinate and process signals from their neighboring cells to generate diverse functional responses that are critical for CNS functions in health and disease, including regulation of the blood-brain barrier permeability, angiogenesis, clearance of toxic metabolites, capillary hemodynamic responses, neuroinflammation and stem cell activity. Here we examine the key signaling pathways between pericytes and their neighboring endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons that control neurovascular functions. We also review the role of pericytes in CNS disorders including rare monogenic diseases and complex neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and brain tumors. Finally, we discuss directions for future studies. PMID:27227366

  11. Calcium dynamics in astrocyte processes during neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Couchman, Kiri; Lyons, Declan G; Collot, Mayeul; Agarwal, Amit; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bergles, Dwight E; Charpak, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced neuronal activity in the brain triggers a local increase in blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, via several mechanisms, including calcium (Ca2+) signaling in astrocytes. However, recent in vivo studies have questioned the role of astrocytes in functional hyperemia because of the slow and sparse dynamics of their somatic Ca2+ signals and the absence of glutamate metabotropic receptor 5 in adults. Here, we reexamined their role in neurovascular coupling by selectively expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in astrocytes of the olfactory bulb. We show that in anesthetized mice, the physiological activation of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) terminals reliably triggers Ca2+ increases in astrocyte processes but not in somata. These Ca2+ increases systematically precede the onset of functional hyperemia by 1–2 s, reestablishing astrocytes as potential regulators of neurovascular coupling. PMID:25531572

  12. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  13. Oral neurovascular hamartoma: an extraordinary verdict in the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Junaid, Montasir; Ahmed, Sadaf Qadeer; Kazi, Maliha; Haroon, Saroona

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a neurovascular hamartoma within the oral cavity is truly a rare entity. Scarcely reported in the literature, these hamartomas are smooth, pinkish masses and are painless, and therefore difficult to diagnose. They are benign in nature and apply pressure to their surroundings. The histological diagnosis remains the gold standard as it comprises of neural tissue and vascular components. Treatment is surgical excision with adequate margins. Recurrence is reported in cases of incomplete resection. PMID:24969068

  14. Anesthesia and the quantitative evaluation of neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia has broad actions that include changing neuronal excitability, vascular reactivity, and other baseline physiologies and eventually modifies the neurovascular coupling relationship. Here, we review the effects of anesthesia on the spatial propagation, temporal dynamics, and quantitative relationship between the neural and vascular responses to cortical stimulation. Previous studies have shown that the onset latency of evoked cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes is relatively consistent across anesthesia conditions compared with variations in the time-to-peak. This finding indicates that the mechanism of vasodilation onset is less dependent on anesthesia interference, while vasodilation dynamics are subject to this interference. The quantitative coupling relationship is largely influenced by the type and dosage of anesthesia, including the actions on neural processing, vasoactive signal transmission, and vascular reactivity. The effects of anesthesia on the spatial gap between the neural and vascular response regions are not fully understood and require further attention to elucidate the mechanism of vascular control of CBF supply to the underlying focal and surrounding neural activity. The in-depth understanding of the anesthesia actions on neurovascular elements allows for better decision-making regarding the anesthetics used in specific models for neurovascular experiments and may also help elucidate the signal source issues in hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques. PMID:22510601

  15. Complex rostral neurovascular system in a giant pliosaur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffa, Davide; Sassoon, Judyth; Cuff, Andrew R.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Benton, Michael J.

    2014-05-01

    Pliosaurs were a long-lived, ubiquitous group of Mesozoic marine predators attaining large body sizes (up to 12 m). Despite much being known about their ecology and behaviour, the mechanisms they adopted for prey detection have been poorly investigated and represent a mystery to date. Complex neurovascular systems in many vertebrate rostra have evolved for prey detection. However, information on the occurrence of such systems in fossil taxa is extremely limited because of poor preservation potential. The neurovascular complex from the snout of an exceptionally well-preserved pliosaur from the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic, c. 170 Myr ago) of Weymouth Bay (Dorset, UK) is described here for the first time. Using computed tomography (CT) scans, the extensive bifurcating neurovascular channels could be traced through the rostrum to both the teeth and the foramina on the dorsal and lateral surface of the snout. The structures on the surface of the skull and the high concentrations of peripheral rami suggest that this could be a sensory system, perhaps similar to crocodile pressure receptors or shark electroreceptors.

  16. The wound inflammatory response exacerbates growth of pre-neoplastic cells and progression to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Nicole; Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie Louise; Ward, Laura Chloe; Collin, John; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Steiniche, Torben; Schmidt, Henrik; Feng, Yi; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a long-standing association between wound healing and cancer, with cancer often described as a “wound that does not heal”. However, little is known about how wounding, such as following surgery, biopsy collection or ulceration, might impact on cancer progression. Here, we use a translucent zebrafish larval model of RasG12V-driven neoplasia to image the interactions between inflammatory cells drawn to a wound, and to adjacent pre-neoplastic cells. We show that neutrophils are rapidly diverted from a wound to pre-neoplastic cells and these interactions lead to increased proliferation of the pre-neoplastic cells. One of the wound-inflammation-induced trophic signals is prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In an adult model of chronic wounding in zebrafish, we show that repeated wounding with subsequent inflammation leads to a greater incidence of local melanoma formation. Our zebrafish studies led us to investigate the innate immune cell associations in ulcerated melanomas in human patients. We find a strong correlation between neutrophil presence at sites of melanoma ulceration and cell proliferation at these sites, which is associated with poor prognostic outcome. PMID:26136213

  17. The wound inflammatory response exacerbates growth of pre-neoplastic cells and progression to cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Nicole; Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie Louise; Ward, Laura Chloe; Collin, John; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Steiniche, Torben; Schmidt, Henrik; Feng, Yi; Martin, Paul

    2015-09-01

    There is a long-standing association between wound healing and cancer, with cancer often described as a "wound that does not heal". However, little is known about how wounding, such as following surgery, biopsy collection or ulceration, might impact on cancer progression. Here, we use a translucent zebrafish larval model of Ras(G12V)-driven neoplasia to image the interactions between inflammatory cells drawn to a wound, and to adjacent pre-neoplastic cells. We show that neutrophils are rapidly diverted from a wound to pre-neoplastic cells and these interactions lead to increased proliferation of the pre-neoplastic cells. One of the wound-inflammation-induced trophic signals is prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In an adult model of chronic wounding in zebrafish, we show that repeated wounding with subsequent inflammation leads to a greater incidence of local melanoma formation. Our zebrafish studies led us to investigate the innate immune cell associations in ulcerated melanomas in human patients. We find a strong correlation between neutrophil presence at sites of melanoma ulceration and cell proliferation at these sites, which is associated with poor prognostic outcome. PMID:26136213

  18. Near infrared spectroscopy--investigations in neurovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Schytz, Henrik Winther

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore and develop methods, where continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) can be applied in different neurovascular diseases, in order to find biological markers that are useful in clinical neurology. To develop a new method to detect changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), the first study investigated a multi-source detector separation configuration and indocyanine green (ICG) as a tracer to calculate a corrected blood flow index (BFI) value. The study showed no correlation between CBF changes measured by 133Xenon single photon emission computer tomography (133Xe-SPECT) and the corrected BFI value. It was concluded, that it was not possible to obtain reliable BFI data with the ICG CW-NIRS method. NIRS measurements of low frequency oscillations (LFOs) may be a reliable method to investigate vascular alterations in neurovascular diseases, but this requires an acceptable LFOs variation between hemispheres and over time in the healthy brain. The second study therefore investigated day-to-day and hemispheric variations in LFOs with NIRS. It was shown that NIRS might be useful in assessing LFOs between hemispheres, as well as interhemispheric phase and gain directly and over time. Migraine may be associated with persistent impairment of neurovascular coupling, but there is no experimental evidence to support this. The third study therefore investigated interictal neurovascular coupling during a mental task by a Stroop test in migraine without aura (MO) patients, which is the most common type of migraine. The study showed intact neurovascular coupling in the prefrontal cortex outside of attacks in patients with MO. The fourth study aimed to investigate possible changes in LFOs amplitude following nitric oxide (NO) donor infusion in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), which is a rare Mendelian subtype of migraine with aura. This study showed increased LFOs amplitude only in FHM patients with co-existing common type of migraine

  19. Protection after stroke: cellular effectors of neurovascular unit integrity

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Duque, Rafael Andres; Barreto, George E.; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders are prevalent worldwide. Cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 55% of all neurological diseases, are the leading cause of permanent disability, cognitive and motor disorders and dementia. Stroke affects the function and structure of blood-brain barrier, the loss of cerebral blood flow regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and the loss of neural connections. Currently, no gold standard treatments are available outside the acute therapeutic window to improve outcome in stroke patients. Some promising candidate targets have been identified for the improvement of long-term recovery after stroke, such as Rho GTPases, cell adhesion proteins, kinases, and phosphatases. Previous studies by our lab indicated that Rho GTPases (Rac and RhoA) are involved in both tissue damage and survival, as these proteins are essential for the morphology and movement of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells, thus playing a critical role in the balance between cell survival and death. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK blocks the activation of the neurodegeneration cascade. In addition, Rac and synaptic adhesion proteins (p120 catenin and N-catenin) play critical roles in protection against cerebral infarction and in recovery by supporting the neurovascular unit and cytoskeletal remodeling activity to maintain the integrity of the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, neuroprotective agents, such as atorvastatin, and CDK5 silencing after cerebral ischemia and in a glutamate-induced excitotoxicity model may act on the same cellular effectors to recover neurovascular unit integrity. Therefore, future efforts must focus on individually targeting the structural and functional roles of each effector of neurovascular unit and the interactions in neural and non-neural cells in the post-ischemic brain and address how to promote the recovery or prevent the loss of homeostasis in the short, medium and long term. PMID:25177270

  20. Feed the brain: insights into the study of neurovascular coupling.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Donald G; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The microcirculation is tightly regulated by a diverse range of mechanisms which share the common goal of matching blood flow delivery with tissue metabolic demand. Despite in-depth examination of tissues like skeletal muscle, brain microcirculation has remained largely unexplored due to methodological limitations. Recent, technological advances have, however, started to grant greater access to this vital microcirculatory bed. This overview is part of a Special Topics Issue centered on the methodology, theory, and mechanistic basis of neurovascular coupling. Solicited manuscripts have been purposely written in an opinionated manner to provoke thought and to illuminate new emerging areas of investigation. PMID:25771945

  1. Digital tomosynthesis: technique modifications and clinical applications for neurovascular anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Maravilla, K.R.; Murry, R.C. Jr.; Diehl, J.; Suss, R.; Allen, L.; Chang, K.; Crawford, J.; McCoy, R.

    1984-09-01

    Digital tomosynthesis studies (DTS) using a linear tomographic motion can provide good quality clinical images when combined with subtraction angiotomography. By modifying their hardware system and the computer software algorithms, the authors were able to reconstruct tomosynthesis images using an isocentric rotation (IR) motion. Applying a combination of linear tomographic and IR techniques in clinical cases, they performed DTS studies in six patients, five with aneurysms and one with a hypervascular tumor. The results showed detailed definitions of the pathologic entities and the regional neurovascular anatomy. Based on this early experience, DTS would seem to be a useful technique for the preoperative surgical planning of vascular abnormalities.

  2. Inflammatory/Hemostatic Biomarkers and Coronary Artery Calcium Progression in Women at Midlife (from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation, Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Wang, Norman C; Matthews, Karen A; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma J M; Chang, Chung-Chou H; El Khoudary, Samar R

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown whether inflammatory/hemostatic biomarkers are associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. Our purpose was to evaluate the associations of baseline levels of C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator antigen, and circulating factor VII with CAC progression in healthy midlife women. Inflammatory/hemostatic biomarkers were measured at baseline. CAC was quantified by computed tomography scans at baseline and after 2.3 ± 0.5 years of follow-up. Significant CAC progression was defined as present if (1) follow-up CAC Agatston score was >0 if baseline CAC score = 0; (2) annualized change in CAC score was ≥10 if baseline CAC score >0 to <100; and (3) annualized percent change in CAC score was ≥10% if baseline CAC score ≥100. Extent of CAC progression was defined as [log(CAC(follow-up)+25) - log(CAC(baseline)+25)]/year. Logistic and linear regression models were used as appropriate, and the final models were adjusted for baseline CAC score, age, study site, race/ethnicity, menopausal status, sociodemographics, traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, family history of CVD, and CVD medication use. The study included 252 women (baseline age 51.2 ± 2.6 years; 67.5% white; 56.4% premenopausal or early perimenopausal). In final models, only log(PAI-1) was associated with presence of CAC progression (odds ratio 1.91, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.93; per 1 log unit increase in PAI-1; p = 0.003). In addition, higher log(PAI-1) was marginally associated with greater extent of CAC progression (p = 0.06). In conclusion, PAI-1 is associated with the presence of CAC progression in middle-aged women. Targeting PAI-1 may decrease atherogenesis beyond conventional CVD risk factors. PMID:27289291

  3. Neurovascular coupling, cerebral white matter integrity, and response to cocoa in older people

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Shelley; Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Fisher, Naomi D.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors and to determine whether neurovascular coupling could be modified by cocoa consumption. Methods: Sixty older people (aged 72.9 ± 5.4 years) were studied in a parallel-arm, double-blind clinical trial of neurovascular coupling and cognition in response to 24 hours and 30 days of cocoa consumption. Cognitive measures included Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Test A and B. Neurovascular coupling was measured from the beat-to-beat blood flow velocity responses in the middle cerebral arteries to the N-Back Task. In a subset of MRI-eligible participants, cerebral white matter structural integrity was also measured. Results: Neurovascular coupling was associated with Trails B scores (p = 0.002) and performance on the 2-Back Task. Higher neurovascular coupling was also associated with significantly higher fractional anisotropy in cerebral white matter hyperintensities (p = 0.02). Finally, 30 days of cocoa consumption was associated with increased neurovascular coupling (5.6% ± 7.2% vs −2.4% ± 4.8%; p = 0.001) and improved Trails B times (116 ± 78 seconds vs 167 ± 110 seconds; p = 0.007) in those with impaired neurovascular coupling at baseline. Conclusion: There is a strong correlation between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function, and both can be improved by regular cocoa consumption in individuals with baseline impairments. Better neurovascular coupling is also associated with greater white matter structural integrity. PMID:23925758

  4. Patterned optogenetic modulation of neurovascular and metabolic signals

    PubMed Central

    Richner, Thomas J; Baumgartner, Ryan; Brodnick, Sarah K; Azimipour, Mehdi; Krugner-Higby, Lisa A; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Williams, Justin C; Pashaie, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    The hemodynamic and metabolic response of the cortex depends spatially and temporally on the activity of multiple cell types. Optogenetics enables specific cell types to be modulated with high temporal precision and is therefore an emerging method for studying neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling. Going beyond temporal investigations, we developed a microprojection system to apply spatial photostimulus patterns in vivo. We monitored vascular and metabolic fluorescence signals after photostimulation in Thy1-channelrhodopsin-2 mice. Cerebral arteries increased in diameter rapidly after photostimulation, while nearby veins showed a slower smaller response. The amplitude of the arterial response was depended on the area of cortex stimulated. The fluorescence signal emitted at 450/100 nm and excited with ultraviolet is indicative of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an endogenous fluorescent enzyme involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. This fluorescence signal decreased quickly and transiently after optogenetic stimulation, suggesting that glucose metabolism is tightly locked to optogenetic stimulation. To verify optogenetic stimulation of the cortex, we used a transparent substrate microelectrode array to map cortical potentials resulting from optogenetic stimulation. Spatial optogenetic stimulation is a new tool for studying neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling. PMID:25388678

  5. Potassium Buffering in the Neurovascular Unit: Models and Sensitivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Witthoft, Alexandra; Filosa, Jessica A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are critical regulators of neural and neurovascular network communication. Potassium transport is a central mechanism behind their many functions. Astrocytes encircle synapses with their distal processes, which express two potassium pumps (Na-K and NKCC) and an inward rectifying potassium channel (Kir), whereas the vessel-adjacent endfeet express Kir and BK potassium channels. We provide a detailed model of potassium flow throughout the neurovascular unit (synaptic region, astrocytes, and arteriole) for the cortex of the young brain. Our model reproduces several phenomena observed experimentally: functional hyperemia, in which neural activity triggers astrocytic potassium release at the perivascular endfoot, inducing arteriole dilation; K+ undershoot in the synaptic space after periods of neural activity; neurally induced astrocyte hyperpolarization during Kir blockade. Our results suggest that the dynamics of the vascular response during functional hyperemia are governed by astrocytic Kir for the fast onset and astrocytic BK for maintaining dilation. The model supports the hypothesis that K+ undershoot is caused by excessive astrocytic uptake through Na-K and NKCC pumps, whereas the effect is balanced by Kir. We address parametric uncertainty using high-dimensional stochastic sensitivity analysis and identify possible model limitations. PMID:24209849

  6. Emerging roles of pericytes in the regulation of the neurovascular unit in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jeremy; Rom, Slava; Ramirez, Servio H.; Persidsky, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes of the central nervous system (CNS) are uniquely positioned within a multicellular structure termed the neurovascular unit (NVU) to provide crucial support to blood brain barrier (BBB) formation, maintenance, and stability. Numerous CNS diseases are associated with some aspect of BBB dysfunction. A dysfunction can manifest as one or multiple disruptions to any of the following barriers: physical, metabolic, immunological and transport barrier. A breach in the BBB can notably result in BBB hyper-permeability, endothelial activation and enhanced immune-endothelial interaction. How the BBB is regulated within this integrated unit remains largely unknown, especially as it relates to pericyte-endothelial interaction. We summarize the latest findings on pericyte origin, possible marker expression, and availability within different organ systems. We highlight pericyte-endothelial cell interactions, concentrating on extra- and intra- cellular signaling mechanisms linked to platelet derived growth factor-B, transforming growth factor -β, angiopoietins, Notch, and gap junctions. We discuss the role of pericytes in the NVU under inflammatory insult, focusing on how pericytes may indirectly affect leukocyte CNS infiltration, the direct role of pericyte-mediated basement membrane modifications, and immune responses. We review new findings of pericyte actions in CNS pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, diabetic retinopathy, and HIV-1 infection. The uncovering of the regulatory role of pericytes on the BBB will provide key insight into how barrier integrity can be re-established during neuroinflammation. PMID:25119834

  7. The neurovascular protection afforded by delayed local hypothermia after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Jaechan; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a robust therapeutic tool in experimental stroke models but its clinical applications are limited. Furthermore, optimal conditions for therapeutic hypothermia, such as, temperature and the initiation and duration of cooling must be individualized. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of delayed local hypothermia, administered for 44 hr after 4 hr of reperfusion in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo), using a cooling device that allowed controlled local hypothermia (31 °C) in brain. Histological data revealed that local hypothermia significantly reduced infarct volumes and glial hypertrophic activation. Brain water contents, IgG leakage, and Evans Blue extravasation were notably reduced by local hypothermia. Furthermore, local hypothermia had strong vasculoprotective effects, as determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA), laminin, aquaporin-4, and tight junction proteins in brain. Our data indicate that delayed/prolonged local hypothermia confers neurovascular protection, reduces brain edema, and inhibits inflammatory glial activation, and suggest that hypothermic conservation of vascular structures and functions account for the therapeutic effects of local hypothermia observed in this model of experimental stroke. PMID:23469955

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor: a neurovascular target in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian; Storkebaum, Erik; de Almodóvar, Carmen Ruiz; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Brain function critically relies on blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients, to establish a barrier for neurotoxic substances, and to clear waste products. The archetypal vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, arose in evolution as a signal affecting neural cells, but was later co-opted by blood vessels to regulate vascular function. Consequently, VEGF represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface. On the one hand, VEGF is neuroprotective, through direct effects on neural cells and their progenitors and indirect effects on brain perfusion. In accordance, preclinical studies show beneficial effects of VEGF administration in neurodegenerative diseases, peripheral neuropathies and epilepsy. On the other hand, pathologically elevated VEGF levels enhance vessel permeability and leakage, and disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity, as in demyelinating diseases, for which blockade of VEGF may be beneficial. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the role and therapeutic potential of VEGF in neurological diseases. PMID:27364743

  9. [The neurovascular unit in health and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ago, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    The neurovascular unit (NVU), a minimal unit to exert neurological functions, is composed of neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and extracellular matrix proteins forming basal membranes. The cell components interact with one another and function cooperatively under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pericytes and astrocytes participate crucially in the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the tight junction formed by endothelial cells, and regulate cerebral blood flow in response to neurological activities. The BBB actively regulate molecular import and export. The concept of the NVU is also useful for understanding pathogenesis and exploring therapeutic targets in various CNS disorders. In this review, recent research advances regarding the NVU and its components in health and ischemic stroke are summarized. PMID:27333744

  10. Neurovascular Interactions in the Neurologically Compromised Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Cooper, R; Lee, C W; Dempsey, L; Brigadoi, S; Edwards, A; Airantzis, D; Everdell, N; Michell, A; Holder, D; Austin, T; Hebden, J

    2016-01-01

    Neurological brain injuries such as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) and associated conditions such as seizures have been associated with poor developmental outcome in neonates. Our limited knowledge of the neurological and cerebrovascular processes underlying seizures limits their diagnosis and timely treatment. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides haemodynamic information in the form of changes in concentration of de/oxygenated haemoglobin, which can improve our understanding of seizures and the relationship between neural and vascular processes. Using simultaneous EEG-DOT, we observed distinct haemodynamic changes which are temporally correlated with electrographic seizures. Here, we present DOT-EEG data from two neonates clinically diagnosed as HIE. Our results highlight the wealth of mutually-informative data that can be obtained using DOT-EEG techniques to understand neurovascular coupling in HIE neonates. PMID:26782249

  11. The neurovascular unit and combination treatment strategies for stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhang Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administered within 4.5 hours of symptom onset restores cerebral blood flow and promotes neurological recovery of stroke patients. However, the narrow therapeutic time window and the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage after tPA treatment pose major hurdles to its clinical usage. In light of the failures of neuroprotective therapies in clinical trials, emerging concepts suggest that neuroprotection alone without restoration of tissue perfusion and vascular integrity may not be adequate for treatment of acute stroke. Here we review evidence of the use of adjuvant pharmacological agents to extend the therapeutic window for tPA via targeting the neurovascular unit and the underlying mechanisms of the combination therapy in experimental stroke. PMID:22595494

  12. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:24780769

  13. Intermittent hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery: an uncommon neurovascular compression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meila, Dan; Wetter, Axel; Brassel, Friedhelm; Nacimiento, Wilhelm

    2012-12-15

    Neurovascular compression is assumed to cause symptoms like trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vestibular paroxysmia. We present a patient with recurrent episodes of transient dysarthria due to isolated right hypoglossal nerve (HN) palsy. We describe the first case of a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) as the putative cause of a hypoglossal neurovascular compression syndrome. Our patient received a daily low-dose medication of carbamazepine resulting in complete relief of symptoms. In conclusion, PHA is not only an anatomic variation but also a possible cause of a neurovascular compression syndrome leading to intermittent HN palsy. PMID:23020989

  14. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  15. Neurovascular unit on a chip: implications for translational applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) dynamically controls exchange between the brain and the body, but this interaction cannot be studied directly in the intact human brain or sufficiently represented by animal models. Most existing in vitro BBB models do not include neurons and glia with other BBB elements and do not adequately predict drug efficacy and toxicity. Under the National Institutes of Health Microtissue Initiative, we are developing a three-dimensional, multicompartment, organotypic microphysiological system representative of a neurovascular unit of the brain. The neurovascular unit system will serve as a model to study interactions between the central nervous system neurons and the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) compartment, all coupled to a realistic blood-surrogate supply and venous return system that also incorporates circulating immune cells and the choroid plexus. Hence all three critical brain barriers will be recapitulated: blood-brain, brain-CSF, and blood-CSF. Primary and stem cell-derived human cells will interact with a variety of agents to produce critical chemical communications across the BBB and between brain regions. Cytomegalovirus, a common herpesvirus, will be used as an initial model of infections regulated by the BBB. This novel technological platform, which combines innovative microfluidics, cell culture, analytical instruments, bioinformatics, control theory, neuroscience, and drug discovery, will replicate chemical communication, molecular trafficking, and inflammation in the brain. The platform will enable targeted and clinically relevant nutritional and pharmacologic interventions for or prevention of such chronic diseases as obesity and acute injury such as stroke, and will uncover potential adverse effects of drugs. If successful, this project will produce clinically useful technologies and reveal new insights into how the brain receives, modifies, and is affected by drugs, other neurotropic agents, and diseases. PMID:24564885

  16. Neurovascular unit impairment in early Alzheimer's disease measured with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    van de Haar, Harm J; Jansen, Jacobus F A; van Osch, Matthias J P; van Buchem, Mark A; Muller, Majon; Wong, Sau May; Hofman, Paul A M; Burgmans, Saartje; Verhey, Frans R J; Backes, Walter H

    2016-09-01

    The neurovascular unit, which protects neuronal cells and supplies them with essential molecules, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The aim of this study was to noninvasively investigate 2 linked functional elements of the neurovascular unit, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF), in patients with early AD and healthy controls. Therefore, both dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging were applied to measure BBB permeability and CBF, respectively. The patients with early AD showed significantly lower CBF and local blood volume in the gray matter, compared with controls. In the patients, we also found that a reduction in CBF is correlated with an increase in leakage rate. This finding supports the hypothesis that neurovascular damage, and in particular impairment of the neurovascular unit constitutes the pathophysiological link between CBF reduction and BBB impairment in AD. PMID:27459939

  17. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  18. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  19. Dexamethasone Rescues Neurovascular Unit Integrity from Cell Damage Caused by Systemic Administration of Shiga Toxin 2 and Lipopolysaccharide in Mice Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alipio; Jacobsen, Mariana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Cejudo, María Laura; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) that can lead to fatal encephalopathies. Neurological abnormalities may occur before or after the onset of systemic pathological symptoms and motor disorders are frequently observed in affected patients and in studies with animal models. As Stx2 succeeds in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and invading the brain parenchyma, it is highly probable that the observed neurological alterations are based on the possibility that the toxin may trigger the impairment of the neurovascular unit and/or cell damage in the parenchyma. Also, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced and secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) may aggravate the deleterious effects of Stx2 in the brain. Therefore, this study aimed to determine (i) whether Stx2 affects the neurovascular unit and parenchymal cells, (ii) whether the contribution of LPS aggravates these effects, and (iii) whether an inflammatory event underlies the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the observed injury. The administration of a sub-lethal dose of Stx2 was employed to study in detail the motor cortex obtained from a translational murine model of encephalopathy. In the present paper we report that Stx2 damaged microvasculature, caused astrocyte reaction and neuronal degeneration, and that this was aggravated by LPS. Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory, reversed the pathologic effects and proved to be an important drug in the treatment of acute encephalopathies. PMID:23894578

  20. Neurovascular Coupling is Impaired in Slow Walkers: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Galica, Andrew; Moscufo, Nicola; Serrador, Jorge M.; Iloputaife, Ike; Egorova, Svetlana; Dell'Oglio, Elisa; Meier, Dominik; Newton, Elizabeth; Milberg, William P.; Guttmann, Charles; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neurovascular coupling may be involved in compensatory mechanisms responsible for preservation of gait speed in elderly people with cerebrovascular disease. Our study examines the association between neurovascular coupling in the middle cerebral artery and gait speed in elderly individuals with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity. Methods Twenty-two fast and 20 slow walkers in the lowest quartile of cerebral vasoreactivity were recruited from the MOBILIZE Boston Study. Neurovascular coupling was assessed in bilateral middle cerebral arteries by measuring cerebral blood flow during the N-Back Task. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities were measured for each group using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Neurovascular coupling was attenuated in slow compared to fast walkers (2.8% [CI95%: −0.9–6.6] vs. 8.2% [CI95%: 4.7–11.8]; p=0.02). The odds of being a slow walker were 6.4 (CI95%: 1.7–24.9, p=0.007) if there was a high burden of white matter hyperintensity, however, this risk increased to 14.5 (CI95%: 2.3–91.1, p=0.004) if neurovascular coupling was also attenuated. Interpretation Our results suggest that intact neurovascular coupling may help preserve mobility in elderly people with cerebral microvascular disease. PMID:21674588

  1. Blood Pressure Increases in OSA due to Maintained Neurovascular Sympathetic Transduction: Impact of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tamisier, Renaud; Tan, Can Ozan; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Levy, Patrick; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that greater resting sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome would not induce a lesser sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Design: Case-controlled cohort study. Participants: 33 patients with newly diagnosed OSA without comorbidities and 14 healthy controls. Interventions: 6 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for OSA patients and follow-up for 9 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: We assessed resting sympathetic outflow and sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Sympathetic activity was directly measured (microneurography) at rest and in response to sustained isometric handgrip exercise. Neurovascular transduction was derived from the relationship of sympathetic activity and blood pressure to leg blood flow during exercise. Despite an elevated sympathetic activity of ∼50% in OSA compared to controls, neurovascular transduction was not different (i.e., absence of tachyphylaxis). After six months of CPAP, there were significant declines in diastolic pressure, averaging ∼4 mm Hg, and in sympathetic activity, averaging ∼20% with no change in transduction. Conclusions: Greater sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea does not appear to be associated with lesser neurovascular transduction. Hence, elevated sympathetic outflow without lesser transduction may underlie the prevalent development of hypertension in this population that is well controlled by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Citation: Tamisier R, Tan CO, Pepin JL, Levy P, Taylor JA. Blood pressure increases in OSA due to maintained neurovascular sympathetic transduction: impact of CPAP. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1973–1980. PMID:26039959

  2. Neurovascular pathophysiology in cerebral ischemia, dementia and the ageing brain – current trends in basic, translational and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th International Symposium on Neuroprotection and Neurorepair was held from May 2nd to May 5th, 2012 in Potsdam, Germany. The symposium, which directly continues the successful Magdeburg meeting series, attracted over 330 colleagues from 29 countries to discuss recent findings and advances in the field. The focus of the 2012 symposium was widened from stroke and traumatic brain injury to neurodegenerative diseases, notably dementia, and more generally the ageing brain. Thereby, emphasis was given on neurovascular aspects of neurodegeneration and stroke including the blood–brain barrier, recent findings regarding the pathomechanism of Alzheimer’s disease, and brain imaging approaches. In addition, neurobiochemical aspects of neuroprotection, the role of astrogliosis, the clinical progress of cell-based approaches as well as translational hurdles and opportunities were discussed in-depth. This review summarizes some of the most stimulating discussions and reports from the meeting. PMID:22883324

  3. The temporo-spatial localization of polymorphonuclear cells related to the neurovascular unit after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Nora; Strecker, Jan-Kolja; Minnerup, Jens; Schilling, Matthias

    2014-10-24

    Inflammatory responses after cerebral ischemia are important for the development of final infarct size but the role of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) is still a matter of debate, since previously used antibodies were recently declared as non-specific. In the present study, we investigated the temporo-spatial localization of PMN related to the neurovascular unit using specific antibodies, 7/4 and Ly6G, and application of G-CSF to induce proliferation and mobilization of PMN precursors after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice. Infarct volumes, sensorimotor function, neurological outcome and immunohistochemical analysis of PMN were performed after G-CSF administration or placebo treatment. G-CSF-treated mice showed reduced infarct size (51.15±15.68 mm(2) vs. 39.31±16.13 mm(2) at day 1; 50.11±16.68 mm(2) vs. 33.16±4.86 mm(2) at day 4; p<0.05). They showed improved motor-function recovery and had a significantly better outcome compared to placebo-treated animals. Comparison of the two PMN detecting antibodies showed no difference in saturation plots or cell quantification. Studying the basement membrane-associated localization revealed ca. 60% extravascular PMN, independent of G-CSF administration. Extravascular PMNs were without any connection to laminin, but all near to the vessels. We conclude that 7/4 is a suitable marker to investigate PMN compared to Ly6G, which confirms results from former studies using the 7/4-antibody. Furthermore we report the observation that PMN were detected outside the laminin barrier but almost exclusively in close vicinity to the neurovascular unit. PMID:25152468

  4. Ageing is a process where the growth effect of neuronal noradrenaline changes progressively in favour of the flow mediated, neurodegenerative and inflammatory effect of plasma noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Crotty, T P

    2016-08-01

    The noradrenaline stimulus has two components, one excitor, the other inhibitory. Neuronal noradrenaline is the excitor component and plasma noradrenaline is the inhibitory. The balance of effect between the two, the noradrenergic balance, is the controlled variable of the sympathetic system and determines the effect of noradrenaline. Neuronal noradrenaline stimulates tissues by diffusion from their sympathetic nerve endings, plasma noradrenaline does so by diffusion from their microcirculations. Changes in microcirculatory flow, by altering the flow mediated effect of plasma noradrenaline, are mainly responsible for altering the noradrenergic balance in the peripheral tissues; changes in CSF flow are speculated to be mainly responsible for doing the same in the brain, by altering the balance between synaptic noradrenaline in the brain and nonsynaptic noradrenaline in the subarachnoid CSF. When plasma noradrenaline alters the noradrenergic balance it triggers afferent sympathetic activity that alerts hypothalamic neurons to the event and they restore the balance and tissue homeostasis, within milliseconds, by adjusting the level of efferent sympathetic activity they project back to the affected tissue. Because the restoration is so rapid the effect of plasma noradrenaline is normally unobservable and dismissed as not having occurred. Because the hypothalamus is not involved with the responses of isolated canine lateral saphenous vein segments to noradrenaline, the effects of plasma noradrenaline in that preparation are not countered by reactive efferent activity and, consequently, are readily apparent in it. Quantitatively, they have been found to be a function of microcirculatory flow and noradrenaline concentration and, qualitatively, to be inhibitory, dilator, pro inflammatory and neurodegenerative. In life, due to a progressive increase in plasma noradrenaline concentration and, more so, in microcirculatory flow, the noradrenergic balance moves progressively in

  5. Advanced and standardized evaluation of neurovascular compression syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastreiter, Peter; Vega Higuera, Fernando; Tomandl, Bernd; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2004-05-01

    Caused by a contact between vascular structures and the root entry or exit zone of cranial nerves neurovascular compression syndromes are combined with different neurological diseases (trigeminal neurolagia, hemifacial spasm, vertigo, glossopharyngeal neuralgia) and show a relation with essential arterial hypertension. As presented previously, the semi-automatic segmentation and 3D visualization of strongly T2 weighted MR volumes has proven to be an effective strategy for a better spatial understanding prior to operative microvascular decompression. After explicit segmentation of coarse structures, the tiny target nerves and vessels contained in the area of cerebrospinal fluid are segmented implicitly using direct volume rendering. However, based on this strategy the delineation of vessels in the vicinity of the brainstem and those at the border of the segmented CSF subvolume are critical. Therefore, we suggest registration with MR angiography and introduce consecutive fusion after semi-automatic labeling of the vascular information. Additionally, we present an approach of automatic 3D visualization and video generation based on predefined flight paths. Thereby, a standardized evaluation of the fused image data is supported and the visualization results are optimally prepared for intraoperative application. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved 3D representation and evaluation of vascular compression syndromes. Its value for diagnosis and surgery is demonstrated with various clinical examples.

  6. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, ‘flow-diverter’, can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities. PMID:27009500

  7. Neuro-vascular link: from genetic insights to therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and nerves (neurogenesis) is of great medical relevance. It is well known that dysregulation of angiogenesis leads to tissue ischemia, cancer, inflammation and other disorders, while a dysfunction of the nerve system contributes to motorneuron disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALs) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The observations of Andreas Vesalius--Belgian anatomist of the 16th century--that patterning ofvessels and nerves show more than remarkable similarities, are currently revisited in exciting studies. Indeed, often, vessels and nerves even track alongside each other. Recent genetic studies revealed that vessels and nerves share many more common principles and signals for navigation, proliferation and survival than previously suspected. For instance, gene inactivation studies in mice and zebrafish showed that axon guidance signals regulate vessel navigation. Conversely, prototypic angiogenic factors such as VEGF control neurogenesis and regulate axon and neuron guidance, independently of their angiogenic activity. The next coming years promise to become an exciting journey to further unravel the molecular basis and explore the therapeutic potential of the neurovascular link. PMID:20120252

  8. Gaining Surgical Access for Repositioning the Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Siweedi, Saif Yousif Abdullah; Nambiar, P.; Shanmuhasuntharam, P.; Ngeow, W. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining anatomical landmarks that can be used to gain access to the inferior alveolar neurovascular (IAN) bundle. Scanned CBCT (i-CAT machine) data of sixty patients and reconstructions performed using the SimPlant dental implant software were reviewed. Outcome variables were the linear distances of the mandibular canal to the inferior border and the buccal cortex of the mandible, measured immediately at the mental foramen (D1) and at 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm (D2–D5) distal to it. Predictor variables were age, ethnicity, and gender of subjects. Apicobasal assessment of the canal reveals that it is curving downward towards the inferior mandibular border until 20 mm (D3) distal to the mental foramen where it then curves upwards, making an elliptic-arc curve. The mandibular canal also forms a buccolingually oriented elliptic arc in relation to the buccal cortex. Variations due to age, ethnicity, and gender were evident and this study provides an accurate anatomic zone for gaining surgical access to the IAN bundle. The findings indicate that the buccal cortex-IAN distance was greatest at D3. Therefore, sites between D2 and D5 can be used as favorable landmarks to access the IAN bundle with the least complications to the patient. PMID:24892077

  9. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-03-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, ‘flow-diverter’, can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities.

  10. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, 'flow-diverter', can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities. PMID:27009500

  11. Neurovascular factors in resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) for the assessment of disease and treatment, and a number of studies have reported significant diseaserelated changes in resting-state blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal amplitude and functional connectivity. rsfMRI is particularly suitable for clinical applications because the approach does not require the patient to perform a task and scans can be obtained in a relatively short amount of time. However, the mechanisms underlying resting-state BOLD activity are not well understood and thus the interpretation of changes in resting state activity is not always straightforward. The BOLD signal represents the hemodynamic response to neural activity, and changes in resting-state activity can reflect a complex combination of neural, vascular, and metabolic factors. This paper examines the role of neurovascular factors in rsfMRI and reviews approaches for the interpretation and analysis of resting state measures in the presence of confounding factors. PMID:23644003

  12. Targeting the neurovascular unit for treatment of neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    VanGilder, Reyna L.; Rosen, Charles L.; Barr, Taura L.; Huber, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Drug discovery for CNS disorders has been restricted by the inability for therapeutic agents to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, current drugs aim to correct neuron cell signaling, thereby neglecting pathophysiological changes affecting other cell types of the neurovascular unit (NVU). Components of the NVU (pericytes, microglia, astrocytes, and neurons, and basal lamina) act as an intricate network to maintain the neuronal homeostatic microenvironment. Consequently, disruptions to this intricate cell network lead to neuron malfunction and symptoms characteristic of CNS diseases. A lack of understanding in NVU signaling cascades may explain why current treatments for CNS diseases are not curative. Current therapies treat symptoms by maintaining neuron function. Refocusing drug discovery to sustain NVU function may provide a better method of treatment by promoting neuron survival. In this review, we will examine current therapeutics for common CNS diseases, describe the importance of the NVU in cerebral homeostasis and discuss new possible drug targets and technologies that aim to improve treatment and drug delivery to the diseased brain. PMID:21172386

  13. Cigarette Smoke Amplifies Inflammatory Response and Atherosclerosis Progression Through Activation of the H1R-TLR2/4-COX2 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Rajat S.; Sharma, Mukut; Dileepan, Kottarappat N.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that infection and persistent inflammation are key players in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is well established that cigarette smoke (CS) promotes atherosclerotic CVD, very little is known about the potential impact of the collective effects of CS and intermittent or chronic subclinical infection on atherosclerosis. Our previous studies demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synergistically enhance endothelial cell inflammatory response. We further noted that the synergy between histamine and LPS was due to reciprocal upregulation of histamine receptor and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and functions. These results suggest that the combined and persistent effects of mast cell mediators and bacterial agents on the vasculature are risk factors of CVD. Our recent data demonstrated that CS extract enhances histamine- and LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells, suggesting that CS and mast cell mediators may collectively amplify inflammatory response in the vessel wall. We hypothesize that CS enhances histamine-mediated upregulation of TLR2/TLR4 signaling in the endothelium and promotes progression of atherosclerosis. This article presents our perspective on the modulatory effects of CS and nicotine on the “histamine-TLR-COX-2 axis.” PMID:26617606

  14. Inflammatory stress exacerbates the progression of cardiac fibrosis in high-fat-fed apolipoprotein E knockout mice via endothelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun Ling; Liu, Jing; Ni, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Lv, Lin Li; Tang, Ri Ning; Ni, Hai Feng; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in the progression of cardiac fibrosis. This study investigated whether inflammation exacerbated the progression of cardiac fibrosis in high-fat-fed apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO) mice via endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). Methods Twenty-four male ApoE KO mice were divided into normal chow diet (Control), high-fat diet (HFD), or high-fat diet plus 10% casein injection (inflamed) groups for 8 weeks. The body weight of ApoE KO mice was measured at each week. The lipid profile and serum amyloid A (SAA) levels were examined using clinical biochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. Cardiac lipid and collagen accumulation was visualised with haematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome staining. EndMT-related molecule expression was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results SAA levels were increased in the inflamed group compared with the HFD and control groups, suggesting that inflammation was successfully induced. There were no differences in body weight among three groups at each week. Interestingly, inflammation significantly reduced serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels compared with the HFD mice. However, both foam cell formation in cardiac blood vessels and cardiac collagen deposition were increased in the inflamed group, as demonstrated by HE and Masson trichrome staining. Furthermore, inflammation reduced protein expression of CD31 and increased protein expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen I, which contribute to cardiac EndMT. Conclusions Inflammatory stress exacerbates the progression of cardiac fibrosis in high-fat-fed ApoE KO mice via EndMT, suggesting that hyperlipidaemia and inflammation act synergistically to redistribute plasma lipids to cardiac tissues and accelerate the progression of cardiac fibrosis. PMID:23471419

  15. Progression of radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in relation to inflammatory markers and mediators in the blood.

    PubMed

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Eliasson, Sören; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with clinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its relation to the blood level of inflammatory mediators and markers. Sixteen patients were investigated by computed tomography on two occasions 25-46 months apart. The radiographs were assessed independently for changes in presence of erosions, sclerosis, flattening, osteophytes, and subchondral pseudocysts. The serum (S) or plasma (P) concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombocyte particle concentration, scrotonin (S-5-HT and P-5-HT), tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, tumor necrosis factor soluble receptor type II, interleukin-1 soluble receptor type II (P-IL-1sRII) and interleukin 6 as well as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. The radiographic status showed no consistent or significant change during the observation period, but the individual variation was considerable. The radiographic signs of erosion and sclerosis varied most. Regression of erosions was associated with high S-5-HT and P-IL-1sRII, while progression of erosions was associated with high P-5-HT. Regression of sclerosis was associated with an increase in P-5-HT and high ESR. Progression of flattening was associated with high CRP. In conclusion, this study indicates that the progression of radiographic changes that occurs in the TMJ of patients with well-controlled RA during a period of 25-46 months seems to be related to the blood levels of CRP, 5-HT, and IL-1sRII. However, only minor progression can be expected to occur, and with considerable individual variation. PMID:15124777

  16. Vestibular paroxysmia: a treatable neurovascular cross-compression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    The leading symptoms of vestibular paroxysmia (VP) are recurrent, spontaneous, short attacks of spinning or non-spinning vertigo that generally last less than one minute and occur in a series of up to 30 or more per day. VP may manifest when arteries in the cerebellar pontine angle cause a segmental, pressure-induced dysfunction of the eighth nerve. The symptoms are usually triggered by direct pulsatile compression with ephaptic discharges, less often by conduction blocks. MR imaging reveals the neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve (3D constructive interference in steady state and 3D time-of-flight sequences) in more than 95 % of cases. A loop of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery seems to be most often involved, less so the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, the vertebral artery, or a vein. The frequent attacks of vertigo respond to carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine, even in low dosages (200-600 mg/d or 300-900 mg/d, respectively), which have been shown to also be effective in children. Alternative drugs to try are lamotrigine, phenytoin, gabapentin, topiramate or baclofen or other non-antiepileptic drugs used in trigeminal neuralgia. The results of ongoing randomized placebo-controlled treatment studies, however, are not yet available. Surgical microvascular decompression of the eighth nerve is the "ultima ratio" for medically intractable cases or in exceptional cases of non-vascular compression of the eighth nerve by a tumor or cyst. The International Barany Society for Neuro-Otology is currently working on a consensus document on the clinical criteria for establishing a diagnosis of VP as a clinical entity. PMID:27083889

  17. Adult Neurogenesis: Ultrastructure of a Neurogenic Niche and Neurovascular Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Chaves da Silva, Paula Grazielle; Benton, Jeanne L.; Beltz, Barbara S.; Allodi, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    neurovascular relationships in the brain of P. clarkii by characterizing the organization and ultrastructure of the neurogenic niche and associated vascular tissues. PMID:22723980

  18. Vaccine against MUC1 antigen expressed in inflammatory bowel disease and cancer lessens colonic inflammation and prevents progression to colitis associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Pamela L.; Narayanan, Sowmya; Gariépy, Jean; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Finn, Olivera J.

    2009-01-01

    Association of chronic inflammation with an increased risk of cancer is well established but the contributions of innate versus adaptive immunity are not fully delineated. There has furthermore been little consideration of the role played by chronic inflammation-associated antigens, including cancer antigens, and the possibility to use them as vaccines to lower the cancer risk. We studied the human tumor antigen MUC1 that is abnormally expressed in colon cancers and also in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that gives rise to colitis associated colon cancer (CACC). Using our new mouse model of MUC1+ IBD that progresses to CACC, IL-10−/− mice crossed with MUC1 transgenic mice, we show that vaccination against MUC1 delays IBD and prevents progression to CAAC. One mechanism is the induction of MUC1-specific adaptive immunity (anti-MUC1 IgG, anti-MUC1 CTL) that appears to eliminate abnormal MUC1+ cells in IBD colons. The other mechanism is the change in the local and the systemic microenvironments. Compared to IBD in vaccinated mice, IBD in control mice is dominated by larger numbers of neutrophils in the colon and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the spleen, which can compromise adaptive immunity and facilitate tumor growth. This suggests that the tumor-promoting microenvironment of chronic inflammation can be converted to a tumor-inhibiting environment by increasing adaptive immunity against a disease-associated antigen. PMID:20332301

  19. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Marini, Frank C; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Dembinski, Jennifer L; LaMarca, Heather L; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Danka, Elizabeth S; Henkle, Sarah L; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-03-10

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  20. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  1. Inflammation and cancer: inhibiting the progression of residual hepatic VX2 carcinoma by anti-inflammatory drug after incomplete radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xianjie; Ding, Jing; Duan, Bingwei; Lu, Shichun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accelerated progression of residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after incomplete radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been reported more frequently. Recent data have redefined the concept of inflammation as a critical component of tumor progression. However, there has been little understanding regarding the relationship between progression of residual HCC and the inflammation induced by thermal destruction of the tumor after RFA. The present study was designed to determine whether inflammation facilitates rapid progression of residual hepatic VX2 carcinoma and to clarify the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods: Forty-eight rabbits were each implanted with two VX2 hepatic tumors via supraumbilical median laparotomy. One of the tumors in two different lobes was ablated by RFA. All the rabbits were then randomly divided into four groups (12 rabbits in each group) receiving anti-inflammatory treatment with different doses of aspirin: control group, AS-L group (aspirin, 5 mg/kg/d), AS-M group (aspirin, 20 mg/kg/d), and AS-H group (aspirin, 100 mg/kg/d). The levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were detected to evaluate the effect of the anti-inflammation. Tumor growth, lung and kidney metastasis, and survival were assessed. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase 3 (caspase-3) in residual tumor was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western-blotting. Results: The levels of serum IL-6, hs-CRP, and TNF-α in the AS-H group decreased significantly in comparison with those of the control group (P<0.05). The focal tumor volume and lung and kidney metastases of rabbits in the AS-H group were less significant compared with those of the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PCNA, MMP-9, and VEGF in the AS-H group decreased

  2. Iron behaving badly: inappropriate iron chelation as a major contributor to the aetiology of vascular and other progressive inflammatory and degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas B

    2009-01-01

    Background The production of peroxide and superoxide is an inevitable consequence of aerobic metabolism, and while these particular 'reactive oxygen species' (ROSs) can exhibit a number of biological effects, they are not of themselves excessively reactive and thus they are not especially damaging at physiological concentrations. However, their reactions with poorly liganded iron species can lead to the catalytic production of the very reactive and dangerous hydroxyl radical, which is exceptionally damaging, and a major cause of chronic inflammation. Review We review the considerable and wide-ranging evidence for the involvement of this combination of (su)peroxide and poorly liganded iron in a large number of physiological and indeed pathological processes and inflammatory disorders, especially those involving the progressive degradation of cellular and organismal performance. These diseases share a great many similarities and thus might be considered to have a common cause (i.e. iron-catalysed free radical and especially hydroxyl radical generation). The studies reviewed include those focused on a series of cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological diseases, where iron can be found at the sites of plaques and lesions, as well as studies showing the significance of iron to aging and longevity. The effective chelation of iron by natural or synthetic ligands is thus of major physiological (and potentially therapeutic) importance. As systems properties, we need to recognise that physiological observables have multiple molecular causes, and studying them in isolation leads to inconsistent patterns of apparent causality when it is the simultaneous combination of multiple factors that is responsible. This explains, for instance, the decidedly mixed effects of antioxidants that have been observed, since in some circumstances (especially the presence of poorly liganded iron) molecules that are nominally antioxidants can actually act as pro-oxidants. The reduction of redox

  3. Ganoderma lucidum Combined with the EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, Erlotinib Synergize to Reduce Inflammatory Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Arroyo, Ivette J; Rios-Fuller, Tiffany J; Feliz-Mosquea, Yismeilin R; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Leal-Alviarez, Daniel J; Maldonado-Martinez, Gerónimo; Cubano, Luis A; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) targeted against EGFR and downstream pathways has increased the necessity to identify agents that may be combined with these therapies to provide a sustained response for breast cancer patients. Here, we investigate the therapeutic potential of Ganoderma lucidum extract (GLE) in breast cancer, focusing on the regulation of the EGFR signaling cascade when treated with the EGFR TKI, Erlotinib. SUM-149, or intrinsic Erlotinib resistant MDA-MB-231 cells, and a successfully developed Erlotinib resistant cell line, rSUM-149 were treated with increasing concentrations of Erlotinib, GLE, or their combination (Erlotinib/GLE) for 72h. Treatment effects were tested on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion. To determine tumor progression, severe combined immunodeficient mice were injected with SUM-149 cells and then treated with Erlotinib/GLE or Erlotinib for 13 weeks. We assessed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and AKT in in vitro and in vivo models. Our results show that GLE synergizes with Erlotinib to sensitize SUM-149 cells to drug treatment, and overcomes intrinsic and developed Erlotinib resistance. Also, Erlotinib/GLE decreases SUM-149 cell viability, proliferation, migration and invasion. GLE increases Erlotinib sensitivity by inactivating AKT and ERK signaling pathways in our models. We conclude that a combinatorial therapeutic approach may be the best way to increase prognosis in breast cancer patients with EGFR overexpressing tumors. PMID:26958085

  4. Ganoderma lucidum Combined with the EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, Erlotinib Synergize to Reduce Inflammatory Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Arroyo, Ivette J.; Rios-Fuller, Tiffany J.; Feliz-Mosquea, Yismeilin R.; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Leal-Alviarez, Daniel J.; Maldonado-Martinez, Gerónimo; Cubano, Luis A.; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) targeted against EGFR and downstream pathways has increased the necessity to identify agents that may be combined with these therapies to provide a sustained response for breast cancer patients. Here, we investigate the therapeutic potential of Ganoderma lucidum extract (GLE) in breast cancer, focusing on the regulation of the EGFR signaling cascade when treated with the EGFR TKI, Erlotinib. SUM-149, or intrinsic Erlotinib resistant MDA-MB-231 cells, and a successfully developed Erlotinib resistant cell line, rSUM-149 were treated with increasing concentrations of Erlotinib, GLE, or their combination (Erlotinib/GLE) for 72h. Treatment effects were tested on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion. To determine tumor progression, severe combined immunodeficient mice were injected with SUM-149 cells and then treated with Erlotinib/GLE or Erlotinib for 13 weeks. We assessed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and AKT in in vitro and in vivo models. Our results show that GLE synergizes with Erlotinib to sensitize SUM-149 cells to drug treatment, and overcomes intrinsic and developed Erlotinib resistance. Also, Erlotinib/GLE decreases SUM-149 cell viability, proliferation, migration and invasion. GLE increases Erlotinib sensitivity by inactivating AKT and ERK signaling pathways in our models. We conclude that a combinatorial therapeutic approach may be the best way to increase prognosis in breast cancer patients with EGFR overexpressing tumors. PMID:26958085

  5. SENP1-mediated NEMO deSUMOylation in adipocytes limits inflammatory responses and type-1 diabetes progression

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lan; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Zhang, Haifeng; Qin, Lingfeng; Hwa, John; Yun, Zhong; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Adipocyte dysfunction correlates with the development of diabetes. Here we show that mice with a adipocyte-specific deletion of the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 gene develop symptoms of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), including hyperglycaemia and glucose intolerance with mild insulin resistance. Peri-pancreatic adipocytes from SENP1-deficient mice exhibit heightened NF-κB activity and production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce CCL5 expression in adjacent pancreatic islets and direct cytotoxic effects on pancreatic islets. Mechanistic studies show that SENP1 deletion in adipocytes enhances SUMOylation of the NF-κB essential molecule, NEMO, at lysine 277/309, leading to increased NF-κB activity, cytokine production and pancreatic inflammation. We further show that NF-κB inhibitors could inhibit pre-diabetic cytokine production, β-cell damages and ameliorate the T1DM phenotype in SENP1-deficient mice. Feeding a high-fat diet augments both type-1 and type-2 diabetes phenotypes in SENP1-deficient mice, consistent with the effects on adipocyte-derived NF-κB and cytokine signalling. Our study reveals previously unrecognized mechanism regulating the onset and progression of T1DM associated with adipocyte dysfunction. PMID:26596471

  6. Technetium 99m-methylene diphosphonate bone scans in children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Laxer, R.M.; Allen, R.C.; Malleson, P.N.; Morrison, R.T.; Petty, R.E.

    1985-03-01

    Eleven children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy were investigated by technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate bone scanning. Eight of 12 scans demonstrated abnormal findings, four showing diffusely decreased uptake and four diffusely increased uptake of the radionuclide in the affected site. Three scans showed normal findings initially, as did one previously abnormal scan when repeated in the asymptomatic patient 6 months later. Diffusely abnormal findings can be helpful in the diagnosis of childhood reflex neurovascular dystrophy, but a normal scan does not exclude the diagnosis.

  7. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Decelerates Rheumatoid Arthritis Progression by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses and Joint Destruction via Modulating NF-κB and MAPK Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbing; Sun, Chi; Tao, Ran; Xu, Xinbao; Xu, Libin; Cheng, Hongbing; Wang, Youhua; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a naturally occurring redox cofactor that acts as an essential nutrient and antioxidant and has been reported to exert potent immunosuppressive effects. However, the therapeutically potential of PQQ on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been explored. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PQQ were investigated in interleukin (IL)-1β-treated SW982 cells, a RA-like fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) injury model. Our observations showed that pretreatment with PQQ significantly inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 and suppressed the production of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and IL-6 in IL-1β-treated SW982 cells. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the phosphorylation level of p65, p38, and JNK MAP kinase pathways were also inhibited by PQQ in IL-1β-stimulated SW982 cells. To further confirm the therapeutic effects of PQQ on RA in vivo, a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used. Mice treated with PQQ demonstrated marked attenuation of arthritic symptoms based on histopathology and clinical arthritis scores. These results collectively suggested that PQQ might be a promising therapeutic agent for alleviating the progress of RA. PMID:26319019

  8. Preliminary methods for wearable neuro-vascular assessment with non-invasive, active sensing.

    PubMed

    Carek, Andrew M; Töreyin, Hakan; Hersek, Sinan; Inan, Omer T

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a non-invasive and active sensing scheme that is ultimately aimed to be integrated in a wearable system for neuro-vascular health assessment is presented with preliminary results. With this system, vascular tone is modulated by local heating and cooling of the palm, and the resulting changes in local hemodynamics are monitored via impedance plethysmography (IPG) and photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors interfaced with custom analog electronics. Proof-of-concept measurements were conducted on three subjects using hot packs/ice bags to modulate the palmar skin temperature. From ensemble averaged and smoothed versions of pulsatile IPG and PPG signals, the effects of local changes in skin temperature on a series of parameters associated with neuro-vascular mechanisms (heart rate, blood volume, blood flow rate, blood volume pulse inflection point area ratio, and local pulse transit time) have been observed. The promising experimental results suggest that, with different active temperature modulation schemes (consisting of heating/cooling cycles covering different temperature ranges at different rates), it would be possible to enhance the depth and specificity of the information associated with neuro-vascular health by using biosensors that can fit inside a wearable device (such as a sleeve). This study sets the foundation for future studies on designing and testing such a wearable neuro-vascular health assessment system employing active sensing. PMID:26736951

  9. The Role of Pericytes in Neurovascular Unit Remodeling in Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    ElAli, Ayman; Thériault, Peter; Rivest, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Neurons are extremely vulnerable cells that tightly rely on the brain’s highly dynamic and complex vascular network that assures an accurate and adequate distribution of nutrients and oxygen. The neurovascular unit (NVU) couples neuronal activity to vascular function, controls brain homeostasis, and maintains an optimal brain microenvironment adequate for neuronal survival by adjusting blood-brain barrier (BBB) parameters based on brain needs. The NVU is a heterogeneous structure constituted by different cell types that includes pericytes. Pericytes are localized at the abluminal side of brain microvessels and contribute to NVU function. Pericytes play essential roles in the development and maturation of the neurovascular system during embryogenesis and stability during adulthood. Initially, pericytes were described as contractile cells involved in controlling neurovascular tone. However, recent reports have shown that pericytes dynamically respond to stress induced by injury upon brain diseases, by chemically and physically communicating with neighboring cells, by their immune properties and by their potential pluripotent nature within the neurovascular niche. As such, in this paper, we would like to review the role of pericytes in NVU remodeling, and their potential as targets for NVU repair strategies and consequently neuroprotection in two pathophysiologically distinct brain disorders: ischemic stroke and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). PMID:24743889

  10. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel F.; Puebla, Mariela; Figueroa, Xavier F.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30) and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1). The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO) can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in this process

  11. Ursolic Acid Inhibits the Initiation, Progression of Prostate Cancer and Prolongs the Survival of TRAMP Mice by Modulating Pro-Inflammatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Ong, Tina H.; Kumar, Alan Prem; Lun, Chang K.; Ho, Paul C.; Wong, Peter T. H.; Hui, Kam M.; Sethi, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men worldwide. In this study, using transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice, the effect of diet enriched with 1% w/w ursolic acid (UA) was investigated to evaluate the stage specific chemopreventive activity against prostate cancer. We found that TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 8 weeks (weeks 4 to 12) delayed formation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Similarly, mice fed with UA diet for 6 weeks (weeks 12 to 18) inhibited progression of PIN to adenocarcinoma as determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Finally, TRAMP mice fed with UA diet for 12 weeks (weeks 24 to 36) demonstrated markedly reduced tumor growth without any significant effects on total body weight and prolonged overall survival. With respect to the molecular mechanism, we found that UA down-regulated activation of various pro-inflammatory mediators including, NF-κB, STAT3, AKT and IKKα/β phosphorylation in the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) tissues that correlated with the reduction in serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, UA significantly down-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and COX-2 but up-regulated the levels of caspase-3 as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue sections. Finally, UA was detected in serum samples obtained from various mice groups fed with enriched diet in nanogram quantity indicating that it is well absorbed in the GI tract. Overall, our findings provide strong evidence that UA can be an excellent agent for both the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22427843

  12. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  13. Brain endothelial TAK1 and NEMO safeguard the neurovascular unit

    PubMed Central

    Ridder, Dirk A.; Wenzel, Jan; Müller, Kristin; Töllner, Kathrin; Tong, Xin-Kang; Assmann, Julian C.; Stroobants, Stijn; Weber, Tobias; Niturad, Cristina; Fischer, Lisanne; Lembrich, Beate; Wolburg, Hartwig; Grand’Maison, Marilyn; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Korpos, Eva; Truchetet, Francois; Rades, Dirk; Sorokin, Lydia M.; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Bedell, Barry J.; Pasparakis, Manolis; Balschun, Detlef; D’Hooge, Rudi; Löscher, Wolfgang; Hamel, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key component of NF-κB signaling, cause the genetic disease incontinentia pigmenti (IP). This leads to severe neurological symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying brain involvement were unclear. Here, we show that selectively deleting Nemo or the upstream kinase Tak1 in brain endothelial cells resulted in death of endothelial cells, a rarefaction of brain microvessels, cerebral hypoperfusion, a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB), and epileptic seizures. TAK1 and NEMO protected the BBB by activating the transcription factor NF-κB and stabilizing the tight junction protein occludin. They also prevented brain endothelial cell death in a NF-κB–independent manner by reducing oxidative damage. Our data identify crucial functions of inflammatory TAK1–NEMO signaling in protecting the brain endothelium and maintaining normal brain function, thus explaining the neurological symptoms associated with IP. PMID:26347470

  14. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future. PMID:23281076

  15. Neurovascular Compression Caused by Popliteus Muscle Enlargement Without Discrete Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Popliteal entrapment syndrome caused by isolated popliteus muscle enlargement is very rare, although its occurrence has been reported after discrete trauma. However, popliteal artery stenosis with combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy caused by popliteus muscle enlargement without preceding trauma has not been reported. A 57-year-old man presented with a tingling sensation and pain in his left calf. He had no previous history of an injury. The symptoms were similar to those of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Calf pain became worse despite treatment, and the inability to flex his toes progressed. Computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity showed popliteal artery stenosis caused by popliteus muscle enlargement and surrounding edema. An electrodiagnostic study confirmed combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy at the popliteal fossa. Urgent surgical decompression was performed because of the progressive neurologic deficit and increasing neuropathic pain. The calf pain disappeared immediately after surgery, and he was discharged after the neurologic functions improved. PMID:27446794

  16. Neurovascular pathways to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2014-01-01

    The neurovascular unit (NVU) comprises brain endothelial cells, pericytes or vascular smooth muscle cells, glia and neurons. The NVU controls blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow, and maintains the chemical composition of the neuronal ‘milieu’, which is required for proper functioning of neuronal circuits. Recent evidence indicates that BBB dysfunction is associated with the accumulation of several vasculotoxic and neurotoxic molecules within brain parenchyma, a reduction in cerebral blood flow, and hypoxia. Together, these vascular-derived insults might initiate and/or contribute to neuronal degeneration. This article examines mechanisms of BBB dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders, notably Alzheimer’s disease, and highlights therapeutic opportunities relating to these neurovascular deficits. PMID:22048062

  17. Cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal: neurovascular anatomy on gas CT cisternograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, C.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Drayer, B.P.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.; Thompson, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The authors reviewed 103 normal gas CT cisternograms to delineate the appearance of normal neurovascular structures in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC). Cranial nerves VII and VIII were identified in the CPA in 97% of cases, either separately (53%) or as a bundle (44%). Intracanalicular branches of the VIIIth cranial nerve were identified in 20% of cases, and cranial nerve V was visualized in the CPA in 14%. The characteristic vascular loop, usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, was visible in 35% of cases, and, in 22% of visualized cases, was in an intracanalicular location. In 10% of cases, greater than 66% of the IAC was occupied by the neurovascular bundle. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations seen on gas CT cisternograms is necessary to prevent false-positive interpretations.

  18. Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging: From Mechanisms to Therapies. Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Akassoglou, Katerina; Agalliu, Dritan; Chang, Christopher J.; Davalos, Dimitrios; Grutzendler, Jaime; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Khakh, Baljit S.; Kleinfeld, David; McGavern, Dorian B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in intravital imaging have launched a new era for the study of dynamic interactions at the neurovascular interface in health and disease. The first Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging Symposium was held at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco in March, 2015. This highly interactive symposium brought together a group of leading researchers who discussed how recent studies have unraveled fundamental biological mechanisms in diverse scientific fields such as neuroscience, immunology, and vascular biology, both under physiological and pathological conditions. These Proceedings highlight how advances in imaging technologies and their applications revolutionized our understanding of the communication between brain, immune, and vascular systems and identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological diseases. PMID:26941593

  19. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  20. Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging: From Mechanisms to Therapies. Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium.

    PubMed

    Akassoglou, Katerina; Agalliu, Dritan; Chang, Christopher J; Davalos, Dimitrios; Grutzendler, Jaime; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Khakh, Baljit S; Kleinfeld, David; McGavern, Dorian B; Nelson, Sarah J; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in intravital imaging have launched a new era for the study of dynamic interactions at the neurovascular interface in health and disease. The first Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging Symposium was held at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco in March, 2015. This highly interactive symposium brought together a group of leading researchers who discussed how recent studies have unraveled fundamental biological mechanisms in diverse scientific fields such as neuroscience, immunology, and vascular biology, both under physiological and pathological conditions. These Proceedings highlight how advances in imaging technologies and their applications revolutionized our understanding of the communication between brain, immune, and vascular systems and identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological diseases. PMID:26941593

  1. New horizons in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling from calibrated fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shu, C Y; Sanganahalli, B G; Coman, D; Herman, P; Hyder, F

    2016-01-01

    Neurovascular coupling relates changes in neuronal activity to constriction/dilation of microvessels. However neurometabolic coupling, which is less well known, relates alterations in neuronal activity with metabolic demands. The link between the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal and neural activity opened doors for functional MRI (fMRI) to be a powerful neuroimaging tool in the neurosciences. But due to the complex makeup of BOLD contrast, researchers began to investigate the relationship between BOLD signal and blood flow and/or volume changes during functional brain activation, which together provided the tools to measure oxygen consumption on the basis of the biophysical model of BOLD. This field is called calibrated fMRI, thereby allowed probing of both neurometabolic and neurovascular couplings for a variety of health conditions in animals and humans. Calibrated fMRI may provide brain disorder biomarkers that could be used for monitoring effective therapies. PMID:27130413

  2. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  3. Neurovascular coupling during nociceptive processing in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey-Gauthier, Renaud; Guillemot, Jean-Paul; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    Neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used extensively to investigate pain-related cerebral mechanisms. However, these methods rely on a tight coupling of neuronal activity to hemodynamic changes. Because pain may be associated with hemodynamic changes unrelated to local neuronal activity (eg, increased mean arterial pressure [MAP]), it is essential to determine whether the neurovascular coupling is maintained during nociceptive processing. In this study, local field potentials (LFP) and cortical blood flow (CBF) changes evoked by electrical stimulation of the left hind paw were recorded concomitantly in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 15 rats. LFP, CBF, and MAP changes were examined in response to stimulus intensities ranging from 3 to 30 mA. In addition, LFP, CBF, and MAP changes evoked by a 10-mA stimulation were examined during immersion of the tail in non-nociceptive or nociceptive hot water (counter-stimulation). SI neurovascular coupling was altered for stimuli of nociceptive intensities (P<0.001). This alteration was intensity-dependent and was strongly associated with MAP changes (r=0.98, P<0.001). However, when the stimulus intensity was kept constant, SI neurovascular coupling was not significantly affected by nociceptive counter-stimulation (P=0.4), which similarly affected the amplitude of shock-evoked LFP and CBF changes. It remains to be determined whether such neurovascular uncoupling occurs in humans, and whether it also affects other regions usually activated by painful stimuli. These results should be taken into account for accurate interpretation of fMRI studies that involve nociceptive stimuli associated with MAP changes. PMID:23707276

  4. Classification of neurovascular compression in glossopharyngeal neuralgia: Three-dimensional visualization of the glossopharyngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Hastreiter, Peter; Dörfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Naraghi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: We introduce a method of noninvasive topographical analysis of the neurovascular relationships of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) by three-dimensional (3D) visualization. Patients with glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) resulting from neurovascular compression (NVC) were studied. Methods: 15 patients with GN were prospectively examined with 3D visualization using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging with constructive interference in steady state (MR-CISS). The datasets were segmented and visualized with the real, individual neurovascular relationships by direct volume rendering. Segmentation and 3D visualization of the CN IX and corresponding blood vessels were performed. The 3D visualizations were interactively compared with the intraoperative setup during microvascular decompression (MVD) in order to verify the results by the observed surgical-anatomical findings. Results: 15 patients (female/male: 5/10) were examined. All of them underwent MVD (100%). Microvascular details were documented. The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) was the most common causative vessel in 12 of 15 patients (80%), the vertebral artery (VA) alone in one case (6.7%), and the combination of compression by the VA and PICA in 3 patients (13.3%). We identified three distinct types of NVC within the root entry zone of CN IX. Conclusion: 3D visualization by direct volume rendering of MR-CISS data offers the opportunity of noninvasive exploration and anatomical categorization of the CN IX. It proves to be advantageous in supporting to establish the diagnosis and microneurosurgical interventions by representing original, individual patient data in a 3D fashion. It provides an excellent global individual view over the entire neurovascular relationships of the brainstem and corresponding nerves in each case. PMID:26759734

  5. Early effects of high-fat diet on neurovascular function and focal ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguo; Prakash, Roshini; Chawla, Dhruv; Du, Wenting; Didion, Sean P; Filosa, Jessica A; Zhang, Quanguang; Brann, Darrell W; Lima, Victor V; Tostes, Rita C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the early effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on neurovascular function and ischemic stroke outcomes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that HFD beginning early in life 1) impairs neurovascular coupling, 2) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction, and 3) worsens short-term outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Functional hyperemia and parenchymal arteriole (PA) reactivity were measured in rats after 8 wk of HFD. The effect of HFD on basilar artery function after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and associated O-GlcNAcylation were assessed. Neuronal cell death, infarct size, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) frequency/severity, and neurological deficit were evaluated after global ischemia and transient MCAO. HFD caused a 10% increase in body weight and doubled adiposity without a change in lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Functional hyperemia and PA relaxation were decreased with HFD. Basilar arteries from stroked HFD rats were more sensitive to contractile factors, and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was impaired. Vascular O-GlcNAcylated protein content was increased with HFD. This group also showed greater mortality rate, infarct volume, HT occurrence rate, and HT severity and poor functional outcome compared with the control diet group. These results indicate that HFD negatively affects neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular function even in the absence of dyslipidemia. These early cerebrovascular changes may be the cause of greater cerebral injury and poor outcomes of stroke in these animals. PMID:23576615

  6. Glial cells dilate and constrict blood vessels: a mechanism of neurovascular coupling.

    PubMed

    Metea, Monica R; Newman, Eric A

    2006-03-15

    Neuronal activity evokes localized changes in blood flow. Although this response, termed neurovascular coupling, is widely used to monitor human brain function and diagnose pathology, the cellular mechanisms that mediate the response remain unclear. We investigated the contribution of glial cells to neurovascular coupling in the acutely isolated mammalian retina. We found that light stimulation and glial cell stimulation can both evoke dilation or constriction of arterioles. Light-evoked and glial-evoked vasodilations were blocked by inhibitors of cytochrome P450 epoxygenase, the synthetic enzyme for epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. Vasoconstrictions, in contrast, were blocked by an inhibitor of omega-hydroxylase, which synthesizes 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Nitric oxide influenced whether vasodilations or vasoconstrictions were produced in response to light and glial stimulation. Light-evoked vasoactivity was blocked when neuron-to-glia signaling was interrupted by a purinergic antagonist. These results indicate that glial cells contribute to neurovascular coupling and suggest that regulation of blood flow may involve both vasodilating and vasoconstricting components. PMID:16540563

  7. Early effects of high-fat diet on neurovascular function and focal ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiguo; Prakash, Roshini; Chawla, Dhruv; Du, Wenting; Didion, Sean P.; Filosa, Jessica A.; Zhang, Quanguang; Brann, Darrell W.; Lima, Victor V.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the early effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on neurovascular function and ischemic stroke outcomes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that HFD beginning early in life 1) impairs neurovascular coupling, 2) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction, and 3) worsens short-term outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Functional hyperemia and parenchymal arteriole (PA) reactivity were measured in rats after 8 wk of HFD. The effect of HFD on basilar artery function after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and associated O-GlcNAcylation were assessed. Neuronal cell death, infarct size, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) frequency/severity, and neurological deficit were evaluated after global ischemia and transient MCAO. HFD caused a 10% increase in body weight and doubled adiposity without a change in lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Functional hyperemia and PA relaxation were decreased with HFD. Basilar arteries from stroked HFD rats were more sensitive to contractile factors, and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was impaired. Vascular O-GlcNAcylated protein content was increased with HFD. This group also showed greater mortality rate, infarct volume, HT occurrence rate, and HT severity and poor functional outcome compared with the control diet group. These results indicate that HFD negatively affects neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular function even in the absence of dyslipidemia. These early cerebrovascular changes may be the cause of greater cerebral injury and poor outcomes of stroke in these animals. PMID:23576615

  8. The sectional anatomy of the carpal tunnel and its related neurovascular structures studied by using plastination.

    PubMed

    Sora, M-C; Genser-Strobl, B

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of the carpal tunnel and its related neurovascular structures. A slice anatomy study was performed on 12 right wrists of unfixed human cadavers by using the plastination technique. The measurements were performed at the level of the pisiform, hook of the hamate and in the middle between these structures. The diameters of the carpal tunnel and the median nerve were measured at the level of the hook of the hamate. The median nerve can be predicted to be 18 +/- 1.6 mm radial to the pisiform and the ulnar neurovascular bundle 6.8 +/- 1.4 mm radial to the pisiform. Between those structures there will be at least a 9-mm area, localized 8 mm radial to the pisiform, where the incision of the transverse carpal ligament could be performed risk-free. At the hamate hook the median nerve can be predicted at 9.24 +/- 1.18 mm and the ulnar artery lies usually 1.26 +/- 2.5 mm radial to the hook. An understanding of the contents and their positions, and relationships to each other allows an accurate identification of neurovascular structures in the carpal tunnel. Our findings can be used as anatomic landmarks of the carpal tunnel and could be helpful to physicians performing carpal tunnel investigations. PMID:15804269

  9. Modeling Neurovascular Coupling from Clustered Parameter Sets for Multimodal EEG-NIRS

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, M. Tanveer; Frost, H. Robert; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in neuroimaging technologies and analysis methods, the fundamental relationship between local changes in cerebral hemodynamics and the underlying neural activity remains largely unknown. In this study, a data driven approach is proposed for modeling this neurovascular coupling relationship from simultaneously acquired electroencephalographic (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) data. The approach uses gamma transfer functions to map EEG spectral envelopes that reflect time-varying power variations in neural rhythms to hemodynamics measured with NIRS during median nerve stimulation. The approach is evaluated first with simulated EEG-NIRS data and then by applying the method to experimental EEG-NIRS data measured from 3 human subjects. Results from the experimental data indicate that the neurovascular coupling relationship can be modeled using multiple sets of gamma transfer functions. By applying cluster analysis, statistically significant parameter sets were found to predict NIRS hemodynamics from EEG spectral envelopes. All subjects were found to have significant clustered parameters (P < 0.05) for EEG-NIRS data fitted using gamma transfer functions. These results suggest that the use of gamma transfer functions followed by cluster analysis of the resulting parameter sets may provide insights into neurovascular coupling in human neuroimaging data. PMID:26089979

  10. Inflammation and neurovascular changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, M C; Couch, Y; Sibson, N; Turner, M R

    2013-03-01

    Neuroinflammation in now established as an important factor in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At various time points, astrocytes and microglia are markedly activated, either producing neuroprotective or pro-inflammatory molecules, which can decrease or increase the rate of primary motor neuron degeneration respectively. Recent research has shown that this neuroinflammatory component is affected by the peripheral immune system; T lymphocytes in particular are able to cross into the brain and spinal cord parenchyma, where they interact with resident microglia, either inducing them to adopt an M1 (cytotoxic) or M2 (protective) phenotype, depending on the stage of disease. Clearly understanding the changes that occur to allow the interaction between peripheral and central immune responses will be essential in any attempt to manipulate the disease process via neuroinflammatory mechanisms. However, our understanding of the endothelial changes, which facilitate the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, is still in its infancy. There are suggestions, though, of up-regulation of cellular adhesion molecules, which are able to arrest circulating leukocytes and facilitate diapedesis into the brain parenchyma. In addition, tight junction proteins appear to be down-regulated, leading to an increase in vascular permeability, an effect that is amplified by vascular damage late in the disease process. This review summarises our current knowledge regarding neuroinflammation, peripheral immune involvement, and endothelial changes in ALS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration and neurodysfunction'. PMID:23110760

  11. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: possible link to blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Maren K L; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P

    2012-11-01

    Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood-brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood-brain barrier

  12. The Brain’s Heart – Therapeutic Opportunities for Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) and Neurovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ning, MingMing; Lo, Eng H.; Ning, Pei-Chen; Xu, Su-Yu; McMullin, David; Demirjian, Zareh; Inglessis, Ignacio; Dec, G William; Palacios, Igor; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.

    2013-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO), a common congenital cardiac abnormality, is a connection between the right and left atria in the heart. As a “back door to the brain”, PFO can serve as a conduit for paradoxical embolism, allowing venous thrombi to enter the arterial circulation, avoiding filtration by the lungs, and causing ischemic stroke. PFO-related strokes affect more than 150,000 people per year in the US, and PFO is present in up to 60% of migraine patients with aura, and in one out of four normal individuals. So, in such a highly prevalent condition, what are the best treatment and prevention strategies? Emerging studies show PFO-related neurovascular disease to be a multi-organ condition with varying individual risk factors that may require individualized therapeutic approaches – opening the field for new pharmacologic and therapeutic targets. The anatomy of PFO suggests that, in addition to thrombi, it can also allow harmful circulatory factors to travel directly from the venous to the arterial circulation, a concept important in finding novel therapeutic targets for PFO-related neurovascular injury. Here, we: 1) review emerging data on PFO-related injuries and clinical trials; 2) discuss potential mechanisms of PFO-related neurovascular disease in the context of multi-organ interaction and heart-brain signaling; and 3) discuss novel therapeutic targets and research frontiers. Clinical studies and molecular mapping of the circulatory landscape of this multi-organ disease will both be necessary in order to better individualize clinical treatment for a condition affecting more than a quarter of the world’s population. PMID:23528225

  13. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R; Martin, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N=6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data. PMID:26192543

  14. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A.; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R.; Martin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N = 6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data. PMID:26192543

  15. Regional differences in neurovascular coupling in rat brain as determined by fMRI and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sloan, H L; Austin, V C; Blamire, A M; Schnupp, J W H; Lowe, A S; Allers, K A; Matthews, P M; Sibson, N R

    2010-11-01

    Increases in neuronal activity induce local increases in cerebral perfusion. However, our understanding of the processes underlying this neurovascular coupling remains incomplete and, particularly, how these vary across the brain. Recent work supports an important role for astrocytes in neurovascular coupling, in large part via activation of their metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). Here, using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electrophysiology we demonstrate regional heterogeneity in the mechanisms underlying neurovascular coupling. Direct electrical stimulation of the rat hindpaw sensorimotor cortex induces blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) fMRI responses in several anatomically distinct cortical and subcortical structures. Following intraperitoneal administration of the type 5 mGluR antagonist, MPEP, both BOLD and CBV responses to cortical stimulation were significantly reduced, whilst the local field potential (LFP) responses remained largely constant. Spatially, the degree of reduction in fMRI responses varied between cortical and subcortical regions (primary cortex approximately 18% vs. striatum approximately 66%), and also between primary and secondary cortical areas ( approximately 18% vs. approximately 55%). Similarly, greater decreases in response amplitude were seen in the contralateral secondary cortex ( approximately 91%) and ipsilateral striatum (approximately 70%), compared to the primary cortex (approximately 44%). Following MPEP, a negative component of the BOLD and CBV responses became more apparent, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate vasodilatory and vasoconstrictory responses. Interestingly, under baseline conditions the quantitative relationship between fMRI and LFP responses in cortical and subcortical regions was markedly different. Our data indicate that coupling between neuronal and fMRI responses is neither empirically nor mechanistically consistent

  16. Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rachel H.X.; Raederstorff, Daniel; Howe, Peter R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor cerebral perfusion may contribute to cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that resveratrol can enhance cerebral vasodilator function and thereby alleviate the cognitive deficits in T2DM. We have already reported that acute resveratrol consumption improved cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to hypercapnia. We now report the effects of resveratrol on neurovascular coupling capacity (CVR to cognitive stimuli), cognitive performance and correlations with plasma resveratrol concentrations. Methods: Thirty-six T2DM adults aged 40–80 years were randomized to consume single doses of resveratrol (0, 75, 150 and 300 mg) at weekly intervals. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor changes in blood flow velocity (BFV) during a cognitive test battery. The battery consisted of dual-tasking (finger tapping with both Trail Making task and Serial Subtraction 3 task) and a computerized multi-tasking test that required attending to four tasks simultaneously. CVR to cognitive tasks was calculated as the per cent increase in BFV from pre-test basal to peak mean blood flow velocity and also as the area under the curve for BFV. Results: Compared to placebo, 75 mg resveratrol significantly improved neurovascular coupling capacity, which correlated with plasma total resveratrol levels. Enhanced performance on the multi-tasking test battery was also evident following 75 mg and 300 mg of resveratrol. Conclusion: a single 75 mg dose of resveratrol was able to improve neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in T2DM. Evaluation of benefits of chronic resveratrol supplementation is now warranted. PMID:27420093

  17. Myositis autoantibodies in Korean patients with inflammatory myositis: Anti-140-kDa polypeptide antibody is primarily associated with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease independent of clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between myositis autoantibodies and clinical subsets of inflammatory myositis in Korean patients. Methods Immunoprecipitation was performed using the sera of classic polymyositis (PM) (n = 11) and dermatomyositis (DM) (n = 38) patients who met the Bohan and Peter criteria for definite inflammatory myositis. A panel of defined myositis autoantibodies was surveyed to investigate the association between each autoantibody and clinical subsets of inflammatory myositis. Results Either MSAs, anti-p140, or anti-p155/140 antibodies were found in 63.3% (31/49) of the study subjects. Anti-140-kDa-polypeptide (anti-p140) (18.4%, 9/49) and anti-155/140-kDa polypeptide (anti-p155/140) (16.3%, 8/49) antibodies were the most common, followed by anti-Mi2 (14.3%, 7/49), anti-ARS (12.2%, 6/49) and anti-SRP (2.0%, 1/49) antibodies. All MSAs and anti-p140 and anti-p155/140 antibodies were mutually exclusive. Anti-p140 (23.7%, 9/38), anti-p155/140 (21.1%, 8/38), and anti-Mi2 (18.4%, 3/38) antibodies were found exclusively in DM patients. Anti-p140 antibody was associated with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p = 0.001), with a sensitivity of 100.0% (4/4) and a specificity of 85.3% (29/34) in DM patients. Anti-p155/140 antibody was associated with cancer-associated DM (p = 0.009), with a sensitivity of 55.6% (5/9) and a specificity of 89.7% (26/29). Cancer-associated survival was significantly worse when anti-p155/140 antibody was present (19.2 ± 7.6 vs. 65.0 ± 3.5 months, p = 0.032). Finally, anti-ARS antibodies were associated with stable or slowly progressive ILD in PM and DM patients (p = 0.005). Conclusions Anti-p140 and anti-p155/140 antibodies were commonly found autoantibodies in Korean patients with inflammatory myositis. Despite the lack of clinically amyopathic DM patients in the study subjects, a strong association was observed between anti-p140 antibody and rapidly progressive ILD. Anti-p155/140 antibody was

  18. Cocaine attenuates blood flow but not neuronal responses to stimulation while preserving neurovascular coupling for resting brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Peng; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine affects neuronal activity and constricts cerebral blood vessels, making it difficult to determine whether cocaine-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) reflect neuronal activation or its vasoactive effects. Here we assessed the effects of acute cocaine on both resting-state and stimulation responses to investigate cocaine’s effects on neurovascular coupling and to differentiate its effects on neuronal activity from its vasoactive actions. We concurrently measured cortical field potentials via thinned skull EEG recordings and CBF with laser Doppler flowmetry in the rat’s somatosensory cortex for both resting state and forepaw stimulation prior to and following cocaine administration (1mg/kg, i.v.). Results show both resting-state field potentials and CBF were depressed after cocaine administration (19.8±4.7% and 52.1±13.4%, respectively) and these changes were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.81, p<0.001) indicating that cocaine did not affect neurovascular coupling at rest and that the reduction in resting CBF reflected reduction in synchronized spontaneous neuronal activity rather than vasoconstriction. In contrast, the forepaw-stimulation-evoked neuronal activity was not changed by cocaine (p=0.244) whereas the CBF to the stimulation was reduced 49.9±2.6% (p=0.028) gradually recovering ~20min post cocaine injection, indicating that neurovascular coupling during stimulation was temporarily disrupted by cocaine. Neurovascular uncoupling by cocaine during stimulation but not during rest indicates that distinct processes might underlie regulation of neurovascular coupling for spontaneous than for stimulation-induced activity. The greater reductions by cocaine to the stimulation-induced CBF increases than to the background CBF should be considered when interpreting fMRI studies comparing activation responses between controls and cocaine abusers. Neurovascular uncoupling could contribute to cocaine’s neurotoxicity particularly for

  19. A modular approach to create a neurovascular unit-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Achyuta, Anil Kumar H; Conway, Amy J; Crouse, Richard B; Bannister, Emilee C; Lee, Robin N; Katnik, Christopher P; Behensky, Adam A; Cuevas, Javier; Sundaram, Shivshankar S

    2013-02-21

    In this work, we describe the fabrication and working of a modular microsystem that recapitulates the functions of the "Neurovascular Unit". The microdevice comprised a vertical stack of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) neural parenchymal chamber separated by a vascular channel via a microporous polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The neural chamber housed a mixture of neurons (~4%), astrocytes (~95%), and microglia (~1%). The vascular channel was lined with a layer of rat brain microvascular endothelial cell line (RBE4). Cellular components in the neural chamber and vascular channel showed viability (>90%). The neural cells fired inhibitory as well as excitatory potentials following 10 days of culture. The endothelial cells showed diluted-acetylated low density lipoprotein (dil-a-LDL) uptake, expressed von Willebrand factor (vWF) and zonula occludens (ZO-1) tight junctions, and showed decreased Alexafluor™-conjugated dextran leakage across their barriers significantly compared with controls (p < 0.05). When the vascular layer was stimulated with TNF-α for 6 h, about 75% of resident microglia and astrocytes on the neural side were activated significantly (p < 0.05 compared to controls) recapitulating tissue-mimetic responses resembling neuroinflammation. The impact of this microsystem lies in the fact that this biomimetic neurovascular platform might not only be harnessed for obtaining mechanistic insights for neurodegenerative disorders, but could also serve as a potential screening tool for central nervous system (CNS) therapeutics in toxicology and neuroinfectious diseases. PMID:23108480

  20. Modified Bilateral Neurovascular Cheek Flap: Functional Reconstruction of Extensive Lower Lip Defects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of extensive lower lip defects is challenging, and functional outcomes are difficult to achieve. Methods: A modified bilateral neurovascular cheek (MBNC) flap has been described. The data of patients with cancer of the lower lip treated with wide excision and reconstructed with the MBNC flap in the Plastic Surgery Unit, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, from 1966 to 2012 were reviewed. Results: Of the total of 143 patients included, 90.91% were women, and their age ranged from 32 to 100 years. All defects involved 70% or greater of the lower lip, which included oral commissure, buccal mucosa, or cheek skin and upper lip. All 20 patients who were followed up demonstrated good outcomes of intercommissural distance, interlabial distance, sulcus depth, and 2-point discrimination compared with normal lip parameters according to age group and satisfaction with treatment. Conclusions: Reconstruction of extensive lower lip defects with the MBNC flap provided good oral competence and functional outcomes. The flap provided adequate lip height and width, with proper position of oral commissure and vermilion reconstruction. The awareness about neurovascular anatomy of the lip and cheek and gentle dissection preserve the lip function. The flap overcomes the drawbacks of Karapandzic technique, which is microstomia, and of Bernard technique, which is a tight adynamic lower lip. It can be used in defects of more than two-thirds of the lip, extending to the cheek, commissural reconstruction, and secondary reconstruction.

  1. Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Christin Y.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Catana, Ciprian; Normandin, Marc D.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Vanduffel, Wim; Rosen, Bruce R.; Mandeville, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    This study employed simultaneous neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the relationship between changes in receptor occupancy measured by PET and changes in brain activity inferred by fMRI. By administering the D2/D3 dopamine receptor antagonist [11C]raclopride at varying specific activities to anesthetized nonhuman primates, we mapped associations between changes in receptor occupancy and hemodynamics [cerebral blood volume (CBV)] in the domains of space, time, and dose. Mass doses of raclopride above tracer levels caused increases in CBV and reductions in binding potential that were localized to the dopamine-rich striatum. Moreover, similar temporal profiles were observed for specific binding estimates and changes in CBV. Injection of graded raclopride mass doses revealed a monotonic coupling between neurovascular responses and receptor occupancies. The distinct CBV magnitudes between putamen and caudate at matched occupancies approximately matched literature differences in basal dopamine levels, suggesting that the relative fMRI measurements reflect basal D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy. These results can provide a basis for models that relate dopaminergic occupancies to hemodynamic changes in the basal ganglia. Overall, these data demonstrate the utility of simultaneous PET/fMRI for investigations of neurovascular coupling that correlate neurochemistry with hemodynamic changes in vivo for any receptor system with an available PET tracer. PMID:23723346

  2. A Novel In Vitro Model to Study Pericytes in the Neurovascular Unit of the Developing Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Wedler, Hannah E.; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical function is impaired in various disorders of the central nervous system including Alzheimer’s disease, autism and schizophrenia. Some of these disorders are speculated to be associated with insults in early brain development. Pericytes have been shown to regulate neurovascular integrity in development, health and disease. Hence, precisely controlled mechanisms must have evolved in evolution to operate pericyte proliferation, repair and cell fate within the neurovascular unit (NVU). It is well established that pericyte deficiency leads to NVU injury resulting in cognitive decline and neuroinflammation in cortical layers. However, little is known about the role of pericytes in pathophysiological processes of the developing cortex. Here we introduce an in vitro model that enables to precisely study pericytes in the immature cortex and show that moderate inflammation and hypoxia result in caspase-3 mediated pericyte loss. Using heterozygous EYFP-NG2 mouse mutants we performed live imaging of pericytes for several days in vitro. In addition we show that pericytes maintain their capacity to proliferate which may allow cell-based therapies like reprogramming of pericytes into induced neuronal cells in the presented approach. PMID:24278454

  3. Pharmacologically-induced neurovascular uncoupling is associated with cognitive impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Stefano; Hertelendy, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Smith, Nataliya; Menyhart, Akos; Farkas, Eszter; Hodges, Erik L; Towner, Rheal; Deak, Ferenc; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Toth, Peter

    2015-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that vascular risk factors, including aging, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity, promote cognitive impairment; however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is adjusted to neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling (NVC) and this mechanism is known to be impaired in the aforementioned pathophysiologic conditions. To establish a direct relationship between impaired NVC and cognitive decline, we induced neurovascular uncoupling pharmacologically in mice by inhibiting the synthesis of vasodilator mediators involved in NVC. Treatment of mice with the epoxygenase inhibitor N-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(2-propynyloxy)-benzenehexanamide (MSPPOH), the NO synthase inhibitor l-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), and the COX inhibitor indomethacin decreased NVC by over 60% mimicking the aging phenotype, which was associated with significantly impaired spatial working memory (Y-maze), recognition memory (Novel object recognition), and impairment in motor coordination (Rotarod). Blood pressure (tail cuff) and basal cerebral perfusion (arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI) were unaffected. Thus, selective experimental disruption of NVC is associated with significant impairment of cognitive and sensorimotor function, recapitulating neurologic symptoms and signs observed in brain aging and pathophysiologic conditions associated with accelerated cerebromicrovascular aging. PMID:26174328

  4. Neurovascular coupling in normal aging: A combined optical, ERP and fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Fabiani, Monica; Gordon, Brian A.; Maclin, Edward L.; Pearson, Melanie A.; Brumback-Peltz, Carrie R.; Low, Kathy A.; McAuley, Edward; Sutton, Bradley P.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Gratton, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by changes in both hemodynamic and neuronal responses, which may be influenced by the cardiorespiratory fitness of the individual. To investigate the relationship between neuronal and hemodynamic changes, we studied the brain activity elicited by visual stimulation (checkerboard reversals at different frequencies) in younger adults and in older adults varying in physical fitness. Four functional brain measures were used to compare neuronal and hemodynamic responses obtained from BA17: two reflecting neuronal activity (the event-related optical signal, EROS, and the C1 response of the ERP), and two reflecting functional hemodynamic changes (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS). The results indicated that both younger and older adults exhibited a quadratic relationship between neuronal and hemodynamic effects, with reduced increases of the hemodynamic response at high levels of neuronal activity. Although older adults showed reduced activation, similar neurovascular coupling functions were observed in the two age groups when fMRI and deoxy-hemoglobin measures were used. However, the coupling between oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin changes decreased with age and increased with increasing fitness. These data indicate that departures from linearity in neurovascular coupling may be present when using hemodynamic measures to study neuronal function. PMID:23664952

  5. Neurovascular coupling and the influence of luminal agonists via the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Dormanns, K; van Disseldorp, E M J; Brown, R G; David, T

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) is presented based on neuronal activity coupled to vasodilation/contraction models via the astrocytic mediated perivascular K(+) and the smooth muscle cell Ca(2+) pathway. Luminal agonists acting on P2Y receptors on the endothelial cell surface provide a flux of IP3 into the endothelial cytosol. This concentration of IP3 is transported via gap junctions between endothelial and smooth muscle cells providing a source of sacroplasmic derived Ca(2+) in the smooth muscle cell. The model is able to relate a neuronal input signal to the corresponding vessel reaction. Results indicate that blood flow mediated IP3 production via the agonist ATP has a substantial effect on the contraction/dilation dynamics of the SMC. The resulting variation in cytosolic Ca(2+) can enhance and inhibit the flow of blood to the cortical tissue. IP3 coupling between endothelial and smooth muscle cells seems to be important in the dynamics of the smooth muscle cell. The VOCC channels are, due to the hyperpolarisation from K(+) SMC efflux, almost entirely closed and do not seem to play a significant role during neuronal activity. The current model shows that astrocytic Ca(2+) is not necessary for neurovascular coupling to occur in contrast to a number of experiments outlining the importance of astrocytic Ca(2+) in NVC, however this Ca(2+) pathway is not the only one mediating NVC. Importantly agonists in flowing blood have a significant influence on the endothelial and smooth muscle cell dynamics. PMID:25167790

  6. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  7. Prostacyclin: An Inflammatory Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Midgett, Charles; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2011-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a member of the prostaglandin family of bioactive lipids. Its best-characterized role is in the cardiovascular system, where it is released by vascular endothelial cells, serving as a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation. In recent years, prostacyclin (PGI2) has also been shown to promote differentiation and inhibit proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition to these well-described homeostatic roles within the cardiovascular system, prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays an important role as an inflammatory mediator. In this review, we focus on the contribution of prostacyclin (PGI2) as both a pathophysiological mediator and therapeutic agent in three major inflammatory-mediated disease processes, namely rheumatoid arthritis, where it promotes disease progression (“pro-inflammatory”), along with pulmonary vascular disease and atherosclerosis, where it inhibits disease progression (“anti-inflammatory”). The emerging role of prostacyclin (PGI2) in this context provides new opportunities for understanding the complex molecular basis for inflammatory-related diseases, and insights into the development of current and future anti-inflammatory treatments. PMID:21687516

  8. Single-Dose and Fractionated Irradiation Promote Initiation and Progression of Atherosclerosis and Induce an Inflammatory Plaque Phenotype in ApoE{sup -/-} Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hoving, Saske; Heeneman, Sylvia; Gijbels, Marion J.J.; Poele, Johannes A.M. te; Russell, Nicola S.; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Increased risk of atherosclerosis and stroke has been demonstrated in patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma and head-and-neck cancer. We previously showed that 14 Gy to the carotid arteries of hypercholesterolemic ApoE{sup -/-} mice resulted in accelerated development of macrophage-rich, inflammatory atherosclerotic lesions. Here we investigate whether clinically relevant fractionated irradiation schedules and lower single doses also predispose to an inflammatory plaque phenotype. Methods and Materials: ApoE{sup -/-} mice were given 8 or 14 Gy, or 20 x 2.0 Gy in 4 weeks to the neck, and the carotid arteries were subsequently examinated for presence of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque size, and phenotype. Results: At 4 weeks, early atherosclerotic lesions were found in 44% of the mice after single doses of 14 Gy but not in age-matched controls. At 22 to 30 weeks after irradiation there was a twofold increase in the mean number of carotid lesions (8-14 Gy and 20 x 2.0 Gy) and total plaque burden (single doses only), compared with age-matched controls. The majority of lesions seen at 30 to 34 weeks after fractionated irradiation or 14-Gy single doses were granulocyte rich (100% and 63%, respectively), with thrombotic features (90% and 88%), whereas these phenotypes were much less common in age-matched controls or after a single dose of 8 Gy. Conclusions: We showed that fractionated irradiation accelerated the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE{sup -/-} mice and predisposed to the formation of an inflammatory, thrombotic plaque phenotype.

  9. Neurovascular dysfunction, inflammation and endothelial activation: Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and dementia. Alzheimer's disease is an increasingly prevalent disease with 5.3 million people in the United States currently affected. This number is a 10 percent increase from previous estimates and is projected to sharply increase to 8 million by 2030; it is the sixth-leading cause of death. In the United States the direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer's and other dementias to Medicare, Medicaid and businesses amount to more than $172 billion each year. Despite intense research efforts, effective disease-modifying therapies for this devastating disease remain elusive. At present, the few agents that are FDA-approved for the treatment of AD have demonstrated only modest effects in modifying clinical symptoms for relatively short periods and none has shown a clear effect on disease progression. New therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Although the idea that vascular defects are present in AD and may be important in disease pathogenesis was suggested over 25 years ago, little work has focused on an active role for cerebrovascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD. Nevertheless, increasing literature supports a vascular-neuronal axis in AD as shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease implicate vascular mechanisms in the development and/or progression of AD. Also, chronic inflammation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, as well as a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases of aging including AD. In this review we summarize data regarding, cardiovascular risk factors and vascular abnormalities, neuro- and vascular-inflammation, and brain endothelial dysfunction in AD. We conclude that the endothelial interface, a highly synthetic bioreactor that produces a large number of soluble factors, is functionally altered in AD and contributes to a noxious CNS milieu by releasing inflammatory and neurotoxic species

  10. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part I: Mandibular Canal and Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives It is critical to determine the location and configuration of the mandibular canal and related vital structures during the implant treatment. The purpose of the present study was to review the literature concerning the mandibular canal and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle anatomical variations related to the implant surgery. Material and Methods Literature was selected through the search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1973 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, prosthetic and periodontal journals and books were performed. Results In total, 46 literature sources were obtained and morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to implant treatment in posterior mandible were presented as two entities: intraosseous mandibular canal and associated inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Conclusions A review of morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to mandibular canal and mandibular vital structures are very important especially in implant therapy since inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle exists in different locations and possesses many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that osteotomies in implant dentistry should not be developed in the posterior mandible until the position of the mandibular canal is established. PMID:24421958

  11. Protective effects of activated protein C on neurovascular unit in a rat model of intrauterine infection-induced neonatal white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng-juan; Liu, Yan; Deng, Shi-hua; Lin, Tu-lian; Rashid, Abid; Liao, Li-hong; Ning, Qin; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2015-12-01

    Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant, has been reported to exert direct vasculoprotective, neural protective, anti-inflammatory, and proneurogenic activities in the central nervous system. This study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effects and potential mechanisms of APC on the neurovascular unit of neonatal rats with intrauterine infection-induced white matter injury. Intraperitoneal injection of 300 μg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered consecutively to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats at embryonic days 19 and 20 to establish the rat model of intrauterine infection- induced white matter injury. Control rats were injected with an equivalent amount of sterile saline on the same time. APC at the dosage of 0.2 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected to neonatal rats immediately after birth. Brain tissues were collected at postnatal day 7 and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate myelin basic protein (MBP) expression in the periventricular white matter region. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were measured using Evens Blue dye and wet/dry weight method. Double immunofluorescence staining and real-time quantitative PCR were performed to detect microglial activation and the expression of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Typical pathological changes of white matter injury were observed in rat brains exposed to LPS, and MBP expression in the periventricular region was significantly decreased. BBB was disrupted and the brain water content was increased. Microglia were largely activated and the mRNA and protein levels of PAR1 were elevated. APC administration ameliorated the pathological lesions of the white matter and increased MBP expression. BBB permeability and brain water content were reduced. Microglia activation was inhibited and the PAR1 mRNA and protein expression levels were both down-regulated. Our results suggested that APC exerted neuroprotective effects

  12. Progression of luminal breast tumors is promoted by ménage à trois between the inflammatory cytokine TNFα and the hormonal and growth-supporting arms of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Meron, Nurit; Leibovich-Rivkin, Tal; Meshel, Tsipi; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer progression is strongly linked to inflammatory processes, aggravating disease course. The impacts of the inflammatory cytokine TNF α on breast malignancy are not fully substantiated, and they may be affected by cooperativity between TNF α and other protumoral mediators. Here, we show that together with representatives of other important arms of the tumor microenvironment, estrogen (hormonal) and EGF (growth-supporting), TNF α potently induced metastasis-related properties and functions in luminal breast tumor cells, representing the most common type of breast cancer. Jointly, TNFα + Estrogen + EGF had a stronger effect on breast cancer cells than each element alone, leading to the following: (1) extensive cell spreading and formation of FAK/paxillin-enriched cellular protrusions; (2) elevated proportion of tumor cells coexpressing high levels of CD44 and β 1 and VLA6; (3) EMT and cell migration; (4) resistance to chemotherapy; (5) release of protumoral factors (CXCL8, CCL2, MMPs). Importantly, the tumor cells used in this study are known to be nonmetastatic under all conditions; nevertheless, they have acquired high metastasizing abilities in vivo in mice, following a brief stimulation by TNFα + Estrogen + EGF. These dramatic findings indicate that TNF α can turn into a strong prometastatic factor, suggesting a paradigm shift in which clinically approved inhibitors of TNFα would be applied in breast cancer therapy. PMID:24369447

  13. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  14. A Neurovascular Perspective for Long-Term Changes After Brain Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pop, V.; Badaut, J.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects all age groups in a population and is an injury generating scientific interest not only as an acute event, but also as a complex brain disease with several underlying neurobehavioral and neuropathological characteristics. We review early and long-term alterations after juvenile and adult TBI with a focus on changes in the neurovascular unit (NVU), including neuronal interactions with glia and blood vessels at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood-flow, BBB structures and function, as well as mechanistic pathways associated with brain aging and neurodegeneration are presented from clinical and experimental reports. Based on the literature, increased attention on BBB changes should be integrated in studies characterizing TBI outcome and may provide a meaningful therapeutic target to resolve detrimental post-traumatic dysfunction. PMID:22350620

  15. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases. PMID:27130417

  16. Investigating Human Neurovascular Coupling Using Functional Neuroimaging: A Critical Review of Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Huneau, Clément; Benali, Habib; Chabriat, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC). They are possibly impaired at early stages of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in humans has been made possible with the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. After a brief review of the current knowledge about possible mechanisms acting in NVC we selected seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature. All these models were described using the same procedure. We compared their physiological assumptions, mathematical formalism, and validation. In particular, we pointed out their strong differences in terms of complexity. Finally, we discussed their validity and their potential applications. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology. PMID:26733782

  17. Hemostatic hydrodissection of the neurovascular bundles during robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: safety and efficacy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekattil, Sijo J.; Dahm, Philipp; Vieweg, Johannes W.

    2009-02-01

    Preservation of continence and potency after Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RALP) are two key outcome measures that patients consider when comparing different treatment options for localized prostate cancer. Ensuring that positive surgical margins are as low as possible provides oncologic control. Various techniques to optimize these outcomes have been employed. This study presents the early outcomes for Hemostatic Hydrodissection of the Neurovascular Bundles during 86 consecutive RALPs. Positive margin rates were 12.5% overall (9% for pT2 and 28.6% for pT3); continence at 6 months was 100%, at 3 months 90% and at 1 month 66%. In patients with no preoperative erectile dysfunction (preoperative SHIM of 25), 79% had return of erections sufficient for intercourse by 6 months. 2 of these patients were able to have intercourse 2 weeks after surgery. These preliminary findings appear promising.

  18. Sensitivity evaluation of DSA-based parametric imaging using Doppler ultrasound in neurovascular phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramoniam, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    An evaluation of the relation between parametric imaging results obtained from Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images and blood-flow velocity measured using Doppler ultrasound in patient-specific neurovascular phantoms is provided. A silicone neurovascular phantom containing internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery was embedded in a tissue equivalent gel. The gel prevented movement of the vessels when blood mimicking fluid was pumped through it to obtain Colour Doppler images. The phantom was connected to a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. To obtain the parametric images, water was pumped through the phantom at various flow rates (100, 120 and 160 ml/min) and 10 ml contrast boluses were injected. DSA images were obtained at 10 frames/sec from the Toshiba C-arm and DSA image sequences were input into LabVIEW software to get parametric maps from time-density curves. The parametric maps were compared with velocities determined by Doppler ultrasound at the internal carotid artery. The velocities measured by the Doppler ultrasound were 38, 48 and 65 cm/s for flow rates of 100, 120 and 160 ml/min, respectively. For the 20% increase in flow rate, the percentage change of blood velocity measured by Doppler ultrasound was 26.3%. Correspondingly, there was a 20% decrease of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT) and 14.3% decrease of Mean Transit Time (MTT), showing strong inverse correlation with Doppler measured velocity. The parametric imaging parameters are quite sensitive to velocity changes and are well correlated to the velocities measured by Doppler ultrasound.

  19. Correlation of histomorphologic findings and partial neurovascular bundle preservation during laparoscopic and robotic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Andino, Lizmarie; Davis, John W; Wei, Wei; Prokhorova, Ina N; Troncoso, Patricia; Matin, Surena F

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the amount of residual periprostatic tissue for radical prostatectomy performed by the partial NS (PNS) technique with that performed by the nerve-sparing (NS) or wide-resection (WR) techniques. Retrospective histomorphologic evaluation of radical prostatectomy specimens (RPSs) from patients undergoing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) was performed. The posterolateral regions corresponding to the neurovascular bundle in RPSs from 48 patients who had undergone NS, PNS, or WR during LRP (n = 30) or RARP (n = 18) were examined by two pathologists unaware of the technique used. The RPSs were evaluated at the base, mid-gland, and apex. The amount of periprostatic tissue at each site was recorded. Measurements were analyzed by use of a linear mixed model. For both LRP and RARP, each gradation of nerve-preservation was associated with periprostatic tissue, except PNS and WR did not differ for LRP at the apex and base or for RARP at the apex, mid-gland, and base. For LRP, a greater amount of tissue was on the left side of the prostate than on the right at the mid-gland level (P = 0.004) whereas for RARP the opposite was found (P = 0.024). Of 18 separate analyses, 13 were significantly associated. The study is limited by its retrospective design. The amount of periprostatic tissue in the neurovascular bundle area correlates well with the nerve-preservation approach used during LRP and RARP, providing anatomic evidence supporting the PNS approach. We also describe a novel finding of laterality bias at the mid-gland level in LRP and RARP specimens. PMID:27000885

  20. Mechanistic Mathematical Modeling Tests Hypotheses of the Neurovascular Coupling in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Lundengård, Karin; Cedersund, Gunnar; Sten, Sebastian; Leong, Felix; Smedberg, Alexander; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response to neural activity. The BOLD response depends on the neurovascular coupling, which connects cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and deoxyhemoglobin level to neuronal activity. The exact mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling are not yet fully investigated. There are at least three different ways in which these mechanisms are being discussed. Firstly, mathematical models involving the so-called Balloon model describes the relation between oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood volume, and cerebral blood flow. However, the Balloon model does not describe cellular and biochemical mechanisms. Secondly, the metabolic feedback hypothesis, which is based on experimental findings on metabolism associated with brain activation, and thirdly, the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypothesis which describes intracellular pathways leading to vasoactive substance release. Both the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses have been extensively studied, but only experimentally. These two hypotheses have never been implemented as mathematical models. Here we investigate these two hypotheses by mechanistic mathematical modeling using a systems biology approach; these methods have been used in biological research for many years but never been applied to the BOLD response in fMRI. In the current work, model structures describing the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses were applied to measured BOLD responses in the visual cortex of 12 healthy volunteers. Evaluating each hypothesis separately shows that neither hypothesis alone can describe the data in a biologically plausible way. However, by adding metabolism to the neurotransmitter feed-forward model structure, we obtained a new model structure which is able to fit the estimation data and successfully predict new, independent validation data

  1. Morroniside Improves Microvascular Functional Integrity of the Neurovascular Unit after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang-Ling; Cheng, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Lei; Xue, Jin-Long; Wang, Xiao-feng; Ai, Hou-Xi; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jing-dong

    2014-01-01

    Treating the vascular elements within the neurovascular unit is essential for protecting and repairing the brain after stroke. Acute injury on endothelial systems results in the disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), while post-ischemic angiogenesis plays an important role in delayed functional recovery. Here, we considered alterations in microvessel integrity to be targets for brain recovery, and tested the natural compound morroniside as a therapeutic approach to restore the vascular elements of injured tissue in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, and morroniside was then administered intragastrically once a day at doses of 30, 90, and 270 mg/kg. BBB integrity and associated factors were analyzed to identify cerebrovascular permeability 3 days after MCAO. The recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), the expression of angiogenic factors and the new vessel formation in the peri-infarct cortex of rats were examined 7 days after MCAO to identify the angiogenesis. We demonstrated that at 3 days post-ischemia, morroniside preserved neurovascular unit function by ameliorating BBB injury. By 7 days post-ischemia, morroniside amplified angiogenesis, in part by enhancing endothelial progenitor cell proliferation and expression of angiogenic factors. Morever, the increase in the amount of vWF+ vessels induced by ischemia could be extended to 28 days after administration of morroniside, indicating the crucial role of morroniside in angiogenesis during the chronic phase. Taken together, our findings suggested that morroniside might offer a novel therapeutic approach for promoting microvascular integrity recovery and provide a thoroughly new direction for stroke therapy. PMID:24979385

  2. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Developing Neurovascular Architecture in the Craniofacial Region of Embryonic Mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Toshiaki; Taya, Yuji; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Soeno, Yuuichi; Sato, Kaori; Aoba, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the mechanism of vascular and axonal guidance to ensure proper morphogenesis and organogenesis. We aimed to perform global mapping of developing neurovascular networks during craniofacial development of embryonic mice. To this end, we developed histology-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions using paraffin-embedded serial sections obtained from mouse embryos. All serial sections were dual-immunolabeled with Pecam1 and Pgp9.5/Gap43 cocktail antibodies. All immunolabeled serial sections were digitized with virtual microscopy to acquire high spatial resolution images. The 3D reconstructs warranted superior positional accuracy to trace the long-range connectivity of blood vessels and individual cranial nerve axons. It was feasible to depict simultaneously the details of angiogenic sprouting and axon terminal arborization and to assess quantitatively the locoregional proximity between blood vessels and cranial nerve axons. Notably, 3D views of the craniofacial region revealed the following: Branchial arch arteries and blood capillary plexi were formed without accompanying nerves at embryonic day (E) 9.5. Cranial nerve axons began to grow into the branchial arches, developing a labyrinth of small blood vessels at E10.5. Vascular remodeling occurred, and axon terminals of the maxillary, mandibular, chorda tympani, and hypoglossal nerve axons had arborized around the lateral lingual swellings at E11.5. The diverged patterning of trigeminal nerves and the arterial branches from the carotid artery became congruent at E11.5. The overall results support the advantage of dual-immunolabeling and 3D reconstruction technology to document the architecture and wiring of the developing neurovascular networks in mouse embryos. PMID:26054056

  3. Developmental Switch in Neurovascular Coupling in the Immature Rodent Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Tsohataridis, Simeon; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Yang, Jenq-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Neurovascular coupling (NVC) in the adult central nervous system (CNS) is a mechanism that provides regions of the brain with more oxygen and glucose upon increased levels of neural activation. Hemodynamic changes that go along with neural activation evoke a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that can be used to study brain activity non-invasively. A correct correlation of the BOLD signal to neural activity is pivotal to understand this signal in neuronal development, health and disease. However, the function of NVC during development is largely unknown. The rodent whisker-to-barrel cortex is an experimentally well established model to study neurovascular interdependences. Using extracellular multi-electrode recordings and laser-Doppler-flowmetry (LDF) we show in the murine barrel cortex of postnatal day 7 (P7) and P30 mice in vivo that NVC undergoes a physiological shift during the first month of life. In the mature CNS it is well accepted that cortical sensory processing results in a rise in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). We show in P7 animals that rCBF decreases during prolonged multi-whisker stimulation and goes along with multi unit activity (MUA) fatigue. In contrast at P30, MUA remains stable during repetitive stimulation and is associated with an increase in rCBF. Further we characterize in both age groups the responses in NVC to single sensory stimuli. We suggest that the observed shift in NVC is an important process in cortical development that may be of high relevance for the correct interpretation of brain activity e.g. in fMRI studies of the immature central nervous system (CNS). PMID:24224059

  4. Mechanistic Mathematical Modeling Tests Hypotheses of the Neurovascular Coupling in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lundengård, Karin; Cedersund, Gunnar; Sten, Sebastian; Leong, Felix; Smedberg, Alexander; Elinder, Fredrik; Engström, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response to neural activity. The BOLD response depends on the neurovascular coupling, which connects cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and deoxyhemoglobin level to neuronal activity. The exact mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling are not yet fully investigated. There are at least three different ways in which these mechanisms are being discussed. Firstly, mathematical models involving the so-called Balloon model describes the relation between oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood volume, and cerebral blood flow. However, the Balloon model does not describe cellular and biochemical mechanisms. Secondly, the metabolic feedback hypothesis, which is based on experimental findings on metabolism associated with brain activation, and thirdly, the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypothesis which describes intracellular pathways leading to vasoactive substance release. Both the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses have been extensively studied, but only experimentally. These two hypotheses have never been implemented as mathematical models. Here we investigate these two hypotheses by mechanistic mathematical modeling using a systems biology approach; these methods have been used in biological research for many years but never been applied to the BOLD response in fMRI. In the current work, model structures describing the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses were applied to measured BOLD responses in the visual cortex of 12 healthy volunteers. Evaluating each hypothesis separately shows that neither hypothesis alone can describe the data in a biologically plausible way. However, by adding metabolism to the neurotransmitter feed-forward model structure, we obtained a new model structure which is able to fit the estimation data and successfully predict new, independent validation data

  5. Effects of natural free radical scavengers on peripheral nerve and neurovascular function in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cotter, M A; Love, A; Watt, M J; Cameron, N E; Dines, K C

    1995-11-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species, coupled with impaired endogenous scavenging mechanisms, plays a prominent role in the aetiology of neurovascular abnormalities in experimental diabetes mellitus. We examined the efficacy of the natural anti-oxidants vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in preventing nerve conduction and nutritive blood flow deficits in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. One month of diabetes caused a 19.1% reduction in sciatic motor conduction velocity (p < 0.001). This was approximately prevented 80-90% by high-dose (1000 mg.kg-1.day-1) vitamin E and beta-carotene treatments (p < 0.001). Vitamin C had lesser effects; the maximum protection found for motor conduction velocity was 36% using a dose of 150 mg.kg-1.day-1 (p < 0.001). High dose (500 mg.kg-1.day-1 (p < 0.001). High dose (500 mg.kg-1.day-1) vitamin C had a lesser effect on conduction than intermediate doses. Joint vitamin C and lower dose (500 mg.kg-1.day-1) vitamin E treatment had a predominantly additive preventive effect against nerve dysfunction. Resistance to hypoxic conduction failure for sciatic nerve in vitro was markedly increased by diabetes and this remained relatively unaffected by treatment. Sciatic nutritive endoneurial blood flow, measured using microelectrode polarography and hydrogen clearance, was reduced 46.1% by 1 month of diabetes (p < 0.001). This was prevented to the extent of 87%, 36% and 98% by vitamins E, C and beta-carotene, respectively (p < 0.01). These data emphasize the role of oxidative stress in the development of early neurovascular changes in experimental diabetes and show that naturally available scavengers have a neuroprotective action. PMID:8582537

  6. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  7. Hydrogen sulfide mitigates matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and neurovascular permeability in hyperhomocysteinemic mice*

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Givvimani, Srikanth; Qipshidze, Natia; Kundu, Soumi; Kapoor, Shray; Vacek, Jonathan C.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinmia (HHcy), was associated with neurovascular diseases. At physiological levels, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protected the neurovascular system. Because Hcy was also a precursor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we sought to test whether the H2S protected the brain during HHcy. Cystathionine-β-synthase heterozygous (CBS+/−) and wild type (WT) mice were supplemented with or without NaHS (30 µM/L, H2S donor) in drinking water. Blood flow and cerebral microvascular permeability in pial vessels were measured by intravital microscopy in WT, WT+NaHS, CBS−/+ and CBS−/+ + NaHS treated mice. The brain tissues were analyzed for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) by Western blot and RT-PCR. The mRNA levels of CBS and cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE, enzyme responsible for conversion of Hcy to H2S) genes were measured by RT-PCR. The results showed a significant increase in MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-3 protein and mRNA in CBS (−/+) mice, while H2S treatment mitigated this increase. Interstitial localization of MMPs was also apparent through Immunohistochemistry. A decrease in protein and mRNA expression of TIMP-4 was observed in CBS (−/+) mice. Microscopy data revealed increase in permeability in CBS (−/+) mice. These effects were ameliorated by H2S and suggested that physiological levels of H2S supplementation may have therapeutic potential against HHcy-induced microvascular permeability, in part, by normalizing the MMP/TIMP ratio in the brain. PMID:19913585

  8. Blood circulating microparticle species in relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A case–control, cross sectional study with conventional MRI and advanced iron content imaging outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J.S.; Chervenak, R.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Tsunoda, I.; Ramanathan, M.; Martinez, N.E.; Omura, S.; Sato, F.; Chaitanya, G.V.; Minagar, A.; McGee, J.; Jennings, M.H.; Monceaux, C.; Becker, F.; Cvek, U.; Trutschl, M.; Zivadinov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to represent an excessive and inappropriate immune response to several central nervous system (CNS) autoantigens, increasing evidence also suggests that MS may also be a neurovascular inflammatory disease, characterized by endothelial activation and shedding of cell membrane microdomains known as ‘microparticles’ into the circulation. Objective To investigate the relationships between these endothelial biomarkers and MS. Methods We examined the relative abundance of CD31+/PECAM-1, CD51+CD61+ (αV–β3) and CD54+ (ICAM-1) bearing microparticles in sera of healthy individuals, patients with relapsing–remitting MS, and secondary-progressive MS. We also investigated the correlation among circulating levels of different microparticle species in MS with conventional MRI (T2- and T1-lesion volumes and brain atrophy), as well as novel MR modalities [assessment of iron content on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)-filtered phase]. Results Differences in circulating microparticle levels were found among MS groups, and several microparticle species (CD31+/CD51+/CD61+/CD54+) were found to correlate with conventional MRI and SWI features of MS. Conclusion These results indicate that circulating microparticles’ profiles in MS may support mechanistic roles for microvascular stress and injury which is an underlying contributor not only to MS initiation and progression, but also to pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26073484

  9. Combined inhibition of PDE4 and PI3Kδ modulates the inflammatory component involved in the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dinavahi, S S; Nyayapathy, S; Perumal, Y; Dharmarajan, S; Viswanadha, S

    2014-04-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) represents a group of disorders with several underlying causes that hamper airflow into the lungs. Despite current intervention therapies, COPD remains a disease with a significant unmet medical need. Treatment with Phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitors results in modest efficacy at clinically relevant doses. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the combination of a PDE4 (Roflumilast) and a Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) δ (IC87114) inhibitor for their therapeutic potential in diminishing the inflammatory response associated with COPD. Due to their divergent and independent pathways, we hypothesize that the combination would be efficacious at low concentrations in an in vitro setting. Inhibition of TNFα, pAkt, MMP-9 in differentiated U937 macrophages upon stimulation with LPS/CSE was determined. Neutrophil functionality manifested by a modulation of elastase activity was estimated. Protective effect of drug combination on CSE induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells was also determined. Data demonstrated that the combination of Roflumilast and IC87114 reduced TNFα, pAkt and MMP-9 at nanomolar concentrations and was several fold potent than either of the compounds alone. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase was also increased significantly with the combination along with a better protection against CSE induced apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells, thereby providing a rationale for their evaluation in COPD patients. PMID:24105104

  10. Skimmin, a Coumarin from Hydrangea paniculata, Slows down the Progression of Membranous Glomerulonephritis by Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Inhibiting Immune Complex Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongqi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dongming; Shi, Jing; Yang, Jingzhi

    2013-01-01

    Skimmin is one of the major pharmacologically active molecules present in Hydrangea paniculata, a medical herb used in the traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. In the current study, we attempted to investigate its renoprotective activity and underlying mechanisms in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (c-BSA). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups, including normal control, model control, Mycophenolate Mofetil-treated group, and two skimming-treated groups (15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). Our research showed that treatment with skimmin significantly reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), and serum creatinine (Scr) as compared with model control after experimental induction of membranous glomerulonephritis (P < 0.01). Moreover, glomerular hypercellularity, tubulointerstitial injury, and glomerular deposition of IgG were less intense after skimmin treatment. By immunochemistry analysis, we demonstrated that skimmin could significantly inhibit interleukin-1β (IL1β) and IL-6 expression (P < 0.05), reduce the loss of nephrin and podocin, and suppress the infiltration of renal interstitium by CD3-positive T cell and CD20-positive B cell. These results suggest that treatment with skimmin can significantly improve renal function and suppress the IgG deposition as well as the development of glomerular lesions in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis. PMID:23990847

  11. Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection potentiates adipose tissue macrophage polarization toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and contributes to diabetes progression in a diet-induced obesity model

    PubMed Central

    Cabalén, María E.; Cabral, María F.; Sanmarco, Liliana M.; Andrada, Marta C.; Onofrio, Luisina I.; Ponce, Nicolás E.; Aoki, María P.; Gea, Susana; Cano, Roxana C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity and Chagas disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) represent serious public health concerns. The interrelation between parasite infection, adipose tissue, immune system and metabolism in an obesogenic context, has not been entirely explored. A novel diet-induced obesity model (DIO) was developed in C57BL/6 wild type mice to examine the effect of chronic infection (DIO+I) on metabolic parameters and on obesity-related disorders. Dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and cardiac/hepatic steatosis were strongly developed in DIO mice. Strikingly, although these metabolic alterations were collectively improved by infection, plasmatic apoB100 levels remain significantly increased in DIO+I, suggesting the presence of pro-atherogenic small and dense LDL particles. Moreover, acute insulin resistance followed by chronic hyperglycemia with hypoinsulinemia was found, evidencing an infection-related-diabetes progression. These lipid and glucose metabolic changes seemed to be highly dependent on TLR4 expression since TLR4−/− mice were protected from obesity and its complications. Notably, chronic infection promoted a strong increase in MCP-1 producing macrophages with a M2 (F4/80+CD11c-CD206+) phenotype associated to oxidative stress in visceral adipose tissue of DIO+I mice. Importantly, infection reduced lipid content but intensified inflammatory infiltrates in target tissues. Thus, parasite persistence in an obesogenic environment and the resulting host immunometabolic dysregulation may contribute to diabetes/atherosclerosis progression. PMID:26921251

  12. Inflammatory mechanisms of endometritis.

    PubMed

    Woodward, E M; Troedsson, M H T

    2015-07-01

    Transient post breeding endometritis is a normal physiological reaction in the mare, as it is believed that an inflammatory response is necessary for the effective removal of contaminating bacteria and excess spermatozoa introduced into the uterus. While most mares can clear endometritis within a reasonable amount of time, persistent endometritis caused by either bacteria or spermatozoa can threaten the success of a pregnancy. A subpopulation of mares is susceptible to persistent endometritis, and these mares are a concern in equine reproductive medicine. Research has identified several factors that contribute to susceptibility; however, the exact mechanisms of the progression of the disease are still being elucidated. Current research focuses on endometrial gene expression during endometritis in an attempt to understand the timing of specific inflammatory processes involved with the development of susceptibility to persistent endometritis. With an increased understanding of the mechanisms involved with the disease, current treatments can be improved upon, and new treatments can be developed to target affected pathways. PMID:25537084

  13. Eicosanoid Profiling in an Orthotopic Model of Lung Cancer Progression by Mass Spectrometry Demonstrates Selective Production of Leukotrienes by Inflammatory Cells of the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Gijon, Miguel; Amin, Jay; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Walker, Deandra; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Lu, Xian; Murphy, Robert C.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.

    2013-01-01

    Eicosanoids are bioactive lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid1 (AA), which is released by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). AA is metabolized through three major pathways, cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO) and cytochrome P450, to produce a family of eicosanoids, which individually have been shown to have pro- or anti-tumorigenic activities in cancer. However, cancer progression likely depends on complex changes in multiple eicosanoids produced by cancer cells and by tumor microenvironment and a systematic examination of the spectrum of eicosanoids in cancer has not been performed. We used liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to quantitate eicosanoids produced during lung tumor progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent mouse model of lung cancer, in which Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells are injected into lungs of syngeneic mice. The presence of tumor increased products of both the cyclooxygenase and the lipoxygenase pathways in a time-dependent fashion. Comparing tumors grown in cPLA2 knockout vs wild-type mice, we demonstrated that prostaglandins (PGE2, PGD2 and PGF2a) were produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME), but leukotriene (LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4) production required cPLA2 expression in the TME. Using flow cytometry, we recovered tumor-associated neutrophils and 2 types of tumor-associated macrophages from tumor-bearing lungs and we defined their distinct eicosanoid profiles by LC/MS/MS. The combination of flow cytometry and LC/MS/MS unravels the complexity of eicosanoid production in lung cancer and provides a rationale to develop therapeutic strategies that target select cell populations to inhibit specific classes of eicosanoids. PMID:24244531

  14. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    PubMed

    Neetu, Soni; Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  15. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  16. Neurovascular risks of sacral screws with bicortical purchase: an anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Ergur, Ipek; Kiray, Amac; Kosay, Can; Tayefi, Hamid

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this cadaver study is to define the anatomic structures on anterior sacrum, which are under the risk of injury during bicortical screw application to the S1 and S2 pedicles. Thirty formaldehyde-preserved human male cadavers were studied. Posterior midline incision was performed, and soft tissues and muscles were dissected from the posterior part of the lumbosacral region. A 6 mm pedicle screw was inserted between the superior facet of S1 and the S1 foramen. The entry point of the S2 pedicle screw was located between S1 and S2 foramina. S1 and S2 screws were placed on both right and the left sides of all cadavers. Then, all cadavers were turned into supine position. All abdominal and pelvic organs were moved away and carefully observed for any injury. The tips of the sacral screws were marked and the relations with the anatomic structures were defined. The position of the sacral screws relative to the middle and lateral sacral arteries and veins, and the sacral sympathetic trunk were measured. There was no injury to the visceral organs. In four cases, S1 screw tip was in direct contact with middle sacral artery. In two cases, S1 screw tip was in direct contact with middle sacral vein. It was observed that the S1 screw tips were in close proximity to sacral sympathetic trunk on both right and the left sides. The tip of the S2 screw was in contact with middle sacral artery on the left side only in one case. It is found that the tip of the S2 screw was closely located with the middle sacral vein in two cases. The tip of the S2 pedicle screw was in contact with the sacral sympathetic trunk in eight cases on the right side and seven cases on the left side. Lateral sacral vein was also observed to be disturbed by the S1 and S2 screws. As a conclusion, anterior cortical penetration during sacral screw insertion carries a risk of neurovascular injury. The risk of sacral sympathetic trunk and minor vascular structures together with the major neurovascular

  17. The absolute CBF response to activation is preserved during elevated perfusion: Implications for neurovascular coupling measures

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Joseph R.; Driver, Ian D.; Bright, Molly G.; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in which the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to a neural stimulus are measured, can be used to estimate the fractional increase in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) that accompanies evoked neural activity. A measure of neurovascular coupling is obtained from the ratio of fractional CBF and CMRO2 responses, defined as n, with the implicit assumption that relative rather than absolute changes in CBF and CMRO2 adequately characterise the flow-metabolism response to neural activity. The coupling parameter n is important in terms of its effect on the BOLD response, and as potential insight into the flow-metabolism relationship in both normal and pathological brain function. In 10 healthy human subjects, BOLD and CBF responses were measured to test the effect of baseline perfusion (modulated by a hypercapnia challenge) on the coupling parameter n during graded visual stimulation. A dual-echo pulsed arterial spin labelling (PASL) sequence provided absolute quantification of CBF in baseline and active states as well as relative BOLD signal changes, which were used to estimate CMRO2 responses to the graded visual stimulus. The absolute CBF response to the visual stimuli were constant across different baseline CBF levels, meaning the fractional CBF responses were reduced at the hyperperfused baseline state. For the graded visual stimuli, values of n were significantly reduced during hypercapnia induced hyperperfusion. Assuming the evoked neural responses to the visual stimuli are the same for both baseline CBF states, this result has implications for fMRI studies that aim to measure neurovascular coupling using relative changes in CBF. The coupling parameter n is sensitive to baseline CBF, which would confound its interpretation in fMRI studies where there may be significant differences in baseline perfusion between groups. The absolute change in

  18. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Anthony C.; Koide, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K+) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca2+ signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca2+ signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca2+ signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca2+ and elevation of extracellular K+). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ release events leading to inversion of NVC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)—strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the brain surface

  19. New aspects of the topographical anatomy of the mammary gland regarding its neurovascular supply along a regular ligamentous suspension.

    PubMed

    Wueringer, Elisabeth; Tschabitscher, Manfred

    2002-07-01

    The exact location of the main nerves and vessels to the breast and the nipple-areola complex has always been obscure. We found that the course of the rich neurovascular supply to the nipple runs along a regularly-located, suspensory apparatus and can therefore be predicted exactly. It consists of a horizontal fibrous septum originating at the pectoral fascia along the 5th rib, merging into vertical ligaments along the sternum medially and along the lateral border of pectoralis minor laterally. Cranially, and in an anterior direction, the vertical ligaments are connected by the superficial fascia. In the current anatomical study, we seek to demonstrate the vascular supply provided by these structures more impressively. For this purpose we dissected the ligamentous suspension after intraarterial injection with colored latex in both breasts of 10 female cadavers. The large vessels, guided by this circle of fibrous attachments could then be seen clearly. In a further 4 female cadavers, a similar procedure was performed after intraarterial injection of surgical ink. This stained the vascular layers even more intensely. This topographical knowledge has clinical relevance. The rich and constant neurovascular supply to the nipple areola complex may be maintained in a new breast-reduction technique, which allows safe postoperative viability and sensibility of the nipple. The clinical results act as a striking evidence of our anatomical findings. Further procedures taking advantage of the easy determination and access to the neurovascular supply may be seen in future. PMID:14566611

  20. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  1. Toward the Era of a One-Stop Imaging Service Using an Angiography Suite for Neurovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sheng-Che; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chang, Feng-Chi; Luo, Chao-Bao; Teng, Michael Mu-Huo; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Transportation of patients requiring multiple diagnostic and imaging-guided therapeutic modalities is unavoidable in current radiological practice. This clinical scenario causes time delays and increased risk in the management of stroke and other neurovascular emergencies. Since the emergence of flat-detector technology in imaging practice in recent decades, studies have proven that flat-detector X-ray angiography in conjunction with contrast medium injection and specialized reconstruction algorithms can provide not only high-quality and high-resolution CT-like images but also functional information. This improvement in imaging technology allows quantitative assessment of intracranial hemodynamics and, subsequently in the same imaging session, provides treatment guidance for patients with neurovascular disorders by using only a flat-detector angiographic suite—a so-called one-stop quantitative imaging service (OSIS). In this paper, we review the recent developments in the field of flat-detector imaging and share our experience of applying this technology in neurovascular disorders such as acute ischemic stroke, cerebral aneurysm, and stenoocclusive carotid diseases. PMID:23762863

  2. Early and late stimulus-evoked cortical hemodynamic responses provide insight into the neurogenic nature of neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Harris, Sam; Bruyns-Haylett, Michael; Boorman, Luke; Zheng, Ying; Jones, Myles; Berwick, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding neurovascular coupling is a prerequisite for the interpretation of results obtained from modern neuroimaging techniques. This study investigated the hemodynamic and neural responses in rat somatosensory cortex elicited by 16 seconds electrical whisker stimuli. Hemodynamics were measured by optical imaging spectroscopy and neural activity by multichannel electrophysiology. Previous studies have suggested that the whisker-evoked hemodynamic response contains two mechanisms, a transient ‘backwards' dilation of the middle cerebral artery, followed by an increase in blood volume localized to the site of neural activity. To distinguish between the mechanisms responsible for these aspects of the response, we presented whisker stimuli during normocapnia (‘control'), and during a high level of hypercapnia. Hypercapnia was used to ‘predilate' arteries and thus possibly ‘inhibit' aspects of the response related to the ‘early' mechanism. Indeed, hemodynamic data suggested that the transient stimulus-evoked response was absent under hypercapnia. However, evoked neural responses were also altered during hypercapnia and convolution of the neural responses from both the normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions with a canonical impulse response function, suggested that neurovascular coupling was similar in both conditions. Although data did not clearly dissociate early and late vascular responses, they suggest that the neurovascular coupling relationship is neurogenic in origin. PMID:22126914

  3. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  4. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-07-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  5. Model of the transient neurovascular response based on prompt arterial dilation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Khan, Reswanul; Thompson, Jeffrey K; Ress, David

    2013-09-01

    Brief neural stimulation results in a stereotypical pattern of vascular and metabolic response that is the basis for popular brain-imaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imagine. However, the mechanisms of transient oxygen transport and its coupling to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) are poorly understood. Recent experiments show that brief stimulation produces prompt arterial vasodilation rather than venous vasodilation. This work provides a neurovascular response model for brief stimulation based on transient arterial effects using one-dimensional convection-diffusion transport. Hemoglobin oxygen dissociation is included to enable predictions of absolute oxygen concentrations. Arterial CBF response is modeled using a lumped linear flow model, and CMRO2 response is modeled using a gamma function. Using six parameters, the model successfully fit 161/166 measured extravascular oxygen time courses obtained for brief visual stimulation in cat cerebral cortex. Results show how CBF and CMRO2 responses compete to produce the observed features of the hemodynamic response: initial dip, hyperoxic peak, undershoot, and ringing. Predicted CBF and CMRO2 response amplitudes are consistent with experimental measurements. This model provides a powerful framework to quantitatively interpret oxygen transport in the brain; in particular, its intravascular oxygen concentration predictions provide a new model for fMRI responses. PMID:23756690

  6. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthew J; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26499397

  7. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H K; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases. PMID:26503597

  8. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases.

  9. Brain regional angiogenic potential at the neurovascular unit during normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Murugesan, Nivetha; Demarest, Tyler G.; Madri, Joseph A.; Pachter, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Given strong regional specialization of the brain, cerebral angiogenesis may be regionally modified during normal aging. To test this hypothesis, expression of a broad cadre of angiogenesis-associated genes was assayed at the neurovascular unit (NVU) in discrete brain regions of young vs. aged mice by laser capture microdissection coupled to quantitative real-time PCR. Complementary quantitative capillary density/branching studies were performed as well. Effects of physical exercise were also assayed to determine if age-related trends could be reversed. Additionally, gene response to hypoxia was probed to highlight age-associated weaknesses in adapting to this angiogenic stress. Aging impacted resting expression of angiogenesis-associated genes at the NVU in a region-dependent manner. Physical exercise reversed some of these age-associated gene trends, as well as positively influenced cerebral capillary density/branching in a region-dependent way. Lastly, hypoxia revealed a weaker angiogenic response in aged brain. These results suggest heterogeneous changes in angiogenic capacity of the brain during normal aging, and imply a therapeutic benefit of physical exercise that acts at the level of the NVU. PMID:22019053

  10. A 3D neurovascular bundles segmentation method based on MR-TRUS deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Ogunleye, Tomi; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D neurovascular bundles (NVB) segmentation method for ultrasound (US) image by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS deformable registration. First, 3D NVB was contoured by a physician in MR images, and the 3D MRdefined NVB was then transformed into US images using a MR-TRUS registration method, which models the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimates the boundary deformation and the volumetric deformations under the elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 6 patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was less than 2 mm, and the average NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was over 89%. This NVB segmentation technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NVB response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  11. Free neurovascular flap from the first web of the foot in hand reconstruction.

    PubMed

    May, J W; Chait, L A; Cohen, B E; O'Brien, B M

    1977-09-01

    To identify an anatomically reliable and functionally acceptable neurovascular free flap for use in hand reconstruction, 50 fresh cadaver feet were dissected under the operating microscope, with particular attention paid to the anatomy of the first web area. A distal communicating artery was seen in 100% of dissections, allowing either dorsal or plantar donor artery inflow to nourish the entire flap area. Because of the ease of dissection, the first dorsal metatarsal or dorsalis pedis is suggested as the donor artery, and a dorsal branch of the greater saphenous venous system is suggested as the donor vein. The deep peroneal nerve was seen to consistently innervate the first web and, along with the plantar digital nerves, is suggested as an anatomically identifiable donor nerve. Either part of the foot first web may be used alone or together as a free flap. When indicated further dorsal skin may be incorporated into the web flap to expand its application. Two-point discrimination studies of the lateral plantar surface of the great toe in 50 normal individuals showed an average of 11.2 mm. This was significantly better as a potential donor flap than the medial dorsum of the foot where the average was 32 mm. A single case demonstrating the application of this flap in hand reconstruction is presented. PMID:332757

  12. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-01

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574304

  13. Reconstruction of fingertip defects with the neurovascular tranquilli-leali flap.

    PubMed

    Loréa, P; Chahidi, N; Marchesi, S; Ezzedine, R; Marin Braun, F; Dury, M

    2006-06-01

    For many years, bipedicled palmar advancement flaps were used rarely in fingers because they sacrificed the dorsal branches of the digital arteries, risking dorsal skin necrosis. In 1995, a short bipedicled neurovascular VY advancement flap raised distally to the PIP flexion crease, which spared the dorsal blood supply, was described by Elliot et al. (1995). This paper includes an anatomical study on 28 fresh cadaver fingers to evaluate the advancement potential of this flap. It also reviews 22 fingertip reconstructions in 22 patients using this flap. The mean advancement of the flap in the cadaver study was 14 (range 10-16) mm. This procedure gave good clinical results in respect of healing, sensibility, bone cover and appearance. Complications occurred in four fingers (18%), viz. two infections, one neuroma and one stiff proximal interphalangeal joint. Our study suggests that this flap can be used to treat fingertip defects of a size of approximately half of the pulp of the distal phalangeal segment of the finger. PMID:16403425

  14. Imaging the Perivascular Space as a Potential Biomarker of Neurovascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joel; Berezuk, Courtney; McNeely, Alicia A; Gao, Fuqiang; McLaurin, JoAnne; Black, Sandra E

    2016-03-01

    Although the brain lacks conventional lymphatic vessels found in peripheral tissue, evidence suggests that the space surrounding the vasculature serves a similar role in the clearance of fluid and metabolic waste from the brain. With aging, neurodegeneration, and cerebrovascular disease, these microscopic perivascular spaces can become enlarged, allowing for visualization and quantification on structural MRI. The purpose of this review is to: (i) describe some of the recent pre-clinical findings from basic science that shed light on the potential neurophysiological mechanisms driving glymphatic and perivascular waste clearance, (ii) review some of the pathobiological etiologies that may lead to MRI-visible enlarged perivascular spaces (ePVS), (iii) describe the possible clinical implications of ePVS, (iv) evaluate existing qualitative and quantitative techniques used for measuring ePVS burden, and (v) propose future avenues of research that may improve our understanding of this potential clinical neuroimaging biomarker for fluid and metabolic waste clearance dysfunction in neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. PMID:26993511

  15. SIV-induced impairment of neurovascular repair: a potential role for VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Ebenezer, Gigi J.; McArthur, Justin C.; Polydefkis, Michael; Dorsey, Jamie L.; O'Donnell, Ryan; Hauer, Peter; Adams, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerves and blood vessels travel together closely during development but little is known about their interactions post-injury. The SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) recapitulates peripheral nervous system pathology of HIV infection. In this study, we assessed the effect of SIV infection on neurovascular regrowth using a validated excisional axotomy model. Six uninfected and five SIV-infected macaques were studied 14 and 70 days after axotomy to characterize regenerating vessels and axons. Blood vessel extension preceded the appearance of regenerating nerve fibers suggesting that vessels serve as scaffolding to guide regenerating axons through extracellular matrix. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed along vascular silhouettes by endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular cells. VEGF expression correlated with dermal nerve (r=0.68, p= 0.01) and epidermal nerve fiber regrowth (r=0.63, p=0.02). No difference in blood vessel growth was observed between SIV-infected and control macaques. In contrast, SIV-infected animals demonstrated altered length, pruning and arborization of nerve fibers as well as alteration of VEGF expression. These results reinforce earlier human primate findings that vessel growth precedes and influences axonal regeneration. The consistency of these observations across human and non-human primates validates the use of the pigtailed-macaque as a preclinical model. PMID:22549763

  16. Aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular rarefaction, neurovascular uncoupling, and cognitive decline in mice.

    PubMed

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Warrington, Junie P; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Koller, Akos; Ballabh, Praveen; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular impairment, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high-fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. We found that aging exacerbates the obesity-induced decline in microvascular density both in the hippocampus and in the cortex. The extent of hippocampal microvascular rarefaction and the extent of impairment of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function positively correlate. Aging exacerbates obesity-induced loss of pericyte coverage on cerebral microvessels and alters hippocampal angiogenic gene expression signature, which likely contributes to microvascular rarefaction. Aging also exacerbates obesity-induced oxidative stress and induction of NADPH oxidase and impairs cerebral blood flow responses to whisker stimulation. Collectively, obesity exerts deleterious cerebrovascular effects in aged mice, promoting cerebromicrovascular rarefaction and neurovascular uncoupling. The morphological and functional impairment of the cerebral microvasculature in association with increased blood-brain barrier disruption and neuroinflammation (Tucsek Z, Toth P, Sosnowsk D, et al. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease. J Gerontol Biol Med Sci. 2013. In press, PMID: 24269929) likely contribute to obesity-induced cognitive decline in aging. PMID:24895269

  17. Testing methodologies for the nonlinear analysis of causal relationships in neurovascular coupling.

    PubMed

    Lüdtke, Niklas; Logothetis, Nikos K; Panzeri, Stefano

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the use and implementation of a nonlinear methodology for establishing which changes in neurophysiological signals cause changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging. Unlike previous analytical approaches, which used linear correlation to establish covariations between neural activity and BOLD, we propose a directed information-theoretic measure, the transfer entropy, which can elucidate even highly nonlinear causal relationships between neural activity and BOLD signal. In this study we investigated the practicality of such an analysis given the limited data samples that can be collected experimentally due to the low temporal resolution of BOLD signals. We implemented several algorithms for the estimation of transfer entropy and we tested their effectiveness using simulated local field potentials (LFPs) and BOLD data constructed to match the main statistical properties of real LFP and BOLD signals measured simultaneously in monkey primary visual cortex. We found that using the advanced methods of entropy estimation implemented and described here, a transfer entropy analysis of neurovascular coupling based on experimentally attainable data sets is feasible. PMID:20409664

  18. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases. PMID:26503597

  19. Inflammatory glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bodh, Sonam A.; Kumar, Vasu; Raina, Usha K.; Ghosh, B.; Thakar, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is seen in about 20% of the patients with uveitis. Anterior uveitis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. The mechanisms by which iridocyclitis leads to obstruction of aqueous outflow include acute, usually reversible forms (e.g., accumulation of inflammatory elements in the intertrabecular spaces, edema of the trabecular lamellae, or angle closure due to ciliary body swelling) and chronic forms (e.g., scar formation or membrane overgrowth in the anterior chamber angle). Careful history and follow-up helps distinguish steroid-induced glaucoma from uveitic glaucoma. Treatment of combined iridocyclitis and glaucoma involves steroidal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and antiglaucoma drugs. However, glaucoma drugs can often have an unpredictable effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) in the setting of uveitis. Surgical intervention is required in case of medical failure. Method of Literature Search: Literature on the Medline database was searched using the PubMed interface. PMID:21713239

  20. Sphingolipid metabolites in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous building blocks of eukaryotic cell membranes. Progress in our understanding of sphingolipid metabolism, state-of-the-art sphingolipidomic approaches and animal models have generated a large body of evidence demonstrating that sphingolipid metabolites, particularly ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, are signalling molecules that regulate a diverse range of cellular processes that are important in immunity, inflammation and inflammatory disorders. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of sphingolipid metabolites and new perspectives on their roles in regulating chronic inflammation have been reported. The knowledge gained in this emerging field will aid in the development of new therapeutic options for inflammatory disorders. PMID:24899305

  1. NADPH-diaphorase activity and neurovascular coupling in the rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Vlasenko, O V; Maisky, V A; Maznychenko, A V; Pilyavskii, A I

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of NADPH-diaphorase-reactive (NADPH-dr) neurons and neuronal processes in the cerebral cortex and basal forebrain and their association with parenchymal vessels were studied in normal adult rats using NADPH-d histochemical protocol. The intensely stained cortical interneurons and reactive subcortically originating afferents, and stained microvessels were examined through a light microscope at law (x250) and high (x630) magnifications. NADPH-dr interneurons were concentrated in layers 2-6 of the M1 and M2 areas. However, clear predominance in their concentration (14 +/- 0.8 P < 0.05 per section) was found in layer 6. A mean number of labeled neurons in auditory (AuV), granular and agranular (GI, AIP) areas of the insular cortex was calculated to reach 12.3 +/- 0.7, 18.5 +/- 1.0 and 23.3 +/- 1.7 units per section, respectively (P < 0.05). The distinct apposition of labelled neurons to intracortical vessels was found in the M1, M2. The order of frequency of neurovascular coupling in different zones of the cerebral cortex was as following sequence: AuV (31.2%, n = 1040) > GI (18.0%, n = 640) > S1 (13.3%, n = 720) > M1 (6.3%, n = 1360). A large number of structural associations between labeled cells and vessels in the temporal and insular cortex indicate that NADPH-d-reactive interneurons can contribute to regulation of the cerebral regional blood flow in these areas. PMID:18416183

  2. Recreating blood-brain barrier physiology and structure on chip: A novel neurovascular microfluidic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Pensabene, Virginia; Markov, Dmitry A.; Allwardt, Vanessa; Neely, M. Diana; Shi, Mingjian; Britt, Clayton M.; Hoilett, Orlando S.; Yang, Qing; Brewer, Bryson M.; Samson, Philip C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; May, James M.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu; Bowman, Aaron B.; Reiserer, Ronald S.; Wikswo, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical structure that serves as the gatekeeper between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. It is the responsibility of the BBB to facilitate the entry of required nutrients into the brain and to exclude potentially harmful compounds; however, this complex structure has remained difficult to model faithfully in vitro. Accurate in vitro models are necessary for understanding how the BBB forms and functions, as well as for evaluating drug and toxin penetration across the barrier. Many previous models have failed to support all the cell types involved in the BBB formation and/or lacked the flow-created shear forces needed for mature tight junction formation. To address these issues and to help establish a more faithful in vitro model of the BBB, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that is comprised of both a vascular chamber and a brain chamber separated by a porous membrane. This design allows for cell-to-cell communication between endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes and independent perfusion of both compartments separated by the membrane. This NeuroVascular Unit (NVU) represents approximately one-millionth of the human brain, and hence, has sufficient cell mass to support a breadth of analytical measurements. The NVU has been validated with both fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran diffusion and transendothelial electrical resistance. The NVU has enabled in vitro modeling of the BBB using all human cell types and sampling effluent from both sides of the barrier. PMID:26576206

  3. Citalopram Enhances Neurovascular Regeneration and Sensorimotor Functional Recovery after Ischemic Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa R.; Ogle, Molly E.; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) after stroke enhances motor functional recovery; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. We hypothesized that daily administration of the clinical drug citalopram would produce these functional benefits via enhancing neurovascular repair in the ischemic peri-infarct region. To test this hypothesis, focal ischemic stroke was induced in male C57/B6 mice by permanent ligation of distal branches of the middle cerebral artery to the barrel cortex and 7-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. Citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 24 hrs after stroke and daily thereafter. To label proliferating cells, bromo-deoxyuridine was injected daily beginning 3 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical and functional assays were performed to elucidate citalopram-mediated cellular and sensorimotor changes after stroke. Citalopram treatment had no significant effect on infarct formation or edema 3 days after stroke; however, citalopram-treated mice had better functional recovery than saline-treated controls 3 and 14 days after stroke in the adhesive removal test. Increased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor was detected in the peri-infarct region 7 days after stroke in citalopram-treated animals. The number of proliferating neural progenitor cells and the distance of neuroblast migration from the sub-ventricular zone towards the ischemic cortex were significantly greater in citalopram-treated mice at 7 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical staining and co-localization analysis showed that citalopram-treated animals generated more new neurons and microvessels in the peri-infarct region 21 and 28 days after stroke. Taken together, these results suggest that citalopram promotes post-stroke sensorimotor recovery likely via enhancing neurogenesis, neural cell migration and the microvessel support in the peri-infarct region of

  4. Neurovascular bundle dissection for Nesbit procedure in congenital penile curvature patients: medial or lateral?

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Akman, Tolga; Salabas, Emre; Dincer, Murat; Ortac, Mazhar; Kadioglu, Ates

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of the modified Nesbit procedure using different techniques for dissecting the neurovascular bundle (NVB) to correct ventral congenital penile curvatures (CPCs). The bundle was mobilized using the medial and lateral dissection technique in 21 (Group 1) and 13 (Group 2) patients, respectively. In the medial technique, Buck's fascia is opened at the dorsal side of the penis, the deep dorsal vein is removed at the most prominent site of the curvature and a diamond-shaped tunica albuginea (TA) is excised from the midline of the penis. In the lateral technique, the bundle is mobilized using a longitudinal lateral incision of the Buck's fascia above the urethra at the 5 and 7 o'clock positions via a bilateral approach. The localization and degree of curvature was evaluated using the combined intracavernous injection stimulation test or from the patients' photographs. The mean patient age and degree of curvature were similar between groups. The mean operation time was longer for Group 2 (P = 0.01). In Group 1, nine patients (42.8%) required one diamond excision, 10 (47.6%) required two diamond excisions and two (9.5%) required more than two excisions; in Group 2, six patients (46.2%) required two diamond excisions and seven patients (53.8%) required more than two diamond excisions (P = 0.019). The differences in penile shortening, penile straightening and numbness of the glans penis were not statistically significant. Medial dissection of the bundle for the modified Nesbit procedure reduces the number of diamond-shaped removals of TA and thus shortens operation time in comparison with its lateral counterpart. PMID:24625879

  5. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia. PMID:26751937

  6. Failed microvascular decompression surgery for hemifacial spasm due to persistent neurovascular compression: an analysis of reoperations.

    PubMed

    Bigder, Mark Gregory; Kaufmann, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery for hemifacial spasm (HFS) is potentially curative. The findings at repeat MVD in patients with persistent or recurrent HFS were analyzed with the aim to identify factors that may improve surgical outcomes. METHODS Intraoperative findings were determined from review of dictated operative reports and operative diagrams for patients who underwent repeat MVD after prior surgery elsewhere. Clinical follow-up was obtained from the hospital and clinic records, as well as telephone questionnaires. RESULTS Among 845 patients who underwent MVD performed by the senior author, 12 had been referred after prior MVD for HFS performed elsewhere. Following repeat MVD, all patients improved and complete spasm resolution was described by 11 of 12 patients after a mean follow-up of 91 ± 55 months (range 28-193). Complications were limited to 1 patient with aggravation of preexisting hearing loss and mild facial weakness and 1 patient with aseptic meningitis without sequelae. Significant factors that may have contributed to the failure of the first surgery included retromastoid craniectomies that did not extend laterally to the sigmoid sinus or inferiorly to the posterior fossa floor in 11 of 12 patients and a prior surgical approach that focused on the cisternal portion of the facial nerve in 9 of 12 patients. In all cases, significant persistent neurovascular compression (NVC) was evident and alleviated more proximally on the facial root exit zone (fREZ). CONCLUSIONS Most HFS patients will achieve spasm relief with thorough alleviation of NVC of the fREZ, which extends from the pontomedullary sulcus root exit point to the Obersteiner-Redlich transition zone. PMID:26295916

  7. Progress and frustration in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, B. N.

    1980-01-01

    Advances -- and lack of them -- in our understanding of the aetiology, nature, and treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease during the past 30 years are reviewed with special reference to personal experience. PMID:7002013

  8. Other noninfectious inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Álex; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) represent a broad spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including monophasic, multiphasic, and progressive disorders that range from highly localized forms to multifocal or diffuse variants. In addition to the classic multiple sclerosis (MS) phenotypes, several MS variants have been described, which can be differentiated on the basis of severity, clinical course, and lesion distribution. Other forms of IIDD are now recognized as distinct entities and not MS variants, such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. The CNS can also be affected by a variety of inflammatory diseases. These include primary angiitis of the CNS (PACNS), a rare disorder specifically targeting the CNS vasculature, and various systemic conditions which, among other organs and systems, can also affect the CNS, such as systemic vasculitis and sarcoidosis. The diagnosis of PACNS is difficult, as this condition may be confused with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a term comprising a group of conditions characterized by prolonged but reversible vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine is the radiologic technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and, together with the clinical and laboratory findings, enables a prompt and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27432677

  9. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  10. Effects of cerebral ischemia on human neurovascular coupling, CO2 reactivity, and dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Salinet, Angela S M; Robinson, Thompson G; Panerai, Ronney B

    2015-01-15

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation can be impaired in acute ischemic stroke but the combined effects of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA), CO2 cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), and neurovascular coupling (NVC), obtained from simultaneous measurements, have not been described. CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) (CBFv, transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, Finometer), and end-tidal Pco2 (PetCO2 , infrared capnography) were recorded during a 1-min passive movement of the arm in 27 healthy controls [mean age (SD) 61.4 (6.0) yr] and 27 acute stroke patients [age 63 (11.7) yr]. A multivariate autoregressive-moving average model was used to separate the contributions of BP, arterial Pco2 (PaCO2 ), and the neural activation to the CBFv responses. CBFv step responses for the BP, CO2, and stimulus inputs were also obtained. The contribution of the stimulus to the CBFv response was highly significant for the difference between the affected side [area under the curve (AUC) 104.5 (4.5)%] and controls [AUC 106.9 (4.3)%; P = 0.008]. CBFv step responses to CO2 [affected hemisphere 0.39 (0.7), unaffected 0.55 (0.8), controls 1.39 (0.9)%/mmHg; P = 0.01, affected vs. controls; P = 0.025, unaffected vs. controls] and motor stimulus inputs [affected hemisphere 0.20 (0.1), unaffected 0.22 (0.2), controls 0.37 (0.2) arbitrary units; P = 0.009, affected vs. controls; P = 0.02, unaffected vs. controls] were reduced in the stroke group compared with controls. The CBFv step responses to the BP input at baseline and during the paradigm were not different between groups (P = 0.07), but PetCO2 was lower in the stroke group (P < 0.05). These results provide new insights into the interaction of CA, CVR, and NVC in both health and disease states. PMID:25593216

  11. The effects of sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate application on the neural and neurovascular tissues: An experimental animal study

    PubMed Central

    Ant, Ayca; Karamert, Recep; Kulduk, Gamze; Ekinci, Özgür; Tutar, Hakan; Göksu, Nebil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA) is a protective agent that is also used as “a chemical dissector” in various surgical fields. The aim of this study is to evaluate the toxic effects of MESNA on neural and neurovascular structures based on a morphological analysis and examine its safety in neurotological applications. Methods: Three groups of guinea pigs were used as subjects. MESNA solution (50 and 100%) and saline solution were applied to the subarachnoid space over the brain tissue via a middle fossa approach of study and control groups, respectively. Effects of MESNA were assessed by means of light microscope. McNemar Chi-square test was used to evaluate the histopathological findings. Statistical significance of P < 0.05 was taken as criterion. Results: No morphological changes were observed on vascular and neural structures in the study groups in both concentrations, compared to the control group. Conclusions: On a morphological basis, a single application of MESNA does not cause any morphological changes that indicate a toxicity in neural and neurovascular structures. PMID:26487975

  12. Positive Outcome After a Small-Caliber Gunshot Fracture of the Upper Cervical Spine without Neurovascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Thula; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Gunshot wounds to the cervical spine most frequently concur with serious injuries to the spinal cord and cervical vessels and often have a fatal outcome. Case Report We describe the case of a 35-year-old male with a complex fracture of the C2 vertebra body and a mandibular fracture after a penetration gunshot to the cervical spine. Computed tomography (CT) at admission revealed the exact extent of the fractures and the small caliber bullet lodged next to the C2 vertebra. In this rare and extremely lucky case no collateral vascular or neurological damage was detected. Eighteen months after surgical bullet removal and posterior C1–C3 fusion complete bone healing of the C2 vertebra was achieved and there were no secondary neurovascular deficits. Conclusions Immediate surgical C1–C3 fixation resulted in an excellent outcome without secondary neurovascular deficits in this rare case of traumatic complex C2 vertebral fracture caused by a gunshot injury. PMID:27081417

  13. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue. PMID:26137552

  14. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue. PMID:26137552

  15. Caspase-3 Contributes to ZO-1 and Cl-5 Tight-Junction Disruption in Rapid Anoxic Neurovascular Unit Damage

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tight-junction (TJ) protein degradation is a decisive step in hypoxic blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown in stroke. In this study we elucidated the impact of acute cerebral ischemia on TJ protein arrangement and the role of the apoptotic effector protease caspase-3 in this context. Methodology/Principal Findings We used an in vitro model of the neurovascular unit and the guinea pig whole brain preparation to analyze with immunohistochemical methods the BBB properties and neurovascular integrity. In both methodological approaches we observed rapid TJ protein disruptions after 30 min of oxygen and glucose deprivation or middle cerebral artery occlusion, which were accompanied by strong caspase-3 activation in brain endothelial cells (BEC). Surprisingly only few DNA-fragmentations were detected with TUNEL stainings in BEC. Z-DEVD-fmk, an irreversible caspase-3 inhibitor, partly blocked TJ disruptions and was protective on trans-endothelial electrical resistance. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide evidence that caspase-3 is rapidly activated during acute cerebral ischemia predominantly without triggering DNA-fragmentation in BEC. Further we detected fast TJ protein disruptions which could be partly blocked by caspase-3 inhibition with Z-DEVD-fmk. We suggest that the basis for clinically relevant BBB breakdown in form of TJ disruptions is initiated within minutes during ischemia and that caspase-3 contributes to this process. PMID:21364989

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas. PMID:24415861

  17. PI3K/Akt Pathway Contributes to Neurovascular Unit Protection of Xiao-Xu-Ming Decoction against Focal Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Guo-Hua; Bao, Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Wen; Xu, Li-Li; Cai, Ding-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we used a focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion rat model to investigate the protective effects of Xiao-Xu-Ming decoction (XXMD) on neurovascular unit and to examine the role of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt pathway in this protection. The cerebral ischemia was induced by 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral infarct area was measured by tetrazolium staining, and neurological function was observed at 24 h after reperfusion. DNA fragmentation assay, combined with immunofluorescence, was performed to evaluate apoptosis of neuron, astrocyte, and vascular endothelial cell which constitute neurovascular unit. The expression levels of proteins involved in PI3K/Akt pathway were detected by Western blot. The results showed that XXMD improved neurological function, decreased cerebral infarct area and neuronal damage, and attenuated cellular apoptosis in neurovascular unit, while these effects were abolished by inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002. We also found that XXMD upregulated p-PDKl, p-Akt, and p-GSK3β expression levels, which were partly reversed by LY294002. In addition, the increases of p-PTEN and p-c-Raf expression levels on which LY294002 had no effect were also observed in response to XXMD treatment. The data indicated the protective effects of XXMD on neurovascular unit partly through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:23781261

  18. Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for the treatment of established facial paralysis following ablative surgery in the parotid region.

    PubMed

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Asato, Hirotaka; Ueda, Kazuki; Yamada, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for facial reanimation was performed as a secondary reconstructive procedure for 45 patients with facial paralysis resulting from ablative surgery in the parotid region. This intervention differs from neurovascular free-muscle transfer for treatment of established facial paralysis resulting from conditions such as congenital dysfunction, unresolved Bell palsy, Hunt syndrome, or intracranial morbidity, with difficulties including selection of recipient vessels and nerves, and requirements for soft-tissue augmentation. This article describes the authors' operative procedure for neurovascular free-muscle transfer after ablative surgery in the parotid region. Gracilis muscle (n = 24) or latissimus dorsi muscle (n = 21) was used for transfer. With gracilis transfer, recipient vessels comprised the superficial temporal vessels in 12 patients and the facial vessels in 12. For latissimus dorsi transfer, recipient vessels comprised the facial vessels in 16 patients and the superior thyroid artery and superior thyroid or internal jugular vein in four. Facial vessels on the contralateral side were used with interpositional graft of radial vessels in the remaining patient with latissimus dorsi transfer. Cross-face nerve grafting was performed before muscle transfer in 22 patients undergoing gracilis transfer. In the remaining two gracilis patients, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the primary recipient nerve. Dermal fat flap overlying the gracilis muscle was used for cheek augmentation in one patient. In the other 23 patients, only the gracilis muscle was used. With latissimus dorsi transfer, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the recipient nerve in three patients, and a cross-face nerve graft was selected as the recipient nerve in six. The contralateral facial nerve was selected as the recipient nerve in 12 patients, and a thoracodorsal nerve from the latissimus dorsi muscle segment was crossed through the upper lip

  19. Exposure of the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle for the safe application of acetabular reinforcement cages in complex revisions.

    PubMed

    Smitham, Peter J; Kosuge, Dennis; Howie, Donald W; Solomon, Lucian B

    2016-05-16

    The posterior approach to the hip is the most common extensile approach used, however exposure is limited superiorly by the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle (SGNB). The extra-pelvic course of the SGNB demonstrates variability between individuals, occasionally located only 1 cm from the acetabular rim. In complex acetabular reconstructions where the application of a reinforcement cage maybe required protecting the SGNB is challenging. The flanges of these cages are designed to sit on the ilium superior to the acetabular rim and to receive screws for fixation. The application of such cages may result in iatrogenic injury to the SGNB by way of forceful retraction or entrapment. We describe a technique that involves exposure and release of the SGNB such that the flanges of cage constructs may be safely applied. PMID:27079287

  20. Two-photon microscopy as a tool to study blood flow and neurovascular coupling in the rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Andy Y; Driscoll, Jonathan D; Drew, Patrick J; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Kleinfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral vascular system services the constant demand for energy during neuronal activity in the brain. Attempts to delineate the logic of neurovascular coupling have been greatly aided by the advent of two-photon laser scanning microscopy to image both blood flow and the activity of individual cells below the surface of the brain. Here we provide a technical guide to imaging cerebral blood flow in rodents. We describe in detail the surgical procedures required to generate cranial windows for optical access to the cortex of both rats and mice and the use of two-photon microscopy to accurately measure blood flow in individual cortical vessels concurrent with local cellular activity. We further provide examples on how these techniques can be applied to the study of local blood flow regulation and vascular pathologies such as small-scale stroke. PMID:22293983

  1. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:27515290

  2. Functional MRI during hyperbaric oxygen: Effects of oxygen on neurovascular coupling and BOLD fMRI signals.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Huang, Shiliang; Boley, Angela; Lodge, Daniel; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is used to treat a number of ailments. Improved understanding of how HBO affects neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) changes could shed light on the role of oxygen in neurovascular coupling and help guide HBO treatments. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses: i) activation-induced CBF fMRI response is not dependent on hemoglobin deoxygenation, and ii) activation-induced BOLD fMRI is markedly attenuated under HBO. CBF and BOLD fMRI of forepaw stimulation in anesthetized rats under HBO at 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA) were compared with normobaric air. Robust BOLD and CBF fMRI were detected under HBO. Inflow effects and spin-density changes did not contribute significantly to the BOLD fMRI signal under HBO. Analysis of the T2(⁎)-weighted signal at normobaric air and 1, 2 and 3ATA oxygen in the tissue and the superior sagittal sinus showed a strong dependence on increasing inhaled [O2]. Spontaneous electrophysiological activity and evoked local-field potentials were reduced under HBO. The differences between normobaric air and HBO in basal and evoked electrical activity could not fully account for the strong BOLD responses under HBO. We concluded that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism and that stimulus-evoked BOLD responses and the venous T2(⁎)-weighted signals still have room to increase under 3ATA HBO. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study under HBO, providing insights into the effects of HBO on neural activity, neurovascular coupling, tissue oxygenation, and the BOLD signal. PMID:26143203

  3. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids robustly promotes neurovascular restorative dynamics and improves neurological functions after stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Hui; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; Hu, Xiaoming; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurological disease with no satisfactory therapies to preserve long-term neurological function, perhaps due to the sole emphasis on neuronal survival in most preclinical studies. Recent studies have revealed the importance of protecting multiple cell types in the injured brain, such as oligodendrocytes and components of the neurovascular unit, before long-lasting recovery of function can be achieved. For example, revascularization in the ischemic penumbra is critical to provide various neurotrophic factors that enhance the survival and activity of neurons and other progenitor cells, such as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that chronic dietary supplementation with fish oil promotes post-stroke angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis, thereby leading to long-term functional improvements. Mice received dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA-enriched fish oil for three months before and up to one month after stroke. As expected, dietary n-3 PUFAs significantly increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the brain and improved long-term behavioral outcomes after cerebral ischemia. n-3 PUFAs also robustly improved revascularization and angiogenesis and boosted the survival of NeuN/BrdU labeled newborn neurons up to 35days after stroke injury. Furthermore, these pro-neurogenic effects were accompanied by robust oligodendrogenesis. Thus, this is the first study to demonstrate that chronic dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs is an effective prophylactic measure not only to protect against ischemic injury for the long term but also to actively promote neurovascular restorative dynamics and brain repair. PMID:25771800

  4. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2009-05-01

    Early and effective treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is important to minimize axonal degeneration that occurs secondary to demyelination. The disease course is invariably chronic, so long-term treatment is often required, and adverse effects and costs are important considerations in devising a treatment plan. CIDP responds to prednisone, but long-term treatment can result in significant adverse effects. Azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine can be used as steroid-sparing agents and may facilitate more rapid and successful tapering of prednisone. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasma exchange are also effective in the treatment of CIDP and can be used in patients who are unresponsive to prednisone or develop steroid-related adverse effects. IVIg may also be used as a first-line treatment, but its cost can be a limiting factor. A few uncontrolled studies have suggested that pulsed weekly methylprednisolone is both effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of CIDP. Treatments based on rituximab or cyclophosphamide have also been used in resistant disease. Variants of CIDP have been described on the basis of their association with specific antibodies or immunoglobulins and their response to specific immunomodulatory treatments. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block responds to IVIg in the majority of patients. However, weakness may slowly worsen over time, and some patients become unresponsive. Anecdotal reports suggest that rituximab may be useful in patients who develop progressive disease. Placebo-controlled trials in anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy suggest that rituximab is effective and, with a combination of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, numbness and strength may improve. Other treatments that may be effective include plasma exchange and IVIg. Treatment is generally started with prednisone, IVIg, or plasma exchange. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are used only

  5. Inflammatory markers in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Michalakeas, Christos A; Parissis, John; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Ntai, Konstantina; Papadakis, Ioannis; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Lekakis, John

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is considered one of the major processes that contribute to atherogenesis. Inflammation plays an important role not only on the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis but also on plaque rupture, an event that leads to acute vascular events. Various biomarkers express different pathways and pathophysiologic mechanisms of cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory biomarkers express different parts of the atherogenic process, regarding the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis or the destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque. Therefore, inflammatory biomarkers may prove to be useful in the detection, staging, and prognosis of patients with CAD. Furthermore, the fact that inflammatory processes are essential steps in the course of the disease offers future therapeutic targets for the interruption of the atherogenic process or for the management of acute events. PMID:22628054

  6. Overcoming radiation resistance in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A; Debeb, Bisrat G; Xu, Wei; Buchholz, Thomas A

    2010-06-01

    The clinical-pathological features of inflammatory breast cancer include enrichment of factors that have been previously associated with radioresistant disease, including negative hormone receptor status and a phenotype enriched for relatively radioresistant breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The risks and benefits of accelerated postmastectomy radiation treatment regimens in the multimodality management of inflammatory breast cancer were reviewed at the first International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The biological basis for radiation resistance and strategies to radiosensitize these tumors were also presented. The prevalent basal phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer makes it an ideal clinical model to examine stem cell hypotheses, which the authors believe can help guide future trials to continue making incremental progress against this aggressive disease. PMID:20503417

  7. The importance of balanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in diffuse lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael P; Strieter, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    The lung responds to a variety of insults in a remarkably consistent fashion but with inconsistent outcomes that vary from complete resolution and return to normal to the destruction of normal architecture and progressive fibrosis. Increasing evidence indicates that diffuse lung disease results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors pro-inflammatory mediators dictating the development of chronic diffuse lung disease. This review focuses on the mediators that influence this imbalance. PMID:11806840

  8. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking. PMID:27416522

  9. Inflammatory Mediators of Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Hijona, Elizabeth; Hijona, Lander; Arenas, Juan I.; Bujanda, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming a world-wide public health problem. NAFLD represents a spectrum of disease ranging from “simple steatosis”, which is considered relatively benign, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and to NAFLD-associated cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. The etiology of NAFLD and its progression is complex and remains incompletely understood. The progression of the disease involves many factors. Apart from the two hits, the accumulation of TG and the development of fibrosis and necroinflammatory processes, exit numerous molecules associated with these two hits. Among them we can highlight the pro-inflammatory molecules and adiponectins. This review focuses on the growing evidence from both experimental and human studies suggesting a central role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We review the role of cytokines as key regulators of insulin sensitivity and hepatic lipid overloading, liver injury and inflammation, and fibrosis with an emphasis on potential therapeutic implications. PMID:20300479

  10. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  11. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare the effect of biannual peripheral magnetic resonance imaging, radiography and standard of care disease progression monitoring on pharmacotherapeutic escalation in rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Permanent joint damage is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common and destructive form of inflammatory arthritis. In aggressive disease, joint damage can occur within 6 months from symptom onset. Early, intensive treatment with conventional and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can delay the onset and progression of joint damage. The primary objective of the study is to investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or radiography (X-ray) over standard of care as tools to guide DMARD treatment decision-making by rheumatologists for the care of RA. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled trial has been designed. Rheumatoid and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis patients will undergo an MRI and X-ray assessment every 6 months. Baseline adaptive randomization will be used to allocate participants to MRI, X-ray, or sham-intervention groups on a background of standard of care. Prognostic markers, treating physician, and baseline DMARD therapy will be used as intervention allocation parameters. The outcome measures in rheumatology RA MRI score and the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score will be used to evaluate the MRI and X-ray images, respectively. Radiologists will score anonymized images for all patients regardless of intervention allocation. Disease progression will be determined based on the study-specific, inter-rater smallest detectable difference. Allocation-dependent, intervention-concealed reports of positive or negative disease progression will be reported to the treating rheumatologist. Negative reports will be delivered for the sham-intervention group. Study-based radiology clinical reports will be provided to the treating rheumatologists for extra-study X-ray requisitions to limit patient radiation exposure as part of diagnostic imaging standard of care. DMARD treatment dose escalation and therapy changes will be measured to evaluate the primary objective. A sample size of

  12. Distribution of temperature changes and neurovascular coupling in rat brain following 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") exposure.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Jiang, Lihong; Hyder, Fahmeed; Behar, Kevin L

    2015-10-01

    (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is an abused psychostimulant that produces strong monoaminergic stimulation and whole-body hyperthermia. MDMA-induced thermogenesis involves activation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), primarily a type specific to skeletal muscle (UCP-3) and absent from the brain, although other UCP types are expressed in the brain (e.g. thalamus) and might contribute to thermogenesis. Since neuroimaging of brain temperature could provide insights into MDMA action, we measured spatial distributions of systemically administered MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in rat cortex and subcortex using a novel magnetic resonance method, Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), with an exogenous temperature-sensitive probe (thulium ion and macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTMA(4-))). The MDMA-induced temperature rise was greater in the cortex than in the subcortex (1.6 ± 0.4 °C versus 1.3 ± 0.4 °C) and occurred more rapidly (2.0 ± 0.2 °C/h versus 1.5 ± 0.2 °C/h). MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in the cortex and body were correlated, although the body temperature exceeded the cortex temperature before and after MDMA. Temperature, neuronal activity, and blood flow (CBF) were measured simultaneously in the cortex and subcortex (i.e. thalamus) to investigate possible differences of MDMA-induced warming across brain regions. MDMA-induced warming correlated with increases in neuronal activity and blood flow in the cortex, suggesting that the normal neurovascular response to increased neural activity was maintained. In contrast to the cortex, a biphasic relationship was seen in the subcortex (i.e. thalamus), with a decline in CBF as temperature and neural activity rose, transitioning to a rise in CBF for temperature above 37 °C, suggesting that MDMA affected CBF and neurovascular coupling differently in subcortical regions

  13. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part II: Mandibular Incisive Canal, Mental Foramen and Associated Neurovascular Bundles in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of the present study was to review the literature of how to identify the mental foramen, mandibular incisive canal and associated neurovascular bundles during implant surgery and how to detect and avoid the damage of these vital structures during implant therapy. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen, mental nerve, anterior mental loop. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1979 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, and periodontal journals and books was performed. Results In total, 47 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The morphology and variations of the mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles were presented as two entities. It suggested that clinicians should carefully assess these vital structures to avoid nerve/artery damage. Conclusions The mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles exist in different locations and possess many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that the clinicians should carefully identify these anatomical landmarks, by analyzing all influencing factors, prior to their implant surgical operation. PMID:24421959

  14. Microstructural alterations in trigeminal neuralgia determined by diffusion tensor imaging are independent of symptom duration, severity, and type of neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Juergen; Thon, Niklas; Stahl, Robert; Lummel, Nina; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Linn, Jennifer; Mehrkens, Jan-Hinnerk

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT In this prospective study diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to evaluate the influence of clinical and anatomical parameters on structural alterations within the fifth cranial nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) due to neurovascular compression. METHODS Overall, 81 patients (40 men and 41 women; mean age 60 ± 5 years) with typical TN were included who underwent microsurgical decompression. Preoperative 3.0-T high-resolution MRI and DTI were analyzed in a blinded fashion. The respective fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient values were compared with the clinical, imaging, and intraoperative data. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. RESULTS DTI analyses revealed significantly lower FA values within the vulnerable zone of the affected trigeminal nerve compared with the contralateral side (p = 0.05). The DTI analyses also included 3 patients without clear evidence of neurovascular conflict on preoperative MRI. No differences were seen between arterial and venous compression. Lower FA values were found 5 months after symptom onset; however, no correlation was found with the duration of symptoms or severity of compression. CONCLUSIONS DTI analysis allows the quantification of structural alterations, even in those patients without any discernible neurovascular contact on MRI. Moreover, our findings support the hypothesis that both the arteries and veins can cause structural alterations that lead to TN. These aspects can be useful for making treatment decisions. PMID:26406792

  15. Neurovascular Invasion and Histological Grade Serve as the Risk Factors of Cervical Lymph Node Metastases in Early Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kailiu; Yang, Xi; Li, Liwen; Ruan, Min; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Chenping; Li, Siyi

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze the regional characteristics of the cervical lymph node metastasis and to investigate the factors associated with the risk of lymph node involvement. One hundred seventy-one patients suffering from early primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (cT1-2N0) were enrolled. Gender, age, growth site, T stage, histological grade, and neurovascular invasion were statistically analyzed by K-M survival analysis and Cox multivariate analysis to evaluate the relationship between the factors and the neck lymph node metastasis. Of the 171 cases divided into the neck dissection group and observation group, 40 ended up with lymph node metastasis, of which 17 were metastasized to level I, 27 to level II, 10 to level III, 2 to level IV, and 1 to level V. Histological grade and neurovascular invasion were significantly associated with lymph node involvement in univariate and multivariate analyses. Age distribution was found to be significantly associated with the lymph node metastasis in multivariate analysis. The metastasis of early tongue SCC has a certain regularity at different sites. Age was not a critical risk factor for cervical lymph node metastasis after surgery. Tumor size was suspected to exert a negative effect on metastasis by influencing tumor invasion. Histological grade and neurovascular invasion were significantly associated with the risk of cervical lymph node metastasis of early tongue SCC. PMID:25911199

  16. Neurovascular unit dysfunction with blood-brain barrier hyperpermeability contributes to major depressive disorder: a review of clinical and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of people with major depressive disorder (MDD) fail at least two antidepressant drug trials at 1 year. Together with clinical and experimental evidence indicating that the pathophysiology of MDD is multifactorial, this observation underscores the importance of elucidating mechanisms beyond monoaminergic dysregulation that can contribute to the genesis and persistence of MDD. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are mechanistically linked to the presence of neurovascular dysfunction with blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability in selected neurological disorders, such as stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer’s disease. In contrast to other major psychiatric disorders, MDD is frequently comorbid with such neurological disorders and constitutes an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality in disorders characterized by vascular endothelial dysfunction (cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus). Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are implicated in the neurobiology of MDD. More recent evidence links neurovascular dysfunction with BBB hyperpermeability to MDD without neurological comorbidity. We review this emerging literature and present a theoretical integration between these abnormalities to those involving oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in MDD. We discuss our hypothesis that alterations in endothelial nitric oxide levels and endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling are central mechanistic links in this regard. Understanding the contribution of neurovascular dysfunction with BBB hyperpermeability to the pathophysiology of MDD may help to identify novel therapeutic and preventative approaches. PMID:24289502

  17. An extended posterior approach to the hip and pelvis for complex acetabular reconstruction that preserves the gluteal muscles and their neurovascular supply.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L B; Hofstaetter, J G; Bolt, M J; Howie, D W

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the detailed anatomy of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus and their neurovascular supply in 22 hips in 11 embalmed adult Caucasian human cadavers. This led to the development of a surgical technique for an extended posterior approach to the hip and pelvis that exposes the supra-acetabular ilium and preserves the glutei during revision hip surgery. Proximal to distal mobilisation of the gluteus medius from the posterior gluteal line permits exposure and mobilisation of the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle between the sciatic notch and the entrance to the gluteus medius, enabling a wider exposure of the supra-acetabular ilium. This technique was subsequently used in nine patients undergoing revision total hip replacement involving the reconstruction of nine Paprosky 3B acetabular defects, five of which had pelvic discontinuity. Intra-operative electromyography showed that the innervation of the gluteal muscles was not affected by surgery. Clinical follow-up demonstrated good hip abduction function in all patients. These results were compared with those of a matched cohort treated through a Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Our modified approach maximises the exposure of the ilium above the sciatic notch while protecting the gluteal muscles and their neurovascular bundle. PMID:24395310

  18. Why neurodegenerative diseases are progressive: uncontrolled inflammation drives disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of chronic, progressive disorders characterized by the gradual loss of neurons in discrete areas of the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism(s) underlying their progressive nature remains unknown but a timely and well-controlled inflammatory reaction is essential for the integrity and proper function of the CNS. Substantial evidence has documented a common inflammatory mechanism in various neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that in the diseased CNS, interactions between damaged neurons and dysregulated, overactivated microglia create a vicious self-propagating cycle causing uncontrolled, prolonged inflammation that drives the chronic progression of neurodegenerative diseases. We further propose that dynamic modulation of this inflammatory reaction by interrupting the vicious cycle might become a disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18599350

  19. A simple bracing technique to correct kinking of arterial branches to avoid ischemic sequelae during neurovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Gurung, Pritam; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: During microscopic procedures for neurovascular disease, we sometimes encounter kinking of arterial branches resulting in ischemic sequelae. A simple and useful technique that involves inserting a small, ball-like prosthesis made of oxidized cellulose or shredded Teflon with fibrin glue that corrects the arterial branch kinking and avoids subsequent compromise is reported. Methods: Between January and December 2014, three patients developed arterial kinking during microscopic procedures, including two in the caudal loop of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery during microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia and one in a branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during clipping for an unruptured MCA aneurysm. Blood flow insufficiency was confirmed by microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) and indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography. The prosthesis, which was made of shredded Teflon in two cases and oxidized cellulose in one case, was inserted into the crotch of the kinked arteries to correct the kinking of the arteries and restore the proper vascular shape and normal blood flow. Results: The small, ball-shaped prosthesis corrected the kinked arteries and maintained the proper shape, which was confirmed by ICG videoangiography and MDU during the operation and three-dimensional computerized tomography angiography postoperatively. Postoperatively, the patients did not manifest any ischemic sequelae related to the kinked arteries. Conclusion: The insertion of prostheses with fibrin glue into the crotch of a kinked artery for repair is considered a simple and useful method for correcting a kinked artery that avoids ischemic sequelae. PMID:26862447

  20. A brain microvasculature endothelial cell-specific viral vector with the potential to treat neurovascular and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Körbelin, Jakob; Dogbevia, Godwin; Michelfelder, Stefan; Ridder, Dirk A; Hunger, Agnes; Wenzel, Jan; Seismann, Henning; Lampe, Melanie; Bannach, Jacqueline; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Schwaninger, Markus; Trepel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy critically relies on vectors that combine high transduction efficiency with a high degree of target specificity and that can be administered through a safe intravenous route. The lack of suitable vectors, especially for gene therapy of brain disorders, represents a major obstacle. Therefore, we applied an in vivo screening system of random ligand libraries displayed on adeno-associated viral capsids to select brain-targeted vectors for the treatment of neurovascular diseases. We identified a capsid variant showing an unprecedented degree of specificity and long-lasting transduction efficiency for brain microvasculature endothelial cells as the primary target of selection. A therapeutic vector based on this selected viral capsid was used to markedly attenuate the severe cerebrovascular pathology of mice with incontinentia pigmenti after a single intravenous injection. Furthermore, the versatility of this selection system will make it possible to select ligands for additional in vivo targets without requiring previous identification of potential target-specific receptors. PMID:27137490

  1. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Connexin43′s Protection of the Neurovascular Unit under Acute Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuai; Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Hong-Yan; Deng, Fang; Feng, Jia-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We observed mitochondrial connexin43 (mtCx43) expression under cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, analyzed its regulation, and explored its protective mechanisms. Wistar rats were divided into groups based on injections received before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Cerebral infarction volume was detected by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolim chloride staining, and cell apoptosis was observed by transferase dUTP nick end labeling. We used transmission electron microscopy to observe mitochondrial morphology and determined superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. MtCx43, p-mtCx43, protein kinase C (PKC), and p-PKC expression were detected by Western blot. Compared with those in the IR group, cerebral infarction volumes in the carbenoxolone (CBX) and diazoxide (DZX) groups were obviously smaller, and the apoptosis indices were down-regulated. Mitochondrial morphology was damaged after I/R, especially in the IR and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) groups. Similarly, decreased SOD activity and increased MDA were observed after MCAO; CBX, DZX, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) reduced mitochondrial functional injury. Expression of mtCx43 and p-mtCx43 and the p-Cx43/Cx43 ratio were significantly lower in the IR group than in the sham group. These abnormalities were ameliorated by CBX, DZX, and PMA. MtCx43 may protect the neurovascular unit from acute cerebral IR injury via PKC activation induced by mitoKATP channel agonists. PMID:27164087

  2. Intravitreal AAV2.COMP-Ang1 Prevents Neurovascular Degeneration in a Murine Model of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Judd M; Rai, Ruju R; Carroll, Lara S; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; O'Neil, Christina L; Medina, Reinhold J; Das, Subtrata K; Muddana, Santosh K; Olson, Paul R; Nielson, Spencer; Walker, Kortnie; Flood, Maggie M; Messenger, Wyatt B; Archer, Bonnie J; Barabas, Peter; Krizaj, David; Gibson, Christopher C; Li, Dean Y; Koh, Gou Y; Gao, Guangping; Stitt, Alan W; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in the U.S. The vision-threatening processes of neuroglial and vascular dysfunction in DR occur in concert, driven by hyperglycemia and propelled by a pathway of inflammation, ischemia, vasodegeneration, and breakdown of the blood retinal barrier. Currently, no therapies exist for normalizing the vasculature in DR. Here, we show that a single intravitreal dose of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 encoding a more stable, soluble, and potent form of angiopoietin 1 (AAV2.COMP-Ang1) can ameliorate the structural and functional hallmarks of DR in Ins2Akita mice, with sustained effects observed through six months. In early DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 restored leukocyte-endothelial interaction, retinal oxygenation, vascular density, vascular marker expression, vessel permeability, retinal thickness, inner retinal cellularity, and retinal neurophysiological response to levels comparable with nondiabetic controls. In late DR, AAV2.COMP-Ang1 enhanced the therapeutic benefit of intravitreally delivered endothelial colony-forming cells by promoting their integration into the vasculature and thereby stemming further visual decline. AAV2.COMP-Ang1 single-dose gene therapy can prevent neurovascular pathology, support vascular regeneration, and stabilize vision in DR. PMID:26340930

  3. Virtual stenting workflow with vessel-specific initialization and adaptive expansion for neurovascular stents and flow diverters.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Nikhil; Yu, Hongyu; Xu, Jinhui; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun; Meng, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular intervention using traditional neurovascular stents and densely braided flow diverters (FDs) have become the preferred treatment strategies for traditionally challenging intracranial aneurysms. Modeling stent and FD deployment in patient-specific aneurysms and its flow modification results prior to the actual intervention can potentially predict the patient outcome and treatment optimization. We present a clinically focused, streamlined virtual stenting workflow that efficiently simulates stent and FD treatment in patient-specific aneurysms based on expanding a simplex mesh structure. The simplex mesh is generated using an innovative vessel-specific initialization technique, which uses the patient's parent artery diameter to identify the initial position of the simplex mesh inside the artery. A novel adaptive expansion algorithm enables the acceleration of deployment process by adjusting the expansion forces based on the distance of the simplex mesh from the parent vessel. The virtual stenting workflow was tested by modeling the treatment of two patient-specific aneurysms using the Enterprise stent and the Pipeline Embolization Device (commercial FD). Both devices were deployed in the aneurysm models in a few seconds. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of pre- and post-treatment aneurysmal hemodynamics show flow reduction in the aneurysmal sac in treated aneurysms, with the FD diverting more flow than the Enterprise stent. The test results show that this workflow can rapidly simulate clinical deployment of stents and FDs, hence paving the way for its future clinical implementation. PMID:26899135

  4. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  5. Epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Jessica A.; Masters, Gregory A.; Bauer, Thomas L.; Nam, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the lung is a rare malignancy with few cases reported in the literature. Histologically, it is composed by spindle cells and an infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Children and young, non-smoking adults constitute the majority of cases, the clinical behavior ranges from a benign entity to a malignant process with rapid recurrence and metastatic progression. We present a case of epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma (EIMS) of the pleura, a malignant variant of IMT, which was initially treated with debulking surgical resection followed by systemic chemotherapy. The tumor was found to have an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. An ALK directed tyrosine kinase inhibitor was used with an impressive response, the patient remains in remission nearly 1 year after presentation. The pathogenesis, pathologic findings, clinical behavior and imaging of pulmonary EIMS are discussed. PMID:26623133

  6. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  8. Cytomembrane ATP-sensitive K+ channels in neurovascular unit targets of ischemic stroke in the recovery period

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Pan, Sipei; Zheng, Xiaolu; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to analyze the mechanism of cytomembrane ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP) in the neurovascular unit treatment of ischemic stroke in the recovery period. A total of 24 healthy adult male Wistar rats of 5–8 weeks age, weighing 160–200 g were randomly divided into the control (sham-operation group), model, KATP blocker and KATP opener groups (n=6 rats per group). Nylon cerebral artery occlusion was conducted using nylon monofilament coated with Poly-L-lysine, which was used to produce a cerebral infarction model. After feeding normally for 3 days, 5-hydroxydecanoate (40 mg/Kg), and diazoxide (40 mg/Kg) were injected to the abdominal cavity in the blocker, and opener groups, respectively. The control received an equivalent normal saline that was injected into the sham-operation and model groups. The animals were mutilated and samples were collected after 3 days. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression levels of the three subunits of KATP, i.e., kir6.1, and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1 and SUR2 mRNA, as well as to calculate infarct size in tetrazolium chloride staining. The expression level of mRNA in the opener group were significantly higher, followed by the model and blocker groups, with the control group being the lowest (P<0.05). Infarct size in the opener group was markedly smaller than the model and blocker groups, and infarct size in the blocker group was significantly larger (P<0.05). Thus, the target treatment on KATP may improve the prognosis of ischemic stroke during the recovery period. PMID:27446320

  9. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  10. Simultaneous epidural functional near-infrared spectroscopy and cortical electrophysiology as a tool for studying local neurovascular coupling in primates.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Ali Danish; Munk, Matthias H J; Schmidt, Andreas; Risueno-Segovia, Cristina; Bernard, Rebekka; Fetz, Eberhard; Logothetis, Nikos; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2015-10-15

    Simultaneous measurements of intra-cortical electrophysiology and hemodynamic signals in primates are essential for relating human neuroimaging studies with intra-cortical electrophysiology in monkeys. Previously, technically challenging and resourcefully demanding techniques such as fMRI and intrinsic-signal optical imaging have been used for such studies. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is a relatively less cumbersome neuroimaging method that uses near-infrared light to detect small changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO), deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and total hemoglobin (HbT) in a volume of tissue with high specificity and temporal resolution. FNIRS is thus a good candidate for hemodynamic measurements in primates to acquire local hemodynamic signals during electrophysiological recordings. To test the feasibility of using epidural fNIRS with concomitant extracellular electrophysiology, we recorded neuronal and hemodynamic activity from the primary visual cortex of two anesthetized monkeys during visual stimulation. We recorded fNIRS epidurally, using one emitter and two detectors. We performed simultaneous cortical electrophysiology using tetrodes placed between the fNIRS sensors. We observed robust and reliable responses to the visual stimulation in both [HbO] and [HbR] signals, and quantified the signal-to-noise ratio of the epidurally measured signals. We also observed a positive correlation between stimulus-induced modulation of [HbO] and [HbR] signals and strength of neural modulation. Briefly, our results show that epidural fNIRS detects single-trial responses to visual stimuli on a trial-by-trial basis, and when coupled with cortical electrophysiology, is a promising tool for studying local hemodynamic signals and neurovascular coupling. PMID:26169323

  11. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD. PMID:26045617

  12. Acacia ferruginea inhibits tumor progression by regulating inflammatory mediators-(TNF-a, iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-2, GM-CSF) and pro-angiogenic growth factor- VEGF.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of A ferruginea extract on Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) induced tumours in BALB/c mice. Experimental animals received A ferruginea extract (10 mg/ kg.b.wt) intraperitoneally for 14 consecutive days after DLA tumor challenge. Treatment with extract significantly increased the life span, total white blood cell (WBC) count and haemoglobin (Hb) content and decreased the level of serum aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) and nitric oxide (NO) in DLA bearing ascites tumor models. In addition, administration of extract significantly decreased the tumour volume and body weight in a DLA bearing solid tumor model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), as well as pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were elevated in solid tumour controls, but significantly reduced by A ferruginea administration. On the other hand, the extract stimulated the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in animals with DLA induced solid tumours. Increase in CD4+ T-cell population suggested strong immunostimulant activity for this extract. GC/MS and LC/MS analysis showed quinone, quinoline, imidazolidine, pyrrolidine, cyclopentenone, thiazole, pyrazole, catechin and coumarin derivatives as major compounds present in the A ferruginea methanolic extract. Thus, the outcome of the present study suggests that A ferruginea extract has immunomodulatory and tumor inhibitory activities and has the potential to be developed as a natural anticancer agent. PMID:23886206

  13. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of rare disorders including polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and autoimmune necrotizing myopathies (NMs). The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies share many similarities. They present acutely, subacutely, or chronically with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for associated distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies also share a variable degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and a nonspecifically abnormal electromyogram demonstrating an irritative myopathy. The muscle pathology demonstrates inflammatory exudates of variable distribution within the muscle fascicle. Despite these similarities, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group. The overlap syndrome (OS) refers to the association of PM, DM, or NM with connective tissue disease, such as scleroderma or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition to elevated antinuclear antibodies (ANA), patients with OS may be weaker in the proximal arms than the legs mimicking the pattern seen in some muscular dystrophies. In this review, we focus on DM, PM, and NM and examine current and promising therapies. PMID:23117947

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo, Michele; Missiroli, Filippo; Borgiani, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Cusumano, Andrea; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old). AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension). In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species) have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2) that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines), immune cells (macrophages), and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25478207

  15. Anti-inflammatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Fistarol, Susanna K; Itin, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mucosal disorders are treated conventionally with potent or superpotent topical corticosteroids. For more than 20 years, topical cyclosporine has been used in the management of oral mucous membrane affections. Recently other topically applied calcineurin inhibitors, namely tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, expanded the armamentarium for the treatment of inflammatory mucosal diseases. This chapter places its main emphasis on the efficacy and safety of topical calcineurin inhibitors in the management of different oral and genital conditions, including anogenital lichen sclerosus (LS), oral and genital lichen planus, plasma cell balanitis and vulvitis, mucous membrane pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris, all conditions having usually a protracted course, requiring long-lasting treatment. There is current evidence for the effectiveness of both pimecrolimus and tacrolimus in the topical treatment of inflammatory oral mucosal diseases and genital dermatoses, especially oral lichen planus and genital LS. PMID:21325840

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed. PMID:26939275

  17. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  18. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  19. Demonstration of Brain Tumor-Induced Neurovascular Uncoupling in Resting-State fMRI at Ultrahigh Field.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shruti; Sair, Haris I; Airan, Raag; Hua, Jun; Jones, Craig K; Heo, Hye-Young; Olivi, Alessandro; Lindquist, Martin A; Pekar, James J; Pillai, Jay J

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate in a small case series for the first time the phenomenon of brain tumor-related neurovascular uncoupling (NVU) in resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultrahigh field (7T). Two de novo (i.e., untreated) brain tumor patients underwent both BOLD resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) on a 7T MRI system and motor task-based BOLD fMRI at 3T. Ipsilesional (i.e., ipsilateral to tumor or IL) and contralesional (i.e., contralateral to tumor or CL) region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed on both 3T motor task-related general linear model-derived activation maps and on 7T rsfMRI independent component analysis (ICA)-derived sensorimotor network maps for each case. Asymmetry scores (ASs) were computed based on numbers of suprathreshold voxels in the IL and CL ROIs. In each patient, ASs derived from ROI analysis of suprathreshold voxels in IL and CL ROIs in task-related activation maps and rsfMRI ICA-derived sensorimotor component maps indicate greater number of suprathreshold voxels in contralesional than ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex in both maps. In patient 1, an AS of 0.2 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (voxels with Z-scores >5.0) of the task-based activation map and AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the ICA-derived sensorimotor component map. Similarly, in patient 2, an AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the task-based activation map and an AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the ICA-derived sensorimotor component map. Overall, decreased BOLD signal was noted in IL compared with CL ROIs on both task-based activation maps and ultrahigh field resting-state maps, indicating the presence of NVU. We have demonstrated evidence of NVU on ultrahigh field 7T rsfMRI comparable with the findings on standard 3T motor task-based fMRI in both cases

  20. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  1. P2RX7 sensitizes Mac-1/ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and promotes neurovascular injury during septic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Hong, Ling-Juan; Huang, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Quan; Tao, Rong-Rong; Tan, Chao; Lu, Nan-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Ahmed, Muhammad M; Lu, Ying-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shi, Wei-Xing; Lai, En-Yin; Wilcox, Christopher S; Han, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is a critical factor determining sepsis mortality. Vascular inflammation is known to be involved in SE, but the molecular events that lead to the development of encephalopathy remain unclear. Using time-lapse in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we provide the first direct evidence that cecal ligation and puncture in septic mice induces microglial trafficking to sites adjacent to leukocyte adhesion on inflamed cerebral microvessels. Our data further demonstrate that septic injury increased the chemokine CXCL1 level in brain endothelial cells by activating endothelial P2RX7 and eventually enhanced the binding of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing leukocytes to endothelial ICAM-1. In turn, leukocyte adhesion upregulated endothelial CX3CL1, thereby triggering microglia trafficking to the injured site. The sepsis-induced increase in endothelial CX3CL1 was abolished in CD18 hypomorphic mutant mice. Inhibition of the P2RX7 pathway not only decreased endothelial ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion but also prevented microglia overactivation, reduced brain injury, and consequently doubled the early survival of septic mice. These results demonstrate the role of the P2RX7 pathway in linking neurovascular inflammation to brain damage in vivo and provide a rationale for targeting endothelial P2RX7 for neurovascular protection during SE. PMID:25998681

  2. Assessment of neurovascular dynamics during transient ischemic attack by the novel integration of micro-electrocorticography electrode array with functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Tan, Stacey Sze Hui; Kwon, Ki Yong; Ling, Ji Min; Bandla, Aishwarya; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Tan, Eddie Tung Wee; Li, Wen; Ng, Wai Hoe; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2015-10-01

    This study developed a novel system combining a 16-channel micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) electrode array and functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) to examine changes in neurovascular functions following transient ischemic attack (TIA) in rats. To mimic the pathophysiology of TIA, a modified photothrombotic ischemic model was developed by using 3 min illumination of 5 mW continuous-wave (CW) green laser light focusing on a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR) were measured pre- and post-ischemia over a focal cortical region (i.e., 1.5×1.5 mm(2)). Unexpectedly, the SO2, peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA) of SSEPs and ADR recovered and achieved levels greater than the baseline values at the 4th hour post-ischemia induction without any intervention, whereas the CBV value only partially recovered. In other words, transient ischemia led to increased neural activity when the relative CBV was reduced, which may further compromise neural integrity or lead to subsequent vascular disease. This novel μECoG-fPAM system complements currently available imaging techniques and represents a promising technology for studying neurovascular coupling in animal models. PMID:26149348

  3. P2RX7 sensitizes Mac-1/ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and promotes neurovascular injury during septic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Hong, Ling-Juan; Huang, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Quan; Tao, Rong-Rong; Tan, Chao; Lu, Nan-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Ahmed, Muhammad M; Lu, Ying-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shi, Wei-Xing; Lai, En-Yin; Wilcox, Christopher S; Han, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is a critical factor determining sepsis mortality. Vascular inflammation is known to be involved in SE, but the molecular events that lead to the development of encephalopathy remain unclear. Using time-lapse in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we provide the first direct evidence that cecal ligation and puncture in septic mice induces microglial trafficking to sites adjacent to leukocyte adhesion on inflamed cerebral microvessels. Our data further demonstrate that septic injury increased the chemokine CXCL1 level in brain endothelial cells by activating endothelial P2RX7 and eventually enhanced the binding of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing leukocytes to endothelial ICAM-1. In turn, leukocyte adhesion upregulated endothelial CX3CL1, thereby triggering microglia trafficking to the injured site. The sepsis-induced increase in endothelial CX3CL1 was abolished in CD18 hypomorphic mutant mice. Inhibition of the P2RX7 pathway not only decreased endothelial ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion but also prevented microglia overactivation, reduced brain injury, and consequently doubled the early survival of septic mice. These results demonstrate the role of the P2RX7 pathway in linking neurovascular inflammation to brain damage in vivo and provide a rationale for targeting endothelial P2RX7 for neurovascular protection during SE. PMID:25998681

  4. Inflammatory status in human hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Esparza, María; Tristán-Manzano, María; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on new findings about the inflammatory status involved in the development of human liver cirrhosis induced by the two main causes, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and chronic alcohol abuse, avoiding results obtained from animal models. When liver is faced to a persistent and/or intense local damage the maintained inflammatory response gives rise to a progressive replacement of normal hepatic tissue by non-functional fibrotic scar. The imbalance between tissue regeneration and fibrosis will determine the outcome toward health recovery or hepatic cirrhosis. In all cases progression toward liver cirrhosis is caused by a dysregulation of mechanisms that govern the balance between activation/homeostasis of the immune system. Detecting differences between the inflammatory status in HCV-induced vs alcohol-induced cirrhosis could be useful to identify specific targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention in each case. Thus, although survival of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis seems to be similar to that of patients with HCV-related cirrhosis (HCV-C), there are important differences in the altered cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in the progression toward human liver cirrhosis. The predominant features of HCV-C are more related with those that allow viral evasion of the immune defenses, especially although not exclusively, inhibition of interferons secretion, natural killer cells activation and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. On the contrary, the inflammatory status of alcohol-induced cirrhosis is determined by the combined effect of direct hepatotoxicity of ethanol metabolites and increases of the intestinal permeability, allowing bacteria and bacterial products translocation, into the portal circulation, mesenteric lymph nodes and peritoneal cavity. This phenomenon generates a stronger pro-inflammatory response compared with HCV-related cirrhosis. Hence, therapeutic intervention in HCV-related cirrhosis must be mainly focused to

  5. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  6. Taurine and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Kontny, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is the most abundant free amino acid in humans and plays an important role in several essential biological processes such as bile acid conjugation, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Moreover, attenuation of apoptosis and its antioxidant activity seem to be crucial for the cytoprotective effects of taurine. Although these properties are not tissue specific, taurine reaches particularly high concentrations in tissues exposed to elevated levels of oxidants (e.g., inflammatory cells). It suggests that taurine may play an important role in inflammation associated with oxidative stress. Indeed, at the site of inflammation, taurine is known to react with and detoxify hypochlorous acid generated by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO)-halide system. This reaction results in the formation of less toxic taurine chloramine (TauCl). Both haloamines, TauCl and taurine bromamine (TauBr), the product of taurine reaction with hypobromous acid (HOBr), exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to a well-documented regulatory role of taurine and taurine haloamines (TauCl, TauBr) in acute inflammation, their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases is not clear. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of taurine, TauCl and TauBr in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases initiated or propagated by MPO-derived oxidants. The aim of this paper is to show links between inflammation, neutrophils, MPO, oxidative stress and taurine. We will discuss the possible contribution of taurine and taurine haloamines to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, especially in the best studied example of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22810731

  7. Inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerosis: current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Economou, Evangelos K; Crea, Filippo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The notion of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory disease has intensified research on the role of cytokines and the way these molecules act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are expressed by all types of cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects, and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leucocytes, and other vascular residing cells. It is now understood that widely used drugs such as statins, aspirin, methotrexate, and colchicine act in an immunomodulatory way that may beneficially affect atherogenesis and/or cardiovascular disease progression. Moreover, advancement in pharmaceutical design has enabled the production of highly specific antibodies against key molecules involved in the perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade, raising hope for advances in the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review describes the actions and effects of these agents, their potential clinical significance, and future prospects. PMID:26843277

  8. [2013: what's new in inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, T

    2014-12-01

    Several high-quality publications were published in 2013 and some major trials studies were started. In Guillain-Barré syndrome, events included the launch of IGOS and a better understanding of diagnostic limits, the effect of influenza vaccination, and better care, but uncertainty remains about analgesics. A new mouse model was also described. In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), diagnostic pitfalls can be recalled. Our knowledge of underlying pathophysiological processes has improved, and the value of monitoring with function and deficit scores has been demonstrated. IVIG can sometimes be effective longer than expected, but CIDP remains sensitive to corticosteroids, particularly with the long-term beneficial effects of megadose dexamethasone. The impact of fingolimod remains to be demonstrated in an ongoing trial. Advances concerning multifocal motor neuropathy, inflammatory plexopathy, and neuropathy with anti -MAG activity are discussed but treatments already recognized as effective should not be changed. Imaging of peripheral nerve progresses. PMID:25459118

  9. Obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lessmann, Astrid; Torrego-Fernández, Alfons

    2013-09-01

    Pathologies acquired after the establishment of an artificial airway include stenosis, granulomas and the formation of pseudomembranes, to name a few. The most common form of presentation in adults is circumferential stenosis, which often requires therapeutic endoscopic measures to achieve resolution. This Case Report describes the case of an obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane in the shape of a tracheal septum secondary to repeated intubations that was resolved with conservative treatment. The clinical presentation of this entity generally includes the appearance of respiratory infection and/or atelectasis after the withdrawal of the orotracheal tube as a consequence of the accumulation of secretions between the tracheal wall and the pseudomembrane. Inflammatory pseudomembranes can resolve spontaneously with the help of glucocorticoids, although on occasion they require an invasive endotracheal procedure depending on the evolution. PMID:23419993

  10. Inflammatory pseudotumor of spleen

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Noorollahi, Hasan; Hani, Mohsen; Bagheri, Marzie

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is an uncommon tumor and its occurrence in spleen is rare. This tumor is composed of proliferation of spindle cells of unknown origin and etiology that mimic other tumors at clinical and histological evaluation. The most surmising etiology is Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and the most suspected origin is myofibroblasts, hence its synonym is “inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.” The clinical appearance of tumor is related to its location but the most ones are abdominal pain, fever and weight loss. Surgical removal for this lesion is treatment of choice and there is few reported case with recurrence and metastasis. Herein we report a 63-year-old female patient with and abdominal discomfort that primary paraclinical investigations had been showed splenic mass and therefore surgical treatment was performed for her. Microscopic examination suggest some different diagnosis such as IPT, thus immunohistochemical staining was perform to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the others. PMID:24592376

  11. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  12. [Role of non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids in chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Heinz, G A; Mashreghi, M-F

    2016-05-01

    Non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids (RNA), including microRNA, long non-coding RNA and circular RNA, can influence the expression of genes mediating inflammatory processes and therefore affect the course and progression of chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent studies using antisense oligonucleotides suggest that such non-coding regulatory RNAs are suitable as novel therapeutic target molecules for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:27115697

  13. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement has primarily been reported in patients with inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, vasculitic neuropathy and leprosy. Nerve ultrasonography is a promising diagnostic supportive tool for inflammatory neuropathies. The ultrasonographic findings that are currently useful are 1) nerve enlargement primarily suggests the existence of inflammatory or demyelinating neuropathies and 2) for patients with CIDP or demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the pattern of nerve enlargement is noted, and this pattern is useful for discriminating between these diseases. More precise evidence of ultrasonographic findings for inflammatory neuropathies should be established in the future. PMID:24607946

  14. Systemic therapies for inflammatory eye disease: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this review we consider the current evidence base for treatments in inflammatory eye disease, and in particular uveitis, from a historical perspective. We consider the challenges that have traditionally hindered progress in inflammatory eye disease including small target populations, heterogeneous disease groups, poorly defined phenotypes, diagnostic inconsistency, subjective outcome measures, specific issues around visual acuity as an outcome measure and low commercial interest. Strategies to address these issues are considered de novo and with reference to recent advances outside of ophthalmology and highlight the promise for ocular inflammation. Progress in these specialties has included the development of thriving clinical-trial cultures, public-private partnerships, pathogenetic- and structure-led drug design, efficient drug development pipelines, and biomarker-defined treatment protocols enabling personalization of medicine. Although there are challenges, these are exciting opportunities as we seek to develop safe and effective treatments for patients with inflammatory eye disease. PMID:23617902

  15. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  16. Effect of exosomes derived from multipluripotent mesenchymal stromal cells on functional recovery and neurovascular plasticity in rats after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanlu; Chopp, Michael; Meng, Yuling; Katakowski, Mark; Xin, Hongqi; Mahmood, Asim; Xiong, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Object Transplanted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) improve functional recovery in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we test a novel hypothesis that systemic administration of cell-free exosomes generated from MSCs promotes functional recovery and neurovascular remodeling in rats after TBI. Methods Wistar rats were subjected to TBI followed by tail vein injection of 100 μg protein of exosomes derived from MSCs or an equal volume of vehicle phosphate-buffered saline (n = 8/group) 24 hours later. To evaluate cognitive and sensorimotor functional recovery, the modified Morris water maze, neurological severity score and footfault tests were performed. Animals were sacrificed at 35 days after TBI. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed for measurements of lesion volume, neurovascular remodeling (angiogenesis and neurogenesis), and neuroinflammation. Results Compared with saline-treated controls, exosome-treated TBI rats showed significant improvement in spatial learning at 34-35 days measured by the Morris water maze test (p < 0.05), and sensorimotor functional recovery, i.e., reduced neurological deficits and footfault frequency, observed at 14-35 days post injury (p < 0.05). Exosome treatment significantly increased the number of newborn endothelial cells in the lesion boundary zone and dentate gyrus, and significantly increased the number of newborn immature and mature neurons in the dentate gyrus as well as reduced neuroinflammation. Conclusions We, for the first time, demonstrate that MSC-generated exosomes effectively improve functional recovery, at least in part, by promoting endogenous angiogenesis and neurogenesis and reducing inflammation in rats after TBI. Thus, MSC-generated exosomes may provide a novel cell-free therapy for TBI and possibly other neurological diseases. PMID:25594326

  17. Prefrontal white matter pathology in air pollution exposed Mexico City young urbanites and their potential impact on neurovascular unit dysfunction and the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Vargas-Martínez, Javier; Gómez-Maqueo-Chew, Aline; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George; Gónzalez-Maciel, Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Millions of urban children are chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants, i.e., fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. Compared with children living with clear air those in Mexico City (MC) exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, low CSF Aβ42, breakdown of the BBB, attention and short-term memory deficits, prefrontal white matter hyperintensities, damage to epithelial and endothelial barriers, tight junction and neural autoantibodies, and Alzheimer and Parkinson's hallmarks. The prefrontal white matter is a target of air pollution. We examined by light and electron microscopy the prefrontal white matter of MC dogs (n: 15, age 3.17±0.74 years), children and teens (n: 34, age: 12.64±4.2 years) versus controls. Major findings in MC residents included leaking capillaries and small arterioles with extravascular lipids and erythrocytes, lipofuscin in pericytes, smooth muscle and endothelial cells (EC), thickening of cerebrovascular basement membranes with small deposits of amyloid, patchy absence of the perivascular glial sheet, enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces and nanosize particles (20-48nm) in EC, basement membranes, axons and dendrites. Tight junctions, a key component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) were abnormal in MC versus control dogs (χ(2)<0.0001), and white matter perivascular damage was significantly worse in MC dogs (p=0.002). The integrity of the NVU, an interactive network of vascular, glial and neuronal cells is compromised in MC young residents. Characterizing the early NVU damage and identifying biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction may provide a fresh insight into Alzheimer pathogenesis and open opportunities for pediatric neuroprotection. PMID:26829765

  18. Hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming exacerbates ischemia-induced brain injury and augments inflammatory response in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Gu, Yong; Wu, Zhou; Hu, Ya-Fang; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-05-20

    Hypothermia followed by slow rewarming is neuroprotective for ischemic stroke. However, slow rewarming causes patients' longer stay in intensive care unit and increases the risk of hypothermic complications. Hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming (HTRR) is more convenient; but it exacerbates intracranial hypertension for patients with massive hemispheric infarcts. The present study aims to investigate in detail how HTRR exacerbates ischemic brain injury and what are underlying mechanisms. Rats subjected to transient focal ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion were treated with normothermia or hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming. Neurological outcome, neuronal injury, blood-brain barrier integrity and expressions of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Results showed that HTRR at a rate of 3 °C/20 min increased both neurological deficit score and Longa score, enhanced the loss of neurons and the plasma level of neuron-specific enolase. Rapid rewarmed rats also displayed increased Evans blue dye extravasation, matrix metalloproteinase 9 level and tight junction impairment. Meanwhile, interleukin-1β, -6, tumor necrosis factor α and cyclooxygenase-2 were markedly elevated in rapid rewarmed rats. Anti-inflammatory agent minocycline suppressed HTRR-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines and improved neurological outcome. These results indicated that HTRR significantly impaired neurovascular unit and augmented proinflammatory response in stroke. PMID:27107700

  19. Chemopreventive action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the inflammatory pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents against a variety of cancers owing to their capability in blocking the tumor development by cellular proliferation and by promoting apoptosis. Inflammation is principal cause of colon carcinogenesis. A missing link between inflammation and cancer could be the activation of NF-κB, which is a hallmark of inflammatory response, and is commonly detected in malignant tumors. Therefore, targeting pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes and transcription factors will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. In the present study, we have studied the role of various pro-inflammatory enzymes and transcription factors in the development of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer and also observed the role of three NSAIDs, viz., Celecoxib, Etoricoxib and Diclofenac. Carcinogenic changes were observed in morphological and histopathological studies, whereas protein regulations of various biomolecules were identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Apoptotic studies was done by TUNEL assay and Hoechst/PI co-staining of the isolated colonocytes. It was found that DMH-treated animals were having an over-expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes, aberrant nuclear localization of activated cell survival transcription factor, NF-κB and suppression of anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPAR-γ, thereby suggesting a marked role of inflammation in the tumor progression. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has significantly reduced the inflammatory potential of the growing neoplasm. PMID:26898448

  20. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  1. [Inflammatory myopathies. New concepts].

    PubMed

    López Longo, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Myopathies are diseases characterized by the primary affection of skeletal muscle. In general they present with muscle weakness, pain, contracture, paresthesias, rigidity, or fatigue. They can be hereditary, such as muscle dystrophies, congenital, myotonic, metabolic, and myasthenic, or acquired. Among the latter ones we include idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), toxic, endocrine, or infectious myopathies and myasthenia gravis. There is a current acceptance of considerable clinical and histopathological overlap among some muscle dystrophies and some IIM. However, the molecular profile is different and characteristic in each myopathy and the study into the patterns of expression of genes in the muscle can be useful in their differential diagnosis, including that of IIM. PMID:21794553

  2. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  3. The inflammatory inception of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Jaime A; Bizama, Carolina; García, Patricia; Ferreccio, Catterina; Javle, Milind; Miquel, Juan F; Koshiol, Jill; Roa, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a lethal disease with notable geographical variations worldwide and a predilection towards women. Its main risk factor is prolonged exposure to gallstones, although bacterial infections and other inflammatory conditions are also associated. The recurrent cycles of gallbladder epithelium damage and repair enable a chronic inflammatory environment that promotes progressive morphological impairment through a metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma, along with cumulative genome instability. Inactivation of TP53, which is mutated in over 50% of GBC cases, seems to be the earliest and one of the most important carcinogenic pathways involved. Increased cell turnover and oxidative stress promote early alteration of TP53, cell cycle deregulation, apoptosis and replicative senescence. In this review, we will discuss evidence for the role of inflammation in gallbladder carcinogenesis obtained through epidemiological studies, genome-wide association studies, experimental carcinogenesis, morphogenetic studies and comparative studies with other inflammation-driven malignancies. The evidence strongly supports chronic, unresolved inflammation as the main carcinogenic mechanism of gallbladder cancer, regardless of the initial etiologic trigger. Given this central role of inflammation, evaluation of the potential for GBC prevention removing causes of inflammation or using anti-inflammatory drugs in high-risk populations may be warranted. PMID:26980625

  4. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  5. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Amato, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) consist of rare heterogenous autoimmune disorders that present with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis (IBM). Besides frequent creatine kinase (CK) elevation, the electromyogram confirms the presence of an irritative myopathy. Extramuscular involvement affects a significant number of cases with interstitial lung disease (ILD), cutaneous in dermatomyositis (DM), systemic or joint manifestations and increased risk of malignancy especially in DM. Myositis specific autoantibodies influence phenotype of the IIM. Jo-1 antibodies are frequently associated with ILD and the newly described HMG-CoA reductase antibodies are characteristic of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy (NM). Muscle pathology ranges from inflammatory exudates of variable distribution, to intact muscle fiber invasion, necrosis, phagocytosis and in the case of IBM rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. Despite many similarities, the IIM are a quite heterogeneous from the histopathological and pathogenetic standpoints in addition to some clinical and treatment-response difference. The field has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of these rare disorders. In this review, we focus on DM, polymyositis (PM) and NM and examine current and promising therapies. The reader interested in more details on IBM is referred to the corresponding chapter in this issue. PMID:25037081

  6. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  7. Chemokines in tumor development and progression

    SciTech Connect

    Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2012-01-15

    Chemokines were originally identified as mediators of the inflammatory process and regulators of leukocyte trafficking. Subsequent studies revealed their essential roles in leukocyte physiology and pathology. Moreover, chemokines have profound effects on other types of cells associated with the inflammatory response, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Thus, chemokines are crucial for cancer-related inflammation, which can promote tumor development and progression. Increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of tumor cells. The wide range of activities of chemokines in tumorigenesis highlights their roles in tumor development and progression.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:20478501

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; McLafferty, Laura; Goyal, Alka

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the etiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated psychological sequelae in children and adolescents with this lifelong disease. Pediatric-onset IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has significant medical morbidity and in many young persons is also associated with psychological and psychosocial challenges. Depression and anxiety are particularly prevalent and have a multifaceted etiology, including IBD-related factors such as cytokines and steroids used to treat IBD and psychosocial stress. A growing number of empirically supported interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and educational resources, help youth and their parents cope with IBD as well as the psychological and psychosocial sequelae. While there is convincing evidence that such interventions can help improve anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life, their effects on IBD severity and course await further study. PMID:21855713

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are advancing rapidly owing to immunologic investigations of a plethora of animal models of intestinal inflammation, ground-breaking advances in the interrogation of diseases that are inherited as complex genetic traits, and the development of culture-independent methods to define the composition of the intestinal microbiota. These advances are bringing a deeper understanding to the genetically determined interplay between the commensal microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the immune system and the manner in which this interplay might be modified by relevant environmental factors in the pathogenesis of IBD. This review examines these interactions and, where possible, potential lessons from IBD-directed, biologic therapies that may allow for elucidation of pathways that are central to disease pathogenesis in humans. PMID:20192811

  11. Inflammatory pathways in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hreggvidsdottir, Hulda S; Noordenbos, Troy; Baeten, Dominique L

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis is the second most common form of chronic inflammatory arthritis and a unique hallmark of the disease is pathologic new bone formation. Several cytokine pathways have been genetically associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), the prototypic subtype of SpA, and additional evidence from human and animal studies support a role of these pathways in the disease. TNF has a key role in SpA as blockade significantly reduces inflammation and destruction, however the treatment does not halt new bone formation. New insights into the TNF pathway were recently obtained from an animal model specifically overexpressing the transmembrane form of TNF. This model leads to axial and peripheral new bone formation which is not seen in soluble TNF overexpression models, indicating different pathogenic roles of soluble and transmembrane TNF in arthritis development. Besides TNF, the IL-23/IL-17 axis is emerging as an important inflammatory pathway in SpA, as a SNP in the IL-23R locus has been associated with developing AS, mice overexpressing IL-23 develop SpA-like features and IL-17 blockade has been shown to be efficacious for AS patients in a phase II trial. In this review, we focus on the cytokine pathways that have recently been genetically associated with SpA, i.e. TNF, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-23/IL-17. We review the current genetic, experimental and human in vivo data available and discuss how these different pathways are involved in the pathophysiology of SpA. Additionally, we discuss how these pathways relate to the pathogenic new bone formation in SpA. PMID:23969080

  12. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wöbke, Thea K.; Sorg, Bernd L.; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis (MS), atherosclerosis, or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signaling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes (i) the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, (ii) the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-κB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and (iii) the activation of signaling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signaling and other signaling cascades involved in inflammation. An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-seq, and FAIRE-seq. PMID:25071589

  13. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, Sandra P.

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process. PMID:18475521

  14. Lipid Bodies in Inflammatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; D’Avila, Heloisa; Wan, Hsiao-Ching; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, have increasingly been recognized as functionally active organelles linked to diverse biological functions and human diseases. These organelles are actively formed in vivo within cells from the immune system, such as macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils, in response to different inflammatory conditions and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors discuss structural and functional aspects of LBs and current imaging techniques to visualize these organelles in cells engaged in inflammatory processes, including infectious diseases. The dynamic morphological aspects of LBs in leukocytes as inducible, newly formable organelles, elicitable in response to stimuli that lead to cellular activation, contribute to the evolving understanding of LBs as organelles that are critical regulators of different inflammatory diseases, key markers of leukocyte activation, and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21430261

  15. Canine chronic inflammatory rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Rebecca C; Johnson, Lynelle R

    2006-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory rhinitis is commonly found in dogs with chronic nasal disease and is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the nasal mucosa in the absence of an obvious etiologic process. The pathogenesis of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis remains unknown. Animals respond poorly to antibiotics, oral glucocorticoids, and antihistamines, making primary infectious, immune-mediated, or allergic etiologies unlikely. Aberrant immune response to inhaled organisms or allergens may induce inflammation in some animals. Common clinical signs include nasal discharge, sneezing, coughing, epistaxis, and stertor. Diagnosis is made by performing a thorough history, physical examination, radiography or advanced imaging (via computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging), rhinoscopy, and nasal mucosal biopsy to rule out primary etiologies of nasal discharge. Treatment strategies have included various antibiotics, antihistamines, oral and inhalant steroids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, and antifungal medications. Some dogs may respond partially to doxycycline or azithromycin, although it is unclear whether response is related to antimicrobial or antiinflammatory properties of these drugs. Hydration of the nasal cavity through nasal drops or aerosols may limit nasal discharge, and some animals may improve with inhalant (but rarely oral) glucocorticoids. PMID:16711613

  16. Idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    PubMed

    Tieu, Joanna; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Limaye, Vidya

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge on idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) has evolved with the identification of myositis-associated and myositis-specific antibodies, development of histopathological classification and the recognition of how these correlate with clinical phenotype and response to therapy. In this paper, we outline key advances in diagnosis and histopathology, including the more recent identification of antibodies associated with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy (IMNM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Ongoing longitudinal observational cohorts allow further classification of these patients with IIM, their predicted clinical course and response to specific therapies. Registries have been developed worldwide for this purpose. A challenging aspect in IIM, a multisystem disease with multiple clinical subtypes, has been defining disease status and clinically relevant improvement. Tools for assessing activity and damage are now recognised to be important in determining disease activity and guiding therapeutic decision-making. The International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies (IMACS) group has developed such tools for use in research and clinical settings. There is limited evidence for specific treatment strategies in IIM. With significant development in the understanding of IIM and improved classification, longitudinal observational cohorts and trials using validated outcome measures are necessary, to provide important information for evidence-based care in the clinical setting. PMID:27421222

  17. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  18. A progressive pruritic rash with blisters.

    PubMed

    Overcash, Michael D; Ewald, Matt

    2016-05-01

    This article describes a patient with a progressive pruritic rash and fluid-filled blisters. A punch biopsy later confirmed the diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid, an inflammatory condition that most commonly occurs in older adults and is treated with corticosteroids. PMID:27124233

  19. The Detection and Exclusion of the Prostate Neuro-Vascular Bundle (NVB) in Automated HIFU Treatment Planning Using a Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy F.; Fedewa, Russell; Seip, Ralf; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Dines, Kris A.; Pfile, Richard; Penna, Michael A.; Gardner, Thomas A.

    2005-03-01

    Men with prostate cancer are likely to develop impotence after prostate cancer therapy if the treatment damages the neuro-vascular bundles (NVB). The NVB are generally located at the periphery of the prostate gland. To preserve the NVB, a Doppler system is used to detect and localize the associated blood vessels. This information is used during the therapy planning procedure to avoid treatment surrounding the blood vessel areas. The Sonablate®500 (Focus Surgery, Inc.) image-guided HIFU device is enhanced with a pulse-wave multi-gate Doppler system that uses the current imaging transducer and mechanical scanner to acquire Doppler data. Doppler detection is executed after the regular B-mode images are acquired from the base to the apex of the prostate using parallel sector scans. The results are stored and rendered in 3-D display, registered with additional models generated for the capsule, urethra, and rectal wall, and the B-mode data and treatment plan itself. The display of the blood flow can be in 2-D color overlaid on the B-mode image or in 3-D color structure. Based on this 3-D model, the HIFU treatment planning can be executed in automated or manual mode by the physician to remove originally defined treatment zones that overlap with the NVB (for preservation of NVB). The results of the NVB detection in animal experiments, and the 3-D modeling and data registration of the prostate will be presented.

  20. Wnt/β-catenin coupled with HIF-1α/VEGF signaling pathways involved in galangin neurovascular unit protection from focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Limei; Gao, Kuo; Chen, Xiuping; Xiong, Sihuai; Zhao, Huihui; Li, Shaojing

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironmental regulation has become a promising strategy for complex disease treatment. The neurovascular unit (NVU), as the key structural basis to maintain an optimal brain microenvironment, has emerged as a new paradigm to understand the pathology of stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of galangin, a natural flavonoid isolated from the rhizome of Alpina officinarum Hance, on NVU microenvironment improvement and associated signal pathways in rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Galangin ameliorated neurological scores, cerebral infarct volume and cerebral edema and reduced the concentration of Evans blue (EB) in brain tissue. NVU ultrastructural changes were also improved by galangin. RT-PCR and western blot revealed that galangin protected NVUs through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway coupled with HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF and β-catenin could be the key nodes of these two coupled pathways. In conclusion, Galangin might function as an anti-ischemic stroke drug by improving the microenvironment of NVUs. PMID:26537366

  1. Synergy of endothelial and neural progenitor cells from adipose-derived stem cells to preserve neurovascular structures in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Handayani, Fitri; Chiang, Yi-Lun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Ho, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Che; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal cerebral hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury damages the architecture of neurovascular units (NVUs) and results in neurological disorders. Here, we differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) toward the progenitor of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and neural precursor cells (NPCs) via microenvironmental induction and investigated the protective effect by transplanting ASCs, EPCs, NPCs, or a combination of EPCs and NPCs (E+N) into neonatal HI injured rat pups. The E+N combination produced significant reduction in brain damage and cell apoptosis and the most comprehensive restoration in NVUs regarding neuron number, normal astrocytes, and vessel density. Improvements in cognitive and motor functions were also achieved in injured rats with E+N therapy. Synergistic interactions to facilitate transmigration under in vitro hypoxic microenvironment were discovered with involvement of the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signal in EPCs and the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signals in NPCs. Therefore, ASCs exhibit great potential for cell sources in endothelial and neural lineages to prevent brain from HI damage. PMID:26447335

  2. Synergy of endothelial and neural progenitor cells from adipose-derived stem cells to preserve neurovascular structures in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Handayani, Fitri; Chiang, Yi-Lun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Ho, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Che; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal cerebral hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury damages the architecture of neurovascular units (NVUs) and results in neurological disorders. Here, we differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) toward the progenitor of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and neural precursor cells (NPCs) via microenvironmental induction and investigated the protective effect by transplanting ASCs, EPCs, NPCs, or a combination of EPCs and NPCs (E+N) into neonatal HI injured rat pups. The E+N combination produced significant reduction in brain damage and cell apoptosis and the most comprehensive restoration in NVUs regarding neuron number, normal astrocytes, and vessel density. Improvements in cognitive and motor functions were also achieved in injured rats with E+N therapy. Synergistic interactions to facilitate transmigration under in vitro hypoxic microenvironment were discovered with involvement of the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signal in EPCs and the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signals in NPCs. Therefore, ASCs exhibit great potential for cell sources in endothelial and neural lineages to prevent brain from HI damage. PMID:26447335

  3. Inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Seropian, Ignacio M; Sonnino, Chiara; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Biasucci, Luigi M; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    After acute myocardial infarction, ventricular remodeling is characterized by changes at the molecular, structural, geometrical and functional level that determine progression to heart failure. Inflammation plays a key role in wound healing and scar formation, affecting ventricular remodeling. Several, rather different, components of the inflammatory response were studied as biomarkers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. Widely available and inexpensive tests, such as leukocyte count at admission, as well as more sophisticated immunoassays provide powerful predictors of adverse outcome in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. We review the value of inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction and their association with ventricular remodeling, heart failure and sudden death. In conclusion, the use of these biomarkers may identify subjects at greater risk of adverse events and perhaps provide an insight into the mechanisms of disease progression. PMID:25681486

  4. Inflammatory Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Piergiorgi; Lettieri, Marta; Fortuna, Cinzia; Manoni, Mara; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Purpose and Methods: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can be a severe sight-threatening sequela, which can be secondary to both infectious and noninfectious uveitis. This review summarizes the different diseases associated with CNV, highlighting new treatment modalities and the possible strategies, which could be applied for the therapy of this occurrence. Results: Since CNV can often originate from posterior pole lesions and can be hard to identify, an accurate examination is mandatory in order to identify the correct diagnosis. In the majority of cases, fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) enable the determination of the clinical characteristics of the CNV. An infectious disease should be looked for to include a suitable therapy when available. The treatment strategy for CNV secondary to noninfectious uveal inflammations should be directed at controlling the inflammatory process. Systemic corticosteroids with or without immunosuppressive agents are indicated even when the CNV occurs with apparently inactive uveitis: Chronic subclinical inflammation can be the basis for the pathogenesis of CNV. Additional therapies aimed directly at the neovascular process, such as the intravitreal anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) agents, are recommended particularly when the therapy shows an insufficient response. Conclusion: CNV secondary to uveitis is a severe sequela leading to significant visual impairment. ICGA is mandatory in order to obtain relevant information about the choroidal status. Several therapeutic options have been considered, but no guidelines are provided at the moment. Moreover, the current data are still only based on case reports or small series. For such reasons, further trials are mandatory to validate the preliminary available results. PMID:20404991

  5. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role. PMID:23146613

  6. Inflammatory cell phenotypes in AAAs; their role and potential as targets for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Matthew A; Ruhlman, Melissa K.; Baxter, B. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. AAA is typically an asymptomatic disease and caused approximately 15,000 deaths annually in the U.S. Previous studies have examined both human and murine aortic tissue for the presence of various inflammatory cell types. Studies show that in both human and experimental AAAs, prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, such as CD4+ T cells and macrophages, occurs in the damaged aortic wall. These cells have the ability to undergo phenotypic modulation based on microenvironmental cues, potentially influencing disease progression. Pro-inflammatory CD4+ T cells and classically activated macrophages dominate the landscape of aortic infiltrates. The skew to pro-inflammatory phenotypes alters disease progression and plays a role in causing chronic inflammation. The local cytokine production and presence of inflammatory mediators, such as extracellular matrix breakdown products, influence the uneven balance of the inflammatory infiltrate phenotypes. Understanding and developing new strategies that target the pro-inflammatory phenotype could provide useful therapeutic targets for a disease with no current pharmacological intervention. PMID:26044582

  7. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers. PMID:27458590

  8. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  9. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: where are we?

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presently one of the most investigated human disorders. Expansion of knowledge of its pathophysiology has helped in developing novel medications to combat gut inflammation with a considerably degree of success. Despite this progress, much more remains to be done in regard to gaining a more profound understanding of IBD pathogenesis, detecting inflammation before it clinically manifests, implementing lifestyle modifications, and developing agents that can modify the natural course of the disease. One of the limitations to achieve these goals is the lack of integration of the major components of IBD pathogenesis, that is the exposome, the genome, the gut microbiome, and the immunome. An "IBD integrome" approach that takes advantage of all functional information derived from the detailed investigation of each single pathogenic component through the use of systems biology may offer the solution to understand IBD and cure it. PMID:25827798

  11. Is Depression an Inflammatory Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Studies consistently report that groups of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) demonstrate increased levels of a variety of peripheral inflammatory biomarkers when compared with groups of nondepressed individuals. These findings are often interpreted as meaning that MDD, even in medically healthy individuals, may be an inflammatory condition. In this article, we examine evidence for and against this idea by looking more closely into what the actual patterns of inflammatory findings indicate in terms of the relationship between MDD and the immune system. Data are presented in support of the idea that inflammation only contributes to depression in a subset of patients versus the possibility that the depressogenic effect of inflammatory activation is more widespread and varies depending on the degree of vulnerability any given individual evinces in interconnected physiologic systems known to be implicated in the etiology of MDD. Finally, the treatment implications of these various possibilities are discussed. PMID:21927805

  12. Macrophage Polarization in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24910531

  13. Nuclear Receptors and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the steroid hormone glucocorticoid and its nuclear receptor regulate the inflammatory process, a crucial component in the pathophysiological process related to human diseases that include atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and liver tumors. Growing evidence demonstrates that orphan and adopted orphan nuclear receptors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver × receptors, the farnesoid × receptor, NR4As, retinoid × receptors, and the pregnane × receptor, regulate the inflammatory and metabolic profiles in a ligand-dependent or -independent manner in human and animal models. This review summarizes the regulatory roles of these nuclear receptors in the inflammatory process and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:18375823

  14. Koch's postulates, microbial dysbiosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, V P; Proctor, S D; Willing, B P

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a growing amount of evidence supports the role of microbes and an imbalanced microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While many reviews have been written on the microbiota in IBD, few have considered how they fulfil the Koch's postulates. In this review, we consider how the Koch's postulates might be modified so that they can be fulfilled for polymicrobial diseases, and we discuss the progress made to date in fulfilling them. PMID:27179648

  15. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. PMID:26970125

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Y; Yau, A Y; Ziai, K; Maducdoc, M M; Djalilian, H R

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) are rare, idiopathic, non-neoplastic lesions that most commonly affect the orbit, but may involve other areas such as the larynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinuses, and meninges. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left-sided hearing loss, aural fullness, and otalgia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a soft-tissue mass in the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Histopathologic examination showed overlying squamous epithelium with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, subepithelial fibrosis, and chronic inflammatory infiltrate, which were consistent with an IP. Radiologic images and MRI indicated an ill-defined soft tissue involving the roof and posterior aspect of the TMJ, extending into the anterior external auditory canal. Our case was treated with a 2-week course of high dose prednisone (1 mg/kg) and a 2-week taper with resolution of symptoms. Two years after treatment, the patient shows no evidence of recurrence on MRI. PMID:26891541

  17. Study in mice shows that an aggressive type of breast cancer is linked to an inflammatory protein

    Cancer.gov

    Aberrant expression of an inflammatory protein, nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), may enhance the progression and metastasis of an aggressive and less common form of breast cancer, known as the estrogen receptor-negative type of disease.

  18. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammations are a common element of many gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, and diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett's esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. PMID:24781339

  19. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Kira G.; Bortner, James D.; Falk, Gary W.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Lynch, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammation are a common element of many GI diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett’s esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. PMID:24781339

  20. Inflammatory Mediators in Intervertebral Disk Degeneration and Discogenic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wuertz, Karin; Haglund, Lisbet

    2013-01-01

    Although degeneration of the intervertebral disk has historically been described as a misbalance between anabolic and catabolic factors, the role of inflammatory mediators has long been neglected. However, past research clearly indicates that inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α are expressed at higher levels in “diseased” intervertebral disks. Both disk cells as well as invading macrophages can be the source of the detected cytokines. Importantly, occurrence of inflammatory mediators in the disk can worsen the progress of degeneration by inducing the expression of matrix degrading enzymes as well as by inhibiting extracellular matrix synthesis. In addition, inflammatory mediators play a crucial role in pain development during intervertebral disk herniation (i.e., sciatica) and disk degeneration (i.e., discogenic pain). This review provides information on the most relevant inflammatory mediators during different types of disk diseases and explains how these factors can induce disk degeneration and the development of discogenic and sciatic/radiculopathic pain. PMID:24436868

  1. Inflammatory aortic aneurysms. A clinical review with new perspectives in pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, T E; Hallett, J W

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors present a review of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and to examine the literature on the diagnosis, operative management, and long-term survival of patients with inflammatory AAAs. Furthermore, to review current theories on the cause of inflammatory AAAs and present recent studies that provoke new thought on the cause of these aneurysms. BACKGROUND DATA: Inflammatory AAAs represent 3% to 10% of all AAAs and present the surgical team with a unique challenge. Progress has occurred in the technical approach to these aneurysms, and operative morbidity and mortality have been reduced. However, the pathogenesis remains an enigma. Recent studies raise questions regarding the influence of tobacco and genetic factors that accentuate an antigen-driven inflammatory response. METHODS: The authors conduct a review of the literature on both noninflammatory and inflammatory AAAs. RESULTS: Review of the literature of inflammatory AAAs reveals advancement in the definition, diagnosis, management, and long-term survival of patients with inflammatory AAAs. This review found an evolution in thought regarding the cause of inflammatory AAAs. In contrast to initial reports describing a distinct clinical entity, recent evidence suggests that inflammatory AAAs arise from the same causal stimulus responsible for noninflammatory AAAs. Finally, recent studies show an influence of tobacco and genetic factors on the pathogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: The literature supports the theory that inflammatory AAAs arise from the same or similar antigenic stimulus which is responsible for the noninflammatory AAA. Genetic and chemical factors such as tobacco use predispose certain persons to the development of noninflammatory AAAs and others to develop the extreme end of an inflammatory spectrum, the inflammatory AAA. Furthermore, inflammatory AAAs can be managed with the same operative morbidity, mortality, and long-term survival as noninflammatory AAAs. Images Figure 2. Figure 3

  2. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  3. Molecular cues guiding inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Olga; Martín, Pilar; González-Amaro, Roberto; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Alarm signals generated at inflammatory foci reach the vascular lumen to attract immune cells towards the affected tissue. Different leucocyte subsets decipher and integrate these complex signals in order to make adequate decisions for their migration towards the inflamed tissue. Soluble cues (cytokines and chemokines) and membrane receptors in both endothelium and leucocytes orchestrate the coordinated recruitment of specific inflammatory cell subsets. All these molecules are spatio-temporally organized in specialized structures at the luminal side of endothelium and the leucocyte membrane or are generated as chemical gradients in the damaged tissue. Thus, the repertoire of chemokines and their receptors as well as adhesion molecules expressed by each leucocyte subset determine their recruitment for participation in specific inflammatory pathologies. Whenever inflammatory signals are altered or misprocessed, inflammation can become chronic, causing extensive tissue damage. To combat chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases, novel therapeutic strategies attempt to silence the predominant signals in each inflammatory scenario. In this review, we provide a general overview of all these aspects related to the molecular regulation of leucocyte guidance in inflammatory responses. PMID:20053659

  4. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  5. Outcomes of Stent-assisted Coil Embolization of Wide-necked Intracranial Aneurysms Using the Solitaire™ AB Neurovascular Remodeling Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study presents our experience with respect to the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients treated with stent-assisted coil embolization using Solitaire™ AB stents. Materials and Methods From March 2011 to December 2014, 50 patients with 55 wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms were evaluated. Four patients presented with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stent deployment was performed with a standard coiling procedure in 49 aneurysms. Three patients underwent bailout stenting, 2 patients were treated by temporary stenting and one patient was treated only by stenting without coiling for dissecting aneurysm. Results Successful placement of the Solitaire AB stent was achieved in all the cases. Based on the postprocedural angiographic results, a Raymond 1 was obtained in 32 (59%) of 54 aneurysms, excluded by one case of dissecting aneurysm, and a Raymond 2 in 13 (24%), and a Raymond 3 in 9 (17%). There was one thromboembolic (2%) and three hemorrhagic complications (6%). However, procedure-related morbidity or mortality was not found. Annual follow-up angiographic results from the embolization were obtained in 40 (74.1%) of 54 cases. These results were represented as Raymond 1 in 27 (67.5%), class 2 in 9 (22.5%), and class 3 in 4 (10%) cases. Angiographic improvement associated with progressive thrombosis of the aneurysm was obtained in 10 aneurysms. Four aneurysms were recanalized without requiring additional treatment. In-stent stenosis was found in one aneurysm, but stent migration was not seen on follow-up angiography. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization using the Solitaire AB stent for treating wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms was found to be safe and effective immediately post-embolization and after follow-up. Long-term follow-up will be required to identify the effect of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rates. PMID:27066440

  6. Modeling of region-specific fMRI BOLD neurovascular response functions in rat brain reveals residual differences that correlate with the differences in regional evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Pawela, Christopher P; Hudetz, Anthony G; Ward, B Douglas; Schulte, Marie L; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Mauck, Matthew C; Cho, Younghoon R; Neitz, Jay; Hyde, James S

    2008-06-01

    The response of the rat visual system to flashes of blue light has been studied by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The BOLD temporal response is dependent on the number of flashes presented and demonstrates a refractory period that depends on flash frequency. Activated brain regions included the primary and secondary visual cortex, superior colliculus (SC), dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG), and lateral posterior nucleus (LP), which were found to exhibit differing temporal responses. To explain these differences, the BOLD neurovascular response function was modeled. A second-order differential equation was developed and solved numerically to arrive at region-specific response functions. Included in the model are the light input from the diode (duty cycle), a refractory period, a transient response following onset and cessation of stimulus, and a slow adjustment to changes in the average level of the signal. Constants in the differential equation were evaluated for each region by fitting the model to the experimental BOLD response from a single flash, and the equation was then solved for multiple flashes. The simulation mimics the major features of the data; however, remaining differences in the frequency dependence of the response between the cortical and subcortical regions were unexplained. We hypothesized that these discrepancies were due to regional-specific differences in neuronal response to flash frequency. To test this hypothesis, cortical visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded using the same stimulation protocol as the fMRI. Cortical VEPs were more suppressed than subcortical VEPs as flash frequency increased, supporting our hypothesis. This is the first report that regional differences in neuronal activation to the same stimulus lead to differential BOLD activation. PMID:18406628

  7. Iptakalim, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, confers neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats by protecting neurovascular unit cells

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yu-hua; Wang, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of iptakalim, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, in transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and its involved mechanisms. Methods: Intraluminal occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in a rat model was used to investigate the effect of iptakalim at different time points. Infarct volume was measured by staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax. In vitro, neurovascular unit (NVU) cells, including rat primary cortical neurons, astrocytes, and cerebral microvascular endothelial cells, were cultured and underwent oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The protective effect of iptakalim on NVU cells was investigated by cell viability and injury assessments, which were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and release of lactate dehydrogenase. Caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA expressions were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Administration of iptakalim 0 or 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct volumes, improved neurological scores, and attenuated brain edema after cerebral I/R injury. Iptakalim treatment (0 h after reperfusion) also reduced caspase-3 expression and increased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by immunohistochemistry. Iptakalim inhibited OGD-induced cell death in cultured neurons and astrocytes, and lactate dehydrogenase release from cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Iptakalim reduced mRNA expression of caspase-3 and increased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in NVU cells. Conclusions: Iptakalim confers neuroprotection against cerebral I/R injury by protecting NVU cells via inhibiting of apoptosis. PMID:21960347

  8. Microbiota-specific Th17 Cells: Yin and Yang in Regulation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Feidi; Liu, Zhanju; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms are involved in regulation of host response to microbiota to maintain the intestinal homeostasis. Th17 cells are enriched in the intestinal lamina propria under steady conditions. Many studies have demonstrated that microbiota-reactive Th17 cells in the intestines mediate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, clinical trials of anti-interleukin-17A or anti-interleukin-17RA antibodies in patients with Crohn's Disease show no improvement or even exacerbation of disease. Accumulating data has also indicated that Th17 cells may provide a protective effect as well to the intestines from inflammatory insults under homeostasis regulation, even under inflammatory conditions. Thus both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions of intestinal Th17 cells have emerged under various conditions. In this review article, we will summarize recent progresses of Th17 cells in regulation of intestinal homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27057688

  9. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female.

    PubMed

    Soro, Luis A; Gust, Anthony J; Purcell, Stephen M

    2013-10-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  10. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female

    PubMed Central

    Soro, Luis A.; Gust, Anthony J.; Purcell, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  11. Vinpocetine reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory pain and neutrophil recruitment in mice by targeting oxidative stress, cytokines and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Silva, Rangel L; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-07-25

    In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tissue resident macrophages and recruited neutrophils produce inflammatory mediators through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. These mediators include inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species that, in turn, sensitize nociceptors and lead to inflammatory pain. Vinpocetine is a nootropic drug widely used to treat cognitive and neurovascular disorders, and more recently its anti-inflammatory properties through inhibition of NF-κB activation have been described. In the present study, we used the intraplantar and intraperitoneal LPS stimulus in mice to investigate the effects of vinpocetine pre-treatment (3, 10, or 30mg/kg by gavage) in hyperalgesia, leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-33). LPS-induced NF-κB activation and cytokine production were investigated using RAW 264.7 macrophage cell in vitro. Vinpocetine (30mg/kg) significantly reduces hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (a neutrophil marker) in the plantar paw skin, and also inhibits neutrophil and mononuclear cell recruitment, superoxide anion and nitric oxide production, oxidative stress, and cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-33) in the peritoneal cavity. At least in part, these effects seem to be mediated by direct effects of vinpocetine on macrophages, since it inhibited the production of the same cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-33) and the NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results suggest that vinpocetine represents an important therapeutic approach to treat inflammation and pain induced by a gram-negative bacterial component by targeting NF-κB activation and NF-κB-related cytokine production in macrophages. PMID:25980587

  12. [Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Ye, J J

    2016-02-11

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a collection of inflammatory disorders associated with paradoxical worsening of preexisting infectious processes or emerging diseases or even dead after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a period of recovery of immune function. Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is mainly caused by cytomegalovirus which performing a series of ocular inflammation accompanied with the increase of CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as cytomegalovirus retinitis, after HAART. With HAART widely used, the patients of IRIS gradually increased. But the clinical presentations of IRIS were various because of different pathogens. This review summarized the clinical manifestations, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment of ocular IRIS.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 51: 150-153). PMID:26906710

  13. A novel pathway by which the environmental toxin 4-Nonylphenol may promote an inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Jung, Byeong Ho; Cadet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background 4-Nonylphenol is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is formed as a byproduct in the manufacturing and/or sewage treatment of regular household items. Previous work in our lab has implicated 4-NP in the progression of autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease in which macrophages mistakenly attack the intestinal linings, causing chronic inflammation. Several key pro-and anti-inflammatory molecules have been shown to be involved in the manifestation of this disease, including IL-23A, COX-2, IL-8, TLR-4, and IL-10. Material/Methods 4-NP’s effects on these known mediators of IBD were effectively analyzed using a novel model for IBD, by which 4-NP may promote an inflammatory response. Data were collected using DNA Microarray, RT-PCR, and ELISA, after 48 hour treatment of U937 histiocytic lymphocyte cells and COLO320DM human intestinal epithelial cells with 1 nM and 5 nM concentrations of 4-NP. Results Significant dysregulation of the expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory genes was observed in U937 cells that would promote and prolong inflammation. However, TLR-4, IL-8, and COX-2 gene expressions showed unprecedented effects in COLO320DM cells suggesting that these genes mediate apoptotic processes within the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that 4-NP administration engenders immune responses linked to apoptotic processes via dysregulation of macrophage signaling. In sum, 4-NP appears to increases the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease by promoting or prolonging adverse progression of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24717721

  14. Dentigerous cyst of inflammatory origin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Bianca Zimmermann; Beltrame, Ana Paula; Bolan, Michele; Grando, Liliane Janete; Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    There is an association between persistent, prolonged inflammation of a primary tooth and the development of an inflammatory dentigerous cyst involving the succedaneous tooth. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of an inflammatory dentigerous cyst of the permanent maxillary left central incisor in a nine-year-old boy caused by a long-term inflammation/infection of its predecessor. The treatment consisted of conservative decompression, which allowed for rapid healing and the eruption of the permanent tooth. The patient was followed up with periodic clinical and radiographic evaluations for several years. PMID:25198956

  15. Inflammatory Biomarkers of Birth Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Chalak, Lina F

    2016-09-01

    Although therapies in addition to whole-body cooling are being developed to treat the neonate at risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we have no quickly measured serum inflammatory or neuronal biomarkers to acutely and accurately identify brain injury or to follow the efficacy of therapy. This review covers inflammatory serum biomarkers in the setting of birth asphyxia that can help assess the degree or severity of encephalopathy at birth and neurodevelopmental outcomes. These biomarkers still need to be independently validated in large cohorts before they are ready for clinical implementation in practice. PMID:27524450

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Höer, J; Steinau, G; Füzesi, L; Gunawan, B; Schumpelick, V

    1999-07-01

    A 5-year-old-boy presented with a right pleural effusion and fever. A tumorous mass was located between the right lung and the liver. The boy underwent a right thoracotomy with excision of the tumor and the adherent parts of the right hemidiaphragm. Histology and immunohistochemistry showed an inflammatory pseudotumor of the diaphragm. This is the first reported case of an inflammatory pseudotumor in this location. A brief review of the heterogeneous theories about the pathogenesis and the different therapeutic regimens for this rare neoplastic entity are discussed. PMID:10415294

  17. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Menaka, K. B.; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, N. Suchetha

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis. PMID:20407654

  18. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  19. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  20. Maladaptive immune and inflammatory pathways lead to cardiovascular insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Aroor, Annayya R; McKarns, Susan; Demarco, Vincent G; Jia, Guanghong; Sowers, James R

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a hallmark of obesity, the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The progression of insulin resistance increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The significance of insulin resistance is underscored by the alarming rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities in the Unites States and worldwide over the last 40-50 years. The incidence of obesity is also on the rise in adolescents. Furthermore, premenopausal women have lower CVD risk compared to men, but this protection is lost in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Although systemic and cardiovascular insulin resistance is associated with impaired insulin metabolic signaling and cardiovascular dysfunction, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance and cardiovascular dysfunction remain poorly understood. Recent studies show that insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes is linked to a metabolic inflammatory response, a state of systemic and tissue specific chronic low grade inflammation. Evidence is also emerging that there is polarization of macrophages and lymphocytes towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype that contributes to progression of insulin resistance in obesity, cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In this review, we provide new insights into factors, such as, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic activation and incretin modulators (e.g., DPP-4) and immune responses that mediate this inflammatory state in obesity and other conditions characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:23932846

  1. Imaging for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melanie S; Chu, Daniel I

    2015-12-01

    Multiple imaging modalities exist for inflammatory bowel disease. This article explores the use of plain radiographs, contrast radiologic imaging, computed tomography, MRI, ultrasound, and capsule endoscopy. History, technique, indications for use, limitations, and future directions are discussed for each modality. PMID:26596919

  2. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  3. Managing Inflammatory Manifestations in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Alessandra; Mahlaoui, Nizar

    2016-10-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by lack of phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, which results in inflammatory dysregulation and increased susceptibility to infections. Patients with CGD may develop severe obstructive disorders of the digestive tract as a result of their dysregulated inflammatory response. Despite a growing focus on inflammatory manifestations in CGD, the literature data on obstructive complications are far less extensive than those on infectious complications. Diagnosis and management of patients with concomitant predispositions to infections and hyperinflammation are particularly challenging. Although the inflammatory and granulomatous manifestations of CGD usually respond rapidly to steroid treatment, second-line therapies (immunosuppressants and biologics) may be required in refractory cases. Indeed, immunosuppressants (such as anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, thalidomide, and anakinra) have shown some efficacy, but the value of this approach is controversial, given the questionable risk-to-benefit ratio and the small numbers of patients treated to date. Significant progress in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (the only curative treatment for CGD) has been made through better supportive care and implementation of improved, reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Gene therapy may eventually be an option for patients lacking a suitable donor; clinical trials with new, safer vectors are ongoing at a few centers. PMID:27299584

  4. Resistin in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the serum levels and local expression of resistin in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies to controls, and to determine the relationship between resistin levels, inflammation and disease activity. Methods Serum resistin levels were determined in 42 patients with inflammatory myopathies and 27 healthy controls. The association among resistin levels, inflammation, global disease activity and muscle strength was examined. The expression of resistin in muscle tissues from patients with inflammatory myopathies and healthy controls was evaluated. Gene expression and protein release from resistin-stimulated muscle and mononuclear cells were assessed. Results In patients with inflammatory myopathies, the serum levels of resistin were significantly higher than those observed in controls (8.53 ± 6.84 vs. 4.54 ± 1.08 ng/ml, P < 0.0001) and correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.328, P = 0.044) and myositis disease activity assessment visual analogue scales (MYOACT) (r = 0.382, P = 0.026). Stronger association was observed between the levels of serum resistin and CRP levels (r = 0.717, P = 0.037) as well as MYOACT (r = 0.798, P = 0.007), and there was a trend towards correlation between serum resistin and myoglobin levels (r = 0.650, P = 0.067) in anti-Jo-1 positive patients. Furthermore, in patients with dermatomyositis, serum resistin levels significantly correlated with MYOACT (r = 0.667, P = 0.001), creatine kinase (r = 0.739, P = 0.001) and myoglobin levels (r = 0.791, P = 0.0003) and showed a trend towards correlation with CRP levels (r = 0.447, P = 0.067). Resistin expression in muscle tissue was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory myopathies compared to controls, and resistin induced the expression of interleukins (IL)-1β and IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in mononuclear cells but not in myocytes. Conclusions The results of this study

  5. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  6. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  7. Distinct inflammatory and cytopathic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Brynskov, Jørn; Krogfelt, Karen A; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Brix, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as implied from a higher prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli in the gut of IBD-affected individuals. However, it is unclear whether different non-diarrheagenic E. coli spp. segregate from each other in their ability to promote intestinal inflammation. Herein we compared the inflammation-inducing properties of non-diarrheagenic LF82, 691-04A, E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) and eleven new intestinal isolates from different locations in five IBD patients and one healthy control. Viable E. coli were cultured with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), followed by analysis of secreted cytokines, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular death. The IBD-associated E. coli LF82 induced the same dose-dependent inflammatory cytokine profile as ECN and ten of the new E. coli isolates displayed as high level IL-12p70, IL-1β, IL-23 and TNF-α from moDCs irrespective of their site of isolation (ileum/colon/faeces), disease origin (diseased/non-diseased) or known virulence factors. Contrarily, 691-04A and one new IBD E. coli isolate induced a different cellular phenotype with enhanced killing of moDCs and IECs, coupled to elevated IL-18. The cytopathic nature of 691-04A and one other IBD E. coli isolate suggests that colonization with specific non-diarrheagenic E. coli could promote intestinal barrier leakage and profound intestinal inflammation, while LF82, ECN and the remaining non-diarrheagenic E. coli isolates hold notorious pro-inflammatory characteristics that can progress inflammation in case of intestinal barrier leakage. PMID:26522075

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinics and pathology. Do inflammatory bowel disease and periodontal disease have similar immunopathogeneses?

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, P

    2001-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two chronic, tissue-destructive, clinical entities Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) both apparently caused by immunological overreaction (hypersensitivity) to commensal gut bacteria. Under normal conditions the intestinal immune system shows a down-regulating tone ('oral tolerance') against dietary antigens and the indigenous microbiota. This local homeostasis is disturbed in IBD, leading to hyperactivation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells with abundant secretion of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and production of IgG antibodies against commensal bacteria. In addition, UC includes genetically determined autoimmunity, particularly IgG1-mediated cytotoxic epithelial attack. Breaching of the epithelium is the best-defined event underlying abrogation of oral tolerance, but immune deviation caused by cytokines fiom irritated epithelial cells or subepithelial elements (for example, mast cells, natural killer cells, macrophages) may also be involved. Endogenous infection with local hypersensitivity likewise causes periodontal disease, reflecting 'frustrated' immune elimination mechanisms entertained by antigens from dental plaque. Altogether, perturbation of a tightly controlled cytokine network, with abnormal crosstalk between several cell types, apparently explains the progressive immunopathology of chronic inflammatory mucosal diseases in general. This adverse development will be influenced by numerous immunity genes, the dosage and potential pathogeniciy of commensal bacteria, general health, nutritional status, and psychological factors. Several targets for new therapy have tentatively been identified to block immunopathological mechanisms in IBD, and inhibition of TNF has a striking beneficial effect in CD, supporting a central role of this cytokine. PMID:11570527

  9. There Is No Correlation Between Erectile Dysfunction and Dose to Penile Bulb and Neurovascular Bundles Following Real-Time Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solan, Amy N. Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between the onset of erectile dysfunction and dose to the penile bulb and neurovascular bundles (NVBs) after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-seven patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy met the following eligibility criteria: (1) treatment with {sup 125}I brachytherapy to a prescribed dose of 160 Gy with or without hormones without supplemental external beam radiation therapy, (2) identification as potent before the time of implantation based on a score of 2 or higher on the physician-assigned Mount Sinai Erectile Function Score and a score of 16 or higher on the abbreviated International Index of Erectile Function patient assessment, and (3) minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up was 25.7 months (range, 12-47 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of impotence was 23% (34 of 147 patients). An additional 43% of potent patients (49 of 113 patients) were using a potency aid at last follow-up. The penile bulb volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) ranged from 0-0.05 cc (median, 0 cc), with a dose to the hottest 5% (D{sub 5}) range of 12.5-97.9 Gy (median, 40.8 Gy). There was no correlation between penile bulb D{sub 5} or V{sub 100} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. For the combined right and left NVB structures, V{sub 100} range was 0.3-5.1 cc (median, 1.8 cc), and V{sub 150} range was 0-1.5 cc (median, 0.31 cc). There was no association between NVB V{sub 100} or V{sub 150} and postimplantation impotency on actuarial analysis. Conclusion: Penile bulb doses are low after real-time ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy. We found no correlation between dose to either the penile bulb or NVBs and the development of postimplantation impotency.

  10. The treatment of inflammatory polyneuropathy by plasma exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, M L; Legg, N J; Lockwood, M C; Pallis, C

    1982-01-01

    Observations are reported on six patients with inflammatory polyneuropathy who were treated by plasma exchange. In four cases the polyneuropathy was acute and in two it was chronic or relapsing. Two acute cases and one chronic relapsing case had plasma exchange during a rapidly progressive phase of the disease, and showed a prompt and substantial recovery of function. The other three patients were exchanged when disease activity had reached a plateau. Only minor degrees of improvement were seen in two of these cases. One patient showed an initial mild deterioration before subsequent recovery. There were no significant side effects. These findings are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis and clinical management of inflammatory polyneuropathy. PMID:7130991

  11. E3 ubiquitin ligases as novel targets for inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Goru, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Anuradha; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2016-04-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the post translational modifications which decide the fate of various proteins in the cells, by either directing them towards proteasomal degradation or participation in several cell signalling pathways. Recently, the role of ubiquitination has been unravelled in pathogenesis and progression of various diseases, where inflammation is critical, like obesity, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, angiotensin-II induced cardiac inflammation and asthma. E3 ligases are known to be instrumental in regulation of the inflammatory cascade. This review focuses on the role of different E3 ligases in the development of inflammatory diseases and thus may help us to target these E3 ligases in future drug discovery to prevent inflammation. PMID:26875639

  12. Bilateral Inflammatory Aural Polyps: A Manifestation of Samter's Triad

    PubMed Central

    Brobst, Robert; Suss, Nichole; Joe, Stephanie; Redleaf, Saadia

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual case of bilateral inflammatory aural polyps in a patient with Samter's triad. This 52-year-old patient had a history of chronic rhinosinusitis with sinonasal polyps, asthma, and aspirin sensitivity, with progressive right-sided hearing loss, otorrhea, and aural fullness. She was found to have bilateral aural polyps, with the larger obstructing lesion on the right. A computed tomography supported these findings and revealed bilateral opacification of the middle ear cleft and mastoid air cells. An initial right tympanomastoidectomy was performed with the specimen histologically resembling a typical sinonasal polyp. We speculate that this patient's middle ear polyposis is secondary to the inflammatory changes of Samter's triad. This has not been described previously in the literature. PMID:20182629

  13. [Inflammatory pseudotumors of the kidney. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Dakir, Mohamed; Taha, Abdellatif; Sarf, Ismail; Attar, Hicham; Aboutaieb, Rachid; Meziane, Fathi

    2003-02-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumours of the kidney are rare and raise a problem of differential diagnosis with renal cancer. The authors discuss the diagnostic difficulties of this disease in the light of two patients, aged 32 years and 60 years, admitted for left low back pain (2 cases), large kidney (1 case) and haematuria (1 case). The combination of renal ultrasound and CT suggested a renal tumour or a renal cyst, and MRI suggested a necrotic tumour. Surgical exploration led to tumour excision in one case and surgical biopsy in the other case due to the unresectable appearance of the tumour. Histological examination revealed an inflammatory mass with no signs of malignancy in the two cases. A favourable course was observed in both cases with a normal kidney on subsequent CT. The preoperative diagnosis of pseudotumour remains difficult, despite progress in medical imaging and often requires surgical exploration. The diagnosis is based on a correlation of radiological and histological findings. PMID:12703371

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Herpes Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ... is pelvic inflammatory disease treated? Several types of antibiotics can cure PID. Antibiotic treatment does not, however, reverse any ...

  15. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  16. Systemic inflammatory response and neuromuscular involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Allen, Kezia; Oei, Felicia; Leoni, Emanuela; Kuhle, Jens; Tree, Timothy; Fratta, Pietro; Sharma, Nikhil; Sidle, Katie; Howard, Robin; Orrell, Richard; Fish, Mark; Greensmith, Linda; Pearce, Neil; Gallo, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined blood expression of neuromuscular and inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of disease progression and prognosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: Logistic regression adjusted for markers of the systemic inflammatory state and principal component analysis were carried out on plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK), ferritin, and 11 cytokines measured in 95 patients with ALS and 88 healthy controls. Levels of circulating biomarkers were used to study survival by Cox regression analysis and correlated with disease progression and neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels available from a previous study. Cytokines expression was also tested in blood samples longitudinally collected for up to 4 years from 59 patients with ALS. Results: Significantly higher levels of CK, ferritin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α, and interleukin (IL)–1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 and lower levels of interferon (IFN)–γ were found in plasma samples from patients with ALS compared to controls. IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were the most highly regulated markers when all explanatory variables were jointly analyzed. High ferritin and IL-2 levels were predictors of poor survival. IL-5 levels were positively correlated with CK, as was TNF-α with NfL. IL-6 was strongly associated with CRP levels and was the only marker showing increasing expression towards end-stage disease in the longitudinal analysis. Conclusions: Neuromuscular pathology in ALS involves the systemic regulation of inflammatory markers mostly active on T-cell immune responses. Disease stratification based on the prognostic value of circulating inflammatory markers could improve clinical trials design in ALS. PMID:27308305

  17. Macrophage Diversity Enhances Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Binzhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    There is persuasive clinical and experimental evidence that macrophages promote cancer initiation and malignant progression. During tumor initiation they create an inflammatory environment that is mutagenic and which promotes growth. As tumors progress to malignancy, macrophages stimulate angiogenesis, enhance tumor cell migration, invasion, and suppress anti-tumor immunity. At metastatic sites macrophages prepare the target tissue for arrival of tumor cells and then a different subpopulation of macrophages promotes tumor cell extravasation, survival, and subsequent growth. Specialized subpopulations of macrophages may represent important new therapeutic targets. PMID:20371344

  18. 9 CFR 381.86 - Inflammatory processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inflammatory processes. 381.86 Section... Carcasses and Parts § 381.86 Inflammatory processes. Any organ or other part of a carcass which is affected by an inflammatory process shall be condemned and, if there is evidence of general...

  19. 9 CFR 381.86 - Inflammatory processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inflammatory processes. 381.86 Section... Carcasses and Parts § 381.86 Inflammatory processes. Any organ or other part of a carcass which is affected by an inflammatory process shall be condemned and, if there is evidence of general...

  20. 9 CFR 381.86 - Inflammatory processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inflammatory processes. 381.86 Section... Carcasses and Parts § 381.86 Inflammatory processes. Any organ or other part of a carcass which is affected by an inflammatory process shall be condemned and, if there is evidence of general...

  1. Costs in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Witczak, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Variables influencing total direct medical costs in inflammatory bowel diseases include country, diagnosis (generally, patients with Crohn's disease generated higher costs compared with patients with ulcerative colitis), and year since diagnosis. In all studies the mean costs were higher than the median costs, which indicates that a relatively small group of the most severely ill patients significantly affect the total cost of treatment of these diseases. A major component of direct medical costs was attributed to hospitalisation, ranging from 49% to 80% of the total. The costs of surgery constituted 40–61% of inpatient costs. Indirect costs in inflammatory bowel diseases, unappreciated and often underestimated (considered by few authors and as a loss of work), are in fact important and may even exceed direct medical costs. PMID:27110304

  2. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  3. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet—have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  4. Probiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A‐P; Ouyang, Q

    2006-01-01

    Enteric microflora profiles vary considerably between active inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and healthy conditions. Intestinal microflora may partake in the pathogenesis of IBD by one or some ways: specific pathogenic infection induces abnormal intestinal mucosal inflammation; aberrant microflora components trigger the onset of IBD; abnormal host immune response loses normal immune tolerance to luminal components; luminal antigens permeate through the defective mucosal barrier into mucosal lamina propria and induce abnormal inflammatory response. Preliminary studies suggest that administration of probiotics may be benefit for experimental colitis and clinical trials for IBD. Researches have been studying the function of probiotics. Introduction of probiotics can balance the aberrant enteric microflora in IBD patients, and reinforce the various lines of intestinal defence by inhibiting microbial pathogens growth, increasing intestinal epithelial tight junction and permeability, modulating immune response of intestinal epithelia and mucosal immune cells, secreting antimicrobial products, decomposing luminal pathogenic antigens. PMID:16754706

  5. Inflammatory myoglandular polyp causing hematochezia.

    PubMed

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Okuda, Masato; Kudo, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Seiyuu; Shirakawa, Atsuko

    2008-09-14

    A case of inflammatory myoglandular polyp (IMGP) causing hematochezia is reported. The patient was a 33-year-old man who visited our hospital for further evaluation of hematochezia. Colonoscopy revealed a red, hard, spherical peduncular polyp with erosion and mucous exudation, about 20 mm in diameter, in the descending colon. Excluding the polyp, there was no lesion in the colorectum. Endoscopic polypectomy was performed. Histological examination of the specimen revealed inflammatory granulation tissue in the lamina propria, proliferation of smooth muscle, and hyperplastic glands with variable cystic changes. This polyp was diagnosed as an IMGP. The symptom of hematochezia was resolved after endoscopic resection. Our case shows that treatment is necessary for IMGP if intestinal bleeding occurs and endoscopists should be aware of the endoscopic characteristics of IMGP. PMID:18785292

  6. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. PMID:26060024

  7. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Kichenaradjou, A; Barrett, A W; Norris, P; Rowell, N; Newman, L

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumour (IP), also known as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT), is a rare lesion of the maxillofacial skeleton and a diagnosis by exclusion. We describe three cases which affected the maxilla, two women and one man of ages 67, 56 and 70 years at presentation. All showed the typical, rather non-specific histopathological features. IgG4-positive plasma cells varied greatly in prominence, and none of the three lesions expressed ALK-1. Both women responded to steroids and radiotherapy, though one also required azathioprine. Despite maxillectomy, radiotherapy, steroids and cyclophosphamide, the man suffered intracranial spread and succumbed to persistent disease. The cases described here demonstrate the clinicopathological difficulties presented by this entity and its aggressive, unpredictable behaviour. PMID:27052813

  8. Modeling the effects of systemic mediators on the inflammatory phase of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Racheal L; Segal, Rebecca A; Diegelmann, Robert F; Reynolds, Angela M

    2015-02-21

    The normal wound healing response is characterized by a progression from clot formation, to an inflammatory phase, to a repair phase, and finally, to remodeling. In many chronic wounds there is an extended inflammatory phase that stops this progression. In order to understand the inflammatory phase in more detail, we developed an ordinary differential equation model that accounts for two systemic mediators that are known to modulate this phase, estrogen (a protective hormone during wound healing) and cortisol (a hormone elevated after trauma that slows healing). This model describes the interactions in the wound between wound debris, pathogens, neutrophils and macrophages and the modulation of these interactions by estrogen and cortisol. A collection of parameter sets, which qualitatively match published data on the dynamics of wound healing, was chosen using Latin Hypercube Sampling. This collection of parameter sets represents normal healing in the population as a whole better than one single parameter set. Including the effects of estrogen and cortisol is a necessary step to creating a patient specific model that accounts for gender and trauma. Utilization of math modeling techniques to better understand the wound healing inflammatory phase could lead to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic wounds. This inflammatory phase model will later become the inflammatory subsystem of our full wound healing model, which includes fibroblast activity, collagen accumulation and remodeling. PMID:25446708

  9. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated. PMID:19922669

  10. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public. PMID:26968556

  11. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-02-20

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  12. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  13. Neurovascular Injury in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurological and vascular complications following hip arthroplasty are uncommon, and their impact ranges from transient and trivial to permanent and devastating. The proximity of neural and vascular structures makes any operation on the hip potentially hazardous. Direct or indirect injuries of these structures may occur during operative exposure and subsequent procedures. Thus, complete awareness of the anatomy of the pelvis and proximal femur is required. Peripheral nerve injuries can involve either distant sites or nerves in the immediate vicinity of the hip joint. Sciatic nerve injury is the most common nerve injury following total hip arthroplasty. Femoral nerve injury is much less common and is associated with an anterior approach. Its diagnosis is often delayed, but the prognosis is generally better than with sciatic nerve injury. The superior gluteal nerve is at risk during the direct lateral approach. Obturator nerve injury is the least common type of injury and has the least functional consequences. Vascular injuries are less common but more immediately life threatening. The mechanisms of vascular injury include occlusion associated with preexisting peripheral vascular disease and vascular injury during removal of cement during screw fixation of acetabular components, cages, or structural grafts. It is critical to avoid the anterior quadrants for acetabular screw fixation. All acetabular and femoral defects should be bone-grafted to avoid inadvertent cement migration. Following these guidelines, surgeons should be able to offer the most appropriate treatment and counseling to the patients.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of red pepper (Capsicum baccatum) on carrageenan- and antigen-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Fernando; Alves, Márcia K; Vieira, Sílvio M; Carvalho, Toni A; Leite, Carlos E; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Poloni, José A; Cunha, Fernando Q; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2008-04-01

    Inflammation is a pivotal component of a variety of diseases, such as atherosclerosis and tumour progression. Various naturally occurring phytochemicals exhibit anti-inflammatory activity and are considered to be potential drug candidates against inflammation-related pathological processes. Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum (Willd.) Eshbaugh (Solanaceae) is the most consumed species in Brazil, and its compounds, such as capsaicinoids, have been found to inhibit the inflammatory process. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of C. baccatum have not been characterized. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of C. baccatum juice in animal models of acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and immune inflammation induced by methylated bovine serum albumin. Pretreatment (30 min) of rats with pepper juice (0.25-2.0 g kg(-1)) significantly decreased leucocyte and neutrophil migration, exudate volume and protein and LDH concentration in pleural exudates of a pleurisy model. This juice also inhibited neutrophil migration and reduced the vascular permeability on carrageenan-induced peritonitis in mice. C. baccatum juice also reduced neutrophil recruitment and exudate levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in mouse inflammatory immune peritonitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the main constituent of C. baccatum juice, as extracted with chloroform, is capsaicin. In agreement with this, capsaicin was able to inhibit the neutrophil migration towards the inflammatory focus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the anti-inflammatory effect of C. baccatum juice and our data suggest that this effect may be induced by capsaicin. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect induced by red pepper may be by inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the inflammatory site. PMID:18380920

  15. Gene and cell therapy based treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    van der Marel, Sander; Majowicz, Anna; van Deventer, Sander; Petry, Harald; Hommes, Daniel W; Ferreira, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are a group of chronic inflammatory disorders most commonly affecting young adults. Currently available therapies can result in induction and maintenance of remission, but are not curative and have sometimes important side effects. Advances in basic research in IBD have provided new therapeutic opportunities to target the inflammatory process involved. Gene and cell therapy approaches are suitable to prevent inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract and show therefore potential in the treatment of IBD. In this review, we present the current progress in the field of both gene and cell therapy and future prospects in the context of IBD. Regarding gene therapy, we focus on viral vectors and their applications in preclinical models. The focus for cell therapy is on regulatory T lymphocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells, their potential for the treatment of IBD and the progress made in both preclinical models and clinical trials. PMID:22180846

  16. Quality Improvement in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Corey A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) present a unique opportunity to define and improve the quality of care. Processes of care can be complex, and outcomes of care may vary across different healthcare delivery settings. Patients with IBD are managed over long periods of time and often by the same physician within a single care delivery system. Both patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have variable courses of disease progression that require changes in therapy over time. These factors necessitate multiple areas of potential assessment and improvement of processes and outcomes of care. A current initiative is the development of quality measures. The American Gastroenterological Association has developed accountability measures for the Physician Quality Reporting System, and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America has developed a set of top 10 recommended processes and outcomes of measurement for high-quality care of patients with IBD. In addition, the pediatric ImproveCareNow collaborative network has collected improvement data from dozens of pediatric centers over the past 5 years and has demonstrated improvement in overall disease activity in their cohort through iterative quality improvement processes. Future directions for quality indicators for adults with IBD will involve implementation of quality-measure reporting, both for purposes of reimbursement as well as improvement of care. These strategies will need to be closely monitored to evaluate the effect of improvement programs on outcomes. PMID:23943663

  17. Inflammatory Biomarkers Profile as Microenvironmental Expression in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Jonescu-Cuypers, Christian; Nicula, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana-Mary

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder with progressive stromal thinning and transformation of the normal corneal architecture towards ectasia that results in decreased vision due to irregular astigmatism and irreversible tissue scarring. The pathogenesis of keratoconus still remains unclear. Hypotheses that this condition has an inflammatory etiopathogenetic component apart from the genetic and environmental factors are beginning to escalate in the research domain. This paper covers the most relevant and recent published papers regarding the biomarkers of inflammation, their signaling pathway, and the potentially new therapeutic options in keratoconus. PMID:27563164

  18. Inflammatory Biomarkers Profile as Microenvironmental Expression in Keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Catalina; Corbu, Catalina Gabriela; Tanase, Cristiana; Jonescu-Cuypers, Christian; Nicula, Cristina; Dascalescu, Dana; Cristea, Miruna; Voinea, Liliana-Mary

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder with progressive stromal thinning and transformation of the normal corneal architecture towards ectasia that results in decreased vision due to irregular astigmatism and irreversible tissue scarring. The pathogenesis of keratoconus still remains unclear. Hypotheses that this condition has an inflammatory etiopathogenetic component apart from the genetic and environmental factors are beginning to escalate in the research domain. This paper covers the most relevant and recent published papers regarding the biomarkers of inflammation, their signaling pathway, and the potentially new therapeutic options in keratoconus. PMID:27563164

  19. Sarah's Knee: A Famous Actress With Chronic, Inflammatory Monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pinals, Robert S

    2004-02-01

    Sarah Bernhardt had a recurrent and later persistent inflammatory arthritis of her right knee for more than 25 years. She probably had pulmonary tuberculosis, starting a dozen years before the arthritis, and her chronic synovitis may have been tuberculous. Several months in a cast led to deterioration and later amputation of the leg, an outcome that might have been prevented by surgical arthrodesis. Despite the loss of her limb and progressive renal failure, she continued an active theatrical career until her death at age 78. PMID:17043454

  20. Transjugular Portal Venous Stenting in Inflammatory Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, Rolf; Textor, Jochen; Decker, Pan; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans

    2002-12-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis associated with inflammatory extrahepatic portal vein stenosis and progressive ascites. Four months after the acute onset, when no signs of infection were present, portal decompression was performed to treat refractory ascites. Transjugulartranshepatic venoplasty failed to dilate the stenosis in the extrahepatic portion of the portal vein sufficiently. Therefore a Wallstent was implanted, resulting in almost normal diameter of the vessel. In follow-up imaging studies the stent and the portal vein were still patent 12 months after the intervention and total resolution of the ascites was observed.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A) is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways. PMID:25525444

  2. [Αnti-Inflammatory medication as adjunctive antidepressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Boufidou, F; Nikolaou, C

    2016-01-01

    Mounting data of evidence that have emerged during the last twenty years, point towards the existence of an inflammatory mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of depressive disorder. These data have inspired a number of clinical studies characterized by the administration of inflammatory response altering medication in addition to conventional medication in depressive disorder patients. The drugs were either Non Steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) or Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFa) inhibitors and were selected among those that are already in use for various diseases related to the immune system. The choice of these specific immunomodulatory agents for the co-administration with conventional antidepressive medication was based on a number of laboratory data and clinical evidence. A total of seven relevant clinical trials have been conducted, all of them with promising results that have been published between 2006 and 2013. However, only four out of them were eligibly designed regarding the homogeneity of the study groups, randomization, double-blinding and placebo controlling. These three studies showed clinical advantages of the adjunctive medication as estimated by significant drops in Hamilton scores. Of interest are the findings of the most recent and largest clinical trial of the TNF-a antagonist infliximab which show that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents may be beneficial only in depressive patients with raised levels of baseline inflammatory markers. A limitation of the studies was that, since no guidelines currently exist for anti-inflammatory agents and depression, adjunctive medication could have been under or overdosed. Other limitations were the follow-up period that was rather small and the number of the participants that was also small. Recently, a lot of progress has been made in identifying therapeutic targets along metabolic pathways in the brain relevant to depression, which could be manipulated by immune mediators. In fact

  3. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and inflammation: whether to target the malignant clone or the inflammatory process or both.

    PubMed

    Koschmieder, S; Mughal, T I; Hasselbalch, H C; Barosi, G; Valent, P; Kiladjian, J-J; Jeryczynski, G; Gisslinger, H; Jutzi, J S; Pahl, H L; Hehlmann, R; Maria Vannucchi, A; Cervantes, F; Silver, R T; Barbui, T

    2016-05-01

    The Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal disorders involving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and are associated with myeloproliferation, splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. Similar signs and symptoms can also be found in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, and inflammatory processes have been found to play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of MPNs. Signal transduction pathways involving JAK1, JAK2, STAT3 and STAT5 are causally involved in driving both the malignant cells and the inflammatory process. Moreover, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drugs have been used successfully in the treatment of MPNs. However, to date, many unresoved issues remain. These include the role of somatic mutations that are present in addition to JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL W515 mutations, the interdependency of malignant and nonmalignant cells and the means to eradicate MPN-initiating and -maintaining cells. It is imperative for successful therapeutic approaches to define whether the malignant clone or the inflammatory cells or both should be targeted. The present review will cover three aspects of the role of inflammation in MPNs: inflammatory states as important differential diagnoses in cases of suspected MPN (that is, in the absence of a clonal marker), the role of inflammation in MPN pathogenesis and progression and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for MPNs. The findings emphasize the need to separate the inflammatory processes from the malignancy in order to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of patients with Philadelphia-negative MPNs. PMID:26854026

  4. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  5. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  6. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  7. B cells and antibodies in progressive multiple sclerosis: Contribution to neurodegeneration and progression.

    PubMed

    Fraussen, Judith; de Bock, Laura; Somers, Veerle

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelination, axonal degeneration and gliosis. The progressive form of MS is an important research topic as not much is known about its underlying mechanisms and no therapy is available. Although progressive MS is traditionally considered to be driven by neurodegeneration, compartmentalized CNS inflammation is currently accepted as one of the driving processes behind neurodegeneration and progression. In this review, the involvement of B cells and antibodies in progressive MS is discussed. The identification of meningeal ectopic B cell follicles in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients and the successful use of B cell-depleting therapy in primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients have underlined the importance of B cells in progressive MS. Proof is also available for the role of antibodies in neurodegeneration and progression in MS. Here, oligoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) production and autoreactive antibodies are described, with a focus on antibodies directed against sperm-associated antigen 16 (SPAG16). Further research into the role of B cells and autoantibodies in MS progression can lead to novel prognostic and theranostic opportunities. PMID:27396817

  8. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  9. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  10. Inflammatory reaction - communication of cells.

    PubMed

    Terheyden, Hendrik; Stadlinger, Bernd; Sanz, Mariano; Garbe, Annette I; Meyle, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    This article presents scientific background information on the animated 3D film "Inflammatory Reactions - Communication of Cells" (Quintessence Publications, ISBN 978-1-85097-231-0). Gingivitis and periodontitis are understood as the result of a coordinated action of a few clearly identified cellular players who communicate with each other via cytokines. For didactic reasons, the course of a periodontal infection is described here in four phases: (1) bacterial biofilm formation and development of a host response in the marginal periodontium, (2) innate immune response leading to gingivitis, (3) role of the adaptive immune system in attachment loss and pocket formation, and (4) down-regulation of inflammation and periodontal regeneration and repair following biofilm removal. The control of the cells is discussed as a cytokine network, which can be modulated in pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending on the control of the bacterial infection. Degradation of soft tissue structural proteins like collagen and proteoglycans by matrix metalloproteinases and degradation of hard tissue matrix by osteoclasts are explained as an interference of the immune system with the natural equilibrium of tissue remodeling. Five mechanisms of promotion of bone loss through the influence of the immune system are described. One example is bone resorption as a consequence of the shift of the RANKL/osteoprotegerin balance by soluble RANKL synthesized by CD4(+) Th 1 cells as well as the interference with the coupling of osteoclasts and osteoblasts through dedifferentiation of osteoblasts by TNFα. Finally, the signaling required for down-regulation of inflammatory reactions and the reasons for the incomplete regeneration after periodontal bone loss are discussed. PMID:23600659

  11. Epidemiology and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The role of alcohol in causing or aggravating the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. For finding a conclusive answer for this valuable question we conducted this review. Only two studies were identified that successfully fulfilled our inclusive criteria. Usual consumption of alcohol reduced the risk compared with less frequent use (odds ratio = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.37-0.86). Light alcoholic drinking has protective effects against development of ulcerative colitis. But this inverse association disappeared when smoking was included. PMID:23539486

  12. Inflammatory Mechanisms in Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Kelly, G; Prens, Errol P

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic relapsing disease of follicular occlusion that causes immense clinical and psychosocial morbidity when refractory to treatment. HS is no longer considered a disease of primary infectious etiology, although bacteria play a role. There is increasing evidence that HS is associated with immune dysregulation, based on its clinical association with other immune-mediated disorders, by its response to biologic therapy in the clinical arena, and from molecular research. This article summarizes what is known in relation to the inflammatory pathways in HS. PMID:26617358

  13. Pneumomediastinum in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Fenves, Andrew Z.

    2015-01-01

    A 28-year-old man with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) developed sudden-onset chest pain and dyspnea 9 days after esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. A chest radiograph demonstrated pneumomediastinum tracking along the left heart border. The spontaneous pneumomediastinum was presumed to be a complication of his severe colitis. The severity of our patient's symptoms ultimately necessitated a subtotal colectomy, a decision unrelated to the pneumomediastinum. IBD-associated pneumomediastinum can be attributed to retroperitoneal air leakage from severe colitis and usually resolves with conservative management. PMID:26130885

  14. [Inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pregnant women in their characteristics do not differ from general population, unless they had operations on the pelvic organs. Women with a first pregnancy, regardless of the activity of IBD have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy and high risk births. Most treatment methods are compatible with pregnancy and breastfeeding. Women affected by IBD should discuss their plans for pregnancy with the doctor first in order to know the possible dangers. Every patient in the IBD during pregnancy must be observed by a gastroenterologist, accoucheur and pediatrician to ensure peace of mother and child. PMID:22830229

  15. The evolution of inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Andrew F.

    1996-01-01

    Invertebrates do not display the level of sophistication in immune reactivity characteristic of mammals and other ‘higher’ vertebrates. Their great number and diversity of forms, however, reflect their evolutionary success and hence they must have effective mechanisms of defence to deal with parasites and pathogens and altered self tissues. Inflammation appears to be an important first line defence in all invertebrates and vertebrates. This brief review deals with the inflammatory responses of invertebrates and fish concentrating on the cell types involved and the mediators of inflammation, in particular, eicosanoids, cytokines and adhesion molecules. PMID:18475690

  16. Longitudinal study of circulating protein biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Viennois, Emilie; Baker, Mark T.; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Lixin; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic and progressive inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In IBD, protein serological biomarkers could be relevant tools for assessing disease activity, performing early-stage diagnosis and managing the treatment. Using the interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mouse, a model that develops a time-dependent IBD-like disorder that predominates in the colon; we performed longitudinal studies of circulating protein biomarkers in IBD. Circulating protein profiles in serum samples collected from 30-, 93-, and 135-day-old IL-10−/− mice were investigated using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 different proteins were identified and confirmed by ELISA and Western blot to be differentially accumulated in serum samples from mid- to late-stage IL-10−/− mice compared to early non-inflamed IL-10−/− mice. The use of another model of colitis and an extra-intestinal inflammation model validated this biomarker panel and demonstrated that comprised some global inflammatory markers, some intestinal inflammation-specific markers and some chronic intestinal inflammation markers. Statistical analyses using misclassification error rate charts validated the use of these identified proteins as powerful biomarkers of colitis. Unlike standard biomarker screening studies, our analyses identified a panel of proteins that allowed the definition of protein signatures that reflect colitis status. PMID:25230104

  17. Crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the widely accepted association between crusted scabies and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection, crusted scabies has not been included in the spectrum of infections associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 28-year-old Mexican individual with late HIV-infection, who had no apparent skin lesions but soon after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, he developed an aggressive form of crusted scabies with rapid progression of lesions. Severe infestation by Sarcoptes scabiei was confirmed by microscopic examination of the scale and skin biopsy. Due to the atypical presentation of scabies in a patient responding to antiretroviral therapy, preceded by no apparent skin lesions at initiation of antiretroviral therapy, the episode was interpreted for the first time as “unmasking crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome”. Conclusion This case illustrates that when crusted scabies is observed in HIV-infected patients responding to antiretroviral therapy, it might as well be considered as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Patient context should be considered for adequate diagnosis and treatment of conditions exacerbated by antiretroviral therapy-induced immune reconstitution. PMID:23181485

  18. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity. PMID:27312321

  19. Bioactive Food Components, Inflammatory Targets, and Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Young, Matthew R.; Bobe, Gerd; Colburn, Nancy H.; Milner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Various dietary components may modify chronic inflammatory processes at the stage of cytokine production, amplification of nuclear factor-κB–mediated inflammatory gene expression, and the release of anti-inflammatory cytokine, transforming growth factor-β. This review provides a synopsis of the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence that specific bioactive food components influence inflammation-related targets linked to cancer. A target repeatedly surfacing as a site of action for several dietary components is transforming growth factor β. Whereas the use of dietary intervention strategies offers intriguing possibilities for maintaining normal cell function by modifying a process that is essential for cancer development and progression, more information is needed to characterize the minimum quantity of the bioactive food components required to bring about a change in inflammation-mediated cancer, the ideal time for intervention, and the importance of genetics in determining the response. Unquestionably, the societal benefits of using foods and their components to prevent chronic inflammation and associated complications, including cancer, are enormous. PMID:19258539

  20. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  1. YKL-40/CHI3L1 drives inflammation on the road of tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Libreros, Stephania; Iragavarapu-Charyulu, Vijaya

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation plays a vital role at different stages of tumor progression. The development of tumors is affected by inflammatory mediators produced by the tumor and the host. YKL-40/chitinase-3-like-1 protein is often up-regulated in inflammation-associated diseases. With the use of chronic inflammatory disease systems, we describe the role of YKL-40/chitinase-3-like-1 protein in enhancing the inflammatory response and its implications in tumorigenesis. We also discuss how pre-existing inflammation enhances tumor growth and metastasis. In this mini-review, we highlight the effect of YKL-40/chitinase-3-like-1 protein-associated inflammation in promoting tumor progression. PMID:26310833

  2. Anti-inflammatory Actions of Adjunctive Tetracyclines and Other Agents in Periodontitis and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tilakaratne, Aruni; Soory, Mena

    2014-01-01

    The non-antimicrobial properties of tetracyclines such as anti-inflammatory, proanabolic and anti-catabolic actions make them effective pharmaceuticals for the adjunctive management of chronic inflammatory diseases. An over-exuberant inflammatory response to an antigenic trigger in periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases could contribute to an autoimmune element in disease progression. Their adjunctive use in managing periodontitis could have beneficial effects in curbing excessive inflammatory loading from commonly associated comorbidities such as CHD, DM and arthritis. Actions of tetracyclines and their derivatives include interactions with MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, growth factors and cytokines. They affect the sequence of inflammation with implications on immunomodulation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis; these actions enhance their scope, in treating a range of disease entities. Non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) sustain their diverse actions in organ systems which include anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-proteolytic actions, inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. A spectrum of biological actions in dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy and prevention of bone resorption is particularly relevant to minocycline. Experimental models of ischemia indicate their specific beneficial effects. Parallel molecules with similar functions, improved Zn binding and solubility have been developed for reducing excessive MMP activity. Curbing excessive MMP activity is particularly relevant to periodontitis, and comorbidities addressed here, where specificity is paramount. Unique actions of tetracyclines in a milieu of excessive inflammatory stimuli make them effective therapeutic adjuncts in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders. These beneficial actions of tetracyclines are relevant to the adjunctive management of periodontitis subjects

  3. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. PMID:26221780

  4. MPNs as Inflammatory Diseases: The Evidence, Consequences, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Bjørn, Mads Emil

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the evidence is increasing that chronic inflammation may be an important driving force for clonal evolution and disease progression in the Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and myelofibrosis (MF). Abnormal expression and activity of a number of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with MPNs, in particular MF, in which immune dysregulation is pronounced as evidenced by dysregulation of several immune and inflammation genes. In addition, chronic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the development of premature atherosclerosis and may drive the development of other cancers in MPNs, both nonhematologic and hematologic. The MPN population has a substantial inflammation-mediated comorbidity burden. This review describes the evidence for considering the MPNs as inflammatory diseases, A Human Inflammation Model of Cancer Development, and the role of cytokines in disease initiation and progression. The consequences of this model are discussed, including the increased risk of second cancers and other inflammation-mediated diseases, emphasizing the urgent need for rethinking our therapeutic approach. Early intervention with interferon-alpha2, which as monotherapy has been shown to be able to induce minimal residual disease, in combination with potent anti-inflammatory agents such as JAK-inhibitors is foreseen as the most promising new treatment modality in the years to come. PMID:26604428

  5. Quantification of Various Inflammatory Cells in Advanced Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Christina Mary Priya; Kuruvilla, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis, the pathological basis of coronary artery disease is being extensively studied as understanding of the complex processes involved in the formation and progression that can provide an insight into prevention and treatment of the same. This is an autopsy study to identify and quantify various inflammatory cells in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Aim This study aims at identifying and categorizing the various inflammatory cells present in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, noting their distribution in the plaque, quantifying them using histomorphometry and comparing them across plaques of different AHA types. Materials and Methods Post-mortem angiogram was performed on 3 heart specimens obtained at autopsy of random Road Traffic Accident (RTA) cases which revealed evidence of coronary artery disease. End-arterectomy was done and the arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were cut into serial sections and made into tissue blocks. Sections from these blocks were stained with H & E stain and the plaques were classified based on AHA classification. 50 advanced atherosclerotic plaques of AHA Type IV and V were chosen for this study and were screened for inflammatory cells, first with H & E stain and then with different immunohistochemical stains for T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and neutrophils. The T-lymphocytes thus identified was further sub-typed into CD4+ and CD8+ cells again using IHC markers and the percentage area of each was measured using histomorphometry. Then, these values were compared between AHA Type IV and AHA Type V lesions. Results It was found that the inflammatory cells found in advanced atherosclerotic plaques were predominantly T-lymphocytes as evidenced by their CD3 positivity and they were found to be distributed mainly around the shoulder region and fibrous cap of the plaque. When categorized further, it was found that CD8+ T-cells were always more than CD4+ T-cells in advanced lesions. Meloperoxidase stain for

  6. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  7. Astrocyte pathology in Alexander disease causes a marked inflammatory environment.

    PubMed

    Olabarria, Markel; Putilina, Maria; Riemer, Ellen C; Goldman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Astrocytes and microglia are commonly involved in a wide variety of CNS pathologies. However, they are typically involved in a secondary response in which many cell types are affected simultaneously and therefore it is difficult to know their contributions to the pathology. Here, we show that pathological astrocytes in a mouse model of Alexander disease (AxD; GFAP (Tg);Gfap (+/R236H)) cause a pronounced immune response. We have studied the inflammatory response in the hippocampus and spinal cord of these mice and have found marked microglial activation, which follows that of astrocytes in a spatial pathological progression, as shown by increased levels of Iba1 and microglial cell (Iba1+) density. RNA sequencing and subsequent gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that a majority of the most upregulated genes in GFAP (Tg);Gfap (+/R236H) mice are directly associated with immune function and that cytokine and chemokine GO attributes represent nearly a third of the total immune attributes. Cytokine and chemokine analysis showed CXCL10 and CCL2 to be the most and earliest increased molecules, showing concentrations as high as EAE or stroke models. CXCL10 was localized exclusively to astrocytes while CCL2 was also present in microglia. Despite the high levels of CXCL10 and CCL2, T cell infiltration was mild and no B cells were found. Thus, mutations in GFAP are sufficient to trigger a profound inflammatory response. The cellular stress caused by the accumulation of GFAP likely leads to the production of inflammatory molecules and microglial activation. Examination of human AxD CNS tissues also revealed microglial activation and T cell infiltrates. Therefore, the inflammatory environment may play an important role in producing the neuronal dysfunction and seizures of AxD. PMID:26296699

  8. Inflammatory markers in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Šomlóová, Z; Petrák, O; Rosa, J; Štrauch, B; Indra, T; Zelinka, T; Haluzík, M; Zikán, V; Holaj, R; Widimský, J

    2016-06-20

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of endocrine hypertension with a high frequency of cardiovascular complications. The unfavorable cardiometabolic profile may be due to aldosterone-mediated activation of inflammatory cells, circulatory cytokines and activation of collagen synthesis in the vessel wall. Aim of our study was to evaluate differences in the levels of hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha and N-terminal propeptide of collagen I (PINP) in patients with PA and essential hypertension (EH) as a control group, and between the subtypes of PA (aldosterone producing adenoma - APA, idiopathic hyperaldosteronism - IHA). We studied 28 patients with PA (IHA - 10 patients, APA - 12 patients, 6 unclassified) and 28 matched patients with EH. There were no differences in the levels of inflammatory markers between the followed groups [EH vs. PA: TNF-alpha (5.09 [3.68-6.32] vs. 4.84 [3.62-6.50] pg/ml), IL-6 (0.94 [0.70-1.13] vs. 0.97 [0.71-1.28] pg/ml), hsCRP (0.53 [0.25-1.54] vs. 0.37 [0.31-0.61] mg/l), leukocytes (6.35+/-1.42 vs. 5.97+/-1.29 10(9) l); APA vs. IHA: TNF-alpha (4.54 [3.62-7.03] vs. 5.19 [4.23-5.27] pg/ml), IL-6 (0.96 [0.63-1.21] vs. 0.90 [0.65-1.06] pg/ml), hsCRP (0.34 [0.29-0.47] vs. 0.75 [0.36-1.11] mg/l), leukocytes (6.37+/-1.41 vs. 5.71+/-1.21 10(9) l)]. Significant differences in the levels of PINP between PA and EH group were observed (35.18 [28.46-41.16] vs. 45.21 [36.95-62.81] microg/l, pinflammatory markers were observed between the followed groups, we confirmed higher levels of PINP in patients with PA. PMID:26447510

  9. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in “research silos” with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  10. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Akers, Amy L; Ball, Karen L; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M; Faughnan, Marie E; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A; McCulloch, Charles E; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L

    2013-04-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in "research silos" with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  11. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T(reg) and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:25264193

  12. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  13. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R Power; Hoskin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  14. Angiogenesis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkim, Canan; Alkim, Huseyin; Koksal, Ali Riza; Boga, Salih; Sen, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important component of pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Chronic inflammation and angiogenesis are two closely related processes. Chronic intestinal inflammation is dependent on angiogenesis and this angiogenesis is modulated by immune system in IBD. Angiogenesis is a very complex process which includes multiple cell types, growth factors, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and signal transduction. Lymphangiogenesis is a new research area in the pathogenesis of IBD. While angiogenesis supports inflammation via leukocyte migration, carrying oxygen and nutrients, on the other hand, it has a major role in wound healing. Angiogenic molecules look like perfect targets for the treatment of IBD, but they have risk for serious side effects because of their nature. PMID:26839731

  15. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are complex, multifactorial disorders characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. Although etiology remains largely unknown, recent research has suggested that genetic factors, environment, microbiota, and immune response are involved in the pathogenesis. Epidemiological evidence for a genetic contribution is defined: 15% of patients with Crohn’s Disease (CD) have an affected family member with IBD, and twin studies for CD have shown 50% concordance in monozygotic twins compared to <10% in dizygotics. The most recent and largest genetic association studies, which employed genome-wide association data for over 75,000 patients and controls, identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD. More recently, a trans-ethnic analysis, including over 20,000 individuals, identified an additional 38 new IBD loci. Although most cases are correlated with polygenic contribution toward genetic susceptibility, there is a spectrum of rare genetic disorders that can contribute to early-onset IBD (before 5 years) or very early onset IBD (before 2 years). Genetic variants that cause these disorders have a wide effect on gene function. These variants are so rare in allele frequency that the genetic signals are not detected in genome-wide association studies of patients with IBD. With recent advances in sequencing techniques, ~50 genetic disorders have been identified and associated with IBD-like immunopathology. Monogenic defects have been found to alter intestinal immune homeostasis through many mechanisms. Candidate gene resequencing should be carried out in early-onset patients in clinical practice. The evidence that genetic factors contribute in small part to disease pathogenesis confirms the important role of microbial and environmental factors. Epigenetic factors can mediate interactions between environment and genome. Epigenetic mechanisms could affect development and progression of IBD. Epigenomics is an emerging field, and

  16. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. PMID:24969296

  17. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  18. Dietary metabolites and the gut microbiota: an alternative approach to control inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Richards, James L; Yap, Yu Anne; McLeod, Keiran H; Mackay, Charles R; Mariño, Eliana

    2016-01-01

    It is now convincingly clear that diet is one of the most influential lifestyle factors contributing to the rise of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity in both developed and developing countries. In addition, the modern 'Western diet' has changed in recent years with increased caloric intake, and changes in the relative amounts of dietary components, including lower fibre and higher levels of fat and poor quality of carbohydrates. Diet shapes large-bowel microbial ecology, and this may be highly relevant to human diseases, as changes in the gut microbiota composition are associated with many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a remarkable role for diet, the gut microbiota and their metabolites—the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs)—in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer and wound-healing. This review summarizes how diet, microbiota and gut microbial metabolites (particularly SCFAs) can modulate the progression of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity, and reveal the molecular mechanisms (metabolite-sensing G protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs) and inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs)). Therefore, considerable benefit could be achieved simply through the use of diet, probiotics and metabolites for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity. PMID:27350881

  19. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  20. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  1. Gut-lung crosstalk in pulmonary involvement with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Jing-Shi; Peng, Shao-Hua; Deng, Xi-Yun; Zhu, De-Mao; Javidiparsijani, Sara; Wang, Gui-Rong; Li, Dai-Qiang; Li, Long-Xuan; Wang, Yi-Chun; Luo, Jun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary abnormalities, dysfunction or hyper-reactivity occurs in association with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) more frequently than previously recognized. Emerging evidence suggests that subtle inflammation exists in the airways among IBD patients even in the absence of any bronchopulmonary symptoms, and with normal pulmonary functions. The pulmonary impairment is more pronounced in IBD patients with active disease than in those in remission. A growing number of case reports show that the IBD patients develop rapidly progressive respiratory symptoms after colectomy, with failure to isolate bacterial pathogens on repeated sputum culture, and often request oral corticosteroid therapy. All the above evidence indicates that the inflammatory changes in both the intestine and lung during IBD. Clinical or subclinical pulmonary inflammation accompanies the main inflammation of the bowel. Although there are clinical and epidemiological reports of chronic inflammation of the pulmonary and intestinal mucosa in IBD, the detailed mechanisms of pulmonary-intestinal crosstalk remain unknown. The lung has no anatomical connection with the main inflammatory site of the bowel. Why does the inflammatory process shift from the gastrointestinal tract to the airways? The clinical and subclinical pulmonary abnormalities, dysfunction, or hyper-reactivity among IBD patients need further evaluation. Here, we give an overview of the concordance between chronic inflammatory reactions in the airways and the gastrointestinal tract. A better understanding of the possible mechanism of the crosstalk among the distant organs will be beneficial in identifying therapeutic strategies for mucosal inflammatory diseases such as IBD and allergy. PMID:24187454

  2. Dietary Inflammatory Index and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease in the SUN Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ramallal, Raúl; Toledo, Estefanía; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; García-Arellano, Ana; Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R.; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Diet is known to play a key role in atherogenesis and in the development of cardiovascular events. Dietary factors may mediate these processes acting as potential modulators of inflammation. Potential Links between inflammatory properties of diet and the occurrence of cardiovascular events have not been tested previously. Objective We aimed to assess the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII), a method to assess the inflammatory potential of the diet, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods In the prospective, dynamic SUN cohort, 18,794 middle-aged, Spanish university graduates were followed up for 8.9 years (median). A validated 136-item food-frequency questionnaire was used to calculate the DII. The DII is based on scientific evidence about the relationship between diet and inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between the DII and incident cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death). Results The risk for cardiovascular events progressively increased with each increasing quartile of DII (ptrend = 0.017). The multivariable-adjusted HR for participants in the highest (most pro-inflammatory) vs. the lowest quartile of the DII was 2.03 (95% CI 1.06–3.88). Conclusions A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with a significantly higher risk for developing cardiovascular events. PMID:26340022

  3. Development of Point of Care Testing Device for Neurovascular Coupling From Simultaneous Recording of EEG and NIRS During Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Utkarsh; Sood, Mehak; Dutta, Anirban; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a point of care testing device for neurovascular coupling (NVC) from simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Here, anodal tDCS modulated cortical neural activity leading to hemodynamic response can be used to identify the impaired cerebral microvessels functionality. The impairments in the cerebral microvessels functionality may lead to impairments in the cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), where severely reduced CVR predicts the chances of transient ischemic attack and ipsilateral stroke. The neural and hemodynamic responses to anodal tDCS were studied through joint imaging with EEG and NIRS, where NIRS provided optical measurement of changes in tissue oxy-(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$HbO2)$ \\end{document} and deoxy-(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$Hb$ \\end{document}) hemoglobin concentration and EEG captured alterations in the underlying neuronal current generators. Then, a cross-correlation method for the assessment of NVC underlying the site of anodal tDCS is presented. The feasibility studies on healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed detectable changes in the EEG and the NIRS responses to a 0.526 A/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mathrm{m}^{2}$ \\end{document} of anodal tDCS. The NIRS system

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease as a disorder of an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules and deficiency of resolution bioactive lipids.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory process seen in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is due to excess production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferons (IFNs), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), HMGB1 (high mobility group B1) and possibly, a reduction in anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). These pro-inflammatory molecules lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide resulting in target tissue damage. I propose that inadequate production of inflammation resolving molecules lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins and nitrolipids that suppress inflammation, ROS production, enhance wound healing and have cytoprotective properties results in inappropriate inflammation, delay in healing/repair process and so target tissue/organ damage continues in IBD. Hence, suggested therapeutic approach could include administration of stable synthetic analogues of lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins and nitrolipids. This implies that measuring urine, stool and plasma levels of lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, maresins and nitrolipids may be used to detect the onset, progression and response to treatment of IBD. PMID:26762544

  5. Experimental Evidence of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Modulation of Inflammatory Cytokines and Bioactive Lipid Mediators: Their Potential Role in Inflammatory, Neurodegenerative, and Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Calviello, Gabriella; Su, Hui-Min; Weylandt, Karsten H.; Fasano, Elena; Serini, Simona; Cittadini, Achille

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence has emerged over the past years to show the critical role played by inflammation in the pathogenesis of several diseases including some cardiovascular, neoplastic, and neurodegenerative diseases, previously not considered inflammation-related. The anti-inflammatory action of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), as well as their potential healthy effects against the development and progression of the same diseases, has been widely studied by our and others' laboratories. As a result, a rethinking is taking place on the possible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs against these disorders, and, in particular, on the influence that they may exert on the molecular pathways involved in inflammatory process, including the production of inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators active in the resolving phase of inflammation. In the present review we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding the modulating effects of ω-3 PUFAs on the production of inflammatory cytokines and proresolving or protective lipid mediators in the context of inflammatory, metabolic, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. PMID:23691510

  6. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes. PMID:24684926

  7. 9 CFR 381.86 - Inflammatory processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inflammatory processes. 381.86 Section 381.86 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... by an inflammatory process shall be condemned and, if there is evidence of general...

  8. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  10. Early Comparison of Inflammatory vs. Fibrostenotic Phenotype in Eosinophilic Esophagitis in a Multicenter Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Chehade, Mirna; Brizuela, Diana; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Chen, Yen-Ju; Riffle, Mary Ellen; Achem, Sami R; Moawad, Fouad J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes esophageal remodeling and stricture formation. We compared the clinical course of symptoms, endoscopic findings, histology, and changes in phenotype over time in EoE patients with inflammatory and fibrostenotic phenotypes. METHODS: Data were obtained from EoE patients from three medical centers and followed prospectively. Endoscopic features and histology from index and follow-up endoscopies were recorded. Behavior was classified as inflammatory if endoscopic findings demonstrated furrows or white plaques and as fibrostenotic if endoscopic findings included fixed rings or strictures. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-six EoE patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 32±18 years, 25% of patients were <18 years, 89% of patients were Caucasians, and 74% of patients were male. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 6.8±7.2 years with a follow-up of 1.7±1.9 years (maximum follow-up of 12 years). Fifty-four percent of patients presented with fibrostenotic EoE, whereas 46% presented with inflammatory EoE. Patients with inflammatory disease were younger than those with fibrostenotic disease (24±19 vs. 39±15 years, P<0.001). Patients with fibrostenotic disease had a longer duration of symptoms than those with inflammatory disease (8.1±7.7 vs. 5.3±6.3 years, P=0.002). Over the study period, 47 (18%) had remission of inflammatory EoE, 68 (27%) continued to have inflammatory disease, 74 (29%) continued to have fibrostenotic disease, 65 (25%) fibrostenotic patients had regression of fibrosis, and 2 patients (1%) progressed from inflammatory disease to fibrostenotic disease. Patients who had regression from their fibrostenosis were more likely than patients who continued to demonstrate fibrostenosis to have a decrease in proximal (54% vs. 32%, P<0.001) and distal (70% vs. 38%, P<0.001) eosinophilia. CONCLUSIONS: Most EoE patients maintained their phenotype or

  11. Th17 Cells in Protection from Tumor or Promotion of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    The roles of inflammation and inflammatory cells such as Th17 cells in the development and progression of cancer have been extensively studied. However, the results have been varied, with conflicting conclusions. Most studies have focused on changes in inflammatory phenotypes once cancers have developed and disease is progressing. Far fewer studies have looked at the immune phenotypic changes that occur during progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. The impact of inflammation and, in particular, Th17 cells on tumor biology is summarized in this review, with a focus on the differences in the outcomes of studies. Possible explanations for the contradictory conclusions are also suggested. PMID:27453801

  12. The Roles of Vitamin D and Its Analogs in Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zongtao; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of nonclassical actions, other than mineral homeostasis, of 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) has expanded its applications. Among these, its anti-inflammation activity has drawn more and more attention of researchers to investigate its role in regulating the progression of inflammatory diseases. The expression of many inflammation-related genes is regulated by 1,25D3 through vitamin D receptor (VDR) in a large variety of cells including immune cells such as, but not limited to, macrophages, dendritic cells, T helper cells, and B cells. Studies of 1,25D3 in these immune cells have shown both direct and indirect immunomodulatory activities affecting innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, 1,25D3 can also exert its anti-inflammation effects through regulating the biosynthesis of pro-inflammatory molecules in the prostaglandin pathway or through nuclear factor kappa light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) by affecting cytokine production and inflammatory responses. These actions of 1,25D3 may explain the associations between vitamin D levels and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, asthma, type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Although several analogs of 1,25D3 have shown potent immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory activity on immune cell cultures or in animal models, no vitamin D analog has been used in clinical research to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, we review the relationship between vitamin D analogs and inflammation based on observations of immune cells, prostaglandin and NFκB pathways, as well as common inflammatory diseases. PMID:26369816

  13. The potential of food protein-derived anti-inflammatory peptides against various chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Kaustav; Mine, Yoshinori; Wu, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is considered as one of the major causes for the initiation of various chronic diseases such as asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, osteoporosis and neurological diseases like Parkinson's disease. Increasing scientific evidence has delineated that inflammatory markers such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and CRP and different transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT are the major key factors that regulate these inflammatory diseases. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting or reducing the expression of these inflammatory biomarkers and/or by modulating the activity of these transcription factors. This review aims to discuss various molecular targets and underlying mechanisms of food protein-derived anti-inflammatory peptides and to explore their potential against various chronic inflammatory diseases. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26711001

  14. Inflammatory networks in ageing, age-related diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Candore, Giuseppina; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Caruso, Marco; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Listi, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Lio, Domenico; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    Inflammation is considered a response set by the tissues in response to injury elicited by trauma or infection. It is a complex network of molecular and cellular interactions that facilitates a return to physiological homeostasis and tissue repair. The individual response against infection and trauma is also determined by gene variability. Ageing is accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation state clearly showed by 2-4-fold increase in serum levels of inflammatory mediators. A wide range of factors has been claimed to contribute to this state; however, the most important role seems to be played by the chronic antigenic stress, which affects immune system thorough out life with a progressive activation of macrophages and related cells. This pro-inflammatory status, interacting with the genetic background, potentially triggers the onset of age-related inflammatory diseases as atherosclerosis. Thus, the analysis of polymorphisms of the genes that are key nodes of the natural immunity response might clarify the patho-physiology of age-related inflammatory diseases as atherosclerosis. On the other hand, centenarians are characterized by marked delay or escape from age-associated diseases that, on average, cause mortality at earlier ages. In addition, centenarian offspring have increased likelihood of surviving to 100 years and show a reduced prevalence of age-associated diseases, as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and less prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. So, genes involved in CVD may play an opposite role in human longevity. Thus, the model of centenarians can be used to understand the role of these genes in successful and unsuccessful ageing. Accordingly, we report the results of several studies in which the frequencies of pro-inflammatory alleles were significantly higher in patients affected by infarction and lower in centenarians whereas age-related controls displayed intermediate values. These findings point to a strong relationship between the genetics

  15. [Treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Gomollón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In addition to immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNF, there are a number of new options in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Vedolizumab has been approved by the FDA and EMA and has demonstrated utility both in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), even in anti-TNF refractory patients. Other monoclonal antibodies with different targets such as PF-005447659 (antiMAd-CAM1), ustekinumab (anti-IL23/IL12) or MEDI2070 (anti-IL23) have shown promising results in distinct clinical scenarios. Mongersen (antisense oligonucleotide anti-Smad7) and oznimod (an SP-1 modulator) are new alternatives with proven efficacy in clinical trials in CD and UC, respectively. Some data suggest that faecal microbiota transplantation could be efficacious in individual patients, although controlled data do not show clear differences with placebo. Autologous stem-cell transplantation has shown long-term efficacy in "ultra-refractory" CD. The number of possible treatments is constantly increasing, and future research should focus both on the selection of the most appropriate treatment for any given patient and on comparative trials between options. PMID:26520192

  16. [Inflammatory mechanisms in nasal polyposis].

    PubMed

    Perić, Aleksandar; Vojvodić, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa, characterized by prolapse of edematous mucosa, most commonly from the area of anterior ethmoid. The mean histological characteristics are proliferation of pseudostratified respiratory epithelium, thickening of the basement membrane, focal fibrosis and eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Although etiology is unknown, two hypotheses are dominant among the scientists: "hypothesis of staphylococcal superantigens" and "hypothesis of immune barrier dysfunction". Although we have not yet achieved a full understanding of the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease, it is known that nasal polyposis is associated with intensive chronic inflammation, followed by dysregulation of chemotaxis, migration, activation and function of eosinophils. A great number of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules are involved in the regulation of these complex mechanisms. After activation, eosinophils produce and release enzymes, which can lead to the damage of mucosa and tissue remodeling. Hyperactive eosinophils release a new amount of chemokines and cytokines, attracting new eosinophils into the site of inflammation, and may cause the persistence of chronic inflammation. PMID:25731009

  17. Pharmacogenetics of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mascheretti, Silvia; Croucher, Peter J P; Schreiber, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of many commonly employed drugs show interindividual variations that relate to several factors, including genetic variability in drug-metabolizing enzymes, transporters or targets. The study of the genetic determinants influencing interindividual variations in drug response is known as pharmacogenetics. The ability to identify, through preliminary genetic screening, the patients most likely to respond positively to a medication should facilitate the best choice of treatment for each patient; drugs likely to exhibit low efficacy or to give negative side-effects can be avoided. Among the medications used for inflammatory bowel disease, the best studied pharmacogenetically is azathioprine. The hematopoietic toxicity of azathioprine is due to single nucleotide polymorphisms in the thiopurine S-methyltransferase enzyme. Additionally, likely gene targets have been investigated to predict the response to glucocorticoids and infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumour necrosis factor that induces remission in approximately 30-40% of patients. However, no genetic predictor of response has been identified in either case. PMID:15157830

  18. Pain and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Davis, Brian; Binion, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD: Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis). Pain may arise from different mechanisms, which can include partial blockage and gut distention as well as severe intestinal inflammation. A majority of patients suffering from acute flares of IBD will experience pain, which will typically improve as disease activity decreases. However, a significant percentage of IBD patients continue experiencing symptoms of pain despite resolving inflammation and achieving what appears to be clinical remission. Current evidence suggests that sensory pathways sensitize during inflammation, leading to persistent changes in afferent neurons and central nervous system pain processing. Such persistent pain is not only a simple result of sensory input. Pain processing and even the activation of sensory pathways is modulated by arousal, emotion, and cognitive factors. Considering the high prevalence of iatrogenic as well as essential neuropsychiatric comorbidities including anxiety and depression in IBD patients, these central modulating factors may significantly contribute to the clinical manifestation of chronic pain. The improved understanding of peripheral and central pain mechanisms is leading to new treatment strategies that view pain as a biopsychosocial problem. Thus, improving the underlying inflammation, decreasing the excitability of sensitized afferent pathways, and altering emotional and/or cognitive functions may be required to more effectively address the difficult and disabling disease manifestations. PMID:19130619

  19. Power Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of the ankle in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Ankle involvement is frequent in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but accurate evaluation by physical examination is often difficult because of the complex anatomical structures of the ankle. Over the last decade, ultrasound (US) has become a practical imaging tool for the assessment of articular and periarticular pathologies, including joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, and enthesitis in rheumatic diseases. Progress in power Doppler (PD) technology has enabled evaluation of the strength of ongoing inflammation. PDUS is very useful for identifying the location and kind of pathologies in rheumatic ankles as well as for distinguishing between inflammatory processes and degenerative changes or between active inflammation and residual damage. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the US assessment of ankle lesions in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus, focusing on the utility of PDUS. PMID:25405085

  20. [The current opinion on inflammatory, biochemistry and hemostatic markers and factors in atherosclerosis. Part I].

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Renata; Kloch, Małgorzata; Bober, Maria; Kolasińska-Kloch, Władysława

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Recent studies have established an immuno-inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis where the process of atherosclerosis has a chronic, fibroproliferative character as an immuno-inflammatory response to factors that damage vessel endothelium. The development of coronary artery disease in subjects without traditional risk factors has prompted a search for new markers of the disease, which may improve primary prevention strategies. The relationship between markers of chronic inflammation and infection and development and progression of atherosclerotic may provide a basis for establishing new methods for causative treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The markers of endothelial damage and activation of inflammatory response have a prognostic value independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:17479866

  1. [The current opinion on inflammatory, biochemistry and hemostatic markers and factors in atherosclerosis. Part II].

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Renata; Kloch, Małgorzata; Bober, Maria; Kolasińska-Kloch, Władysława

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Recent studies have established an immuno-inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis where the process of atherosclerosis has a chronic, fibroproliferative character as an immuno-inflammatory response to factors that damage vessel endothelium. The development of coronary artery disease in subjects without traditional risk factors has prompted a search for new markers of the disease, which may improve primary prevention strategies. The relationship between markers of chronic inflammation and infection and development and progression of atherosclerotic may provide a basis for establishing new methods for causative treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The markers of endothelial damage and activation of inflammatory response have a prognostic value independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:17479867

  2. The Role of Inflammatory Mediators in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Navabi, Shadi S.; Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Seyedzadeh, Mir H.; Yazdani, Reza; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with advanced age, is the most common cause of dementia globally. AD is characterised by cognitive dysfunction, deposition of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuro-inflammation. Inflammation of the brain is a key pathological hallmark of AD. Thus, clinical and immunopathological evidence of AD could be potentially supported by inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, the complement system, acute phase proteins and oxidative mediators. In particular, oxidative mediators may actively contribute to the progression of AD and on-going inflammation in the brain. This review provides an overview of the functions and activities of inflammatory mediators in AD. An improved understanding of inflammatory processes and their role in AD is needed to improve therapeutic research aims in the field of AD and similar diseases. PMID:26357550

  3. Lung Xenotransplantation: Recent Progress and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; Dahi, Siamak; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has undergone important progress in controlling initial hyperacute rejection in many pre-clinical models, with some cell, tissue, and organ xenografts advancing toward clinical trials. However, acute injury, driven primarily by innate immune and inflammatory responses, continues to limit results in lung xenograft models. The purpose of this article is to review the current status of lung xenotransplantation – including the seemingly unique challenges posed by this organ – and summarize proven and emerging means of overcoming acute lung xenograft injury. PMID:25040467

  4. Genetic or Pharmacologic Amplification of Nrf2 Signaling Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osburn, William O.; Yates, Melinda S.; Dolan, Patrick D.; Liby, Karen T.; Sporn, Michael B.; Taguchi, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated destruction of normal parenchymal cells during hepatic inflammatory responses contributes to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated hepatitis and is implicated in the progression of acute inflammatory liver injury to chronic inflammatory liver disease. The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of a battery of antioxidative enzymes and Nrf2 signaling can be activated by small-molecule drugs that disrupt Keap1-mediated repression of Nrf2 signaling. Therefore, genetic and pharmacologic approaches were used to activate Nrf2 signaling to assess protection against inflammatory liver injury. Profound increases in ind of cell death were observed in both Nrf2 wild-type (Nrf2-WT) mice and Nrf2-disrupted (Nrf2-KO) mice 24-hr following intravenous injection of concanavalin A (12.5 mg/kg, ConA), a model for T cell-mediated acute inflammatory liver injury. However, hepatocyte-specific conditional Keap1 null (Alb-Cre:Keap1flox/−, cKeap1-KO) mice with constitutively enhanced expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidative genes as well as Nrf2-WT mice but not Nrf2-KO mice pretreated with three daily doses of a triterpenoid that potently activates Nrf2 (30 µmole/kg, CDDO-Im) were highly resistant to ConA-mediated inflammatory liver injury. CDDO-Im pretreatment of both Nrf2-WT and Nrf2-KO mice resulted in equivalent suppression of serum pro-inflammatory soluble proteins suggesting that the hepatoprotection afforded by CDDO-Im pretreatment of Nrf2-WT mice but not Nrf2-KO mice was not due to suppression of systemic pro-inflammatory signaling, but instead was due to activation of Nrf2 signaling in the liver. Enhanced hepatic expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidative genes inhibited inflammation-mediated oxidative stress, thereby preventing hepatocyte necrosis. Attenuation of hepatocyte death in cKeap1-KO mice and CDDO-Im pretreated Nrf2-WT mice resulted in decreased late-phase pro-inflammatory gene expression in the liver

  5. Inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritis: A critical review of the state-of-the-art, current prospects, and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Maryam; Mobasheri, Ali; Mozafari, Masoud

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been defined as a prototypical non-inflammatory arthropathy, but today there is compelling evidence to suggest that it has an inflammatory component. Many recent studies have shown the presence of synovitis in a large number of patients with OA and demonstrated a direct association between joint inflammation and the progression of OA. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide, matrix degrading enzymes and biomechanical stress are major factors responsible for the progression of OA in synovial joints. The aim of this review is to discuss the significance of a wide range of implicated inflammatory mediators and their contribution to the progression of OA. We also discuss some of the currently available guidelines, practices, and prospects. In addition, this review argues for new innovation in methodologies and instrumentation for the non-invasive detection of inflammation in OA by modern imaging techniques. We propose that identifying early inflammatory events and targeting these alterations will help to ameliorate the major symptoms such as inflammation and pain in OA patients. PMID:26812612

  6. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression. PMID:26876265

  7. Non-infectious inflammatory genital lesions.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Lucio; Bilenchi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The genitalia may be the site of non-infectious inflammatory lesions that are generally manifested as balanoposthitis and vulvovaginitis. In men, these forms constitute 50% of all balanoposthitis forms, and in women, vulvovaginitis frequency is even higher. They consist of genital locations of general skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, and other clinical entities with their own physiognomy, such as Zoon's balanitis-vulvitis. Diagnosis of genital non-infectious inflammatory lesions is usually made on clinical criteria. A biopsy is only necessary for the identification of clinical conditions that may simulate inflammatory form but are actually premalignant processes. PMID:24559568

  8. Clinical Inquiry. Does turmeric relieve inflammatory conditions?

    PubMed

    White, Brett; Judkins, Dolores Zegar

    2011-03-01

    Yes, but data aren't plentiful. Limited evidence suggests that turmeric and its active compound, curcumin, are effective for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, primarily low-quality cohort studies with small patient numbers). Curcumin has shown limited benefit for patients with psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBS), inflammatory eye diseases, familial adenomatous polyposis, and kidney transplantation (SOR: B, small, short randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). No evidence indicates that curcumin helps patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (SOR: B, single RCT). PMID:21369559

  9. Caring for Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Feagins, Linda A; Kane, Sunanda V

    2016-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease are chronic inflammatory diseases with typical onset in early adulthood. These diseases, therefore, can affect a woman throughout the many stages of her life, including menstruation, sexuality, pregnancy, and menopause. Unique health issues face women during these stages and can affect the course of their inflammatory bowel disease as well as treatment strategies and health maintenance. This article covers the non-pregnancy-related issues that are important in caring for women with inflammatory bowel disease. The topics of pregnancy and fertility are covered in a separate review. PMID:27261900

  10. Gender Disparities in Ocular Inflammatory Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  11. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  12. Progressive supranuclear palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Dementia-nuchal dystonia; Richardson-Steele-Olszewski syndrome; Palsy - progressive supranuclear ... Progressive supranuclear palsy is a condition that causes symptoms similar to those of Parkinson disease . It involves damage to many cells ...

  13. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  14. Two-Stage Progressive Femoral Lowering Followed by Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type 3 Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    High developmental dysplasia of the hip is commonly treated with total hip arthroplasty and shortening osteotomy. We present a two stage technique, consisting of progressive femoral lowering followed by total hip arthroplasty. The clinico-radiographic results of eleven patients (twelve hips) who were operated on with the two-stage technique were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 11 ± 5 years. At the final follow-up, ten patients (eleven hips) had a mean Harris hip score of 85 ± 5 points with no implant loosening. One patient (one hip) was revised at 5 years due to infection. No neurovascular complications were observed in any patients. With this technique, we could place the cup in the anatomical position and obtain complete limb symmetry with excellent clinical results at long-term. PMID:25599863

  15. Myeloid cells in atherosclerosis: a delicate balance of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Koltsova, Ekaterina K.; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, whose progression is orchestrated by the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils can be found in normal and atherosclerotic aortas, in which they regulate inflammation and progression of atherosclerosis. The lineage relationship between blood monocyte subsets and the various phenotypes and functions of myeloid cells in diseased aortas is under active investigation. Recent findings Various subsets of myeloid cells play diverse roles in atherosclerosis. This review discusses new findings in phenotypic and functional characterization of different subsets of macrophages, in part determined by the transcription factors IRF5 and Trib1, and dendritic cells, characterized by the transcription factor Zbtb46, in atherosclerosis. Summary Improved understanding proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of macrophages and dendritic cell functions is needed for better preventive and therapeutic measures in atherosclerosis. PMID:24005215

  16. Rationale and Means to Target Pro-Inflammatory Interleukin-8 (CXCL8) Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Laura M.; Maxwell, Pamela J.; Waugh, David J.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that chronic inflammation underpins the development of a number of human cancers, with pro-inflammatory signaling within the tumor microenvironment contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. CXCL8 is an ELR+ pro-inflammatory CXC-chemokine which mediates its effects via signaling through two G protein-coupled receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Elevated CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling within the tumor microenvironment of numerous cancers is known to enhance tumor progression via activation of signaling pathways promoting proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, invasion and cell survival. This review provides an overview of established roles of CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer and subsequently, discusses the possible strategies of targeting CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer, covering indirect strategies (e.g., anti-inflammatories, NFκB inhibitors) and direct CXCL8 or CXCR1/2 inhibition (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, small molecule receptor antagonists, pepducin inhibitors and siRNA strategies). Reports of pre-clinical cancer studies and clinical trials using CXCL8-CXCR1/2-targeting strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases will be discussed. The future translational opportunities for use of such agents in oncology will be discussed, with emphasis on exploitation in stratified populations. PMID:24276377

  17. IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A vast variety of nonstructural proteins have been studied for their key roles and involvement in a number of biological phenomenona. Interleukin-32 is a novel cytokine whose presence has been confirmed in most of the mammals except rodents. The IL-32 gene was identified on human chromosome 16 p13.3. The gene has eight exons and nine splice variants, namely, IL-32α, IL-32β, IL-32γ, IL-32δ, IL-32ε, IL-32ζ, IL-32η, IL-32θ, and IL-32s. It was found to induce the expression of various inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and has been reported previously to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of a number of inflammatory disorders, namely, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastric inflammation and cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the current review, we have highlighted the involvement of IL-32 in gastric cancer, gastric inflammation, and chronic rhinosinusitis. We have also tried to explore various mechanisms suspected to induce the expression of this extraordinary cytokine as well as various mechanisms of action employed by IL-32 during the mediation and progression of the above said problems. PMID:27143819

  18. The hepatic inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Farhood, A; Hopper, R D; Bajt, M L; Jaeschke, H

    2000-04-01

    Acetaminophen overdose induces severe liver injury and hepatic failure. There is evidence that inflammatory cells may be involved in the pathophysiology. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to characterize the neutrophilic inflammatory response after treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen. A time course study showed that neutrophils accumulate in the liver parallel to or slightly after the development of liver injury. The number of neutrophils in the liver was substantial (209 +/- 64 PMN/50 high-power fields at 12 h) compared to baseline levels (7 +/- 1). Serum levels of TNF-alpha and the C-X-C chemokines KC and MIP-2 increased by 28-, 14-, and 295-fold, respectively, over levels found in controls during the injury process. In addition, mRNA expression of MIP-2 and KC were upregulated in livers of acetaminophen-treated animals as determined by ribonuclease protection assay. However, none of these mediators were generated in large enough quantities to account for neutrophil sequestration in the liver. There was no upregulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/ CD18) or shedding of L-selectin on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, an anti-CD18 antibody had no protective effect against acetaminophen overdose during the first 24 h. These results indicate that there is a local inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose, including a substantial accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. Because of the critical importance of beta2 integrins for neutrophil cytotoxicity, these results suggest that neutrophils do not contribute to the initiation or progression of AAP-induced liver. The inflammation observed after acetaminophen overdose may be characteristic for a response sufficient to recruit neutrophils for the purpose of removing necrotic cells but is not severe enough to cause additional damage. PMID:10774834

  19. Cardiovascular and inflammatory response to cholecystokinin during endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Bertozi, Giuliana; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) was first described as a gastrointestinal hormone, but its receptors have been located in cardiac and vascular tissues, as well as in immune cells. Our aims were to investigate the role of CCK on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension and its ability to modulate previously reported inflammatory mediators, therefore affecting cardiovascular function. To conduct these experiments, rats had their jugular vein cannulated for drug administration, and also, the femoral artery cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate records. Endotoxemia induced by LPS from Escherichia coli (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.) stimulated the release of CCK, a progressive drop in MAP, and increase in heart rate. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), nitrate, vasopressin, and lactate levels were elevated in the endotoxemic rats. The pretreatment with proglumide (nonselective CCK antagonist; 30 mg/kg; i.p.) aggravated the hypotension and also increased plasma TNF-α and lactate levels. On the other hand, CCK (0.4 μg/kg; i.v.) administered before LPS significantly restored MAP, reduced aortic and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production, and elevated plasma vasopressin and IL-10 concentrations; it did not affect TNF-α. Physiological CCK concentration reduced nitrite and iNOS synthesis by peritoneal macrophages, possibly through a self-regulatory IL-10-dependent mechanism. Together, these data suggest a new role for the peptide CCK in modulating MAP, possibly controlling the inflammatory response, stimulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and reducing vascular and macrophage iNOS-derived nitric oxide production. Based on these findings, CCK could be used as an adjuvant therapeutic agent to improve cardiovascular function. PMID:23247127

  20. Secondary Student Progress Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    The Secondary Student Progress Plan aims to provide uniform educational expectations for successful course completion and progress toward graduation beginning with grade 7 in school year 1984-85. Arranged in outline form, the plan shows the course of study for grades 7-12, guidelines for evaluating and reporting student progress, promotion…

  1. Reconstructing Progressive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The work of Colonel Francis W. Parker, the man whom Dewey called "the father of progressive education," provides a starting point for reconstructing the loose ambiguities of progressive education into a coherent social and educational philosophy. Although progressives have claimed their approach is more humane and sensitive to children, we need…

  2. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  3. [Methylprednisolone pulse in treatment of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Rafai, M A; Boulaajaj, F Z; Sekkat, Z; El Moutawakkil, B; Slassi, I

    2010-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in children is rare and treatment is based primarily on intravenous immunoglobulins or oral corticosteroids. Boluses of methylprednisolone (MP) are a possible alternative. We report 3 cases of CIDP in children with good outcome after MP pulse therapy. One male (7 years of age) and 2 females (4 and 5 years of age) presented with recurring episodes of functional impotence of both lower limbs and walking impairment, partially reversible without treatment. Clinical and electrophysiological data and the analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid were compatible with CIDP. MP pulses were administered: the total number of pulses varied from 5 to 8, very satisfactory progression on the clinical and electrophysiological pattern was noted, without recurrence in the 3 cases. Childhood CIDP presents clinical, electrophysiological outcome, and prognostic particularities, recurring readily, and the outcome is good. Boluses of MP are an alternative for treatment of these neuropathies in childhood. PMID:20709511

  4. Coronary microvascular dysfunction in chronic inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Faccini, Alessia; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Camici, Paolo G

    2016-06-14

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatoid diseases (CIRD) such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis are an important risk factor for the development of ischaemic heart disease and a source of high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In patients affected by CIRD, inflammation can affect coronary microvascular function and contribute to the development of myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular events, even in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease. Understanding the molecular aspects that underlie the development of coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) in CIRD is of fundamental importance to identify specific therapeutic targets. In this article, we review the pathogenic mechanisms leading to CMD in CIRD, including the controversial results obtained with the use of different therapeutic strategies. We also propose that a practical diagnostic algorithm as the identification of CMD in patients with CIRD may lead to effective measures to prevent the development of angina pectoris and reduce the risk of rapid disease progression. PMID:26912605

  5. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  6. Inflammatory-like presentation of CADASIL: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CADASIL is an autosomal dominant genetic leukoencephalopathy linked to mutations in the Notch3 gene. In rare cases, widespread brain lesions on T2 MRI mimicking multiple sclerosis are observed. From a national registry of 268 patients with adult-onset leukodystrophy, we identified two patients with an atypical presentation of CADASIL without co-occurrence of another systemic disease. Case presentations Patient 1 experienced progressive gait disability and patient 2 relapsing optic neuritis and sensory-motor deficit in the leg. Both patients responded to corticotherapy and patient 2 was also responsive to glatiramer acetate. No oligoclonal bands were found in the CSF, and MRI showed myelitis and lesions with gadolinium enhancement in brain (patient 1) or incomplete CADASIL phenotype (patient 2). Conclusions In rare cases, an inflammatory-like process can occur in CADASIL. In these patients, immunomodulatory treatments, including corticosteroids, could be effective. PMID:22905984

  7. A Personalized Approach to Managing Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires a personalized approach to treat what is a heterogeneous group of patients with inherently variable disease courses. In its current state, personalized care of the IBD patient involves identifying patients at high risk for rapid progression to complications, selecting the most appropriate therapy for a given patient, using therapeutic drug monitoring, and achieving the individualized goal that is most appropriate for that patient. The growing body of research in this area allows clinicians to better predict outcomes for individual patients. Some paradigms, especially within the realm of therapeutic drug monitoring, have begun to change as therapy is targeted to individual patient results and goals. Future personalized medical decisions may allow specific therapeutic plans to draw on serologic, genetic, and microbial data for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. PMID:27499713

  8. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  9. The Function and Roles of ADAMTS-7 in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Lin, Jiqiang; Wei, Fanhua

    2015-01-01

    The ADAMTS proteinases are a group of multidomain and secreted metalloproteinases containing the thrombospondin motifs. ADAMTS-7 is a member of ADAMTS family and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Overexpression of ADAMTS-7 gene promotes the breakdown of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) matrix and accelerates the progression of both surgically induced osteoarthritis and collagen-induced arthritis. Moreover, ADAMTS-7 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) form a positive feedback loop in osteoarthritis. More significantly, granulin-epithelin precursor, a growth factor has important roles in bone development and bone-associated diseases, disturbs the interaction between ADAMTS-7 and COMP, and prevents COMP degradation. This review is based on our results and provides an overview of current knowledge of ADAMTS-7, including its structure, function, gene regulation, and inflammatory diseases involvement. PMID:26696755

  10. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26809024

  11. Pathophysiology and biomarkers in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Svahn, J; Antoine, J-C; Camdessanché, J-P

    2014-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired dysimmune disorder characterized by strong heterogeneity in terms of clinical manifestations, prognostic and response to treatment. To date, its pathophysiology and potential target antigens are not totally identified despite substantial progress in the understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms. Recent researches in the field have underlined the importance of cell-mediated immunity (lymphocytesT CD4+, CD8+ and macrophages), the breakdown of blood-nerve barrier, a failure of T-cell regulation, and the disruption of nodal and paranodal organization at the node of Ranvier. This last point is possibly mediated by autoantibodies towards axoglial adhesion molecules which may disrupt sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels clustering leading to a failure of saltatory conduction and the apparition of conduction blocks. The purpose of this article is to overview the main pathophysiologic mechanisms and biomarkers identified in CIDP. PMID:25459126

  12. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder after all.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation has been increasingly recognized as an important player in the pathophysiology of numerous human disorders. Accumulating evidence has led to the conclusion that a