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1

Mt. Druitt Early Childhood Project. Third, Fourth, and Fifth Annual Reports to Bernard Van Leer Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series of the third, fourth, and fifth annual reports to the Bernard Van Leer Foundation on the Mt. Druitt Early Childhood Project of Macquarie University, Australia, describes the general activities, program developments, and research activities of the project for the period 1977-1979. The main objective of the project is to develop,…

Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Education.

2

Bodcau in situ combustion project. Fourth annual report, September 1, 1979February 28, 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective is to demonstrate the technical efficiency and economics of a commercial scale in-situ combustion project in a shallow heavy oil reservoir. Five elongated inverted nine-spot patterns were developed for this demonstration on Cities Service Company's Bodcau Fee B lease in the Bellevue Field, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. The five patterns comprising the demonstration project enclose 19 productive acres and consist

1981-01-01

3

Bodcau in situ combustion project. Fourth annual report, September 1, 1979-February 28, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to demonstrate the technical efficiency and economics of a commercial scale in-situ combustion project in a shallow heavy oil reservoir. Five elongated inverted nine-spot patterns were developed for this demonstration on Cities Service Company's Bodcau Fee B lease in the Bellevue Field, Bossier Parish, Louisiana. The five patterns comprising the demonstration project enclose 19 productive acres and consist of thirty-eight producing, five injection and five observation wells. This report briefly reviews the history of the project with emphasis on operations from September 1979 through February 1981. Sections on the air system explosion in February 1980 and the results from an evaluation well drilling program in pattern 15 are highlights.

Hardin, G.

1981-07-01

4

El Dorado Micellar-Polymer Demonstration Project. Fourth annual report, September 1977--August 1978  

SciTech Connect

Specifications were determined for the surfactant concentrate and Abbott xanthan gum broth to be used in the north (Chesney) pattern and the Nalco polyacrylamide concentrate to be used in the south (Hegberg) pattern. Results are given for oil displacement tests using the south pattern micellar-polymer fluid sequence in reservoir cores. The data from observation wells MP-131 and MP-227 indicate the breakthrough of alcohol and surfactants. These chemicals at the observation wells signal the probable arrival of the oil banks. Salinity remained constant in the production wells during the last year. The pressures in the project monitoring wells were measured six times during this reporting period. Temperature profiles were determined in four south pattern wells during micellar (soluble) oil injection since it had been shown that allowing the micellar oil to cool would adversely affect its injectivity. The addition of a wax inhibitor and a solvent to the Greenwood County crude oil used in the micellar oil improved the fluid injectivity. Performance monitoring, performance forecasting, and associated program development work have been undertaken. A study of monitoring well pressures indicates a possible west-to-east pressure gradient. An analysis of micellar fluid injectivity data for the north pattern shows that most of the injectivity losses have been caused by sandface skin. Forecasts of flood-front locations illustrate the effects of well rate balance and pressure gradient on areal sweep.

Rosenwald, G.W. (ed.)

1979-04-01

5

FABRIC FILTER SYSTEM STUDY; FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of the fourth year of operation (ending October 1, 1981) of a fabric filter installed by Southwestern Public Service Co. on its Harrington Station Unit 2 coal-fired boiler in Amarillo, Texas. Project work during the fourth year concentrated on fabric stud...

6

Fourth Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Fourth Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting was presented by the Diabetes Technology Society at the Orlando Florida Hyatt Regency Hotel on April 11-12 2008. The first day covered Technologies for Diabetes Monitoring and the second day covered T...

D. C. Klonoff

2008-01-01

7

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fourth annual report, January 1, 1988--December 1, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01

8

Proceedings of the fourth annual conference on fossil energy materials  

SciTech Connect

The Fourth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on may 15--17, 1990. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Judkins, R.R.; Braski, D.N. (comps.)

1990-08-01

9

Evaluation of electric vehicle battery systems through in-vehicle testing: Fourth annual report: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This fourth annual summary report documents the tests performed from October 1987 through September 1988 in EPRI's ongoing project to evaluate and compare the performance of near-term electric vehicle traction battery packs in a real-world operating environment. Detailed test procedures and test data are available from EPRI in an informal data report. Testing includes initial acceptance testing of battery components

G. D. Whitehead; T. W. Blickwedel

1989-01-01

10

Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs  

SciTech Connect

This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

NONE

1995-07-01

11

Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

Not Available

1993-11-05

12

Investigation of the Geokinetics horizontal in situ oil-shale-retorting process. Fourth annual report, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Geokinetics in situ shale oil project is a cooperative venture between Geokinetics Inc. and the US Department of Energy. The objective is to develop a true in situ process for recovering shale oil using a fire front moving in a horizontal direction. The project is being conducted at a field site, Kamp Kerogen, located 70 miles south of Vernal, Utah. This Fourth Annual Report covers work completed during the calendar year 1980. During 1980 one full-size retort was blasted. Two retorts, blasted the previous year, were burned. A total of 4891 barrels of oil was produced during the year.

Hutchinson, D.L. (ed.)

1981-03-01

13

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01

14

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-14

15

ENCOAL mild coal gasification project. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combination of the fourth quarter report (July--September 1993) and the 1993 annual report for the ENCOAL project. The following pages include the background and process description for the project, brief summaries of the accomplishments for the first three quarters, and a detailed fourth quarter report. Its purpose is to convey the accomplishments and current progress of the project. ENCOAL Corporation, has completed the construction of a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by SMC and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). ENCOAL submitted an application to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project was selected by DOE in December, 1989 and the Cooperative Agreement approved in September, 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL mild coal gasification facility was completed in June of 1992, and the project is currently in the operations phase. Some plant modifications have been required and are discussed in this report.

Not Available

1993-10-01

16

Fourth Annual EDUCAUSE Survey Identifies Current IT Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Conducted the fourth consecutive survey of pressing information technology (IT) challenges on campuses. Responses of 542 EDUCAUSE member representatives show that funding has become the number one IT challenge, with security and identity management the next most notable problem area. Identifies other priority IT issues for higher education. (SLD)|

Crawford, Grant; Rudy, Julia A

2003-01-01

17

Hawaii State Senior Center. Fourth Annual Report, July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The activities of the Hawaii State Senior Center during its fourth year of operation are discussed. The center, which is sponsored by the Honolulu Community College, provides health services, counseling, adult education, community service, and recreation and leisure-time activities. Enrolled membership of the center is 1,776. This annual report…

Hawaii State Senior Center, Honolulu.

18

Environmental Quality, the Fourth Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The state of the environment and efforts to improve it are reported upon in this Fourth Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality. Broad in scope, the report covers federal and state activities during the past year, the urban environment, economics and environmental management, the law and land use regulation, environmental quality,…

Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

19

Fourth Annual Conference on HAN (Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate) - Based Liquid Propellants. Vol II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the abstracts and the viewgraphs of the papers presented at the BRL's Fourth Annual Conference on HAN-Based Liquid Propellants.Conference papers include the following: Diamond ANVIL-FTIR Studies of Han and dHAN to 40 Kbar: Infrared Sp...

J. Q. Wojciechowski

1989-01-01

20

Fourth Annual Report of the European Research Centre for Air Pollution Control Measures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the 8-10th of March 1988 the Fourth Status Report of the Project 'European Research Centre for Air Pollution Control Measures' took place at the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe. From this report 31 progress reports on the topic assessment and ana...

F. Horsch W. G. Filby N. Fund S. Gross B. Hanisch

1988-01-01

21

The Elementary Bubble Project: Exploring Critical Media Literacy in a Fourth-Grade Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article addresses issues surrounding critical media literacy using popular culture texts. The authors focus on the example of their work with a fourth-grade class involved in a project to unpack the messages of popular media and advertising texts. This project, which they call the Elementary Bubble Project, was inspired by guerilla artist Ji…

Gainer, Jesse S.; Valdez-Gainer, Nancy; Kinard, Timothy

2009-01-01

22

Coordinating Council. Fourth Meeting: Naca Documents Database Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This NASA Scientific and Technical Information Coordination Council meeting dealt with the topic 'NACA Documents Database Project'. The following presentations were made and reported on: NACA documents database project study plan, AIAA study, the Optimal ...

1991-01-01

23

PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well

Ilya Nemenman; James R. Faeder; William S. Hlavacek; Yi Jiang; Michael E. Wall; Anton Zilman

2011-01-01

24

Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

NONE

1999-02-01

25

Project DEEP STEAM: fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel, Albuquerque, NM, November 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fourth Project DEEP STEAM Technical Advisory Panel Meeting was held on 5 and 6 November 1980 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to review the status of project DEEP STEAM. This Proceedings, following the order of the meeting, is divided into five main sections: the injection string modification program, the downhole steam generator program, supporting activities, field testing, and the Advisory

R. L. Fox; A. B. Donaldson; S. W. Eisenhawer; C. M. Hart; D. R. Johnson; A. J. Mulac; J. R. Wayland; L. J. Weirick

1981-01-01

26

Project DEEP STEAM: Fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The status of project DEEP STEAM was reviewed. Proceedings, are divided into five main sections: (1) the injection string modification program; (2) the downhole steam generator program; (3) supporting activities; (4) field testing; and (5) recommendations and discussion.

R. L. Fox; A. B. Donaldson; S. W. Eisenhawer; C. M. Hart; D. R. Johnson; A. J. Mulac; J. R. Wayland; L. J. Weirick

1981-01-01

27

Project DEEP STEAM: Fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The status of project DEEP STEAM was reviewed. Proceedings, are divided into five main sections: (1) the injection string modification program; (2) the downhole steam generator program; (3) supporting activities; (4) field testing; and (5) recommendations and discussion.

Fox, R. L.; Donaldson, A. B.; Eisenhawer, S. W.; Hart, C. M.; Johnson, D. R.; Mulac, A. J.; Wayland, J. R.; Weirick, L. J.

1981-07-01

28

The Scottish Council for Research in Education. Forty-Fourth Annual Report, 1971-72.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet contains the annual report for 1971-72 of the Scottish Council for Research in Education. The first section lists the officers, members, principle officials, and staff responsible for special projects. The second section presents reports from the various committees of the council, stressing the reconstruction of the council's…

Scottish Council for Research in Education.

29

Proceedings of the fourth annual participants' information meeting, DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The Fourth Annual Participants' Information Meeting of the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in Denver, Colorado, August 31 to September 2, 1982. The purpose of the meeting was to report and evaluate technology development funded by the program and to examine mechanisms for technology transfer. The meeting consisted of an introductory plenary session, followed by two concurrent overview sessions and then six concurrent technical sessions. There were two group meetings to review the findings of the technical sessions. The meeting concluded with a plenary summary session in which the major findings of the meeting were addressed. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

Large, D.E.: Mezga, L.J.; Stratton, L.E.; Rose, R.R. (comps.)

1982-10-01

30

The Fourth Annual Meeting of the International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia: Current Challenges and Recommendations in the Clinical Care of Children with Hemophilia  

PubMed Central

Summary The International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia (INPH) comprises a group of physicians committed to the unique care of and challenges facing pediatric hemophilia patients. By collaborating on an international level, extensive experience can be shared on current practice, new trends can be discussed and scientifically valid studies can be developed and performed. The three overall objectives of the group (scientific progress, education and networking) are achieved at each annual meeting starting with a round table on the members’ current research and clinical activities, project reports of INPH study initiatives, followed by invited educational presentations and interactive discussions. The meetings close with proposals of new projects, future directions of the group and concluding remarks. The Fourth Annual INPH meeting, held in 2009 in Boston, MA, USA, focused on inhibitor development and hemophilic arthropathy in the clinical care of children with hemophilia.

Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, Marijke; Valentino, Leonard A.; Manco-Johnson, Michael

2010-01-01

31

For Profit Organizations Showing Signs of Turnaround: Twenty-Fourth Annual Status Report on for Profit Child Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The year 2010 will not be remembered as a banner year for large for profit child care organizations. But it appears that heading into 2011, optimism has returned. This article presents the twenty-fourth annual status report on for profit child care organizations. In 2010, the total capacity of the three largest for profit chains in North America,…

Neugebauer, Roger; Hartzell, Debra

2011-01-01

32

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect

In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

Andersen, Todd

2002-01-01

33

ECOAL mild coal gasification demonstration project. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combination of the fourth quarter report (July--September 1992) and the 1992 annual report for the ENCOAL project. The following pages include the background and process description for the project, brief summaries of the accomplishments for the first three quarters, and a detailed fourth quarter report. Its purpose is to convey the accomplishments and current progress of the project. During the fourth quarter start-up, operation and shut-down of the plant dominated the activities of the ENCOAL operations team. Plant modifications and run support occupied the technical staff. Several plant tests were achieved. Results of the tests were favorable, and the plant achieved its first continuous one week long run in September. Both PDF and CDL were produced; the first shipment of CDL is planned for October 1992. ENCOAL received approval on its Continuation Application to the DOE and the plant was operating under Phase 3 by the end of the quarter.

Not Available

1993-12-01

34

High Temperature Materials Laboratory fourth annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its fourth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 118 nonproprietary agreements (62 university and 56 industry) and 28 proprietary agreements (2 university, 26 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the user program. Sixty-free nonproprietary research proposals (38 from university, 26 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and four proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1991 are summarized.

Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

1991-12-01

35

JOWOG 39 manufacturing technology, Fourth annual SUBWOG-F robotics meeting minutes  

SciTech Connect

The Fourth Annual SUBWOG F Robotics Conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the Albuquerque Convention Center. The Subwog group was welcomed by Dean Herrig, GE Neutron Devices (GEND), US Co-chairman and Ray Harrigan, SNLA, host for the conference. Mr. Dan Hartley, Vice-president of Energy Systems at SNLA gave an overview of SNLA and their function in the Department of Energy (DOE) Network. Domestic affairs were handled by Dean Herrig. No major personnel changes had occurred since the last meeting in 1988. Tight budgets are affecting robotic activities at all of the US sites and the UK. The terms of reference and objectives of SUBWOG F ROBOTICS were reviewed with no changes recommended. Site overviews were given by all sites represented. The impact of the DOE Environmental Health and Safety (ES&H) requirements has shifted emphasis to automated remote handling and inspection systems. All of the application papers were informative and interesting. Many of the papers showed commonalities of applications and problems among the sites. Time was available at end of meeting to identify, review and discuss achievements and to offer suggestions to improve future meetings and interchange of information. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

NONE

1990-11-01

36

Predicting NCLEX success with the HESI Exit Exam: fourth annual validity study.  

PubMed

The fourth annual validity study of the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Exit Exam was designed to examine not only the accuracy of the examination in predicting NCLEX success but also the degree of risk for failure of the licensure examination associated with specific scoring intervals. A descriptive comparative design was used to examine the data provided by schools of nursing regarding students' NCLEX outcomes in the 1999-2000 academic year. As in the 3 previous studies, the examination was found to be a highly accurate predictor of NCLEX success (98.46%). Each scoring interval was significantly different from each of the other scoring intervals (P = .001). In fact, for the combined group of registered nurse and practical nurse students, the percentage of students who failed the NCLEX more than doubled with each successively lower scoring interval. These findings provide the information faculties needed to make evidence-based decisions regarding students' risks for NCLEX failure. Additionally, frequency data were obtained from this survey regarding the use of the examination as a benchmark for progression and remediation, and these findings may also be useful to faculties that are considering establishing such programs. PMID:18791387

Nibert, Ainslie T; Young, Anne; Adamson, Carolyn

37

Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination. Fourth annual report, July 1, 1987--June 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was chartered April 9, 1984 under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET) and reports to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Executive Office of the President. Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy.

Young, A.L.

1988-06-30

38

Project DEEP STEAM: fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel, Albuquerque, NM, November 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Fourth Project DEEP STEAM Technical Advisory Panel Meeting was held on 5 and 6 November 1980 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to review the status of project DEEP STEAM. This Proceedings, following the order of the meeting, is divided into five main sections: the injection string modification program, the downhole steam generator program, supporting activities, field testing, and the Advisory Panel recommendations and discussion. Each of the 17 presentations is summarized, and a final Discussion section has been added, when needed, for inclusion of comments and replies related to specific presentations. Finally, the Advisory Panel recommendations and the ensuing discussion are summarized in the closing section.

Fox, R.L.; Donaldson, A.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Hart, C.M.; Johnson, D.R.; Mulac, A.J.; Wayland, J.R.; Weirick, L.J.

1981-07-01

39

Bell Creek Field micellar-polymer pilot demonstration. Fourth annual report, October 1979-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

The pilot is a contained 40-acre 5-spot located in a representative watered-out portion of the Unit A Reservoir. The pay is sandstone with an average net pay of 6.4 feet, air permeability of 1050 md, and water TDS of 2500 ppM. The average remaining oil saturation in the 40-acre pilot area was estimated to be 28% at the start of chemical injection. The Pilot has four injectors (Wells MPP-1, MPP-2, MPP-3, and MPP-4) and one producer (Well 12-1). The overall micellar-polymer oil recovery is estimated at 47% of the remaining oil at the initiation of the micellar-polymer flood. In the fourth contract year, micellar slug injection was completed and injection of the graded mobility buffer began. A second radioactive/chemical tracer test was begun at the start of the polymer phase. A delay of approximately one year was experienced during the reservoir description phase. Otherwise, the project has remained on schedule.

Goldburg, A.

1981-06-01

40

Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain Apparel from the Dominican Republic. Fourth Annual Review. Investigation No. 332-503.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the results of the Commissions fourth annual review of the Earned Import Allowance Program (EIAP) for the Dominican Republic. In these reports the Commission is required to evaluate the effectiveness of the EIAP and make recommendatio...

2013-01-01

41

Enhanced oil recovery by improved waterflooding. Fourth annual report, October 1980-September 1981. [Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Energy Resourcs Co. Inc., and its subcontractor Elf Aquitaine Oil and Gas Company are conducting a 100-acre pilot polymer flood in the Storms Pool Field near Carmi, in White County, Illinois. The project is a cost-sharing venture with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Preparation for the polymer flood began in September 1977, and the project is scheduled for completion in December 1983. This report reviews progress during the fourth year of performance (October 1980 through September 1981). The Storms Pool, once highly productive, has yielded over 12 million barrels of oil from the Waltersburg formation since its discovery in 1939. The field has been waterflooded for over 20 years and is now largely in stripper production with high watercuts at most producing wells. Material balance and recent electric logs indicate, however, that there is a substantial volume of movable oil still in place, presumably bypassed by the inefficient waterflood. The polymer flood is intended to improve the sweep efficiency, showing that the engineering, management, and financial resources required for such tertiary techniques can be applied to similar fields that might otherwise be abandoned for lack of investment by parties knowledgeable in enhanced oil technology. Preflush injection and polymer injection were both initiated during this period with total polymer injection now standing at 179,453 barrels (or about 6% pore volume). Laboratory testing has continued throughout the year with the emphasis being on field support (troubleshooting field problems and monitoring the field injection and production systems). No evidence of polymer break-through has been detected at the production wells. Details of the interference testing program and the radiotracer study executed during this period are also presented.

Craig, F.F. III; Passman, F.J.; Burtch, F.W.

1982-05-01

42

Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the National Council of Primary Education, Chicago, Illinois, February 25, 1919. Bulletin, 1919, No. 69  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Council of Primary Education held its fourth annual meeting in the red room of Hotel La Salle, Chicago, 9.30 a: m., Tuesday, February 25. 1919, with the chairman presiding. The Chairman: "The Primary Council is very happy indeed to welcome this audience this morning. This is our fourth birthday, and we are glad have so many people…

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1920

1920-01-01

43

Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the National Council of Primary Education, Chicago, Illinois, February 25, 1919. Bulletin, 1919, No. 69  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The National Council of Primary Education held its fourth annual meeting in the red room of Hotel La Salle, Chicago, 9.30 a: m., Tuesday, February 25. 1919, with the chairman presiding. The Chairman: "The Primary Council is very happy indeed to welcome this audience this morning. This is our fourth birthday, and we are glad have so many people…

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1920

1920-01-01

44

Fourth annual report 1991 (Independent Radiation Monitoring Scheme for Clwyd, Mold).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Independent Radiation Monitoring Scheme for Clwyd began its monitoring programme in Clwyd in 1988. This is the fourth report on the results of the radiation monitoring carried out within Clwyd. The historical reasons for the conception of the Radiatio...

1991-01-01

45

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.  

SciTech Connect

In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

1997-01-01

46

24 CFR 891.715 - Maximum annual commitment and project account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Maximum annual commitment and project account. 891.715 Section...Assistance § 891.715 Maximum annual commitment and project account. (a) Maximum annual commitment. The maximum annual amount...

2013-04-01

47

24 CFR 891.570 - Maximum annual commitment and project account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Maximum annual commitment and project account. 891.570 Section...Assistance § 891.570 Maximum annual commitment and project account. (a) Maximum annual commitment. The maximum annual amount...

2013-04-01

48

24 CFR 883.604 - Maximum annual commitment and project account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Maximum annual commitment and project account. 883.604 Section...Contract § 883.604 Maximum annual commitment and project account. (a) Maximum annual commitment. The maximum annual...

2013-04-01

49

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: FY 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in the single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the risk of explosion. This Task Team, which is composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), an outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions on the Hanford SSTSs. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project, discussed in this report, is being conducted by PNL as part of the Waste Tank Safety Program led by WHC. The overall purpose of the WHC program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Tank Safety Project Office, is to provide technical information on ferrocyanide chemistry and its interaction and reactive behavior with other tank constituents. Ultimately, this information will be used to maintain the tanks in a safe condition, implement interim stabilization strategies, and identify optimal disposal options. While by itself ferrocyanide is a stable complex of ferrous ion and cyanide, it can be made to explode in the laboratory in the presence of oxidizing materials such as nitrates and/or nitrites temperatures above 280{degree}C or by sufficient electrical spark. The specific goal of the PNL project is so determine the conditions necessary for the ferrocyanide-bearing wastes in Hanford SSTs to represent a hazard, to determine the conditions where these same wastes am not a hazard, or to determine the conditions which are necessary to assure the wastes are safe prior to treatment for permanent disposal. This annual report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1991. The activities mainly focused on preparing and characterizing synthetic wastes and alkali nickel ferrocyanides produced using the In-Farm cesium scavenging flowsheet and pure potential nickel ferrocyanides that could be produced by all of the cesium scavenging flowsheets.

Hallen, R.T.; Burger, L.L.; Hockey, R.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

1992-06-01

50

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: FY 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in the single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the risk of explosion. This Task Team, which is composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), an outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions on the Hanford SSTSs. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project, discussed in this report, is being conducted by PNL as part of the Waste Tank Safety Program led by WHC. The overall purpose of the WHC program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Tank Safety Project Office, is to provide technical information on ferrocyanide chemistry and its interaction and reactive behavior with other tank constituents. Ultimately, this information will be used to maintain the tanks in a safe condition, implement interim stabilization strategies, and identify optimal disposal options. While by itself ferrocyanide is a stable complex of ferrous ion and cyanide, it can be made to explode in the laboratory in the presence of oxidizing materials such as nitrates and/or nitrites temperatures above 280{degree}C or by sufficient electrical spark. The specific goal of the PNL project is so determine the conditions necessary for the ferrocyanide-bearing wastes in Hanford SSTs to represent a hazard, to determine the conditions where these same wastes am not a hazard, or to determine the conditions which are necessary to assure the wastes are safe prior to treatment for permanent disposal. This annual report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1991. The activities mainly focused on preparing and characterizing synthetic wastes and alkali nickel ferrocyanides produced using the In-Farm cesium scavenging flowsheet and pure potential nickel ferrocyanides that could be produced by all of the cesium scavenging flowsheets.

Hallen, R.T.; Burger, L.L.; Hockey, R.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

1992-06-01

51

Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract, 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. In this 1971 annual report, average daily attendance figures for participating school districts; JOM funding for…

Laney, L. J.

52

Steam Generator Group Project. Annual report, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Generator Group Project (SGGP) is an NRC program joined by additional sponsors. The SGGP utilizes a steam generator removed from service at a nuclear plant (Surry 2) as a vehicle for research on a variety of safety and reliability issues. This report is an annual summary of progress of the program for 1982. Information is presented on the Steam Generator Examination Facility (SGEF), especially designed and constructed for this research. Loading of the generator into the SGEF is then discussed. The report then presents radiological field mapping results and personnel exposure monitoring. This is followed by information on field reduction achieved by channel head decontaminations. The report then presents results of a secondary side examination through shell penetrations placed prior to transport, confirming no change in generator condition due to transport. Decontamination of the channel head is discussed followed by plans for eddy current testing and removal of the plugs placed during service. Results of a preliminary profilometry examination are then provided.

Clark, R.A.; Lewis, M.

1984-02-01

53

Fourth annual report to Congress on the Automotive Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect

Program implementation and management are described. The status of conventional power-train technology is described with respect to uniform charge reciprocating Otto engine, stratified charge reciprocating Otto engine, rotary Otto engine, diesel engine, and transmissions. The three tasks of the Automotive Technology Development Program are discussed as follows; automotive gas turbine project, automotive Stirling engine development project, and the heavy duty transport technology project.

Not Available

1983-11-01

54

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6, Fourth Annual Tribal Environmental Summit Meeting Summary. Held in Dallas, Texas on October 18-19, 2000.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6 held its fourth annual Tribal Environmental Summit on October 18 and 19, 2000 in Dallas, Texas. Tribal leaders from the 65 Federally recognized Tribes and three tribal consortia located in EPA Region...

2000-01-01

55

Rural Development: Part 1. Information and Technical Assistance Delivered by the Department of Agriculture in Fiscal Year 1973. Fourth Annual Report to the Congress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part 1 of a four part report to the U.S. Congress pursuant to Title IX, Section 901 of the Agricultural Act of 1970, this fourth annual report is limited to rural development activities of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) delivery system (the USDA National Rural Development Committee, State Rural Development Committee, and county…

Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

56

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Project. Annual report 1995.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during t...

T. S. Laws

1996-01-01

57

Umatilla River subbasin fish habitat improvement project. Annual report 1993.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during t...

T. D. Bailey T. S. Laws

1994-01-01

58

Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Annual report, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. The major activities undertaken duri...

T. D. Bailey G. P. Rimbach

1991-01-01

59

Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Annual report 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. The major activities undertaken duri...

T. D. Bailey

1990-01-01

60

Multinational Coordinated 'Arabidopsis thaliana' Functional Genomics Project: Annual Report 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the 2004/2005 annual report of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) on the status of the Multinational Coordinated Arabidopsis thaliana Functional Genomics Project. This 10-year program initiated in 2001 was described in a long-...

2005-01-01

61

Multinational Coordinated 'Arabidopsis thaliana' Functional Genomics Project. Annual Report 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the 2006/2007 annual report of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) on the status of the Multinational Coordinated Arabidopsis thaliana Functional Genomics Project. The primary goal of this 10-year program (initiated in 2001) is...

I. Small X. W. Deng

2007-01-01

62

Improved polymers for enhanced oil recovery: synthesis and rheology. Fourth annual report, October 1980September 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of this project are to gain a more complete understanding of the structural\\/property\\/performance interrelationships of water-soluble polymers which can lead to commercial production of polymers for enhanced recovery projects. To do this synthesis, characterization, and rheological studies of random-and graft copolymers have been undertaken. The status of the following studies is presented in this report: macromolecular synthesis and

C. L. McCormick; R. D. Hester; H. H. Neidlinger; G. C. Wildman

1981-01-01

63

24 CFR 880.503 - Maximum annual commitment and project account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Maximum annual commitment and project account. 880.503 Section...Contract § 880.503 Maximum annual commitment and project account. (a) Maximum Annual Commitment. Where HUD is the contract...

2013-04-01

64

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01

65

Analysis of daily, monthly, and annual burned area using the fourth-generation global fire emissions database (GFED4)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract We describe the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation of the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED4) burned area data set, which provides global monthly burned area at 0.25° spatial resolution from mid-1995 through the present and daily burned area for the time series extending back to August 2000. We produced the full data set by combining 500 m MODIS burned area maps with active fire data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) family of sensors. We found that the global <span class="hlt">annual</span> area burned for the years 1997 through 2011 varied from 301 to 377Mha, with an average of 348Mha. We assessed the interannual variability and trends in burned area on the basis of a region-specific definition of fire years. With respect to trends, we found a gradual decrease of 1.7Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.4%yr - 1) in Northern Hemisphere Africa since 2000, a gradual increase of 2.3Mhayr - 1 (+1.8%yr - 1) in Southern Hemisphere Africa also since 2000, a slight increase of 0.2Mhayr - 1 (+2.5%yr - 1) in Southeast Asia since 1997, and a rapid decrease of approximately 5.5Mhayr - 1 ( - 10.7%yr - 1) from 2001 through 2011 in Australia, followed by a major upsurge in 2011 that exceeded the <span class="hlt">annual</span> area burned in at least the previous 14 years. The net trend in global burned area from 2000 to 2012 was a modest decrease of 4.3Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.2%yr - 1). We also performed a spectral analysis of the daily burned area time series and found no vestiges of the 16 day MODIS repeat cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.; Werf, Guido R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED518216.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Project</span> TRREE 2009-2010 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Project</span> TRREE (Teacher Recruitment and Retention for Educational Excellence) is a federally funded <span class="hlt">project</span> conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education. The purpose of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is to develop a systemic approach to increase the number of highly qualified special education teachers with a focus on recruitment of linguistically, culturally…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Atwell, Nedra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48612578"> <span id="translatedtitle">Devaluating Drainage Design Parameters for the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Drainage <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Pakistan by using SWAP Model: Part I – Calibration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A transient drainage simulation model,SWAP, was used to evaluate the performanceof drainage systems in (semi-) arid zones.Before application, the model wascalibrated by using 14-months datacollected from two sample fields of the<span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Drainage <span class="hlt">Project</span> (FDP), Punjab,Pakistan. During the calibration process,emphasis was given to the accuratedetermination of soil hydraulic parameters,reference evapotranspiration, drainage fromsample fields and bottom boundarycondition. Laboratory determined soilhydraulic parameters were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asad Sarwar; W. G. M. Bastiaanssen; Th. M. Boers; J. C. van Dam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/826156"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispel Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were also implemented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/810395"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispel Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were also implemented in 2002.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86008802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Great Plains Coal Gasification <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Quarterly Technical Progress Report <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Quarter, 1985.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-str...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5639572"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fish & Wildlife <span class="hlt">Annual</span> <span class="hlt">Project</span> Summary, 1983.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>. In 1983, 83 <span class="hlt">projects</span> addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">United States. Bonneville Power Administration.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title24-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title24-vol4-sec884-104.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 884.104 - Maximum total <span class="hlt">annual</span> contract commitment and <span class="hlt">project</span> account (private-owner or PHA-owner <span class="hlt">projects</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...false Maximum total <span class="hlt">annual</span> contract commitment and <span class="hlt">project</span> account (private-owner...104 Maximum total <span class="hlt">annual</span> contract commitment and <span class="hlt">project</span> account (private-owner... (a) Maximum total <span class="hlt">annual</span> contract commitment. The maximum total <span class="hlt">annual</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5566939"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bartlesville <span class="hlt">Project</span> Office FY 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bartlesville <span class="hlt">Project</span> Office (BPO) was established in 1983 to succeed the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). Its lead mission from the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the US Department of energy is to plan and implement research in the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Advanced Extraction and Process Technology (AEPT) subprograms of the Petroleum Program. As such, BPO oversees some 160 research <span class="hlt">projects</span> falling within these two broad subprograms and support activities. These <span class="hlt">projects</span>, form the major portion of DOE's National Petroleum Research Program. The EOR subprogram consists of two research categories: Light Oil and Heavy Oil. These two categories include research activities in: (1) geoscience and reservoir characterization, (2) chemical flooding (3) gas flooding, (4) thermal recovery, (5) novel technology, and (6) microbial EOR. The AEPT subprogram includes research activities in (1) fundamental geoscience and extraction research, (2) supporting technology and environmental research, and (3) university geoscience research. 8 figs., 5 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963298"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispel Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative <span class="hlt">project</span> between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/305866"> <span id="translatedtitle">LLNL NESHAPs <span class="hlt">project</span> 1997 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NESHAP`s limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an <span class="hlt">annual</span> effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 ({mu}Sv) to any member of the public The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site- wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1997 operations were Livermore site. 0 097 mrem (0 97 {mu}Sv) (80% from point-source emissions), 20% from diffuse-source emissions), Site 300 0 014 mrem (O 14 {mu}Sv) (38% from point-source emissions, 62% from diffuse-source emissions) The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air- dispersion/dose-assessment model Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gallegos, G.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10173297"> <span id="translatedtitle">LLNL NESHAPs <span class="hlt">project</span>. 1992 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes work conducted during FY 1992 for the Environmental Monitoring and Analysis Division of the Environmental Protection Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This document contains information regarding environmental monitoring of a wide variety of radioisotopes which are emitted to the atmosphere. These radioisotopes include transuranics, biomedical tracers, tritium, mixed fission products, and other radioisotopes used for general research and nuclear weapons research. Information regarding radionuclide air emissions for each of the 56 buildings at LLNL where radionuclides are used or activation products occur is given. Detailed information is included for all point source emissions from 43 LLNL site buildings. In addition, dose equivalents and dose assessment are evaluated. Reported <span class="hlt">annual</span> releases are based on inventory data and unabated EPA potential release fractions for unmonitored sources, and on actual emission measurements for continuously monitored facilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Surano, K.A.; Failor, R.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Berger, R.L.; Harrach, R.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6085549"> <span id="translatedtitle">Great Plains Coal Gasification <span class="hlt">project</span>. Quarterly technical progress report <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter, 1985</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical service; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhBio...8e0301N"> <span id="translatedtitle">PREFACE: Selected papers from the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing Selected papers from the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very grateful to our previous partner, IET Systems Biology, for their help over the years in publicizing the work presented at the conference, we felt that the changing needs of our participants required that we find a new partner. We are thrilled that Physical Biology is publishing the q-bio proceedings this year. It has been a great collaboration, as evidenced by the high quality of this special issue. What's next for q-bio? We are happy to report that NIGMS has recently extended the q-bio conference grant for the next three years, ensuring strong support for junior researchers who need financial assistance to participate in the event. The conference will retain its emphasis on cellular information processing, but will also build connections to other areas of modern biology and biotechnology, focusing specifically on ecology and evolutionary biology next year. Indeed, to fully understand biological information processing systems, they must be studied in their ecological contexts. We will continue to honor distinguished contributors to the field in our opening banquets; the tradition started with Howard Berg, Bruce Alberts and Michael Savageau in previous years, and continues with Dennis Bray at the upcoming 2011 event. Starting in 2011, the conference will also venture into exploration of the social aspects of science. The future is bright for q-bio! We will see you at the Fifth <span class="hlt">Annual</span> q-bio Conference on 10-13 August 2011, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA and at the Sixth <span class="hlt">Annual</span> q-bio Conference in early August 2012. The special issue at a glance The special issue is a snapshot of presentations at the q-bio conference. As in previous years, it remains a challenge to recruit experimental contributions to the issue. Thus only one of the papers reports new experimental results, and the collection is tilted towards the computational end of the spectrum compared to the total q-bio presentations contributed. The 11 individual papers in this special issue are each briefly introduced here. We have arranged the papers loosely to parallel the four pillars of q-bio: quantitati</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R.; Hlavacek, William S.; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E.; Zilman, Anton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/952608"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2009 with <span class="hlt">Projections</span> to 2030</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term <span class="hlt">projections</span> of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">None</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60793312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy D. Bailey; Gregory P. Rimbach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">4</a> <a 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60793311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 1989 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 17 cooperative lease agreements with private landowners, design and layout of 8.6 miles of Riparian exclosure fence and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey; Timothy D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60573269"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 1989 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 17 cooperative lease agreements with private landowners, design and layout of 8.6 miles of Riparian enclosure fence and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey; Timothy D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60573270"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy D. Bailey; Gregory P. Rimbach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10114278"> <span id="translatedtitle">PFBC Utility Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 & 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP`s proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/208356"> <span id="translatedtitle">ENCOAL mild coal gasification demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, October 1994--September 1995</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document is the combination of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter report (July - September 1995) and the 1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report for the ENCOAL <span class="hlt">project</span>. The following pages include the background and process description for the <span class="hlt">project</span>, brief summaries of the accomplishments for the first three quarters, and a detailed <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter report. Its purpose is to convey the accomplishments and current progress of the <span class="hlt">project</span>. ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of SMC Mining Company (formerly Shell Mining company, now owned by Zeigler Coal Holding Company), has completed the construction and start-up of a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by SMC and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basis coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). The products, as alternative fuels sources, are expected to significantly lower current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation, thereby reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In the LFC technology, coal is first deeply dried to remove water physically. The temperature is further raised in a second stage which results in decomposition reactions that form the new products. This chemical decomposition (mild gasification) creates gases by cracking reactions from the feed coal. The chemically altered solids are cooled and further processed to make PDF. The gases are cooled, condensing liquids as CDL, and the residual gases are burned in the process for heat. The process release for the ENCOAL plant predicted that one ton of feed coal would yield roughly {1/2} ton of PDF and {1/2} barrel of CDL. By varying plant running conditions, however, it has since been learned that the actual CDL recovery rate may be as much as 15% to 20% above the <span class="hlt">projections</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23724663"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Project</span> design and implementation of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> national survey Chinese matiera medica resources].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The planning of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> national survey on Chinese materia medica resources shall follow the requirement of "carrying out the national survey on Chinese materia medica resources, strengthening the construction of Chinese materia medica resources monitoring and information network" which is according to the document issued by the State Council. Based on the responsibilities of State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine which is "organizing the survey, promoting the resource-protection, keeping development and rational utilization", combined with the key problems that need to be solved in current medicinal industry, the related instructions issued by central leadership and the recommendations from NPC delegates, CPPCC members and experts, the planning shall make overall plans and top-level design for the new round of national survey on Chinese materia medica resources. PMID:23724663</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Lu-Qi; Lu, Jian-Wei; Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Zhao, Run-Huai; Zhang, Ben-Gang; Li, Yu; Su, Gang-Qiang; Li, Da-Ning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=walter+AND+white&pg=6&id=ED123290"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Columbia Classroom Environments <span class="hlt">Project...Fourth</span> Progress Report, December 1971.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The Columbia Classroom Environments <span class="hlt">Project</span> (CCEP) report discusses a number of questions about a set of dimensions of learning and development as well as the instruments the <span class="hlt">project</span> was developing for the analysis of behavior in learning environments. Joseph C. Grannis examines The Argument, Assumptions, Definitions, Hypothesis; Rochelle Mayer…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grannis, Joseph C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1818"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection <span class="hlt">Projection</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, Jan 1 - Dec 31, 1997</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This 1997 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection <span class="hlt">project</span> being implemented at the Burns Harbor Plant of Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is receiving cost-sharing from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. This installation is the first in the United States to use British Steel technology1*2 that uses granular coal to provide a portion of the fuel requirements of blast furnaces. The <span class="hlt">project</span> will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical and economic issues associated with the use of coal for injection into blast furnaces. To achieve the progmm objectives, the demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> is divided into the following three Phases: Phase I - Design Phase II - Construction Phase III - Operation Preliminary Design (Phase 1) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at the Burns Harbor Plant (Phase II) began in August 1993 and was completed at the end of 1994. The demonstration test program (Phase III) started in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">None</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/255012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blast furnace granular coal injection <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, January--December 1995</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection <span class="hlt">project</span> being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor Plant. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is receiving cost-sharing from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. This installation is the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The <span class="hlt">project</span> will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> is divided into the following three Phases: (1) Phase I - Design. (2) Phase II - Construction. (3) Phase III - Operation. Preliminary Design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began in August 1993 and was completed at the end of 1994. The demonstration test program (Phase III) started in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10173782"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOE IGCC <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> quarterly report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have previously reported a decision to move the simple cycle commercial operation to a date coincident with the July 1, 1996 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) commercial operation date. This necessitated a major rescheduling of the engineering and construction efforts to ensure a totally coordinated plan. This rescheduling was completed in mid October 1994 and resulted in an integrated engineering and construction schedule. The major effort in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1994 centered around equipment procurement to support the new integrated plan. This is required so that sufficient engineering details will be available to generate construction bid packages with at least 90% completed effort. During the reporting period 43 material requisitions (MR`s) were issued for bids. Also during-the reporting period a total of 14 purchase orders were issued including the generator step-up transformer and major columns and vessels. Bid packages were prepared, for bid submittal in January 1994, for a turnkey sulfuric acid plant and for the transportation/erection of the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The original concept was for MAN GHH to deliver the RSC as part of their design and fabrication contract. However, in an attempt to improve coordination for the overall handling of this significant piece of equipment, it was decided to remove the transportation from MAN GHH`s scope of work and include the transportation with the RSC erection contract. Initial indication from prospective bidders and Bechtel are that lower total costs will be achieved in addition to the expected improved coordination.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-02-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=41451"> <span id="translatedtitle">DEVELOPMENT OF CRITERIA FOR EXTENSION OF APPLICABILITY OF LOW-EMISSION, HIGH-EFFICIENCY COAL BURNERS: <span class="hlt">FOURTH</span> <span class="hlt">ANNUAL</span> REPORT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report summarizes technical progress during the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year of effort on EPA contract 68-02-2667. NOx and SOx emission characteristics of two low-NOx distributed-mixing burners were tested with three coals in a large water-tube simulator furnace (50-70 million Btu/hr firing r...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10104338"> <span id="translatedtitle">F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. 1991 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter 1991 and 1991 summary report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This progress report for <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter 1991 and 1992 summary from the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; upgradient versus downgradient results; turbidity results exceeding standards; water elevations, flow directions, and flow rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, C.Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE83000260"> <span id="translatedtitle">Big Muddy Field Low-Tension Flood Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, April 1981-March 1982.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 1981, about two-thirds of the low-tension slug was injected. By year-end, the oil cut had increased from 0.6 to over 2%. Injection rates were less than predicted. The viscosity of the slug was reduced from 20 to 14 cp. Following the viscosity reduc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Painter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6819729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coalinga polymer demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, July 1978-July 1979</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field demonstration test of displacement mobility control in the East Coalinga Field is being conducted in order to determine the relative merits of polymer flooding and waterflooding in a medium viscosity oil reservoir. The injection pattern consists of four inverted 5-spot patterns and an updip area. Water injection began in June 1976 and continued through April 1978. Polymer injection began in May 1978 and is ongoing. The overall production performance for the pilot has been far less than expected. The current oil production rate is currently below the expected primary decline rate. The polymer injection rate is substantially below original predictions and will increase the time required to inject the designed slug volume.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schultz, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22act+math+score%22&pg=2&id=ED147484"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pilot Course in Century 21 Shorthand. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Semester. An Evaluation of the <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Final Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An evaluation <span class="hlt">project</span> conducted at Dona Ana County Occupational Education Branch of New Mexico State University was designed to compare the effectiveness of Century 21 with Gregg Shorthand. Two classes of shorthand students were set up as experimental groups (due to student attrition, two more groups were added during the third semester). Their…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/850056"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day Watershed Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span>, <span class="hlt">annual</span> report 2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's <span class="hlt">fourth</span> largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these <span class="hlt">projects</span> from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of <span class="hlt">project</span> planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The types of <span class="hlt">projects</span> include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 <span class="hlt">projects</span> were canceled and 7 <span class="hlt">projects</span> were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. <span class="hlt">Project</span> costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/897554"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of riparian exclosure fence and 1.75 miles of instream structures, development of three fencing contracts and three instream work contracts. Results include implementation OF 3 miles of fencing and 3.7 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: weekly inspection and maintenance of fencing <span class="hlt">projects</span>, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of high school students on habitat improvement and preservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/925500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source For the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 6 cooperative lease agreements and one lease addendum with private landowners, design and layout of 4.4 miles of riparian exclosure fence and 1.75 miles of instream structures, development of three fencing contracts and three instream work contracts. Results include implementation of 3 miles of fencing and 3.7 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: weekly inspection and maintenance of fencing <span class="hlt">projects</span>, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of high school students on habitat improvement and preservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey, Timothy D.; Rimbach, Gregory P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=happiness+AND+is+AND+goal&pg=4&id=ED130255"> <span id="translatedtitle">Happiness Is Reading; Reading Resource Center Glendale Elementary School District No. 40, <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Year of a Title I <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report discusses the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year of a remedial reading program for disadvantaged second-through-<span class="hlt">fourth</span>-grade pupils. Separate sections deal with program goals and objectives; selection of participants; reading resource centers; measurement and analysis of reading achievement, self-concept attitudes toward reading, attendance, and parental…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wurster, Stanley R.; Mathis, F. Austin, Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/105085"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blast furnace granular coal injection <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, January--December 1994</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection <span class="hlt">project</span> being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor Plant. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. This installation is the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The <span class="hlt">project</span> will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> is divided into the following three Phases: Phase I -- design; Phase II -- construction; and Phase III -- operation. Preliminary design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began in August 1993 and was completed at the end of 1994. A 100% construction review meeting was held in December and attended by representatives of DOE, Fluor Daniel and Bethlehem Steel. The coal preparation mills were started up in December, 1994, and the first coal was injected into ``D`` blast furnace on December 19, 1994. Near the end of the year, the grinding mills and injection facility were being prepared for performance testing during the first quarter of 1995. The demonstration test program (phase III) will start in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> 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<img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20740969"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> energy outlook 2006 with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2030</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The <span class="hlt">projections</span> are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. 'Issues in Focus' includes a discussion of the basis of EIA's substantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the <span class="hlt">projections</span>. Other topics examined include: energy technologies on the cusp of being introduced; mercury emissions control technologies; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Energy Market Trends', which provides a summary of the AEO2006 <span class="hlt">projections</span> for energy markets. The analysis in AEO2006 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases. In addition, more than 30 alternative cases are included in AEO2006. Complete tables for the five primary cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Major results from many of the alternative cases are provided in Appendix D. Appendix E briefly describes NEMS and the alternatives cases. 112 figs., 25 tabs., 7 apps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/897553"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 1989 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 17 cooperative lease agreements with private landowners, design and layout of 8.6 miles of Riparian exclosure fence and 3.0 miles of instream structures, development of five fencing contracts and six instream work contracts. Results include implementation of 10 miles of fencing and 3 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: data collection from 90 habitat monitoring transects, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of all age groups on habitat improvement and protection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/925497"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 1989 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the Funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The major activities undertaken during this report period were: procurement of 17 cooperative lease agreements with private landowners, design and layout of 8.6 miles of Riparian enclosure fence and 3.0 miles of instream structures, development of five fencing contracts and six instream work contracts. Results include implementation of 10 miles of fencing and 3 miles of instream work. Other activities undertaken during this report period are: data collection from 90 habitat monitoring transects, collection and summarization of temperature data, photopoint establishment, coordination with numerous agencies and tribes and education of all age groups on habitat improvement and protection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey, Timothy D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/850338"> <span id="translatedtitle">West Valley Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> for CY 2004.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE2005840480"> <span id="translatedtitle">Towards a New Class of Mesoporous Materials for Applications in Petroleum Refining. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Technical Progress Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> focuses on the synthesis of mesoporous aluminophosphates, silicates and aluminosilicates as catalysts for applications in the conversion of large petroleum feedstock compounds to useful middle distillates and naphtha transportation fuels. Sum...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Ingram M. Mitchell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2399S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Randomness of <span class="hlt">annual</span> precipitation and climate model <span class="hlt">projections</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precipitation (P), the driver of the entire hydrologic cycle, is characterised by high year-to-year variability for a given region. Because of that, the trend in P generally depends on which period one chooses. Superimposed on that are different expectations about the future possible change of regional water availability. For example, in a recent case study over the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia, we noted that the <span class="hlt">projections</span> of ?P (2070-2099 less 1970-1999) has a large range (~ ±150 mm a-1 century-1) for an ensemble of 39 IPCC AR4 climate model runs using the A1B emissions scenario. When averaged across the multi-run and multi-model ensemble, the <span class="hlt">projected</span> change (4.9 and -8.1 mm a-1 century-1) is near zero, against a background climatological P of ~500 mm a-1. In this presentation, we describe a new approach to evaluating <span class="hlt">projections</span> of ?P in climate models. This approach is based on our recent finding that long-term <span class="hlt">annual</span> P time series in both observations and each model run over the MDB were indistinguishable from that generated by a purely random process. By plotting ?P versus the variance of the time series, we could identify models with <span class="hlt">projections</span> for ?P that were beyond the bounds expected from purely random variations. For the MDB, we anticipate that a purely random process could lead to differences of ± 57 mm a-1 (95% confidence) between successive 30-year periods. This is equivalent to ±11% of the climatological P and translates into variations in runoff of around ±29%. This sets a baseline for gauging modelled and/or observed changes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Fubao; Roderick, Michael; Farquhar, Graham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/560829"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> energy outlook 1998 with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2020</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) is the first AEO with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2020. Key issues for the forecast extension are trends in energy efficiency improvements, the effects of increasing production and productivity improvements on energy prices, and the reduction in nuclear generating capacity. <span class="hlt">Projections</span> in AEO98 also reflect a greater shift to electricity market restructuring. Restructuring is addressed through several changes that are assumed to occur in the industry, including a shorter capital recovery period for capacity expansion decisions and a revised financial structure that features a higher cost of capital as the result of higher competitive risk. Both assumptions tend to favor less capital-intensive generation technologies, such as natural gas, over coal or baseload renewable technologies. The forecasts include specific restructuring plans in those regions that have announced plans. California, New York, and New England are assumed to begin competitive pricing in 1998. The provisions of the California legislation for stranded cost recovery and price caps are incorporated. In New York and New England, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/226038"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> energy outlook 1995, with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents <span class="hlt">projections</span> and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20700837"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> energy outlook 2005 with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2025</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The <span class="hlt">projections</span> are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modelling System (NEMS). The report begins with an 'Overview' summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, 'Legislation and Regulations', discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues in the USA. Issues in Focus includes discussions on key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. 'Issues in Focus' is followed by 'Market Trends', which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast. The analysis in AEO2005 focuses primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and four alternative oil price cases, a low world oil price case, an October oil futures case, and two high world oil price cases. Forecast tables for those cases are provided in Appendixes A through D. The major results for the alterative cases, which explore the impacts of varying key assumption in NEMS (such as rates of technology penetration), are summarized in Appendix E. Appendix F briefly describes NEMS and the alternative cases. 115 figs., 38 tabs., 8 apps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962832"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hangman Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation <span class="hlt">project</span> than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this <span class="hlt">annual</span> funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the <span class="hlt">Project</span>'s public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this <span class="hlt">Project</span>; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coeur d'Alene Tribe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1019039"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2011 with <span class="hlt">Projections</span> to 2035</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">projections</span> in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the <span class="hlt">projections</span>, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and <span class="hlt">projected</span> slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base; prospects for shale gas; the impact of cost uncertainty on construction of new electric power plants; the economics of carbon capture and storage; and the possible impact of regulations on the electric power sector under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the highlights from those discussions are mentioned in this Executive Summary. Readers interested in more detailed analyses and discussions should refer to the 'Issues in focus' section of this report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">None</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5372091"> <span id="translatedtitle">Great Plains Coal Gasification <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter, 1983. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates' full gas production date. Gasification Plant: detailed engineering in the Contractors' home office was completed in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special <span class="hlt">projects</span>, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter. Although the Plant's construction activities are still slightly behind schedule, it is currently forecasted that the construction schedule will be regained by the end of June 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. The current emphasis is on system turnover and commissioning activities. The environmental permitting for the construction phase is complete. Freedom Mine: mine development activities remain on schedule.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61261216"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Third <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, July 1, 1978August 31, 1979</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is a cooperative venture between Cities Service Company and the US Department of Energy. The main objective is to demonstrate the operation and economics of a successful commercial scale In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span> in a heavy oil reservoir. This Third <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report deals primarily with performance, development and economics of the <span class="hlt">project</span> in the third year of operation,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Garvey; W. H. Pusch; R. S. Fulford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/116621"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferrocyanide safety <span class="hlt">project</span> ferrocyanide aging studies FY 1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report gives the results of the work conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1995 on Task 3 of the Ferrocyanide Safety <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Ferrocyanide Aging Studies. Aging refers to the dissolution and hydrolysis of simulated Hanford ferrocyanide waste in alkaline aqueous solutions by radiolytic and chemical means. The ferrocyanide simulant primarily used in these studies was dried In-Farm-1B, Rev. 7, prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company to simulate the waste generated when the In-Farm flowsheet was used to remove radiocesium from waste supernates in single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. In the In-Farm flowsheet, nickel ion and ferrocyanide anion were added to waste supernates to precipitate sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and co-precipitate radiocesium. Once the radiocesium was removed, supernates were pumped from the tanks, and new wastes from cladding removal processes or from evaporators were added. These new wastes were typically highly caustic, having hydroxide ion concentrations of over 1 M and as high as 4 M. The Aging Studies task is investigating reactions this caustic waste may have had with the precipitated ferrocyanide waste in a radiation field. In previous Aging Studies research, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in simulants was shown to dissolve in basic solutions, forming insoluble Ni(OH){sub 2} and soluble Na{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The influence on solubility of base strength, sodium ion concentration, anions, and temperature was previously investigated. The results may indicate that even ferrocyanide sludge that did not come into direct contact with highly basic wastes may also have aged significantly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lilga, M.A.; Alderson, E.V.; Hallen, R.T. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26411790"> <span id="translatedtitle">MARS—a <span class="hlt">project</span> of the diffraction-limited <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source based on supermicrotron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new approach for the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source—Multiturn Accelerator–Recuperator Source (MARS)—was proposed recently. The installation consists of the radiofrequency (RF) multiturn accelerator (similar to the race-track microtron) and long undulator(s). After passing through the undulator(s) the electron beam is decelerated in the same RF accelerating structure. Such energy recovery reduces dramatically the radiation hazard and decreases the required RF</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. N Kulipanov; A. N Skrinsky; N. A Vinokurov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56433728"> <span id="translatedtitle">MARS-a <span class="hlt">project</span> of the diffraction-limited <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source based on supermicrotron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new approach for the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source-Multiturn Accelerator-Recuperator Source (MARS)-was proposed recently. The installation consists of the radiofrequency (RF) multiturn accelerator (similar to the race-track microtron) and long undulator(s). After passing through the undulator(s) the electron beam is decelerated in the same RF accelerating structure. Such energy recovery reduces dramatically the radiation hazard and decreases the required RF</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. N. Kulipanov; A. N. Skrinsky; N. A. Vinokurov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961823"> <span id="translatedtitle">StreamNet <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report Fiscal Year 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fiscal Year 2008 (FY-08) represents a transitional year for the StreamNet <span class="hlt">project</span>. While the <span class="hlt">project</span> continued to acquire/update, standardize, georeference and disseminate fish-related data for the state, some tribal and one federal fisheries agencies, it also took on several new initiatives and is anticipating new regional guidance on data needs. Passage of the Columbia Basin Accords caused an administrative change within the <span class="hlt">project</span>, separating the work done by the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) out to a separate contract with BPA. This will change the structure of the StreamNet contract but not change the relationship with the StreamNet Library or data developed by CRITFC, and will likely increase the availability of tribal data to StreamNet due to increased funding for tribal data efforts. This change will take effect in FY-09. We also expect that data work will be adjusted in the future in response to executive level policy direction in the Columbia Basin based on efforts to establish priorities under a regional data management framework. Data development emphasis was shifted this year to place highest priority on data that support indicators of fish abundance for the focal species covered in the Status of the Resource (SOTR) report, as requested by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) Data Management Framework Subcommittee. We instituted an XML based web service allowing direct access to data from the <span class="hlt">project</span> database for CBFWA to update the SOTR report. The <span class="hlt">project</span> also increased efforts to work with tribal fisheries managers to provide data related assistance and to include tribal data in the StreamNet database. A primary theme this year was exploring means to speed the flow of data. We had ongoing success in our strategic emphasis on increasing automation of data conversion through development of comprehensive database systems within our partner agencies, as outlined in our Vision and Strategic Plan. By assisting development of internal database systems, we will be able to automate conversion of agency data to the regionally consistent format as well as help the agency better meet their own data needs. The Idaho StreamNet <span class="hlt">project</span> contributed to development of IDFG's Idaho Fish and Wildlife Information System (IFWIS), and this year they successfully tested automatic conversion of data to the regional exchange format. We worked with WDFW and developed draft field data input templates for collection of smolt trap and spawning ground survey data. And, we began collaborating in a <span class="hlt">project</span> with ODFW and EcoTrust to develop an online data dissemination tool. As these and additional data systems are brought online, we expect to be able to shorten the time needed to <span class="hlt">annually</span> update data, and hope to use the increased efficiency to free existing staff time to develop additional types of data from our partners. Another long-term theme related to expanding data coverage to estimates of productivity and/or data needed to calculate productivity. Initial investigations within our partner agencies indicated that these data are scattered, with some components like age composition of returning fish already being addressed by StreamNet, but others not yet covered. We will continue to determine how available these data are and investigate the feasibility of capturing the estimates and supporting data in the future. Routine ongoing data development of the standard data sets in StreamNet continued this year. An update and new web page for disseminating Protected Areas data was completed. Initial work was done with the CRITFC to get ready to house and disseminate data developed by the Hatchery Scientific Review Group. All database, GIS and web server systems were maintained successfully, with repairs completed as needed. Software applications were developed or maintained, as needed. All required reports, budgets and equipment inventories were submitted. The StreamNet website (www.streamnet.org), the <span class="hlt">project</span>'s primary means of disseminating fish data, was completely redesigned this year to improve</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Bruce; Roger, Phil; Oftedahl, Lenora</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE2001780809"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific lamprey research and restoration <span class="hlt">project</span>: <span class="hlt">annual</span> report 1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document is the 1998 <span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report for studies of Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) conducted by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and University of Minnesot...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. A. Close</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001NIMPA.467...16K"> <span id="translatedtitle">MARS-a <span class="hlt">project</span> of the diffraction-limited <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source based on supermicrotron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new approach for the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation X-ray source-Multiturn Accelerator-Recuperator Source (MARS)-was proposed recently. The installation consists of the radiofrequency (RF) multiturn accelerator (similar to the race-track microtron) and long undulator(s). After passing through the undulator(s) the electron beam is decelerated in the same RF accelerating structure. Such energy recovery reduces dramatically the radiation hazard and decreases the required RF power. In this paper we present a more detail explanation of this scheme, and specify further the parameter limitations and requirements for the accelerator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kulipanov, G. N.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Vinokurov, N. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10170946"> <span id="translatedtitle">NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Status and outlook. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> progress report, FY 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report summaries the activities and accomplishments of the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span> during fiscal year 1992 (1 October to 30 September 1992). Managed by the Analytic Studies Division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, this <span class="hlt">project</span> is the major activity of the US Department of Energy`s Resource Assessment Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Renne, D.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.; Riordan, C.; Hammond, E.; Ismailidis, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DOER5102461"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Kiln Demonstraction <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Semi-<span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Drawings for the solar lumber predrier demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> for Sherwood Forest products Corp. in Waverly, Ohio, are presented. Drawings are included for the site plan, foundation plan, floor plan, framing plan, and structural plan. <span class="hlt">Project</span> status is out...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/751954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Box Canyon Model Watershed <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1997/1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed <span class="hlt">Project</span>. This <span class="hlt">project</span> will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Primary focus of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kalispel Natural Resource Department</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22symbol+AND+language%22&id=ED458958"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ten Years Old & Competent. The <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Stage of the Competent Children <span class="hlt">Project</span>: A Summary of the Main Findings.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Competent Children <span class="hlt">Project</span> is following a group of about 500 children in the Wellington region of New Zealand from around the age of 5 until they leave school. The main aims of the <span class="hlt">project</span> are to describe children's progress over time and to chart contributions to their progress made by family resources, early childhood education, school…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wylie, Cathy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=seaman+AND+hoffman&id=ED453369"> <span id="translatedtitle">Families First Family Literacy <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 2000.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The Texas "Families First" <span class="hlt">project</span> was started to accomplish the following: (1) strengthen the capacity of local family literacy <span class="hlt">projects</span> to design, support, and administer high quality programs by leveraging resources from several agencies in the state; and (2) finalize the indicators of program quality (IPQs) in early childhood education for…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seaman, Don F.; Hoffman, Victoria; Chen, Chia-Yin; Dunn, Yvette T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Accountant+AND+Occupation&id=ED433776"> <span id="translatedtitle">Employment <span class="hlt">Projections</span> and Program Priorities. AIR 1999 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Forum Paper.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This study compared occupational <span class="hlt">projections</span> for Alabama with graduation rates in corresponding academic programs to provide a context for state and institutional policy decisions on new program initiatives and to comply with recent program viability legislation. The study examined number of degrees conferred, employment <span class="hlt">projections</span>, and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosenthal, Dan; Collier, Kitty</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6702193"> <span id="translatedtitle">Secretary's <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to Congress. Volume III. <span class="hlt">Project</span> summaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Progress and status of representative <span class="hlt">projects</span> in each program within DOE are summarized. Subjects covered and the number of <span class="hlt">projects</span> reported on are: conservation (2); fossil energy (11); nuclear energy (5); renewable energy resources (16); energy production and power marketing (3); general science (11); defense programs (7); contingency planning (3); and management and oversight (1). (MCW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">None</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22south+georgia%22&pg=6&id=ED139862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Youth Community Coordination <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1976.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the first two years of a three year <span class="hlt">project</span>, the Youth-Community Coordination <span class="hlt">Project</span> assisted five communities in five different states (Washington, Colorado, South Carolina, Georgia and Rhode Island), in developing more effective methods of dealing with problems of youth development. A profile of youth needs, attitudes and problems within the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">American Public Welfare Association, Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=affects+AND+foster+AND+children&pg=7&id=ED101843"> <span id="translatedtitle">Childhood & Government <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1973-1974.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This report presents the activities of the Child and Government <span class="hlt">Project</span> (CGP), a research and training program which focuses on government policies that affect children. The <span class="hlt">project</span>'s research efforts described in this report are divided into the following categories: (1) Spending on Children, (2) Children and the Law, (3) Foster Care, and (4)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">California Univ., Berkeley. Earl Warren Legal Inst.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963105"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the <span class="hlt">project</span>, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This <span class="hlt">project</span> provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the <span class="hlt">project</span> year ended. Progress this second year of <span class="hlt">project</span> includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under <span class="hlt">project</span> number 2002-019-00. This <span class="hlt">project</span> supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graves, Ron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pataha [Creek] Model Watershed : 1997 Habitat <span class="hlt">Projects</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">projects</span> outlined in detail on the attached <span class="hlt">project</span> reports are a few of the many <span class="hlt">projects</span> implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until this year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bartels, Duane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 1998 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6811833"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magma Energy Research <span class="hlt">Project</span>, FY80 <span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The technical feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies is explored. Five aspects of the <span class="hlt">project</span> are studied: resource location and definition, source tapping, magma characterization, magma/material compatibility, and energy extraction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colp, J.L. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA467767"> <span id="translatedtitle">SERDP Ecosystem Management <span class="hlt">Project</span> (SEMP): 2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SERDP Ecosystem Management <span class="hlt">Project</span> (SEMP) was initiated in 1998 by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), after a 1997 workshop on Department of Defense ecosystem management challenges. After the workshop, SERDP allocate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. L. Keane H. E. Balbach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60596313"> <span id="translatedtitle">StreamNet <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report Fiscal Year 2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fiscal Year 2008 (FY-08) represents a transitional year for the StreamNet <span class="hlt">project</span>. While the <span class="hlt">project</span> continued to acquire\\/update, standardize, georeference and disseminate fish-related data for the state, some tribal and one federal fisheries agencies, it also took on several new initiatives and is anticipating new regional guidance on data needs. Passage of the Columbia Basin Accords caused an administrative change</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruce Schmidt; Phil Roger; Lenora Oftedahl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/474840"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tank Vapor Characterization <span class="hlt">Project</span>: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> status report for FY 1996</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Fiscal Year 1996, staff at the Vapor Analytical Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed work in support of characterizing the vapor composition of the headspaces of radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Work performed included support for technical issues and sampling methodologies, upgrades for analytical equipment, analytical method development, preparation of unexposed samples, analyses of tank headspaces samples, preparation of data reports, and operation of the tank vapor database. Progress made in FY 1996 included completion and issuance of 50 analytical data reports. A sampling system comparison study was initiated and completed during the fiscal year. The comparison study involved the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based system, and the in situ vapor sampling system (ISVS), a cart-based system. Samples collected during the study were characterized for inorganic, permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds and organic speciation by SUMMA{trademark} and TST methods. The study showed comparable sampling results between the systems resulting in the program switching from the VSS to the less expensive ISVS methodology in late May 1996. A temporal study was initiated in January 1996 in order to understand the influences seasonal temperatures changes have on the vapors in the headspace of Hanford waste tanks. A holding time study was initiated in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of FY 1996. Samples were collected from tank S-102 and rushed to the laboratory for time zero analysis. Additional samples will be analyzed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silvers, K.L.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Almeida, T.L.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Simonen, C.A.; Thornton, B.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Projects</span>, 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Pend Oreille Wetlands <span class="hlt">project</span> consists of two adjacent parcels totaling about 600 acres. The parcels make up the northern boundary of the Kalispel Indian Reservation, and is also adjacent to the Pend Oreille River about 25 miles north of Newport and Albeni Falls Dam (Figure 1). Located in the Selkirk Mountains in Pend Oreille County Washington, the <span class="hlt">project</span> is situated on an active floodplain, increasing its effectiveness as mitigation for Albeni Falls Dam. The combination of the River, wetlands and the north-south alignment of the valley have resulted in an important migratory waterfowl flyway. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Kalispel Natural Resource Department have designated both <span class="hlt">project</span> sites as priority habitats. Seven habitat types exist on the <span class="hlt">project</span> properties and include four wetland habitats (open water, emergent, and scrub-shrub and forested), riparian deciduous forest, upland mixed coniferous forest and floodplain meadow. Importance of the <span class="hlt">project</span> to wildlife is further documented by the occurrence of an active Bald Eagle nest aerie.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Entz, Ray D. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796865"> <span id="translatedtitle">Moses Lake Fishery Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> : FY 1999 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moses Lake <span class="hlt">Project</span> consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The <span class="hlt">project</span> intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the <span class="hlt">project</span>. Phase 1of the <span class="hlt">project</span> culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">None given</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/516048"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority <span class="hlt">Project</span> Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of <span class="hlt">Projects</span>. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation <span class="hlt">projects</span> funded <span class="hlt">annually</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-06-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/901449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>: 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">U.S.D.A. Forest Service activities in the Fifteenmile basin during 1990 involved the placement of 84 log structures in a two mile reach of Fifteenmile Creek (RM 45.4-47.4) by a combination of falling trees into the channel, bucking in blowdown trees spanning the creek, and winching in existing blowdown and log segments from newly fallen trees. The primary <span class="hlt">project</span> objective on Fifteenmile Creek was to increase physical habitat diversity and rearing habitat for age l+ winter steelhead trout. USFS personnel also conducted spring spawning surveys in sections of Ramsey and Eightmile Creeks, physical habitat pre-<span class="hlt">project</span> monitoring in the above <span class="hlt">project</span> reach, water temperature monitoring, and macroinvertebrate sampling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asbridge, Gary M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (<span class="hlt">Project</span>). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The <span class="hlt">Project</span> approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the <span class="hlt">Project</span> in November 2000. The 31,781 acre <span class="hlt">Project</span> is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The <span class="hlt">Project</span> is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife <span class="hlt">projects</span> that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, <span class="hlt">project</span> proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines <span class="hlt">project</span> proposals. The ISRP recommends <span class="hlt">project</span> approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review <span class="hlt">project</span> proposals to ensure each <span class="hlt">project</span> meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (<span class="hlt">Project</span>) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ashley, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/782928"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This <span class="hlt">project</span> provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This <span class="hlt">project</span> calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual <span class="hlt">projects</span> contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new <span class="hlt">projects</span> in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old <span class="hlt">project</span> that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of <span class="hlt">project</span> fences. Since initiation of the <span class="hlt">project</span> in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60132494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular Pebble Bed Reactor <span class="hlt">Project</span>, University Research Consortium <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics ·</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petti; David Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 2002 with <span class="hlt">Projections</span> to 2020</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The latest Energy Outlook report was released in late December by the Department of Energy, looking at key factors of change over the last year and offers <span class="hlt">projections</span> of change to 2020. The report contains specific information on energy issues, prices, use, production, and more, including graphs and tables (when applicable) that relate to the nation as well as specific regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60706015"> <span id="translatedtitle">FY2011 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection <span class="hlt">Project</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and\\/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glen A. Warren; Christopher J. Francy; Jennifer J. Ressler; Luke E. Erikson; Gocha Tatishvili; R. Hatarik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Diesel%22&pg=6&id=ED183760"> <span id="translatedtitle">Program Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> for Industrial Education. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Designed to improve industrial education programs through the development of minimum uniform quality standards, a <span class="hlt">project</span> developed a task list, educationally sequenced the identified tasks, and developed a recommended shop layout and equipment list for four occupational areas: diesel repair, appliance repair, office machine repair, and small…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaeffer, Bruce W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60409261"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photovoltaic Systems Definition <span class="hlt">Project</span>. FY 1977 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activities and accomplishments of the Photovoltaic Systems Definition <span class="hlt">Project</span> during FY 77 are described. Included are status reports for continuing activities that are organized into six task elements. The first three tasks address systems support responsibilities; the remaining three treat concentrator technology development activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60762061"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1999</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this <span class="hlt">project</span>. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=BERCTPR777"> <span id="translatedtitle">North Stanley Polymer Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is a cooperative test of the economics of polymer enhanced waterflooding and is a field scale test involving 1,010 productive acres containing 72 million barrels of pore volume, 19 injection wells, and 28 producers. The primary activity durin...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Johnson J. W. Cunningham B. M. DuBois</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations <span class="hlt">Project</span> is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the <span class="hlt">project</span> provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an <span class="hlt">annual</span> operations plan that the <span class="hlt">project</span> develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations <span class="hlt">Project</span> were transferred to other <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Details of these activities can be found in those <span class="hlt">project</span>'s respective <span class="hlt">annual</span> reports.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=51725"> <span id="translatedtitle">STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SERDP) ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT <span class="hlt">PROJECT</span> (SEMP) FY00 <span class="hlt">ANNUAL</span> REPORT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is an <span class="hlt">annual</span> summary of the research activities and findings and the accomplishments for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) Ecosystem Management <span class="hlt">Project</span> (SEMP). This report provides a brief background on SEMP; shows how SEMP is organi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10148198"> <span id="translatedtitle">NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology <span class="hlt">project</span> to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962633"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression <span class="hlt">Project</span> 2007 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The goal of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These <span class="hlt">projects</span> have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the <span class="hlt">project</span> encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 <span class="hlt">project</span>, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/270725"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action <span class="hlt">Project</span>, fiscal year 1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to stakeholders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface <span class="hlt">project</span> and the ground water <span class="hlt">project</span>. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span>. DOE`s UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> is the world`s largest materials management <span class="hlt">project</span> ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span>, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9288S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in the <span class="hlt">annual</span> cycle of heavy precipitation events across the UK in future <span class="hlt">projections</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heavy precipitation in the UK shows a pronounced <span class="hlt">annual</span> cycle. To study past, present and future impacts on agriculture, ecosystems, etc. it is important to analyse intensity and frequency of extreme events together with their spatial and temporal occurrence throughout the year. We design a statistical model based on extreme value statistics (EVS) and fit the statistical model to the <span class="hlt">projected</span> precipitation output of 14 regional climate models (RCMs) driven by the SRES scenario A1B, used in the ENSEMBLES <span class="hlt">project</span>. Here we model extreme precipitation in the UK as a Poisson process with a non-stationary threshold. We use a sinusoidal model for the location and scale parameter of the corresponding generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution and a constant shape parameter. We assess future changes of the local scale <span class="hlt">annual</span> cycle in extreme precipitation in the ensemble of RCMs. To this end we fit the statistical model to the simulated precipitation for three time slices: 1961-2000, 2021-2060 and 2061-2100. As we have seen in the validation of the RCMs, the peak time of the <span class="hlt">annual</span> return level conditioned on the month of their occurrence is sufficiently well modeled by all RCMs to compare the difference between the three slices and analyse the resulting spatial patterns. We detect a shift in the peak time of the <span class="hlt">annual</span> cycle or a change in the amplitude of the <span class="hlt">annual</span> cycle of the intesity of extreme precipitation events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schindler, A.; Maraun, D.; Luterbacher, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/899631"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the <span class="hlt">project</span> as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--<span class="hlt">Project</span> No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--<span class="hlt">Project</span> No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the <span class="hlt">annual</span> contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two <span class="hlt">project</span> proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific <span class="hlt">project</span> proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2003100432"> <span id="translatedtitle">Silverleaf Whitefly: National Research, Action, and Technology Transfer Plan: <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Review of the Second 5-Year Plan and Final Report for 1992-2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Whitefly National Research and Action Plan Reviews from 1993 to 2002 provided <span class="hlt">annual</span> updates of the federal, state, and industry cooperative efforts to develop efficient management of methods for Bemisia populations. The work was initiated in 1991 whe...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Faust T. J. Henneberry T. M. PLerring W. A. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962432"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook <span class="hlt">Project</span> - ODFW, 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Core activities of the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCSP) are funded through the authority of the Lower Snake River Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP program was approved by the Water Resources Development Act of 1976, PL 94-587, Section 102, 94th Congress substantially in accordance with the Special Report, LSRCP, June 1975 on file with the Chief of Engineers. The LSRCP was prepared and submitted in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958, PL 85-624, 85th Congress, August 12, 1958 to mitigate for the losses of fish and wildlife caused by the construction of dams on lower Snake River. The GRESCSP is an artificial propagation program that was initiated by Bonneville Power Administrations Fish and Wildlife program in the mid 1990's. The intent of this program was to change the mitigation aspect of the LSRCP program (harvest mitigation) to an integrated supplementation program; inasmuch as, hatchery produced fish could be experimentally used as a recovery tool and fish surplus to mitigation would be available for in-place and in-kind harvest. Fish production is still authorized by the LSRCP with the original mitigation return goal of 5,860 adult spring Chinook to the <span class="hlt">project</span> area. The GRESCSP was developed with two primary components: (1) conventional broodstock (<span class="hlt">projects</span> 199800702; 199800703; 199800704) and (2) captive brood (<span class="hlt">projects</span> 199801001; 199801006). The GRESCSP relies on cooperative M&E efforts from the LSRCP including setting aside the Wenaha and Minam tributaries as natural production reserves components used for reference streams. The GRESCSP, coordinated with federal and tribal partners, identifies production levels for both propagation components and weir management strategies for each of the three supplemented tributary areas within the Grande Ronde Sub-basin. The three supplemented areas are Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and upper Grande Ronde River. Lookingglass Creek, an extirpated area, will be stocked (smolts and adults) with Catherine Creek origin salmon to initiate natural production in unseeded habitat, and to initiate future harvest opportunities. The current production levels have been incorporated into the U.S. v. Oregon Interim Management Agreement. The purpose of this contract is to integrate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) efforts with the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) program utilizing Lookingglass Hatchery as the primary rearing facility. BPA constructed an adult holding and spawning structure on the hatchery grounds; however, maintenance of this infrastructure was discontinued due to funding limitation and transferred to the LSRCP program in 2007. These integrated efforts focus on holding and spawning adults, rearing juveniles, fish health, and monitoring natural production (Redd counts) for Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and Upper Grande Ronde stocks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patterson, Scott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/794115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls <span class="hlt">project</span> is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-02-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/587975"> <span id="translatedtitle">1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> epidemiologic surveillance report for Fernald Environmental Management <span class="hlt">Project</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The US Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. During the past several years, a number of DOE sites have participated in the Epidemiologic Surveillance Program. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Fernald Environmental Management <span class="hlt">Project</span> (FEMP) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at FEMP and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5485533"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen engine performance analysis <span class="hlt">project</span>. Second <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Progress in a 3 year research program to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines is reported. Fifteen hydrogen engine configurations will be subjected to performance and emissions characterization tests. During the first two years, baseline data for throttled and unthrottled, carburetted and timed hydrogen induction, Pre IVC hydrogen-fueled engine configurations, with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and water injection, were obtained. These data, along with descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained, are given. Analyses of other hydrogen-engine <span class="hlt">project</span> data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort. The unthrottled engine vis-a-vis the throttled engine is found, in general, to exhibit higher brake thermal efficiency. The unthrottled engine also yields lower NO/sub x/ emissions, which were found to be a strong function of fuel-air equivalence ratio. (LCL)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adt, Jr., R. R.; Swain, M. R.; Pappas, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Mobility+impairments%22&pg=6&id=ED348833"> <span id="translatedtitle">Listening to the Experts: The Views of Working-Aged Consumers with Disabilities. Consumer Needs Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span> Year Four: Results of the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Year of a Five Year Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This monograph details the findings from the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year of a 5-year Consumer Needs Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Sixteen focus groups consisting of 133 working-aged persons (25 to 60 years old) with disabilities were convened in 3 different parts of the United States to discuss their personal and technological needs. Consumers identified problems they face…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ward, Carolyn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22supplements%22&pg=6&id=EJ674748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Education Design Showcase: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Awards 2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> special supplement recognizes outstanding architecture and design in K-12 schools and college facilities. Each entry contains photographs, a text description, and summarized <span class="hlt">project</span> data. Most also include floor plans. Architect and manufacturer indexes complete the supplement. (EV)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">School Planning & Management, 2003</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration <span class="hlt">project</span> is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5910402"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1992 with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dramatic events over the past year show how international developments can affect domestic energy markets. Market reactions to events in the Persian Gulf and in what used to be called the Soviet Union reinforced the perception of global interdependence in regard to both energy supply and energy demand. The interdependence was reflected most visibly and promptly in world oil prices. With US reliance on foreign oil expected to continue trending upward, any price changes tend to feed back'' throughout this Nation's economy. Despite short-term fluctuations, the longer-range US energy outlook has remained relatively constant since last year. Assuming that current laws and policies remain in force, this document addresses uncertainties by discussing four alternative scenarios in addition to a reference'' case. Two cases vary the assumption about the rate at which the US national economy will grow, while the other two estimate effects if world oil prices should go lower or higher. This report gives <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2010 for energy end uses, oil, gas, electricity, coal, and comparative analyses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10112880"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1992 with <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dramatic events over the past year show how international developments can affect domestic energy markets. Market reactions to events in the Persian Gulf and in what used to be called the Soviet Union reinforced the perception of global interdependence in regard to both energy supply and energy demand. The interdependence was reflected most visibly and promptly in world oil prices. With US reliance on foreign oil expected to continue trending upward, any price changes tend to ``feed back`` throughout this Nation`s economy. Despite short-term fluctuations, the longer-range US energy outlook has remained relatively constant since last year. Assuming that current laws and policies remain in force, this document addresses uncertainties by discussing four alternative scenarios in addition to a ``reference`` case. Two cases vary the assumption about the rate at which the US national economy will grow, while the other two estimate effects if world oil prices should go lower or higher. This report gives <span class="hlt">projections</span> to 2010 for energy end uses, oil, gas, electricity, coal, and comparative analyses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10170825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Healy Clean Coal <span class="hlt">Project</span> 1993 <span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary objective of the HCCP is to demonstrate a new power plant design integrating an advanced combustor and heat recovery system coupled with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The parties anticipate that, if the demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> is successful, the technology will be commercialized in the late 1990s and be capable of (1) achieving significant reductions in the emissions of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen from existing facilities, (2) providing for future energy needs in an environmentally acceptable manner. Alaskan bituminous and subbituminous coals will be the fuels. Emissions of SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}, from the plant will be controlled using TRW`s slagging coal combustor with limestone injection, in conjunction with a boiler supplied by Foster Wheeler. Further SO{sub 2}, and particulate removal will be accomplished using Joy Technologies, Inc.`s (Joy) Activated Recycle Spray Absorber System. Successful demonstration of these technologies is expected to result in NO{sub x}, emissions of less than 0.2 lb/MMBtu and SO{sub 2}, removal efficiencies greater than 90 percent. The heart of the system being demonstrated is a combustion system. Each combustor consists of two cylindrical sections followed by a short duct that connects the combustor to the boiler. A precombustor burns about 35 percent of the coal to preheat the main combustor secondary air. The preheated air enters the main combustor section tangentially to impart a swirling motion to the coal and air. The balance of the coal is injected axially through multiple injection ports at the front end of this cylindrical section.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/598405"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research <span class="hlt">project</span>. 1994 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/789570"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1999.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this <span class="hlt">project</span>. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of Pacific lampreys from tribal members within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation was useful in gaining baseline life history information. Tribal members described harvesting two types of lampreys from spring through fall, the short brown type and the long dark type. Lamprey spawning distribution was from the mouth to the headwaters in the Umatilla River. Larval lampreys were observed in the mud and sand areas of the river. Tribal members observed major declines in lampreys within the Columbia River basin. Larval Pacific lampreys were distributed throughout the John Day River basin. Larval distribution in the other subbasins was patchy and limited to the lower reaches of the streams. Larval densities were highly variable in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, as opposed to the Main stem John Day River. Larval lengths varied little in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, but were highly variable in the Main stem John Day River. Larval abundance decreased as we moved upstream in the Columbia and Snake rivers. In addition, we found strong evidence for lack of larval recruitment as distance increased from the mouth of the Columbia River. We identified clinical indicators of stress in adult Pacific lampreys. Plasma glucose became elevated soon after acute stress and remained elevated for one week. Plasma lactate also became elevated by 30 minutes; however, it decreased to resting levels by one hour after application of the stressor. Muscle lactate was shown to have an inverse relationship with glucose. Muscle lactate levels decreased by 4 hours and remained depressed for two days. Plasma chloride ions decreased by one hour, then returned to resting levels by 8 hours, decreased again at 24 hours, and then recovered by 48 hours. The steroid cortisol was not found in the plasma of Pacific lampreys. Our study suggests plasma glucose, lactate, chloride ions, and muscle lactate can be used as clinical indicators of stress in Pacific lampreys.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Close, David A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular Pebble Bed Reactor <span class="hlt">Project</span>, University Research Consortium <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for numerous repetitive calculations has been developed. Use of the code has focused on scoping studies for MPBR design features and proliferation issues. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. · Detailed gas reactor physics calculations have also been performed with the MCNP and VSOP codes. Furthermore, studies on the proliferation resistance of the MPBR fuel cycle has been initiated using these code · Issues identified during the MPBR research has resulted in a NERI proposal dealing with turbo-machinery design being approved for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup “meter” and modularization techniques, were also funded in which the MIT team will be a participant. · A South African MPBR fuel testing proposal is pending ($7.0M over nine years).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petti, David Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/920625"> <span id="translatedtitle">2003 Fernald Environmental Management <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Fernald Environmental Management <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/812363"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery <span class="hlt">Project</span> : Combined-Planning & Design and Operations & Maintenance Reports, 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2000 Combined Maintenance and Operations (O&M) and Planning and Design (P&D) contract is hereby completed based on this <span class="hlt">annual</span> report patterned after the Statement of Work (SOW) for the <span class="hlt">project</span> as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration. Primary <span class="hlt">project</span> activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 process that: (1) Accepted final design, (2) Authorized a capital construction amount of $16,050,000, and (3) Authorized contractor selection, and (4) Provided construction site dedication, and (5) Implemented construction activities over an anticipated 2-year period of July 2000 through October 2002.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60747454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy consumption and expenditure <span class="hlt">projections</span> by income quintile on the basis of the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1997 forecast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. <span class="hlt">Projected</span> energy consumption and expenditures, and <span class="hlt">projected</span> energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. <span class="hlt">Projected</span> consumption of electricity,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. A. Poyer; T. Allison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5212919"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Third <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, July 1, 1978-August 31, 1979</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is a cooperative venture between Cities Service Company and the US Department of Energy. The main objective is to demonstrate the operation and economics of a successful commercial scale In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span> in a heavy oil reservoir. This Third <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report deals primarily with performance, development and economics of the <span class="hlt">project</span> in the third year of operation, with pertinent information from the First and Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report included for background information. The five elongated patterns were developed for this demonstration on Cities Service Company's Bodcau Fee B lease in the Bellevue Field, Bossier, Parish, Louisiana. This field was discovered in 1921 and is a dome type structure covering approximately 900 productive acres. Production is from the Upper Cretaceous Nacatoch Sand occurring from 300 to 400 feet deep. Primary production by fluid expansion and later gravity drainage amounted to only about five percent of the original oil-in-place. Thirty-eight producers, five injectors and five temperature observation wells are included in the 19-acre <span class="hlt">project</span>. Estimated recoverable reserves from the <span class="hlt">project</span> is 700,000 barrels. During the first three years of the contract, cumulative air and water injection has been 7,046,589 MCF and 1,319,270 barrels. Oil production has been 449,816 barrels. This recovery represents 64% of the total estimated recoverable reserves. Current expense at the field level for operations, development, maintenance, well service and Louisiana Severance Total Tax is $10.60 per gross barrel produced.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garvey, J.; Pusch, W.H.; Fulford, R.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/676918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action <span class="hlt">Project</span> fiscal year 1997 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to stakeholders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fiscal year (FY) 1997 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) <span class="hlt">Project</span>. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface <span class="hlt">project</span> and the groundwater <span class="hlt">project</span>. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface <span class="hlt">project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/537312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fiscal year 1996 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action <span class="hlt">Project</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) <span class="hlt">Project</span>. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface <span class="hlt">project</span> and the ground water <span class="hlt">project</span>. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961987"> <span id="translatedtitle">CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary <span class="hlt">project</span> activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six <span class="hlt">projects</span> planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing <span class="hlt">projects</span> in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback <span class="hlt">project</span> on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary <span class="hlt">projects</span> as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major <span class="hlt">project</span> areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation <span class="hlt">Project</span> site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned <span class="hlt">project</span> sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at <span class="hlt">project</span> sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each <span class="hlt">project</span> site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and <span class="hlt">project</span> partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each <span class="hlt">project</span>'s success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each <span class="hlt">project</span> to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned <span class="hlt">project</span> activities and biological opinions were written and approved. <span class="hlt">Project</span> activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10168411"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sandia National Laboratories site-wide hydrogeologic characterization <span class="hlt">project</span> calendar year 1992 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) <span class="hlt">project</span> has been implemented as part of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to develop the regional hydrogeologic framework and baseline for the approximately 100 mi of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) and adjacent withdrawn public lands upon which SNL/NM has performed research and development activities. Additionally, the SWHC <span class="hlt">project</span> will investigate and characterize generic hydrogeologic issues associated with the 172 ER sites owned by SNL/NM across its facilities on KAFB. As called for in the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the permitter and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL/NM as the permittees, an <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is to be prepared by the SWHC <span class="hlt">project</span> team. This document serves two primary purposes: (1) to identify and describe the conceptual framework for the hydrogeologic system underlying SNL/NM and (2) to describe characterization activities undertaken in the preceding year that add to our understanding (reduce our uncertainties) regarding the conceptual and quantitative hydrogeologic framework. This SWHC <span class="hlt">project</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report focuses primarily on purpose 1, providing a summary description of the current {open_quotes}state of knowledge{close_quotes} of the Sandia National Laboratories/Kirtland Air Force Base (SNL/KAFB) hydrogeologic setting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crowson, D.; Gibson, J.D.; Haase, C.S.; Holt, R.; Hyndman, D.; Krumhansl, J.; Lauffer, F.; McCord, J.P.; McCord, J.T.; Neel, D. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/137340"> <span id="translatedtitle">IGCC repowering <span class="hlt">project</span> clean coal II <span class="hlt">project</span> public design report. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, October 1992--September 1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering <span class="hlt">project</span> that was designed to provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) in Springfield, Illinois. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system consists of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-BTU gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment, The <span class="hlt">project</span> is currently completing the second budget period of five. The major activities to date are: (1) Establishment of a design, cost, and schedule for the <span class="hlt">project</span>; (2) Establishment of financial commitments; (3) Acquire design and modeling data; (4) Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; (5) Development of a detailed cost estimate; (6) Resolution of <span class="hlt">project</span> business issues; (7) CWL&P renewal and replacement activities; and (8) Application for environmental air permits. A <span class="hlt">Project</span> Management Plan was generated, The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the <span class="hlt">project</span> was established in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities were accomplished, including the Air Permit Application, completion of the National Environmental Policy Act process, and the draft Environmental Monitoring Plan. At the end of 1992 the DOE requested that Duke Engineering and Services Inc., (DESI) be used to complete the balance of plant cost estimate. DESI was retained to do this work, DESI completed the material take off estimate and included operations, maintenance, and startup in the estimate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE96000558"> <span id="translatedtitle">IGCC repowering <span class="hlt">project</span> clean coal II <span class="hlt">project</span> public design report. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, October 1992--September 1993.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering <span class="hlt">project</span> that was designed to provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) in Springfield, Illinois. The Inte...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60596268"> <span id="translatedtitle">CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric D. Hoverson; Alexandra Amonette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cemml.carleton.ca/davidson/publications/2006/wang_jgr_2006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of International Panel on Climate Change <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Assessment Report climate model simulations of surface albedo with satellite products over northern latitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surface albedos simulated by seventeen climate models over the northern latitudes of the Western Hemisphere were compared with satellite-derived albedo products provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology <span class="hlt">Project</span> (ISCCP). Model simulations were conducted in support of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Assessment Report (AR4). Results show the following: (1) <span class="hlt">Annual</span> albedo of the region averaged</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shusen Wang; Alexander P. Trishchenko; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov; Andrew Davidson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59244977"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment Applicability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large percentage of <span class="hlt">fourth</span> amendment litigation involves the issues of applicability to place, waiver\\/consent, and the reasonable expectation of privacy. Not one of these issues, however, has the remotest thing to do with the ultimate substance of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> amendment protection itself. They deal exclusively with the threshold question of whether the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> amendment is even involved. Only if</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John O. Sonsteng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=212836"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2007 Multi-state research <span class="hlt">project</span> on "Irrigation Management for Humid and Sub-Humid Areas" S1018.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the <span class="hlt">annual</span> results from scientists at the Application and Production Technology Research Unit in Stoneville, as members of the multi-state research <span class="hlt">project</span> on irrigation and water management S1018. The multi-state research <span class="hlt">project</span> has four key objectives, three of which the St...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE20121009755"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009. Final <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the sixth <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of a seven-year <span class="hlt">project</span> (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The <span class="hlt">project</span>, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conduc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Cameron A. B. Borde B. D. Ebberts C. Corbett G. C. Roegner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (Hellsgate <span class="hlt">Project</span>) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate <span class="hlt">Project</span> protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (Hellsgate <span class="hlt">Project</span>) during the past year.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/230338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization <span class="hlt">Project</span> 1994 quality program status report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This status report is for calendar year 1994. It summarizes the <span class="hlt">annual</span> activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization <span class="hlt">Project</span> (YMP or <span class="hlt">Project</span>) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, a baseline is established that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to <span class="hlt">annually</span> identify adverse trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> status report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolivar, S.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/928599"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> Oregon : <span class="hlt">Project</span> title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each <span class="hlt">project</span>. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream. Preliminary cost estimates are summarized for each habitat <span class="hlt">project</span> and economic benefits are calculated for Deer Creek.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olsen, Erik A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10189753"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blast furnace granular coal injection <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, January--December 1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This initial <span class="hlt">annual</span> report describes the Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection <span class="hlt">project</span> being implemented at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor, Indiana, plant. This installation will be the first in the United States to employ British Steel technology that uses granular coal to provide part of the fuel requirement of blast furnaces. The <span class="hlt">project</span> will demonstrate/assess a broad range of technical/economic issues associated with the use of coal for this purpose. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. Preliminary Design (Phase 1) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase 2) began in August 1993. Construction is expected to complete in the first quarter of 1995 which will be followed by the demonstration test program (Phase 3). Progress is described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/650230"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispell (i.e. Kalispel) Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 1996.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1996 the Kalispell Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement <span class="hlt">project</span> for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A habitat and population assessment was conducted on Browns Creek a tributary of Cee Cee Ah Creek, one of the priority tributaries outlined in the 1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report. The assessment was used to determine the type and quality of habitat that was limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high amounts of sediment in the stream, low bank cover, and a lack of winter habitat. Data collected from this assessment was used to prescribe habitat enhancement measures for Browns Creek. Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1995 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, were conducted during field season 1996. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and in stream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. The construction of the largemouth bass hatchery was started in October of 1995. The KNRD, Contractors Northwest Inc. and associated subcontractors are in the process of constructing the hatchery. The <span class="hlt">projected</span> date of hatchery completion is summer 1997.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Lockwood, Jr., Neil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962476"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This <span class="hlt">project</span> is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research <span class="hlt">projects</span> that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This <span class="hlt">project</span> deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW <span class="hlt">projects</span> evaluate hatchery operations (<span class="hlt">project</span> No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (<span class="hlt">project</span> No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three <span class="hlt">projects</span> monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation <span class="hlt">projects</span> which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase <span class="hlt">annual</span> returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E <span class="hlt">project</span> conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year <span class="hlt">projects</span> that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these <span class="hlt">projects</span> include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The <span class="hlt">project</span>'s goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Riparian Buffer <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for the Period April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteen mile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. In the first year of implementation, 26 buffer contracts were established on 25-26 miles of stream. This nearly doubled the <span class="hlt">annual</span> goal. Buffer widths averaged 83 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.5 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,491,235 compared with $64,756 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This <span class="hlt">project</span> provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. More than half of the contracts this year have been done in the Hood and Fifteen mile sub-basins with additional contracts in adjacent sub-basins.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10106710"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clean Coal II: PFBC Utility Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, [January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the Appalachian Power Company (APCO) for the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Utility Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The report covers the period January 1, 1992 to December 31, 1992; during which time, Task 1.1.3 (Value Engineering) was started. Task 1.1.3 as well as continuation of Task 1.1.2 (<span class="hlt">Project</span> Support) are associated with Budget Period 2 (BP2) of the Cooperative Agreement. BP2 tasks, which extend from January 1992 to January 1996, are aimed at reducing the technical and economic risks of a large commercial PFBC plant. This objective is being met by performing value engineering activities and testing various systems, including a sorbent fines admission system. Installation of this system (at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant) started in December 1992. The sorbent system being installed is for the purpose of a process verification. Hardware costs specific to verification activities are being funded under the PFBC Utility Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> Cooperative Agreement. Test data is dependent upon operation of the Tidd facility. The present PFBC program identifies the year 2004 for completion of the <span class="hlt">project</span> at an as-spent total shared cost of approximately $918 million.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15004819"> <span id="translatedtitle">Georgia-Pacific: Crossett Mill Identifies Heat Recovery <span class="hlt">Projects</span> and Operational Improvements that May Save $9.6 Million <span class="hlt">Annually</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assessment team conducted a mill-wide energy survey at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas mill to update a previous pinch analysis. Three heat recovery <span class="hlt">projects</span> were identified that could reduce <span class="hlt">annual</span> costs by $4.8 million and reduce natural gas use by 1,845,000 x 106 Btu. The overall payback period for the heat recovery <span class="hlt">projects</span> would be less than 1 year. Furthermore, by implementing operational improvements, the mill could save $4.8 million more <span class="hlt">annually</span> and 1,500,000 x 106 Btu in natural gas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/835419"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report submitted on the PNNL portion of EMSP <span class="hlt">Project</span> No. 86729</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A migration-resistant fraction (MRF) is a portion of a polluted sediment's contaminant inventory that exhibits slow release. Slow release is a key process that controls organic contaminant transport and fate in a plume long after the major portion of the contaminant inventory of a source term has been depleted or removed. Slow release rates are not well understood nor are they commonly accounted for in subsurface numerical transport models. In this <span class="hlt">project</span>, we propose to study the accumulation and slow-release behavior of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) MRF as a function of time, contaminant concentration and different physicochemical properties of sediments. Both model materials that mimic the physical/chemical properties of sediments and natural sediments will be used in <span class="hlt">project</span> studies. Experiments will be conducted at macro- and microscopic scales under both unsaturated (Washington State University-WSU) and saturated conditions (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory-PNNL). The results will be used to (1) develop a mechanistic description of slow release of CCl4 in the subsurface environment and (2) lay the groundwork for improving the robustness of numerical models that predict organic contaminant transport and fate under natural conditions. The outcomes of this study are expected to improve the conceptual model of CCl4 subsurface transport and fate at different physical scales and have an impact on remediation and site closure decision-making at Department of Energy (DOE) sites, especially in situations involving the potential application of natural attenuation. This report summarizes work performed on the PNNL component of the <span class="hlt">project</span> after the first 8 months of a three-year <span class="hlt">project</span>. Progress on the WSU component of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is addressed under a separate <span class="hlt">annual</span> report submission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riley, Robert; Amonette, James; Peyton, Brent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921262"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> in the Columbia River Estuary, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is the third <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of a six-year <span class="hlt">project</span> to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The <span class="hlt">project</span> is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>. This <span class="hlt">project</span> is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900212"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> in the Columbia River Estuary, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2005</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is the second <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of a six-year <span class="hlt">project</span> to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> throughout the estuary. This <span class="hlt">project</span> is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual <span class="hlt">projects</span> and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5269456"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weeks Island S sand reservoir B gravity stable miscible CO/sub 2/ displacement, Iberia Parish, Louisiana. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, June 1980-June 1981</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Shell, in conjunction with the United States of America Department of Energy, is conducting a gravity stable displacement field test of the miscible CO/sub 2/ process. The test is being conducted in the portion of a fault sealed reservoir lying below a subsea depth of -12,750 feet. Injection of the CO/sub 2/ slug at the producing gas-oil contact commenced in October 1978. Injection of the 860 MM cubic foot slug was completed in February of 1980. The slug of CO/sub 2/ was moved downward through the watered out sand by production of downdip water. The leading edge of the displacement has reached the producing perforations and production of the oil column commenced on January 26, 1981. Conventional cores and the log-inject-log technique were used to determine residual oil saturation in a well drilled as the pilot producer. Pulsed neutron logging devices have been used to detect the CO/sub 2/ slug and monitor its subsequent movements in the vicinity of the production well. The monitor logs indicate the thickness of the oil column had increased during the displacement to the production perforations located 130 feet below the level of CO/sub 2/ injection. The 23 foot oil column remaining at initiation of the <span class="hlt">project</span> had apparently grown to 57 feet. PVT samples production data indicate CO/sub 2/ has penetrated the oil column and free gas is being produced with the oil. However, the qualitative measurements of the logs do not indicate a large gas or CO/sub 2/ content in the oil column.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perry, G.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60789731"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The specific research goal of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable <span class="hlt">annual</span> subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg\\/ha\\/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report covers the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year of sampling of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott R. Everett; Michael A. Tuell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED443814.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies in Teaching 1999 Research Digest. Research <span class="hlt">Projects</span> Presented at <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 1999).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This publication presents a collection of research <span class="hlt">projects</span> presented at the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Research Forum at Wake Forest University: "The Use of Group Work as an Effective Teaching Technique in Lower Level Spanish Classes" (James Blackburn); "What Are the Real Factors behind Student Motivation?" (Matthew Grey Burdick); "Can Students Communicate…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCoy, Leah P., Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/809049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hangman Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this <span class="hlt">project</span> during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of <span class="hlt">Project</span> activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this <span class="hlt">Project</span> for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and <span class="hlt">project</span> orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the <span class="hlt">project</span> to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The <span class="hlt">Project</span> will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the <span class="hlt">Project</span> Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of <span class="hlt">project</span> implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10193546"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferrocyanide Safety <span class="hlt">Project</span> Task 3 Ferrocyanide Aging Studies FY 1993 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the storage of waste in a safe manner. This Task Team, composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions about the Hanford ferrocyanide tanks. The Ferrocyanides Safety <span class="hlt">Project</span> at PNL is part of the Waste Tank Safety Program led by WHC. The overall purpose of the WHC program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Tank Farm <span class="hlt">Project</span> Office, is to (1) maintain the ferrocyanide tanks with minimal risk of an accident, (2) select one or more strategies to assure safe storage, and (3) close out the unreviewed safety question (USQ). This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1993 on Task 3, Ferrocyanides Aging Studies, which deals with the aging behavior of simulated ferrocyanide wastes. Aging processes include the dissolution and hydrolysis of nickel ferrocyanides in high pH aqueous solutions. Investigated were the effects of pH variation; ionic strength and sodium ion concentration; the presence of anions such as phosphate, carbonate, and nitrate; temperature; and gamma radiation on solubility of ferrocyanide materials including In-Farm-lA, Rev. 4 flowsheet-prepared Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lilga, M.A.; Lumetta, M.R.; Schiefelbein, G.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10145149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, [January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Technical Progress Report for the period ending December 31, 1993, summarizes the work done to date by Tampella Power Corporation and Enviropower Inc. Enviropower Inc.`s efforts were concentrated on the Toms Creek PDS (Preliminary Design and Studies). The PDS was based on a Gasification Island size providing coal gas to General Electric`s frame 6(B) gas turbine. During the course of the <span class="hlt">project</span>, the scope of the PDS was expanded to include heat and material balances and selected equipment sizing for an IGCC plant size incorporating General Electric`s newly introduced 6(FA) gas turbine. The reasons for this revision were improved plant economics and performance. Tampella Power Corporation`s efforts were also concentrated on Toms Creek design. Information provided by Enviropower Inc. was used to generate more detailed heat and material balances; P&IDs; equipment and system design; and economic evaluation data. Tampella Power Corporation also performed several site specific heat and material balance calculations and economic analyses to provide the basis for evaluating alternate locations for the <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feher, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6039193"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proceedings - <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> fluidized bed conference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The proceedings contain 14 papers which deal with the following topics: anthracite culm combustion for process heat and cogeneration; case histories describing the performance of circulating fluidized bed combustors (CFBC); design and economics of CFBC; pulverizers for coal and sorbent preparation; ash removal systems; and the status of independent power generation and the Clean Coal Technology Program. Appendices contain manufacturers' installation lists with details of customers, fuels, steam conditions, and applications. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/814963"> <span id="translatedtitle">WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION <span class="hlt">PROJECT</span> <span class="hlt">ANNUAL</span> SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDAR YEAR 2002</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> (WVDP or <span class="hlt">Project</span>) is published to inform those with interest about environmental conditions at the WVDP. In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, the report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2002 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system, confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. In 2002, the West Valley Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, the site of a DOE environmental cleanup activity operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co. (WVNSCO), was in the final stages of stabilizing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) that remained at the site after commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing had been discontinued in the early 1970s. The <span class="hlt">Project</span> is located in western New York State, about 30 miles south of Buffalo, within the New York State-owned Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The WVDP is being conducted in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Ongoing work activities at the WVDP during 2002 included: (1) completing HLW solidification and melter shutdown; (2) shipping low-level radioactive waste off-site for disposal; (3) constructing a facility where large high-activity components can be safely packaged for disposal; (4) packaging and removing spent materials from the vitrification facility; (5) preparing environmental impact statements for future activities; (6) removing as much of the waste left behind in waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 as was reasonably possible; (7) removing storage racks, canisters, and debris from the fuel receiving and storage pool, decontaminating pool walls, and beginning shipment of debris for disposal; (8) ongoing decontamination in the general purpose cell and the process mechanical cell (also referred to as the head end cells); (9) planning for cleanup of waste in the plutonium purification cell (south) and extraction cell number 2 in the main plant; (10) ongoing characterization of facilities such as the waste tank farm and process cells; (11) monitoring the environment and managing contaminated areas within the <span class="hlt">Project</span> facility premises; and (12) flushing and rinsing HLW solidification facilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/663594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy consumption and expenditure <span class="hlt">projections</span> by income quintile on the basis of the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1997 forecast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. <span class="hlt">Projected</span> energy consumption and expenditures, and <span class="hlt">projected</span> energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. <span class="hlt">Projected</span> consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/887001"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery <span class="hlt">Project</span>'s (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/345037"> <span id="translatedtitle">International partnerships in renewable energy: Promoting climate challenge partnerships by small U.S. utilities. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">project</span> report, October 1997--March 1998</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1997, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) received a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to implement a program to promote the participation of NRECA members in the President`s Climate Challenge Action Plan. NRECA had been in discussions with Salt River <span class="hlt">Project</span> (SRP) and the Arizona Electric Power Cooperative (AEPCO) to pursue the opportunity of supporting a small solar energy rural electrification <span class="hlt">project</span> in Sonora prior to the signature of this agreement. When the Climate Challenge <span class="hlt">project</span> was approved, an agreement between NRECA, SRP, and AEPCO was reached to implement the Sonora <span class="hlt">project</span> with funding from DOE, SRP, and AEPCO. This periodic report will summarize the results of the Sonora solar electrification <span class="hlt">project</span>. While other Climate Challenge activities were also underway during this reporting period, due to the impact of this <span class="hlt">project</span> it was decided to provide an in-depth report of this single <span class="hlt">project</span>. Information directly relevant to the actions taken on this <span class="hlt">project</span> is provided in Annexes 1 and 2. The goals of the Sonora Solar Electrification <span class="hlt">project</span> were the following: (1) demonstrate the willingness and ability of US electric utilities to undertake a climate challenge <span class="hlt">project</span> using renewable energy technologies; (2) select one or more communities distant from the electric grid with sufficient interest and resources to accept and sustain rural electric service using solar photovoltaic energy; (3) organize a payment system that would provide for the long-term technical and institutional viability of the <span class="hlt">project</span>; (4) train users to operate the solar home systems safely and within proper operating parameters; (5) train local technicians to maintain the solar home systems; (6) procure and install high quality equipment at affordable costs; and (7) ascertain market conditions for expansion of program in the future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3391507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crossing the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> hurdle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> hurdle, the requirement that pharmaceutical manufacturers can demonstrate that their new products represent good value for money as well as being of good quality, effective and safe, is increasingly being required by healthcare systems. In crossing this ‘<span class="hlt">fourth</span>’ hurdle, companies will usually need to demonstrate that their products are more effective than relevant comparators and that the increased cost is offset by the enhanced benefits. Decision makers, however, must draw their conclusions not only on the basis of the underpinning science but also on the social values of the people they serve.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rawlins, Michael D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/774153"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> Oregon, 1998-1999 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day River basin supports one of the healthiest naturally-produced populations of spring chinook in the mid-Columbia River basin. The study of life history and natural escapement conducted from 1978 to 1985 (Lindsay et al. 1986) provided valuable information on production and productivity of the John Day River spring chinook. With the exception of two years since completion of the study in 1985 (1989 and 1995), spring chinook spawning surveys were conducted in index areas only and have not provided adequate information to assess age composition, progeny-to-parent production values, and estimate natural spawning escapement. The PATH <span class="hlt">project</span> (Marmorek and Peters 1996) has identified the John Day basin spring chinook as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin. To meet the data needs as an index stock, sufficient <span class="hlt">annual</span> estimates of spawner escapement, age composition, and smolt-to-adult survival are essential. There is need to determine the <span class="hlt">annual</span> spawner escapement and age composition for the John Day basin spring chinook to provide us the ability to estimate progeny-to-parent production for each brood year. This need can be met by expanding the <span class="hlt">annual</span> chinook spawning surveys, estimating the <span class="hlt">annual</span> escapement, and determining age composition by scale pattern analyses. This <span class="hlt">project</span> provides information as directed under two measures of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 4.3C specifies that the key indicator populations should be monitored to provide detailed stock status information. In addition, measure 7.1C identifies the need for collection of population status, life history, and other data on wild and naturally spawning populations. This <span class="hlt">project</span> was developed in direct response to recommendations and needs of the PATH <span class="hlt">project</span>, the Fish and Wildlife Program, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Multi-Year Implementation Plan.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jonasson, Brian C.; Albaladejo, Victor D.; Carmichael, Richard W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE92612999"> <span id="translatedtitle">Texts of the instruments concerning the Agency's assistance to Romania for the establishment of a research reactor <span class="hlt">project</span>. A <span class="hlt">fourth</span> supply agreement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency has provided to the Government of Romania in connection with a research reactor <span class="hlt">project</span> (IAEA-INFCIRC/206, 206 Adds.1 and 2 and Mod.2), the Agency and the Governments of Romania and the United States of Ameri...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60788377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> in a series</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Curtis M. Knudsen; Steven L. Schroder; Mark V. Johnston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/572499"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> moment method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Higher moment analysis has typically been used to upper bound certain functions. In this paper, we introduce a new combinatorial method to lower bound the expectation of an absolute value by a <span class="hlt">fourth</span> moment. We present a special case of this lower bound in a particularly useful form — yielding a general mathematical inequality on expectations. In the special case</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bonnie Berger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59007355"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment First Principles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment today is an embarrassment. Much of what the Supreme Court has said in the last half century - that the Amendment generally calls for warrants and probable cause for all searches and seizures, and exclusion of illegally obtained evidence - is initially plausible but ultimately misguided. As a matter of text, history, and plain old common sense,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akhil Reed Amar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DOEET1204752V3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. D. Carmichael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE96014484"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, 1995.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the 1995-96 <span class="hlt">project</span> period, four new habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatill...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. T. Shaw</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntur.lib.ntu.edu.tw/bitstream/246246/81413/1/51.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aggregation of Health Behaviors among <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Graders in Northern Taiwan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To investigate the aggregation of health behaviors among <span class="hlt">fourth</span> graders in northern Taiwan. Methods: This study conducted an analysis of data collected from the 2001 Child and Adolescent Behaviors in Long-term Evolution (CABLE) <span class="hlt">project</span>, which included a sample of 2075 <span class="hlt">fourth</span> grade students. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to investigate the aggregation patterns. Results: After factor analysis,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee-Lan Yen; Ching-Ju Chiu; Wen-Chi Wu; Ling-Yen Pan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/899518"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the <span class="hlt">project</span> as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--<span class="hlt">Project</span> No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--<span class="hlt">Project</span> No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-15/pdf/2012-3488.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 8724 - Natural Gas Pipelines; <span class="hlt">Project</span> Cost and <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Limits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...and II shall be adjusted each calendar year to reflect the `GDP implicit price deflator' published by the Department of Commerce...Commerce's latest <span class="hlt">annual</span> determination of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) implicit price deflator, a mathematical updating...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6172586"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neurosurgery. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> edition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition of this volume in the Operative Surgery Series has been considerably revised to accommodate the many changes which have changed the practice of neurosurgery in the past eight years. There have been advances in technology, such as the wider application of CT scanning, in surgical technique, and in the design of new implantable materials. All these developments have substantially affected both the practice of neurosurgery and the prognosis for the patient and are fully reflected in the new edition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simon, L.; Thomas, D.G.T.; Clark, W.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537718"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> generation bound states</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the spectrum and wave functions of q{sup '}q{sup '} bound states for heavy <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation quarks (q{sup '}) that have a very small mixing with the three observed generations of standard model quarks. Such bound states come with different color, spin and flavor quantum numbers. Since the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation Yukawa coupling, {lambda}{sub q}{sup '}, is large we include all perturbative corrections to the potential between the heavy quark and antiquark of order {lambda}{sub q}{sup '2}N{sub c}/16{pi}{sup 2} where N{sub c} is the number of colors, as well as relativistic corrections suppressed by (v/c){sup 2}. We find that the lightest <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation quark masses for which a bound state exists for color octet states. For the color singlet states, which always have a bound state, we analyze the influence that the Higgs couplings have on the size and binding energy of the bound states.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishiwata, Koji; Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE98005337"> <span id="translatedtitle">West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, September 3, 1997--September 2, 1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following report is the <span class="hlt">Project</span> Management Plan for the fifth year of the West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> is one of four mid-term <span class="hlt">projects</span> selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the DOE...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. H. Gillham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60770536"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 <span class="hlt">project</span> period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the <span class="hlt">project</span> in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. <span class="hlt">Projects</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Todd Shaw; Amy D. Sexton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1291"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tucannon Model Watershed 1997 Habitat <span class="hlt">Projects</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report <span class="hlt">Project</span> Period: January 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Tucannon Model Watershed 1997 habitat <span class="hlt">projects</span> were designed to address critical limiting factors identified through the watershed assessment and Plan development. Construction elements were composed of bioengineering techniques designed to increase salmonid habitat complexity, insure stream bank and geomorphic stability, and reduce stream temperature and sediments in spawning gravels. Cooperation and agreement between landowners and resource agencies for restoring resource conditions has grown due to <span class="hlt">project</span> success and is expected to continue for the benefit of all.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruegman, Terry; Nordheim, Debby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE96001680"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>. 1994 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The <span class="hlt">project</span> focused on...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. T. Shaw</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2008112373"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Project</span> BioShield: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report to Congress, August 2006-July 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Project</span> BioShield is a comprehensive effort involving Federal agencies to develop and make available modern, effective drugs and vaccines to protect against attack by CBRN weapons. <span class="hlt">Project</span> Bioshield expedites the conduct of NIH research and development on...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60420617"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground-water monitoring compliance <span class="hlt">projects</span> for Hanford Site facilities: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> progress report for 1987</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes progress during 1987 of five Hanford Site ground water monitoring <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Four of these <span class="hlt">projects</span> are being conducted according to regulations based on the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the state Hazardous Waste Management Act. The fifth <span class="hlt">project</span> is being conducted according to regulations based on the state Solid Waste Management Act. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60596299"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (Hellsgate <span class="hlt">Project</span>) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate <span class="hlt">Project</span> protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard P. Whitney; Matthew T. Berger; Samuel Rushing; Cory Peone</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60773785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 <span class="hlt">project</span> period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the <span class="hlt">project</span> in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw; R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60714573"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 1995 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the 1995 - 96 <span class="hlt">project</span> period, four new habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw; R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6579748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar kiln demonstraction <span class="hlt">project</span>. Semi-<span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report. [Lumber dryer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Drawings for the solar lumber predrier demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> for Sherwood Forest products Corp. in Waverly, Ohio, are presented. Drawings are included for the site plan, foundation plan, floor plan, framing plan, and structural plan. <span class="hlt">Project</span> status is outlined: site development work was initiated during the late fall of 1980 and some materials for the <span class="hlt">project</span> have been acquired. (WHK)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22harriet%22&pg=6&id=EJ493652"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Harriet Tubman Celebration: Here's How We Do This <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Mixed-Age <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes one school's <span class="hlt">annual</span> celebration of Harriet Tubman, 19th-century African-American heroine of the Underground Railroad. Children ages 4-11 engage in multisensory and cognitive learning activities designed to help them understand the rich traditions of early African Americans and the abolitionist movement to end slavery. Activities…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mensher, Gail B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2996270"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEIZURE PREDICTION: THE <span class="hlt">FOURTH</span> INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recently convened <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> International Workshop on Seizure Prediction (IWSP4) brought together a diverse international group of investigators, from academia and industry, including epileptologists, neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who are conducting interdisciplinary research on the prediction and control of seizures. IWSP4 allowed the presentation and discussion of results, an exchange of ideas, an assessment of the status of seizure prediction, control and related fields and the fostering of collaborative <span class="hlt">projects</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zaveri, Hitten P.; Frei, Mark G.; Arthurs, Susan; Osorio, Ivan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/903223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span>'s Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, <span class="hlt">Project</span> Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/877242"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2002-2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Work undertaken in 2003 included: (1) Seven new fence <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed thereby protecting 7.6 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) Maintenance of all active <span class="hlt">project</span> fences (66.14 miles), watergaps (66), spring developments (33) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (4) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> in 1984 we have 72.94 miles of stream protected using 131.1 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement <span class="hlt">Projects</span> we have 205.96 miles of fence protecting 130.3 miles of stream.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title24-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title24-vol4-sec811-110.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 811.110 - Refunding of obligations issued to finance Section 8 <span class="hlt">projects</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...OF PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCIES AND RELATED AMENDMENTS § 811.110 Refunding of obligations...by HUD. An amount not to exceed one-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> of one percent <span class="hlt">annually</span> of the bonds...<span class="hlt">project</span> owner of a use agreement, and amendment of a regulatory agreement, if...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/773870"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kalispel Resident Fish <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">No <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bluff, Stanley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE91013706"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wildlife impact assessment: Bonneville, McNary, The Dalles, and John Day <span class="hlt">Projects</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report 1989.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Army Corps of Engineers Bonneville <span class="hlt">project</span> in Oregon and Washington. The <span class="hlt">project</span> directly impacted 20,749 acres of wildlife habitat. Seve...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Rasmussen P. Wright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=SAN11893"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, July 1, 1977--June 30, 1978.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The five patterns included in the Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span> are a portion of Cities Service Company's total combustion <span class="hlt">project</span> on its acreage in the Bellevue Field. Pattern developments on Cities Service Company's Bodcau Fee B lease are shown. Pat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Joseph R. S. Fulford W. H. Pusch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DOEET120576"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodcau IN Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Third <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, July 1, 1978-August 31, 1979.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> is a cooperative venture between Cities Service Company and the US Department of Energy. The main objective is to demonstrate the operation and economics of a successful commercial scale In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span> in a heavy oil reservoir. Th...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Garvey W. H. Pusch R. S. Fulford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60259988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Second <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, July 1, 1977June 30, 1978</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The five patterns included in the Bodcau In Situ Combustion <span class="hlt">Project</span> are a portion of Cities Service Company's total combustion <span class="hlt">project</span> on its acreage in the Bellevue Field. Pattern developments on Cities Service Company's Bodcau Fee B lease are shown. Patterns 12 through 16 comprise this demonstration area. The patterns cover 19 productive acres containing approximately 2 million barrels of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Joseph; W. H. Pusch; R. S. Fulford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/161227"> <span id="translatedtitle">Waste Tank Vapor Characterization <span class="hlt">Project</span>: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> status report for FY 1995</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report compiles information collected during the Fiscal Year 1995 pertaining to the waste tank vapor characterization <span class="hlt">project</span>. Information covers the following topics: <span class="hlt">project</span> management; organic sampling and analysis; inorganic sampling and analysis; waste tank vapor data reports; and the waste tanks vapor database.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ligotke, M.W.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Birn, M.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Silvers, K.L.; Goheen, S.C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pocahontas&pg=2&id=ED147547"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experience Based Career Education <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Evaluation Report, 1976-1977.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Fifty-eight Iowa high school seniors participated in an experience based career education (EBCE) <span class="hlt">project</span> conducted at Storm Lake, Sac City, and Pocahontas during 1976-77. The program followed the EBCE model developed by the Appalachia Educational Laboratory. Technical assistance and training for the <span class="hlt">project</span> was furnished by that laboratory. A…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edwards, Judith B.; Van Dusseldorp, Ralph A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60573256"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 1993 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The <span class="hlt">project</span> focused on implementing instream</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw; R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60573258"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 1994 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The <span class="hlt">project</span> focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw; R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60380917"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technology Base Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> for electrochemical energy storage. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report for 1983</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is the Lead Center for management of the Technology Base Research (TBR) <span class="hlt">Project</span>, which is supported by DOE's Office of Energy Systems Research, Energy Storage Division. The purpose of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is to provide the research base which supports DOE efforts to develop electrochemical technology for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. The general</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kinoshita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/877241"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Work undertaken in 2002 included: (1) Seven new fence <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed thereby protecting 6.0 miles of stream (2) Completion of 0.7 miles of dredge tail leveling on Granite Creek. (3) New fence construction (300ft) plus one watergap on Indian Creek/ Kuhl property. (4) Maintenance of all active <span class="hlt">project</span> fences (58.76 miles), watergaps (56), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Restoration and Enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> protected 3 miles of stream within the basin. (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> in 1984 we have 67.21 miles of stream protected using 124.2 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement <span class="hlt">Projects</span> we have 199.06 miles of fence protecting 124.57 miles of stream.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Powell, Russ M.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997APS..PAC.FBC03W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Generation Light Sources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concepts and designs are now being developed at laboratories around the world for light sources with performance levels that exceed present sources, including the very powerful and successful third generation synchrotron radiation sources that have come on line in the past few years. Workshops (M. Cornacchia and H. Winick (eds), Workshop on <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Generation Light Sources, Feb. 24-27, 1992, SSRL Report 92/02) (J.-L. Laclare (ed), ICFA Workshop on <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Generation Light Sources, Jan. 22-25, 1996, <A HREF=http://193.49.43.2/ conferences/conclusions/icfa-conclusions.html>ESRF Report</A>) have been held to review directions for future sources. A main thrust is to increase the brightness and coherence of the radiation using storage rings with lower electron-beam emittance or free-electron lasers (FELs). In the infra-red part of the spectrum very high brightness and coherence is already provided by FEL user facilities driven by linacs and storage rings. It now appears possible to extend FEL operation to the VUV, soft X-ray and even hard X-ray spectral range, to wavelengths down to the angstrom range, using high energy linacs equipped with high-brightness rf photoinjectors and bunch-length compressors. R&D to develop such sources is in progress at BNL, DESY, KEK, SLAC and other laboratories. In the absence of mirrors to form optical cavities, short wavelengths are reached in FEL systems in which a high peak current, low-emittance electron beam becomes bunch-density modulated at the optical wavelength in a single pass through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE); i.e.; startup from noise. A proposal to use the last kilometer of the three kilometer SLAC linac (the first two kilometers will be used for injection to the PEP II B-Factory) to provide 15 GeV electron beams to reach 1.5 Angstroms by SASE in a 100 m long undulator is in preparation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Winick, Herman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963099"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) <span class="hlt">project</span> strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if <span class="hlt">project</span> goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the <span class="hlt">project</span>, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaivoda, Alexis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE87008858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Salt Repository <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Waste Package Program (WPP) Modeling Activiteis: FY 1984 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Salt Repository <span class="hlt">Project</span> (SRP) through its Waste Package Program (WPP). During FY 1984, the WPP continued its program of waste package component development and intera...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. L. Kuhn S. A. Simonson B. A. Pulsipher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB91205716"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Projects</span> Within the Center for Advanced Materials. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, June 1, 1989-May 31, 1990.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has recognized an opportunity for improving gas-fired industrial utilization technology through the application of advanced high-temperature materials. The GRI-sponsored research <span class="hlt">projects</span> within the Center for Advanced Mat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Hellmann S. R. Nestlerode</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB91184929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock Creek Methane from Multiple Coal Seams Completion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, January 1989-December 1989.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Multiple Coal Seams Completion <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a joint venture developing drilling, completion, testing, stimulation, and production procedures for economic production of methane from multiple coal seams. During the report period, much well testing was con...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. X. Dodscha A. L. Headley S. W. Lambert J. B. Lanier J. C. Robb</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE88756452"> <span id="translatedtitle">Japan's Sunshine <span class="hlt">Project</span> 1987 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Summary of Solar Energy R and D Program.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results on Japanese sunshine <span class="hlt">project</span> in 1987 are summarized as to fundamental research, development for practical use and international cooperation to utilize solar photo and thermal energy as follows: Solar photo-utilizing technology consists of the rese...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE95006650"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field fracturing multi-sites <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> technical progress report, July 28, 1993--July 31, 1994.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites <span class="hlt">Project</span> (M-Site) is to conduct experiments to definitively determine hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=FE3050T3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study to Optimize Cr-Mo Steels to Resist Hydrogen and Temper Embrittlement. First <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, End of <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Quarter. Research Report 79-9D9-HYTEM-R3.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first <span class="hlt">annual</span> report on the DOE contract on temper embrittlement and hydrogen embrittlement characteristics of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels gives a review of the status of the program and an outline of the most significant tests performed in H sub 2 S to date....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. J. Shaw E. W. Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=heavy+AND+metals&pg=7&id=ED187164"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Endicott Report. Trends in the Employment of College and University Graduates in Business and Industry, 1980. Thirty-<span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report. A Survey of 170 Well-known Business and Industrial Concerns.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The 34th <span class="hlt">annual</span> survey of policy and practice in the employment of college and university graduates in business and industry reports responses received from 170 companies. Surveys were returned during October and November 1979. The major purpose of the report is to supply information of interest to colleges and universities as well as employers.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Endicott, Frank S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/811363"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 <span class="hlt">project</span> period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the <span class="hlt">project</span> in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. <span class="hlt">Projects</span> continued to be maintained on 49 private properties, one 25-year Non-Exclusive Bureau of Indian Affairs' Easement was secured, six new <span class="hlt">projects</span> implemented and two existing <span class="hlt">project</span> areas improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat. New <span class="hlt">project</span> locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River, upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek, Cottonwood Creek and Buckaroo Creek. New enhancements included: (1) construction of 11,264 feet of fencing between River Mile 43.0 and 46.5 on the Umatilla River, (2) a stream bank stabilization <span class="hlt">project</span> implemented at approximately River Mile 63.5 Umatilla River to stabilize 330 feet of eroding stream bank and improve instream habitat diversity, included construction of eight root wad revetments and three boulder J-vanes, (3) drilling a 358-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 46.0 Umatilla River, (4) installing a 50-foot bottomless arch replacement culvert at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek, (5) installing a Geoweb stream ford crossing on Mission Creek (6) installing a 22-foot bottomless arch culvert at approximately River Mile 0.5 Cottonwood Creek, and (7) providing fence materials for construction of 21,300 feet of livestock exclusion fencing in the Buckaroo Creek Drainage. An approximate total of 3,800 native willow cuttings and 350 pounds of native grass seed was planted at new upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek and Cottonwood Creek <span class="hlt">project</span> sites. Habitat improvements implemented at existing <span class="hlt">project</span> sites included development of a 105-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 12.0 Wildhorse Creek and construction of an engineered stream ford at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek. A total of $277,848 in financial cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Workforce Investment Act, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Umatilla County and Pheasants Forever for planning efforts and habitat enhancements. Monitoring continued to quantify baseline conditions and the effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 96 existing and three newly established photo points to document habitat recovery and pre-<span class="hlt">project</span> conditions. Transects were measured at three stream channel cross sections to assist with engineering and design and to obtain baseline data regarding channel morphology. Biological inventories were conducted at River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek to determine pre-<span class="hlt">project</span> fish utilization above and below the passage barrier. Post-<span class="hlt">project</span> inventories were also conducted at River Mile 85.0 of the Umatilla River at a <span class="hlt">project</span> site completed in 1999. Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Eco-Pacific. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist <span class="hlt">project</span> personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs. Water Works Consulting, Duck Creek Associates and Ed Salminen Consulting were subcontracted for watershed assessment and restoration planning in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed. A document detailing current conditions in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed and necessary restoration actions will be availa</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw, R. Todd; Sexton, Amy D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/607528"> <span id="translatedtitle">West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, September 3, 1997--September 2, 1998</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following report is the <span class="hlt">Project</span> Management Plan for the fifth year of the West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> is one of four mid-term <span class="hlt">projects</span> selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the DOE`s Class 1 Program for the development of advance recovery technologies in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. The West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a field test of the idea that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a low cost tertiary recovery process which is economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil by gravity drainage. The Double Displacement Process is based upon the concept that in fields such as West Hackberry waterdrive recoveries are typically 50%-60% of the original oil in place while gravity drainage recoveries average 80%-90% of the original oil in place. Therefore, by injecting a gas into a watered out reservoir, a gas cap will form an additional oil can be recovered due to gravity drainage. Although the Double Displacement Process has been shown to be successful in recovering tertiary oil in other fields, this <span class="hlt">project</span> will be the first to utilize air injection in the Double Displacement Process. The use of air injection in this process combines the benefits of air`s low cost and universal accessibility with the potential for accelerated oil recovery due to the combustion process. If successful, this <span class="hlt">project</span> will demonstrate that the use of air injection in the Double Displacement Process will result in an economically viable tertiary process in reservoirs where tertiary oil recovery is presently uneconomical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gillham, T.H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/296869"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating <span class="hlt">Project</span> at Oak Ridge, Tennessee</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an <span class="hlt">annual</span> evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation <span class="hlt">Project</span> facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> 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href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/821597"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 <span class="hlt">project</span> period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the <span class="hlt">project</span> in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> continued to be maintained on 44 private properties, four riparian easements and one in-stream enhancement agreement were secured, two new <span class="hlt">projects</span> implemented and two existing <span class="hlt">projects</span> improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities in the Umatilla River Basin. New <span class="hlt">project</span> locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River and Buckaroo Creek. Improvements were implemented at existing <span class="hlt">project</span> sites on the upper Umatilla River and Wildhorse Creek. A stream bank stabilization <span class="hlt">project</span> was implemented at approximately River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River to stabilize 760 feet of eroding stream bank and improve in-stream habitat diversity. Habitat enhancements at this site included construction of six rock barbs with one large conifer root wad incorporated into each barb, stinging approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings, planting 195 tubling willows and 1,800 basin wildrye grass plugs, and seeding 40 pounds of native grass seed. Staff time to assist in development of a subcontract and fence materials were provided to establish eight spring sites for off-stream watering and to protect wetlands within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. A gravel bar was moved and incorporated into an adjacent point bar to reduce stream energy and stream channel confinement within the existing <span class="hlt">project</span> area at River Mile 85 Umatilla River. Approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings were stung and trenched into the stream channel margins and stream banks, and 360 basin wildrye grass plugs planted and 190 pounds of native grass seed broadcast on terraces between River Mile 10 and 12.5 within the existing Wildhorse Creek <span class="hlt">Project</span> Area. Approximately 70 pounds of native grasses were seeded in the existing McKay Creek <span class="hlt">Project</span> Area at approximately River Mile 21.5. Financial and in-kind cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Federation and the Umatilla National Forest for the enhancements at River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River and within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. Monitoring continued to quantify effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Maximum, minimum and average daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 94 existing and two newly established photo points to document habitat recovery. Umatilla Basin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Washington State University. This endeavor involves compiling existing information, identifying data gaps, determining habitat-limiting factors and recommending actions to improve anadromous fisheries habitat. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist <span class="hlt">project</span> personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw, R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900807"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2005-2006 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on <span class="hlt">projects</span> where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active <span class="hlt">project</span> fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement <span class="hlt">Projects</span> from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the <span class="hlt">project</span> we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/819780"> <span id="translatedtitle">Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2000-2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six <span class="hlt">projects</span>, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-<span class="hlt">project</span> monitoring efforts were included for all <span class="hlt">projects</span>, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6485717"> <span id="translatedtitle">El Dorado micellar-polymer demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>. Sixth <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, September 1979-August 1980</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary objectives of this <span class="hlt">project</span> are to determine the economic feasibility of improved oil recovery using two micellar-polymer processes and to determine the associated benefits and problems of each process. The El Dorado Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> is designed to allow a side-by-side comparison of two distinct micellar-polymer processes in the same field so that the reservoir conditions for the two floods are as similar as possible. During this <span class="hlt">project</span> year, polymer solutions have been injected into both patterns for the entire <span class="hlt">project</span> year. Severe biodegradation of the north pattern polymer was controlled by the addition of alcohol to the injection fluids. Modifications to the south pattern polymer injection system were made in order to reduce downtime and maintenance problems and to improve mobility control. Fluid movement at the observation wells has been monitored closely. There have been no significant changes in compositions at any of the production wells. The polymer drive for the north pattern using polyacrylamide following the biopolymer has been developed. Change over to the new design will be made in the next <span class="hlt">project</span> year. The phase behavior for both the north and the south pattern surfactant systems have been studied to gain insight into the behavior that may have occurred when the surfactant systems were injected into the reservoir. Pressures in monitoring wells at the 800-foot mean-sea-level datum were measured twice during the <span class="hlt">project</span> year and routine core analyses were performed on cores from four north pattern wells.Flood-front location calculations were updated and computed oil bank arrival times were estimated using the flood-front and streamline tracking program. Numerical simulations with a finite difference chemical flood simulator were performed for the north pattern process to estimate oil breakthrough time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/877192"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 2000, 3 new <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed thereby adding 4.6 miles of stream to the program. Protection for these reaches required the construction of 3.2 miles of riparian fence and 1 livestock watering sites. 5,750 pounds of grass and shrub seed were planted for revegetating ground disturbed during construction. Stream temperatures were monitored on the Middle Fork of the John Day. All <span class="hlt">project</span> fences, watergaps, spring developments and plantings were checked and repairs performed where needed. We now have 70 miles of stream protected using 111 miles of fence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the <span class="hlt">project</span> area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7359485"> <span id="translatedtitle">El Dorado Micellar-Polymer demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>. First <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, January 1974-June 1975</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Progress made in the implementation of a <span class="hlt">project</span> designed to determine the economic feasibility of improved oil recovery using micellar-polymer processes and to determine the associated benefits and problems of each system tested is reported. The <span class="hlt">project</span> allows a side-by-side comparison of two distinct micellar-polymer processes in the same abandoned field so that the reservoir conditions for the two floods are as nearly alike as possible. Results are reported for test wells drilled to obtain reservoir data, field injectivity and interference tests, and performance predictions. Engineering operations are summarized. (JSR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coffman, C.L.; Rosenwald, G.W. (ed.); Miller, R.J. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60595207"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This <span class="hlt">project</span> is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Craig R. Contor; Robin Harris; Marty King</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10127150"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferrocyanide Safety <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Subtask 3.4, Aging Studies. FY 1992, <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the storage of waste in a safe manner. This Task Team, composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions about the Hanford ferrocyanide tanks. This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1992 on Subtask 3.4, Aging Studies, which is part of Task 3, Chemical Nature of Feffocyanide in Wastes. Subtask 3.4 deals with the aging behavior and solubilization of ferrocyanide tank waste sludges in a basic aqueous environment. Investigated were the effects of pH variation, ionic strength, salts present in SSTS, and gamma radiation on solubilization of vendor-prepared Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lilga, M.A.; Lumetta, M.R.; Riemath, W.F.; Romine, R.A.; Schiefelbein, G.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60023901"> <span id="translatedtitle">Controlled landfill <span class="hlt">project</span>: Mountain View, California. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, January-December 1982</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> studied the effects of leachate recirculation and added water, buffer and sludge on enhancing the generation and improving the recovery of landfill gas. It evaluated the various techniques by providing individual control cells for the demonstration of enhancement methods. The study also documents landfill gas productions from a controlled volume at field scale. Results from this study provide</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. A. Bonham; R. E. Van Heuit; W. M. Carroll; M. Donch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=SAN13952"> <span id="translatedtitle">Micellar--Polymer Joint Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Wilmington Field, California. Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, July 1977--May 1978.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A contract was signed on July 7, 1976, by the City of Long Beach and the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct jointly a Micellar-Polymer <span class="hlt">Project</span> which would establish a tertiary oil recovery technique applicable to unconsolidated oil sands in Wilmington F...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. L. Staub R. T. Johansen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6211048"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOLERAS - University Research <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Progress report No. 3, 1984-85 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accomplishments of solar energy research <span class="hlt">projects</span> maintained by nine US universities are summarized. Some research topics covered include: photosynthesis; passive cooling; crystal growth of gallium arsenides; concentrating optics for PV conversion; amorphous silicon alloys; solar insolation; solar ponds; and wind power. (BCS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10168"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 1998 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 1998, three new <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed improving 1.8 miles of stream and riparian habitat. Protection for these reaches required the construction of 3.2 miles of riparian fence and 7 livestock water gaps. A previously leased property on the Mainstream was converted from apriarian pasture to a corridor fence after no significant recovery had occurred.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuclear+AND+cross+AND+section&pg=2&id=ED073954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interdependence in an Urban Setting. (Second <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report). <span class="hlt">Project</span> Canada West.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intent of this curriculum <span class="hlt">project</span> is to help students focus attention on the interdependent relationships that exist in an urban center. In this progress report (see ED 066 351), the second year's work is outlined. Four teachers each designed a unit of study which are presented here, stating objectives, content, and activities. Unit 1, Nuclear…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Western Curriculum Project on Canada Studies, Edmonton (Alberta).</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE95002766"> <span id="translatedtitle">West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> technical progress report, September 3, 1993--September 2, 1994.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a field test of the idea that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a low cost tertiary recovery process which is economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Proces...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. H. Gillham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE96001225"> <span id="translatedtitle">West Hackberry tertiary <span class="hlt">project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, September 3, 1994--September 2, 1995.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The West Hackberry Tertiary <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a field test of the idea that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a low cost tertiary recovery process which is economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Proces...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Cerveny E. Turek T. Gillham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Air+AND+time+AND+estimate&pg=3&id=ED280383"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Economically Driven Enrollment <span class="hlt">Projections</span> Model. AIR 1986 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Forum Paper.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|An admissions/enrollment model was developed using 5 years of data on undergraduate and graduate enrollment, admissions, budget and tuition revenues, and anticipated tuition costs. The model produced estimates of admissions and enrollment numbers required to meet <span class="hlt">projected</span> increases in the institutional budget. Using a variation of the Markov…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yost, Michael, Jr.; Chino, Laney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE88756450"> <span id="translatedtitle">Japan Sunshine <span class="hlt">Project</span> 1987 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Summary of Hydrogen Energy R and D.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the findings of the researches on hydrogen energy in sunshine <span class="hlt">project</span> in FY 1987. A duration test of the electrolyte membrane of solid polymer fabricated by bonding Pt and Ir catalyst layers was made for seven months to produce hydroge...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60200533"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin, Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1989</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The channelization of Meacham Creek by the Union Pacific Railroad combined with poor riparian livestock management created extreme channel instability and bedload movement within the <span class="hlt">project</span> area. The resulting loss</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scheeler; Carl A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60772707"> <span id="translatedtitle">Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2000-2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six <span class="hlt">projects</span>, two</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jed Volkman; Amy D. Sexton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED512099.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">American Diploma <span class="hlt">Project</span> (ADP) End-of-Course Exams: 2010 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|To assess the raised expectations of college and career readiness for all students, a group of American Diploma <span class="hlt">Project</span> (ADP) Network states formed the ADP Assessment Consortium in 2005. The Consortium created Algebra I and II end-of-course exams, based in large part on Achieve's ADP mathematics benchmarks, which would provide an honest…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Achieve, Inc., 2010</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/925501"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : 1993 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The <span class="hlt">project</span> focused on implementing instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower 1/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River (downstream of the Meacham Creek confluence upstream to the Reservation East Boundary). In 1993, the <span class="hlt">project</span> shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach consistent with other basin efforts and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. Maintenance of existing habitat improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> was included under this comprehensive approach. Maintenance of existing gravel traps, instream and bank stabilization structures was required within <span class="hlt">project</span> areas during the reporting period due to spring flooding damage and high bedload movement. Maintenance activities were completed between river mile (RM) 0.0 and RM 0.25 Boston Canyon Creek, between RM 0.0 and RM 4 Meacham Creek and between RM 78.5 and RM 79 Umatilla River. Habitat enhancement areas were seeded with native grass, legume, shrub and wildflower mixes and planted with willow cuttings to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the <span class="hlt">project</span> areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys were conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaw, R. Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This <span class="hlt">project</span> provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This <span class="hlt">project</span> calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual <span class="hlt">projects</span> contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing <span class="hlt">project</span> in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of <span class="hlt">project</span> fences. Since initiation of the <span class="hlt">project</span> in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGowan, Vance</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5801969"> <span id="translatedtitle">El Dorado Micellar-Polymer Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Eighth <span class="hlt">annual</span> and final report, September 1981-November 1982</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although the injection of drive water continues as of this writing and a complete evaluation is not possible, this report discusses the current working evaluations and performance predictions. Oil response to date has been disappointing and a total of 26,734 barrels of oil have been recovered to date with the South Pattern producing sixty percent more oil than the North Pattern. The forecast for total oil recovery is 29,800 barrels for the North Pattern. No forecast for total oil recovery in the South Pattern is available. It is expected, however, that the <span class="hlt">project</span> will yield a total oil recovery efficiency which is less than half of the original predictions. Current operations are intended to optimize oil recovery utilizing the previously inactive pressure monitoring wells. Daily oil production, which is in excess of 35 barrels per day, is sufficient to generate revenue in excess of daily operating expenses. It is anticipated that the <span class="hlt">project</span> operations will continue as long as oil production justifies the expense. The disappointing oil response has been attributed primarily to the inability of the designed preflushes to yield a salinity environment within the reservoir which was within the optimal salinity range for the surfactant (micellar) systems. The surfactants were, therefore, significantly less efficient at oil mobilization than expected. The extended lifetime of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is due to a substantially lower injectivity than expected which prolonged fluid injection. Although this has been corrected to some degree, decreased productivity in the producing wells continues to keep <span class="hlt">project</span> injection rates at lowered levels. The <span class="hlt">project</span> must be classified as both a failure and a qualified success. Substantial volumes of oil were shown to be mobilized within the reservoir but only limited volumes of this mobilized oil are expected at the producing wells. 128 figures, 30 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Horn, L.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a mitigation <span class="hlt">project</span> intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these <span class="hlt">projects</span> were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of <span class="hlt">project</span> habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. <span class="hlt">Project</span> streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the <span class="hlt">project</span> include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sears, Sheryl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2001-2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> is a mitigation <span class="hlt">project</span> intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these <span class="hlt">projects</span> were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of <span class="hlt">project</span> habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. <span class="hlt">Project</span> streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the <span class="hlt">project</span> include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sears, Sheryl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10161577"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> progress report, 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Test or Burn was conducted from approximately mid-November, 1987 through February, 1988. After the burn the <span class="hlt">project</span> began proceeding with the following overall tasks: venting, flushing and cooling of the cavities; subsurface or groundwater cleanup; post-burn coring and drilling; groundwater monitoring, and site restoration/reclamation. By the beginning of 1991 field activities associated with venting, flushing and cooling of the cavities and post-burn coring and drilling had been completed. However, data analysis continued including the University of North Dakota analyzing drilling and coring data, and the US Department of Energy (DOE)/EG&G developing a chronological listing of <span class="hlt">project</span> events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988STIN...8923014."> <span id="translatedtitle">Japan's sunshine <span class="hlt">project</span> 1987 <span class="hlt">annual</span> summary of solar energy R and D program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results on Japanese sunshine <span class="hlt">project</span> in 1987 are summarized as to fundamental research, development for practical use and international cooperation to utilize solar photo and thermal energy as follows: Solar photo-utilizing technology consists of the research of solar photo-voltatic power generating system (basic research, new type solar cell, amorphous silicon), and the practical utilization of solar photo-voltatic power generating system (lower cost silicon, solar panel, high efficiency crystal type solar cell, amorphous solar cell, solar cell evaluation system, peripheral technology, independent dispersive and centralized solar photo-voltatic power generating systems, photo and thermal hybrid solar photo-voltatic power generating system). Solar thermal utilizing technology consists of research of solar thermal and photo-voltatic power generating system (combined thermal-power solar system), solar air conditioning and hot water supplying system, and development of real industrial solar system. International cooperation means the solar energy technical cooperation <span class="hlt">project</span> between Japan and Australia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60489604"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock Creek methane from Multiple Coal Seams Completion <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, January 1991December 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Multiple Coal Seams Completion Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> develops drilling, completion, testing, stimulation, and production procedures for economic production of methane from multiple coal seams. Wells P6 and P7 were stimulated in the Mary Lee group with water and cross-linked gel treatments. Production from the Mary Lee peaked at 120 MCFD and 10 MCFD for P6 and P7, respectively. Restimulation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. X. Dodscha; A. H. Durden; V. A. Hollub; C. L. McKinnon; J. L. Saulsberry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. <span class="hlt">Project</span> outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LeCaire, Richard (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Nespelem, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint <span class="hlt">project</span> between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (CSMEP - a <span class="hlt">project</span> aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60789233"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOE <span class="hlt">Project</span> on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The <span class="hlt">project</span> objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R C McCallen; K Salari; J Ortega; P Castellucci; C Eastwood; J Paschkewitz; W D Pointer; L J DeChant; B Hassan; F Browand; C Radovich; T Merzel; D Plocher; J Ross; B Storms; J T Heineck; S Walker; C J Roy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962835"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span>, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2001-2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">project</span> focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the <span class="hlt">project</span> area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The <span class="hlt">project</span> addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Conley, Will</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/819786"> <span id="translatedtitle">Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2001-2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2001, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled six properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Since 1997, approximately 7 miles of critical salmonid habitat has been secured for restoration and protection under this <span class="hlt">project</span>. Major accomplishments to date include the following: Secured approximately $250,000 in cost share; Secured 7 easements; Planted 30,000+ native plants; Installed 50,000+ cuttings; and Seeded 18 acres to native grass. Pre and post-<span class="hlt">project</span> monitoring efforts were included for all <span class="hlt">projects</span>, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan. Basin-wide monitoring also included the deployment of 6 thermographs to collect summer stream temperatures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963882"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence <span class="hlt">projects</span> were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active <span class="hlt">project</span> fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/219314"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> report for RCRA groundwater monitoring <span class="hlt">projects</span> at Hanford Site facilities for 1995</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents the <span class="hlt">annual</span> hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hartman, M.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961824"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : <span class="hlt">Project</span> Progress Report 2008 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/754356"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Operating Report CY 1999</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of <span class="hlt">annual</span> rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961871"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2000.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this <span class="hlt">project</span> (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of <span class="hlt">project</span> habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the <span class="hlt">project</span> fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being completed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sear, Sheri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1999.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this <span class="hlt">project</span> (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of <span class="hlt">project</span> habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the <span class="hlt">project</span> fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being completed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jones, Charles D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1998.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this <span class="hlt">project</span> (Phase I, baseline data collection) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> (Phase II, implementation). At the completion of <span class="hlt">project</span> habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the <span class="hlt">project</span> is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Personnel of three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the <span class="hlt">project</span> fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being done by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jones, Charles D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000eso..pres...18."> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Light at Paranal!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">VLT YEPUN Joins ANTU, KUEYEN and MELIPAL It was a historical moment last night (September 3 - 4, 2000) in the VLT Control Room at the Paranal Observatory , after nearly 15 years of hard work. Finally, four teams of astronomers and engineers were sitting at the terminals - and each team with access to an 8.2-m telescope! From now on, the powerful "Paranal Quartet" will be observing night after night, with a combined mirror surface of more than 210 m 2. And beginning next year, some of them will be linked to form part of the unique VLT Interferometer with unparalleled sensitivity and image sharpness. YEPUN "First Light" Early in the evening, the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> 8.2-m Unit Telescope, YEPUN , was pointed to the sky for the first time and successfully achieved "First Light". Following a few technical exposures, a series of "first light" photos was made of several astronomical objects with the VLT Test Camera. This instrument was also used for the three previous "First Light" events for ANTU ( May 1998 ), KUEYEN ( March 1999 ) and MELIPAL ( January 2000 ). These images served to evaluate provisionally the performance of the new telescope, mainly in terms of mechanical and optical quality. The ESO staff were very pleased with the results and pronounced YEPUN fit for the subsequent commissioning phase. When the name YEPUN was first given to the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> VLT Unit Telescope, it was supposed to mean "Sirius" in the Mapuche language. However, doubts have since arisen about this translation and a detailed investigation now indicates that the correct meaning is "Venus" (as the Evening Star). For a detailed explanation, please consult the essay On the Meaning of "YEPUN" , now available at the ESO website. The first images At 21:39 hrs local time (01:39 UT), YEPUN was turned to point in the direction of a dense Milky Way field, near the border between the constellations Sagitta (The Arrow) and Aquila (The Eagle). A guide star was acquired and the active optics system quickly optimized the mirror system. At 21:44 hrs (01:44 UT), the Test Camera at the Cassegrain focus within the M1 mirror cell was opened for 30 seconds, with the planetary nebula Hen 2-428 in the field. The resulting "First Light" image was immediately read out and appeared on the computer screen at 21:45:53 hrs (01:45:53 UT). "Not bad! - "Very nice!" were the first, "business-as-usual"-like comments in the room. The zenith distance during this observation was 44° and the image quality was measured as 0.9 arcsec, exactly the same as that registered by the Seeing Monitoring Telescope outside the telescope building. There was some wind. ESO PR Photo 22a/00 ESO PR Photo 22a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 374 x 400 pix - 128k] [Normal - JPEG: 978 x 1046 pix - 728k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 22a/00 shows a colour composite of some of the first astronomical exposures obtained by YEPUN . The object is the planetary nebula Hen 2-428 that is located at a distance of 6,000-8,000 light-years and seen in a dense sky field, only 2° from the main plane of the Milky Way. As other planetary nebulae, it is caused by a dying star (the bluish object at the centre) that shreds its outer layers. The image is based on exposures through three optical filtres: B(lue) (10 min exposure, seeing 0.9 arcsec; here rendered as blue), V(isual) (5 min; 0.9 arcsec; green) and R(ed) (3 min; 0.9 arcsec; red). The field measures 88 x 78 arcsec 2 (1 pixel = 0.09 arcsec). North is to the lower right and East is to the lower left. The 5-day old Moon was about 90° away in the sky that was accordingly bright. The zenith angle was 44°. The ESO staff then proceeded to take a series of three photos with longer exposures through three different optical filtres. They have been combined to produce the image shown in ESO PR Photo 22a/00 . More astronomical images were obtained in sequence, first of the dwarf galaxy NGC 6822 in the Local Group (see PR Photo 22f/00 below) and then of the spiral galaxy NGC 7793 . All 8.2-m telesco</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/877049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> in the Columbia River Estuary, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2004</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual <span class="hlt">projects</span> as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> on a regional scale. This <span class="hlt">project</span> is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple <span class="hlt">projects</span> were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.iisd.ca/linkages/women.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> World Conference On Women</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> World Conference On Women (4-15 September, Beijing, China) Web page offers general news, late breaking news, background information and more, updated daily. In French and English. Also available via gopher.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963102"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wind River Watershed Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Underwood Conservation District, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of the Wind River <span class="hlt">project</span> is to preserve, protect and restore Wind River steelhead. In March, 1998, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed the steelhead of the lower Columbia as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act. In 1997, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife rated the status of the Wind River summer run steelhead as critical. Due to the status of this stock, the Wind River summer steelhead have the highest priority for recovery and restoration in the state of Washington's Lower Columbia Steelhead Conservation Initiative. The Wind River <span class="hlt">Project</span> includes four cooperating agencies. Those are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), United States Geological Service (USGS), US Forest Service (USFS), and Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Tasks include monitoring steelhead populations (USGS and WDFW), Coordinating a Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Group (UCD), evaluating physical habitat conditions (USFS and UCD), assessing watershed health (all), reducing road sediments sources (USFS), rehabilitating riparian corridors, floodplains, and channel geometry (UCD, USFS), evaluate removal of Hemlock Dam (USFS), and promote local watershed stewardship (UCD, USFS). UCD's major efforts have included coordination of the Wind River Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), water temperature and water chemistry monitoring, riparian habitat improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span>, and educational activities. Our coordination work enables the local Watershed Committee and TAC to function and provide essential input to Agencies, and our habitat improvement work focuses on riparian revegetation. Water chemistry and temperature data collection provide information for monitoring watershed conditions and fish habitat, and are comparable with data gathered in previous years. Water chemistry information collected on Trout Creek should, with 2 years data, determine whether pH levels make conditions favorable for a fish parasite, Heteropolaria lwoffi. Educational activities further the likelihood that future generations will continue to understand and enjoy the presence of native fish stocks in the Wind River basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">White, Jim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10143510"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>: 1990 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek <span class="hlt">project</span> area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the <span class="hlt">project</span> area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scheeler, Carl A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5377987"> <span id="translatedtitle">El Dorado micellar-polymer demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>. Seventh <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, September 1980-August 1981</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary objectives of this <span class="hlt">project</span> are to determine the economic feasibiity of improved oil recovery using two micellar-polymer processes and to determine the associated benefits and problems of each process. During this <span class="hlt">project</span> year, polymer solution has been injected into both patterns. Modifications to the polymer injection equipment for the north and south patterns were made in order to improve the control of injected solution viscosities. The injection rates in the south pattern declined during this reporting period, and several steps were implemented to decrease the injectivity problems. Operational and plant modifications were made to improve lfuid quality and fluid handling. Produced and injected fluid analyses continued during this period. An oil response at observation well MP-132 was observed in September 1980. During this period, the individual phase composition of samples obtained from observation well MP-131 was analyzed. Laboratory experiments using the Union Oil soluble oil flood process in El Dorado cores were completed. The information will be used to make an adequate core flood match using the chemical flood simulator. Results of the simulation of the north pattern observation wells are presented. The oil breakthrough time at well MP-132 observed since then is in reasonable agreement with the forecast. A radial flow simulator was used to match the field performance at well MP-131. Results of the match were used to explain the observed field performance, and comparisons are made to laboratory data. Documentation of the increased understanding of the geologyu of the 650-foot sand has continued.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963073"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fall Chinook Acclimation <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The <span class="hlt">project</span> goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation <span class="hlt">project</span>; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term <span class="hlt">project</span>, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McLeod, Bruce</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962672"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Klickitat Only Monitoring and Evaluation, 2002-2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The monitoring and evaluation activities described in this report were determined by consensus of the scientists from the Yakama Nation (YN). Klickitat Subbasin Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of YKFP's Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP <span class="hlt">project</span> biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - Accurately characterize baseline available habitat and salmonid populations pre-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) EDT Modeling - Identify and evaluate habitat and artificial production enhancement options. (3) Genetics - Characterize the genetic profile of wild steelhead in the Klickitat Basin. (4) Ecological Interactions - Determine the presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sampson, Melvin; Evenson, Rolf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961807"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (CSMEP) - Year 5 : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for FY 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The <span class="hlt">project</span> is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this <span class="hlt">project</span> are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP <span class="hlt">project</span> can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/850507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report covers the first year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The most crucial data for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available. A comprehensive fish health monitoring regimen was incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation study for Umatilla Hatchery. This is a unique feature of the Umatilla Hatchery evaluation <span class="hlt">project</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keefe, MaryLouise; Carmichael, Richard W.; French, Rod A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/949141"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> in the Columbia River Estuary, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/329529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support (HVTE-TS) <span class="hlt">project</span>. 1995--1996 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents a summary of technical work accomplished on the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine--Technology Support (HVTE-TS) <span class="hlt">Project</span> during calendar years 1995 and 1996. Work was performed under an initial National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract DEN3-336. As of September 1996 the contract administration was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DoE) Chicago Operations Office, and renumbered as DE-AC02-96EE50553. The purpose of the HVTE-TS program is to develop gas turbine engine technology in support of DoE and automotive industry programs exploring the use of gas turbine generator sets in hybrid-electric automotive propulsion systems. The program focus is directed to the development of four key technologies to be applied to advanced turbogenerators for hybrid vehicles: Structural ceramic materials and processes; Low emissions combustion systems; Regenerators and seals systems; and Insulation systems and processes. 60 figs., 9 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/888603"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOE <span class="hlt">Project</span> on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The <span class="hlt">project</span> objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Paschkewitz, J; Pointer, W D; DeChant, L J; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Radovich, C; Merzel, T; Plocher, D; Ross, J; Storms, B; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Roy, C J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15001126"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance <span class="hlt">Project</span>: September 2000--September 2001</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the work in 2001 by the Regulatory Assistance <span class="hlt">Project</span> (RAP), under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This work focused on identifying and removing the regulatory and institutional barriers that keep the full economic value of distributed resources from being realized. The following five reports present the work details: (1) Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets, NREL/SR-560-32497; (2) Distributed Resource Distribution Credit Pilot Programs - Revealing the Value to Consumers and Vendors, NREL/SR-560-32499; (3) Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (5) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR. Visit www.eren.doe.gov/distributedpower for more information about RAP contract activity to establish environmental output air emissions standards for small-scale electricity generation (to be published as a future NREL subcontract report).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963048"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fall Chinook Acclimation <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The <span class="hlt">project</span> goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation <span class="hlt">project</span>; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term <span class="hlt">project</span>, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McLeod, Bruce</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1034818"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for Fiscal Year 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') <span class="hlt">Project</span>. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update <span class="hlt">Project</span>, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update <span class="hlt">project</span> proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the <span class="hlt">project</span> year. The juvenile trap was not operated this <span class="hlt">project</span> year.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988STIN...8922183."> <span id="translatedtitle">Japan's sunshine <span class="hlt">project</span> 1987 <span class="hlt">annual</span> summary of geothermal energy R and D</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results are reported on the geothermal energy research for 1987 in the Sunshine <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Exploration methods and formation mechanism of fracture type reservoirs were studied together with the study of their productivity. Basic maps for regional resources evaluation were prepared for five regions in Japan and parameters were determined. Percussion drills and aerated mud excavation technique were developed. Damages in hydrothermal flow were investigated and materials were developed. Crushing and thermal extraction mechanism were analyzed by the pressurized water crushing experiments at a quarry. Results of field experiment on the hot rock mass were analyzed. Environmental conservation and multipurpose use of hot water were investigated. Wide area hydrothermal flow system was surveyed at three areas. High accuracy MT method was developed and its effectiveness was demonstrated. Data was compared and analyzed for the Sengan and Kurikoma areas, which differ in abundance to each other. For development of binary 10 MW class demonstration plant, a well was excavated and tested, downhole pumps were tested and improved, and the conceptual design was investigated for plant equipment. Researches were conducted on the production and recirculation mechanism of hot water and control of water flowout.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/243503"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOE <span class="hlt">project</span> review Massachusetts Photovoltaic Program. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, June 1989--July 1990</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the third year of operations for work under the Cooperative Agreement between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Photovoltaic Center and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a collaborative effort with shared resources, the activity at the Photovoltaic Center and the University of Lowell Photovoltaic Program has continued to advance the utilization and implementation of photovoltaic-powered systems into society. The programs and activities developed over the past three years have supported strategies that cover both international utilization as well as domestic application. Three major areas of activities have centered around the following themes: (1) The identification of market opportunities to enlarge sales potential for the photovoltaic industry. (2) The development of a knowledgeable infrastructure to support PV diffusion in Massachusetts, in the United States, and around the world. (3) The analysis of the physical, economic, and regulatory environment in which PV must compete with mature energy technologies. This past year has been an experience of contrasts for the Photovoltaic Center. <span class="hlt">Projects</span> and activities have resulted in the successful completion of programs goals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/629394"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Tampa Electric Company IGCC <span class="hlt">project</span>]. 1996 DOE <span class="hlt">annual</span> technical report, January--December 1996</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/95283"> <span id="translatedtitle">ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, October 1993--September 1994</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of SMC Mining Company (formerly Shell Mining Company, now owned by Zeigler Coal Holding Company), has completed the construction and start-up of a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by SMC and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). The LFC technology uses a mild pyrolysis or mild gasification process which involves heating the coal under carefully controlled conditions. The process causes chemical changes in the feed coal in contrast to conventional drying, which leads only to physical changes. Wet subbituminous coal contains considerable water, and conventional drying processes physically remove some of this moisture, causing the heating value to increase. The deeper the coal is physically dried, the higher the heating value and the more the pore structure permanently collapses, preventing resorption of moisture. However, deeply dried Powder River Basin coals exhibit significant stability problems when dried by conventional thermal processes. The LFC process overcomes these stability problems by thermally altering the solid to create PDF and CDL. Several of the major objectives of the ENCOAL <span class="hlt">Project</span> have now been achieved. The LFC Technology has been essentially demonstrated. Significant quantities of specification CDL have been produced from Buckskin coal. Plant operation in a production mode with respectable availability (approaching 90%) has been demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1009157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for Fiscal Year 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) <span class="hlt">Project</span>. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10152066"> <span id="translatedtitle">NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Status and outlook. FY 1991 <span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL`s Solar Radiation Resource Assessment <span class="hlt">Project</span> during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU`s), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/355093"> <span id="translatedtitle">Federal Energy Management Program technical assistance case study: The Forrestal Building relighting <span class="hlt">project</span> saves $400K <span class="hlt">annually</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The US Department of Energy (DOE) believes energy efficiency begins at home -- in this case the James A. Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C. Since 1969, the 1.7 million-square-foot Forrestal Building has served as DOE Headquarters. In 1989, a team of in-house energy specialists began searching for opportunities to make the Forrestal Building more energy efficient. The team, on which personnel from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) served, identified lighting as an area in which energy use could be reduced substantially. A monitoring program showed that the building`s more than 34,000 1-foot by 4-foot fluorescent lighting fixtures were responsible for 33% of the building`s total <span class="hlt">annual</span> electric energy use, which represents more than 9 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year. In initiating the relighting program, DOE hoped to achieve these broad goals: Reduce energy use and utility bills, and improve lighting quality by distributing the light more uniformly. Funding was also an important consideration. DOE sought financing alternatives through which the lighting retrofit is paid for without using government-appropriated capital funds. DOE cut lighting costs more than 50% and paid for the <span class="hlt">project</span> with the money saved on energy bills.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/67733"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yucca Mountain <span class="hlt">Project</span> - Argonne National Laboratory <span class="hlt">annual</span> progress report, FY 1994</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1993-September 1994. Studies have been performed to evaluate the performance of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under unsaturated conditions (low volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with simulated waste glasses have been in progress for over eight years and demonstrate that actinides from initially fresh glass surfaces will be released as a result of the spallation of reacted glass layers from the surface, as the small volume of water passes over the waste form. Studies are also underway to evaluate the performance of spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO{sub 2} in <span class="hlt">projected</span> repository conditions. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for nine years and show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that form on the sample surface is similar to that observed in natural analogues. The reaction of spent fuel samples under conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for nearly two years, and the results suggest that spent fuel follows the same reaction progress as UO{sub 2}. The release of individual fission products and transuranic elements was not congruent, with the release being controlled by the formation of small particles or colloids that are suspended in solution and transported away from the waste form. The reaction progress depends on the composition of the spent fuel samples used and, likely, on the composition of the groundwater that contacts the waste form.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bates, J.K.; Fortner, J.A.; Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10161273"> <span id="translatedtitle">York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a <span class="hlt">project</span> company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/811355"> <span id="translatedtitle">Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, Research Element : <span class="hlt">Project</span> Progress Report, 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley <span class="hlt">Project</span> to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999 when six jacks and one jill were captured at Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2000, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: eyed-eggs were placed in Pettit Lake; age-0 presmolts were released to all three lakes in October; age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish and Alturas lakes for volitional spawning in September. Anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to all three lakes. Total kokanee abundance in Redfish Lake was estimated at 10,268, which was the lowest abundance since 1991. Abundance of kokanee in Alturas Lake was estimated at 125,462, which was one of the highest values recorded since 1991. Abundance of kokanee in Pettit Lake was estimated at 40,599, which is the third highest value recorded since 1991. Upon the recommendation of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee, the National Marine Fisheries Service reopened the kokanee fishery on Redfish Lake in 1995 in an attempt to reduce kokanee numbers. Anglers fished an estimated 3,063 hours and harvested approximately 67 kokanee during the 2000 season. Angler effort and harvest were also monitored on Alturas Lake during 2000. Effort on Alturas Lake was 5,190 hours, and harvest of kokanee was 407 fish. Anglers harvested an estimated 11% of the catchable rainbow trout planted into Alturas Lake. The out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 12 to June 14, 2000. A total of 126 wild/natural and 2,378 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts were captured, and total out-migration was estimated at 302 wild/natural and 6,926 hatchery-produced smolts. Estimates of smolt out-migration to Lower Granite Dam (LGR) were made by release strategy and were based on PIT-tag interrogations. An estimated 115 wild/natural smolts passed LGR from Redfish Lake. An estimated 6,987 hatchery-produced smolts released as presmolts into Sawtooth basin lakes passed LGR. None of the 148 age-1 smolts released to Redfish Lake Creek were detected at LGR. Two hundred fifty-seven anadromous sockeye returned to the Sawtooth basin in 2000. All were progeny of the captive broodstock program. The majority (200) of the adults that returned were released back to lakes in the basin for natural spawning along with hatchery produced adults. Redfish Lake received 164 adult sockeye salmon, and 20 to 29 areas of excavation were sighted. Alturas Lake received 77 adult sockeye salmon, and 14 to 19 areas of excavation were sighted. Pettit Lake received 28 adult sockeye salmon. No areas of excavation were noted in Pettit Lake, but spawning was suspected to have occurred in water too deep for observation. ndex reaches on principal tributary streams of Redfish and Alturas lakes were surveyed in August and September 2000 to track bull trout population response to no-harvest fishing regulations. Similar numbers of adult bull trout were observed in both systems, but twice as many redds were observed in Fishhook Creek. Redd counts in both streams have increased since monitoring began in 1998.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hebdon, J. Lance (Jason Lance); Castillo, Jason; Kline, Paul A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/964262"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively motivated movements. In August 2003, three Vemco VR2 fixed station acoustic receivers, supplied by the UCWSRI Transboundary Telemetry <span class="hlt">Project</span>, were deployed in the vicinities of Kettle Falls Bridge, Marcus Island, and Northport, WA. Data downloaded from these receivers through December 2003 confirmed the findings of a previous telemetry study that the Marcus area is an important overwintering habitat for white sturgeon. On 18 February 2004, juvenile white sturgeon (n=2,000) were transported from Kootenay Sturgeon Hatchery in British Columbia to WDFW Columbia Basin Hatchery (CBH) in Moses Lake, WA. Fish were reared at CBH to approximately 30 g and individually outfitted with PIT tags and scute marked. On 11 May 2004, fish were released into Lake Roosevelt in the vicinities of Kettle Falls Bridge, North Gorge, and Northport.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=unit+AND+4+AND+motivation&pg=6&id=ED501482"> <span id="translatedtitle">Teaching Literacy in <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Grade</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Fourth</span> grade is an important year for literacy learning. Having left the primary grades behind, students must grapple with more demanding texts and content material. Effective, motivating instruction can help them succeed. This book helps teachers create an energized and organized learning environment in which all students can improve their…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Denise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1029347"> <span id="translatedtitle">Searches for <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Generation Fermions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results from searches for <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation fermions performed using data samples collected by the CDF II and D0 Detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Many of these results represent the most stringent 95% C. L. limits on masses of new fermions to-date. A <span class="hlt">fourth</span> chiral generation of massive fermions with the same quantum numbers as the known fermions is one of the simplest extensions of the SM with three generations. The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation is predicted in a number of theories, and although historically have been considered disfavored, stands in agreement with electroweak precision data. To avoid Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} constraint from LEP I a <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation neutrino {nu}{sub 4} must be heavy: m({nu}{sub 4}) > m{sub Z}/2, where m{sub Z} is the mass of Z boson, and to avoid LEP II bounds a <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation charged lepton {ell}{sub 4} must have m({ell}{sub 4}) > 101 GeV/c{sup 2}. At the same time due to sizeable radiative corrections masses of <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation fermions cannot be much higher the current lower bounds and masses of new heavy quarks t' and b' should be in the range of a few hundred GeV/c{sup 2}. In the four-generation model the present bounds on the Higgs are relaxed: the Higgs mass could be as large as 1 TeV/c{sup 2}. Furthermore, the CP violation is significantly enhanced to the magnitude that might account for the baryon asymmetry in the Universe. Additional chiral fermion families can also be accommodated in supersymmetric two-Higgs-doublet extensions of the SM with equivalent effect on the precision fit to the Higgs mass. Another possibility is heavy exotic quarks with vector couplings to the W boson Contributions to radiative corrections from such quarks with mass M decouple as 1/M{sup 2} and easily evade all experimental constraints. At the Tevatron p{bar p} collider 4-th generation chiral or vector-like quarks can be either produced strongly in pairs or singly via electroweak production, where the latter can be enhanced for vector-like quarks. In the following we present searches for both pair and single production of heavy quarks performed by CDF and D0 Collaborations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ivanov, A.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ED153665"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOLINET <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 1976-1977.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) documents its disaffiliation from the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB); the increased strength and solidity of the whole organization as evidenced by the addition of 44 new me...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fourth+AND+Amendment&pg=3&id=EJ259500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public School Searches and the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Argues that school administrators encounter conflicts with the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment when they conduct searches of high school students. Discusses the reluctance of the courts to hold school officials to <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment standards; why the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment should apply nonetheless; and an analytical model of how school searches can be accomplished.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trosch, Louis A.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/393381"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites for October 1995--September 1996</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an <span class="hlt">annual</span> report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites, this will be the last <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/928366"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> : 2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's <span class="hlt">fourth</span> largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these <span class="hlt">projects</span> from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of <span class="hlt">project</span> planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The types of <span class="hlt">projects</span> include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 <span class="hlt">projects</span> were canceled and 7 <span class="hlt">projects</span> were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. <span class="hlt">Project</span> costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/110244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly <span class="hlt">projections</span>, Third quarter 1995</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price <span class="hlt">projections</span> for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An <span class="hlt">annual</span> supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent <span class="hlt">projections</span> with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-08-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE2005861049"> <span id="translatedtitle">CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh <span class="hlt">Annually</span> with a Motor Retrofit <span class="hlt">Project</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A motor system improvement <span class="hlt">project</span> was completed at the CEMEX (formerly RMC Pacific Materials) cement plant in Davenport, California, in June 2004. The <span class="hlt">project</span> retrofitted 13 worn motors on multiple cement blowers and silo pumps. Plant personnel evaluated...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title18-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title18-vol1-sec16-18.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">18 CFR 16.18 - <span class="hlt">Annual</span> licenses for <span class="hlt">projects</span> subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...reviews any applications for a new license, a nonpower license, an exemption, or a surrender; (2) The orderly removal of a <span class="hlt">project</span>, if the United States...<span class="hlt">project</span> and no new power or nonpower license or exemption will be issued;...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title18-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title18-vol1-sec16-18.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">18 CFR 16.18 - <span class="hlt">Annual</span> licenses for <span class="hlt">projects</span> subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...reviews any applications for a new license, a nonpower license, an exemption, or a surrender; (2) The orderly removal of a <span class="hlt">project</span>, if the United States...<span class="hlt">project</span> and no new power or nonpower license or exemption will be issued;...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title18-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title18-vol1-sec16-18.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">18 CFR 16.18 - <span class="hlt">Annual</span> licenses for <span class="hlt">projects</span> subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...reviews any applications for a new license, a nonpower license, an exemption, or a surrender; (2) The orderly removal of a <span class="hlt">project</span>, if the United States...<span class="hlt">project</span> and no new power or nonpower license or exemption will be issued;...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" 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class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COO267110"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fundamental Studies of Metal Fluorination Reactions. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to investigate the effects of oxygen on the electrical characteristics of the bulk and the electrode/electrolyte interface of CaF sub 2 electrochemical cells separately, the equivalent electrical circuits for the following cells were determined, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Rapp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/304558"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to evaluate configuration selection for single-ended and dual-composition control as well as compare conventional and advanced control approaches. For each case considered, the controllers were tuned by using setpoint changes and tested using feed composition upsets. Proportional Integral (PI) control performance was used to evaluate the configuration selection problem. For single ended control, the energy balance configuration was found to yield the best performance. For dual composition control, nine configurations were considered. It was determined that in order to identify the optimum configuration, detailed testing using dynamic simulation is required. The optimum configurations were used to evaluate the control performance of conventional PI controllers, DMC (Dynamic Matrix Control), PMBC (Process Model Based Control), and ANN (Artificial Neural Networks) control. It was determined that DMC works best when one product is much more important than the other while PI was superior when both products were equally important. PMBC and ANN were not found to offer significant advantages over PI and DMC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riggs, J.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6821937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proceedings of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> geothermal conference and workshop</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty-eight papers are included. One was indexed previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-three papers and two were listed by title. Reports of two workshop discussion groups on Achieving Technical Performance and Obtaining a License and Protecting the Environment were not abstracted for EDB. (MHR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21017000"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proceedings, twenty-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> international Pittsburgh coal conference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Topics covered include: gasification technologies; coal production and preparation; combustion technologies; environmental control technologies; synthesis of liquid fuels, chemicals, materials and other non-fuel uses of coal; hydrogen from coal; advanced synthesis gas cleanup; coal chemistry, geosciences and resources; Fischer-Tropsch technology; coal and sustainability; global climate change; gasification (including underground gasification); materials, instrumentation and controls; and coal utilisation byproducts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cardiology&pg=3&id=ED088639"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report of the Coastal Bend Migrant Council Health <span class="hlt">Project</span>, San Patricio Migrant Health Center (Texas), 1973-1974.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The <span class="hlt">annual</span> medical progress report covers migrant health services in San Patricio County, Texas, from February 1, 1973 to January 31, 1974. The report discusses: staff, administration, cardiology, dental services, health services, medical services, outreach and environmental health services, prescription services, registration and identification,…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coastal Bend Migrant Council, Mathis, TX. San Patricio Migrant Health Center.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861049"> <span id="translatedtitle">CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh <span class="hlt">Annually</span> with a Motor Retrofit <span class="hlt">Project</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs <span class="hlt">annually</span> by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED489980.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies in Teaching: 2002 Research Digest. Research <span class="hlt">Projects</span> Presented at <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, December 2002)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This document presents the of an <span class="hlt">annual</span> educational research forum held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) on December 11, 2002. A table of contents and 27 research studies of high school teaching are included. Studies include: Effects of the Earth/Environmental Science Requirement on High School Science Enrollment in North…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McCoy, Leah P., Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/949679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hilbert's twenty-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> problem.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For almost a century, a treasure lay hidden in a library in Germany, hidden until a remarkable discovery was made. Indeed, for most of the twentieth century, all of science thought that Hilbert had posed twenty-three problems, and no others. In the mid-1990s, however, as a result of a thorough reading of Hilbert's files, a twenty-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> problem was found (in a notebook, in file Cod ms D Hilbert 600:3), a problem that might have a profound effect on research. This newly discovered problem focuses on the finding of simpler proofs and criteria for measuring simplicity. A proof may be simpler than previously known in one or more ways that include length, size (measured in terms of the total symbol count), and term structure. A simpler proof not only is more appealing aesthetically (and has fascinated masters of logic including C. A. Meredith, A. Prior, and I. Thomas) but is relevant to practical applications such as circuit design and program synthesis. This article presents Hilbert's twenty-<span class="hlt">fourth</span> problem, discusses its relation to certain studies in automated reasoning, and offers researchers with varying interests the challenge of addressing this newly discovered problem. In particular, we include open questions to be attacked, questions that (in different ways and with diverse proof refinements as the focus) may prove of substantial interest to mathematicians, to logicians, and (perhaps in a slightly different manner) to those researchers primarily concerned with automated reasoning.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thiele, R.; Wos, L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. Leipzig</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355948.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macintoshed Libraries 4. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This <span class="hlt">annual</span> collection contains the following 14 papers about the use of Macintosh computers in libraries: "Of Mice and Macs: The Integration of the Macintosh into the Operations and Services of the University of Tennessee, Memphis Health Science Library" (Lois M. Bellamy); "Networking Reference CD-Roms in the Apple Library" (Mary Ellen Bercik);…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.; Vaccaro, Bill, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10104630"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> report on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites for October 1991--September 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource studies that were undertaken in support of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) <span class="hlt">Project</span> in the state of Colorado for the period of October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report fulfills the DOE`s obligation to provide an <span class="hlt">annual</span> report to the state of Colorado on the status and results of cultural resource studies conducted during the above period of record. This requirement is stated in a programmatic memorandum of agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Previous reports were based on a calendar year reporting period. However, in order to be more consistent with the programmatic memorandum of agreement, the period of record for this and subsequent <span class="hlt">annual</span> reports has been changed to the Federal fiscal year. The current status and summaries of 1992 cultural resource surveys are provided for all UMTRA <span class="hlt">Project</span> sites in Colorado. The sites are Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/928365"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> : 2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's <span class="hlt">fourth</span> largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these <span class="hlt">projects</span> from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of <span class="hlt">project</span> planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The types of <span class="hlt">projects</span> include off channel water developments, riparian fencing, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, infiltration galleries and return-flow cooling systems. <span class="hlt">Project</span> costs in 2002 totaled $423,198.00 with a total amount of $345,752.00 (81%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/809041"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration <span class="hlt">Projects</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, 2001.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's <span class="hlt">fourth</span> largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span>, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration <span class="hlt">projects</span> from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of <span class="hlt">project</span> planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation <span class="hlt">projects</span>. The <span class="hlt">project</span> types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. <span class="hlt">Project</span> costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961826"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report Fiscal Year 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary <span class="hlt">project</span> activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement <span class="hlt">projects</span> were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major <span class="hlt">project</span> areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation <span class="hlt">Project</span> site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned <span class="hlt">project</span> sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at <span class="hlt">project</span> sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each <span class="hlt">project</span> to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned <span class="hlt">project</span> activities and biological opinions were written and approved. <span class="hlt">Project</span> activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each <span class="hlt">project</span> site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and <span class="hlt">project</span> partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each <span class="hlt">project</span>'s success.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/878342"> <span id="translatedtitle">EWHCI'94: the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> east-west international conference on human-computer interaction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> East-West Human Computer Interaction conference was quite a surprise, at least for veterans of the earlier EWHCI conferences. The first author attended the first conference (which was held in Moscow the week before the coup which saw the break-up of the old USSR) and served as logistics chair for the second conference (also held in St. Petersburg)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blaine Price; Brad Blumenthal; Laura Leventhal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE2009961826"> <span id="translatedtitle">CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span>. A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report, February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008, Fiscal Year 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Amonette E. D. Hoverson S. Rise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/625747"> <span id="translatedtitle">S. 549: A Bill to extend the deadline under the Federal Power Act applicable to the construction of three hydroelectric <span class="hlt">projects</span> in the State of Arkansas. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Congress, First session</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains S.549, a Bill to extend the deadline under the Federal Power Act applicable to the construction of three hydroelectric <span class="hlt">projects</span> in the State of Arkansas. This bill was introduced in the Senate of the United States, 104th Congress, First session, March 14, 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6515308"> <span id="translatedtitle">Baca Geothermal Demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> legal and regulatory challenges. First semi-<span class="hlt">annual</span> report for period through June 30, 1980</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Legal and Regulatory Constraints Reports identify and describe the major legal and institutional constraints associated with the Baca Geothermal Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. The impacts of these constraints on the <span class="hlt">Project</span> in terms of cost, schedule, and technical design are also analyzed. The purpose of these reports is to provide a guide for future geothermal development.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Province, S.G.; Walter, K.M.; Miller, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6961126"> <span id="translatedtitle">RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring <span class="hlt">projects</span> for Hanford facilities: <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Progress Report for 1989</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring <span class="hlt">projects</span> covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the <span class="hlt">projects</span> is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1294"> <span id="translatedtitle">Idaho Model Watershed <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Model Watershed <span class="hlt">Project</span> was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE92016441"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> subcontract report, 11 March 1991--11 November 1991.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) <span class="hlt">Project</span>. PVMaT is a five-year <span class="hlt">project</span> to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DO...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Whisnant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB88213954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orphan Drugs - <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 1986.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report on the status of orphan drug development as coordinated within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) by the Orphan Products Board (OPB). It is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of HHS to the C...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796139"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> Oregon, 2000-2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate <span class="hlt">annual</span> spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10175305"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> subcontract report, 11 March 1991--11 November 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) <span class="hlt">Project</span>. PVMaT is a five-year <span class="hlt">project</span> to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the <span class="hlt">project</span>, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT <span class="hlt">project</span> is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whisnant, R.A. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60596371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> : <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report Fiscal Year 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat <span class="hlt">Project</span> (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric D. Hoverson; Alexandra Amonette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvD..84h4022B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> order spatial derivative gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we study a modified theory of gravity that contains up to <span class="hlt">fourth</span> order spatial derivatives as a model for the Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity. The propagator is evaluated and, as a result, one extra pole is obtained, corresponding to a spin-2 nonrelativistic massless particle, an extra term which jeopardizes renormalizability, besides the unexpected general relativity unmodified propagator. Then unitarity is proved at the tree level, where the general relativity pole has been shown to have no dynamics, remaining only the 2 degrees of freedom of the new pole. Next, the nonrelativistic effective potential is determined from a scattering process of two identical massive gravitationally interacting bosons. In this limit, Newton’s potential is obtained, together with a Darwin-like term that comes from the extra nonpole term in the propagator. Regarding renormalizability, this extra term may be harmful by power counting, but it can be eliminated by adjusting the free parameters of the model. This adjustment is in accord with the detailed balance condition suggested in the literature and shows that the way in which extra spatial derivative terms are added is of fundamental importance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bemfica, F. S.; Gomes, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59226816"> <span id="translatedtitle">Informants and the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment: A Reconsideration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Article argues that the Court's current interpretation of the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment, which sanctions the government's authority to insert secret spies and informants into our lives, is misguided. Part I highlights the historical background of the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment to show why its procedural safeguards are relevant when considering whether the government should be free of constitutional restraint when deploying informants</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tracey Maclin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=assessing+AND+assessment+AND+practices&pg=3&id=ED516436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Academic Skills Problems. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition Workbook</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|An ideal companion to "Academic Skills Problems, <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition", this indispensable workbook provides practice exercises and reproducible forms for use in direct assessment and intervention. Updated to reflect the changes in the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> edition of the text, the workbook includes teacher and student interview forms, a complete guide to using the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shapiro, Edward S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37417627"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aging without agency: Theorizing the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> age</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article looks at the “<span class="hlt">fourth</span> age” as a manifestation of the fragmentation of “old age”. We argue that the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> age emerges from the institutionalization of the infirmities of old age set against the appearance of a third-age culture that negates past representations of old age. We outline the historical marginalization of old age from early modern society to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chris Gilleard; P. Higgs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5162055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Total Energy <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Shenandoah, Georgia site. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> technical progress report, July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A part of the National Solar Thermal Energy Program, initially funded by DOE, the Shenandoah <span class="hlt">Project</span>, is the world's largest industrial application of the solar total energy concept. The objective of the <span class="hlt">Project</span> is to evaluate a solar total energy system that provides electrical power, process steam, and air conditioning for a knit-wear factory (operated by Bleyle of America, Inc.). During normal operation, solar energy generates a large part of the electricity and displaces part of the fossil fuels normally used to run the factory and produce the clothing. Construction of the system was completed early in 1982, when operations were initiated. Solution of unexpected electrical and mechanical problems produced significant information for subsequent system designs. An overview of the <span class="hlt">Project</span> and a brief System Description is presented following a chronological summary of progress. A discussion of varius anomalies, together with subsequent high quality solar and thermodynamic system performance results, is then discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Moses Lake Fishery Restoration <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake Washington, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report 2002-2003.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report is a precursor to the final technical report we will be writing the next contract period. Consequently, this report, covering the period between September 27, 2002, and September 26, 2003, represents a progress report towards the final technical report we anticipate completing by September 26, 2004. Sample analysis and field work have progressed well and we anticipate no further delays. There are 4 objectives: (1) To quantify secondary production Moses Lake; (2) To quantify the influence of predation on target fishes in Moses Lake; (3) To quantify mortality of selected fished in Moses Lake; and (4) To assess effects of habitat changes from shoreline development and carp on the fish community in Moses Lake.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burgess, Dave</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60788514"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Todd N. Pearsons; Gabriel M. Temple; Anthony L. Fritts</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22vocational+training+projects%22&pg=3&id=ED287056"> <span id="translatedtitle">Teenage Parent Center of the Single Parent Assistance, Counseling and Education <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report FY 86-87.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The Teenage Parent Center of the Single Parent Assistance, Counseling and Education <span class="hlt">Project</span> was developed to support, guide, and direct adolescent mothers, pregnant teenagers, and teens at risk of becoming parents through successful completion of a high school diploma or school year in a vocational setting in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Middlesex County Vocational and Technical High Schools, New Brunswick, NJ.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=larry+AND+morris&pg=2&id=ED329063"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Project</span> Directors' <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Meeting. Conference Proceedings (2nd, Washington, D.C., October 9-10, 1986).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This volume provides an overview of the proceedings of a 1986 meeting which looked at Transition Institute at Illinois programs that help students with disabilities move into postsecondary study or work, discussed how participants could receive technical assistance, and disseminated <span class="hlt">project</span> information. Included are the agenda, the findings from…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chadsey-Rusch, Janis, Ed.; Levy, Merle, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED088640.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Annual</span> Medical Report of the Coastal Bend Migrant Council Health <span class="hlt">Project</span>, San Patricio Migrant Health Center (Texas), 1973-1974.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The primary goal of the migrant health <span class="hlt">project</span> in San Patricio County, Texas was to establish out-patient family health care for migrant and seasonal farmworkers. Several accomplishments were made. By using a physician assistant, the clinic was able to add an additional work without the necessity of extending their hours. The dental services have…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krebethe, William F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22renato%22&pg=7&id=ED254338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Working Parents <span class="hlt">Project</span> (WPP), Division of Family, School and Community Studies (DFSCS) <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report and Executive Summary.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The basic goal of the Working Parents <span class="hlt">Project</span> (WPP) has been to contribute to the understanding of issues arising from the relationship between work and family life. The WPP perspective pays particular attention to the ways workplace culture affects the ability of family members to participate in their children's education at home and in school.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Espinoza, Renato; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE90007437"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water Science and Technology Board <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, 1986.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of the Water Science and Technology Board summarizes the Board's accomplishments during 1986, its current activities, and its plans for the future. The report also includes information on Board and study group memberships, progra...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796137"> <span id="translatedtitle">John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> Oregon, 1999-2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The John Day River basin supports one of the healthiest populations of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the entire Columbia River basin. Spring chinook salmon in this basin are therefore, used as an important index stock to measure the effects of future management actions on other salmon stocks in the Columbia basin. To meet the data requirements as an index stock, we estimated <span class="hlt">annual</span> spawner escapement, age-structure, and smolt-to-adult survival. This information will allow us to estimate progeny-to-parent production for each brood year. To estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates, 1,852 chinook smolts were tagged with PIT tags from 3 March to 5 May, 2000. Length of captured smolts varied, ranging from 80 to 147 mm fork length (mean = 113 mm). These fish will be monitored for PIT tags as returning adults at dams and during future spawning ground surveys. During spawning ground surveys, a total of 351.3 km of stream were surveyed resulting in the observation of 478 redds. When expanded, we estimated total number of redds at 481 and total number of spawners at 1,583 fish in the John Day River basin. We estimated that 13% of the redds were in the mainstem John Day, 27% in the Middle Fork, 34% in the North Fork, and 26% were in the Granite Creek basin. Sampled carcasses had a sex ratio comprised of 53% females and 47% males with an age structure comprised of 0.5% age-2, 6.3% age-3, 88.7% age-4, and 4.5% age-5 fish. Five of the 405 carcasses examined had fin clips suggesting they were of hatchery origin. The 1999 index redd count total for the North Fork, Mainstem, and Granite Creek was lower than the 1999 average (535) but well within the range of <span class="hlt">annual</span> redd counts during this period. The index redd count for the Middle Fork was higher than the 1990's average (92) but considerably lower than the average from 1978-1985 (401). Although quite variable over the past 40 years, the number of redds in the John Day River basin during 1999 was well within the range of redd counts since they were initiated in 1959.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruzycki, James R.; Wilson, Wayne H.; Carmichael, Richard W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921717"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement and modeling of energetic material mass transfer to soil pore water : <span class="hlt">Project</span> CP-1227 : FY04 <span class="hlt">annual</span> technical report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization <span class="hlt">projects</span> have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of a mass transfer model evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water based on experimental work obtained earlier in this <span class="hlt">project</span>. This mass transfer numerical model has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. Next year, the energetic material mass transfer model will be developed further using additional experimental data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stein, Joshua S.; Webb, Stephen Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10160361"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development <span class="hlt">project</span>: Solar radiation research <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, 1 October 1990--30 September 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is a summary of the year 1991 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research task of the Photovoltaic (PV) Advanced Research and Development <span class="hlt">project</span> at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This task directly supports the characterization, testing, and design of PV cells modules, and systems. The development of a scientific and engineering understanding of incident (i.e., available to PV devices) solar irradiance and the appropriate instrumentation systems and measurement methods are the activities and results of this <span class="hlt">project</span>. Activities described in this report include the completion of the Atmospheric Optical Calibration Systems (AOCS) and the comparison of instrumentation systems that collect site-specific measurements of solar irradiance for the purpose of PV system feasibility studies and/or design.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60132802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) <span class="hlt">project</span> entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOEâs Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Andrew Petti; Thomas James Dolan; Gregory Kent Miller; Richard Leroy Moore; William Knox Terry; Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami Ougouag; Chang H Oh; Hans D Gougar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/910747"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor <span class="hlt">Project</span>: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) <span class="hlt">project</span> entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6393486"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Total Energy <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Shenandoah, Georgia site. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> technical progress report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Solar Total Energy <span class="hlt">Project</span> (STEP) at Shenandoah, Georgia, is a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Georgia Power Company to further the search for new sources of energy. A part of the National Solar Thermal Energy Program, initially funded by DOE, the Shenandoah <span class="hlt">Project</span>, is the world's largest industrial application of the solar total energy concept. The objective of the <span class="hlt">Project</span> is to evaluate a solar total energy system that provides electrical power, process steam, and air conditioning for a knit-wear factory (operated by Bleyle of America, Inc.). During normal operation, solar energy generates a large part of the electricity and displaces part of the fossil fuels normally used to run the factory and produce the clothing. Construction of the system was completed early in 1982, when operations were initiated. Solution of unexpected electrical and mechanical problems produced significant information for subsequent system designs. A discussion of various anomalies, together with subsequent high quality solar and thermodynamic system performance results, is included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ney, E.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21409205"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> lepton family is natural in technicolor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Imagine discovering a new <span class="hlt">fourth</span> family of leptons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) but no signs of an associated <span class="hlt">fourth</span> family of quarks. What would that imply? An intriguing possibility is that the new fermions needed to compensate for the new leptons gauge anomalies simultaneously address the big hierarchy problem of the standard model. A natural way to accomplish such a scenario is to have the Higgs itself be a composite of these new fermions. This is the setup we are going to investigate in this paper using as a template minimal walking technicolor. We analyze a general heavy neutrino mass structure with and without mixing with the standard model families. We also analyze the LHC potential to observe the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> lepton family in tandem with the new composite Higgs dynamics. We finally introduce a model uniting the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> lepton family and the technifermion sector at higher energies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frandsen, Mads T. [CP3 - Origins, IFK and IMADA, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Masina, Isabella [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita degli Studi di Ferrara and INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); CP3 - Origins, IFK and IMADA, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Sannino, Francesco [CP3 - Origins, IFK and IMADA, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2004101038"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quarto Programma nazionale di ricerca sull'AIDS. Piano Esecutivo (<span class="hlt">Fourth</span> National Research Program on AIDS. Operational Plan).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> national research program on AIDS is subdivided into the following <span class="hlt">projects</span>: (1) Epidemiology and health care; (2) Pathology, clinic and therapy of HIV infection; (3) Pathogenesis and immunity for individuation of new chemotherapy, immunotherap...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5308413"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computer simulation of production from geopressured-geothermal aquifers. <span class="hlt">Project</span> 61025 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Department of Energy test of the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well for recovery of natural gas from geopressured-geothermal brine, part of the test producted gas in excess of the amount that could be dissolved in the brine. Where this excess gas originated was unknown and several theories were proposed to explain the source. This <span class="hlt">annual</span> report describes IGT's work to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two different theoretical models were calculated in detail using available reservoir simulators. One model considered the excess gas to be dispersed as small bubbles in pores. The other model considered the excess gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifer. Reservoir engineering analysis of the flow test data was used to determine the basic reservoir characteristics. The computer studies revealed that the dispersed gas model gave characteristically the wrong shape for plots of gas/water ratio, and no reasonable match of the calculated values could be made to the experimental results. The free gas cap model gave characteristically better shapes to the gas/water ratio plots if the initial edge of the free gas was only about 400 feet from the well. Because there were two other wells at approximately this distance (Delcambre No. 4 and No. 4A wells) which had a history of down-hole blowouts and mechanical problems, it appears that the source of the excess free gas is from a separate horizon which connected to the Delcambre No. 1 sand via these nearby wells. This conclusion is corroborated by the changes in gas composition when the excess gas occurs and the geological studies which indicate the nearest free gas cap to be several thousand feet away. The occurrence of this excess free gas can thus be explained by known reservoir characteristics, and no new model for gas entrapment or production is needed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rogers, L.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/113954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span>, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, October 1993--September 1994</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration <span class="hlt">project</span> which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/796201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kelt Reconditioning: A Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2000 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family salmonidae. Natural rates of repeat spawning for Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. Increasing this repeat spawning rate using fish culture techniques could assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to grow and develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for local populations. The primary purpose of this <span class="hlt">project</span> in 2000 was to test the general feasibility of collecting, feeding, and treating steelhead kelts in a captive environment. Steelhead kelts were collected from the Yakima River at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (Rkm 48) from 12 March to 13 June 2000. Kelts were reconditioned at adjacent Prosser Hatchery in both rectangular and circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus, and we tested the use of ivermectin to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Some the kelts that died during the reconditioning process were analyzed via pathology and gonad histology to ascertain the possible cause of death and to describe their reproductive development at the time of death. All surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on 12 December 2000. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived captivity, gained weight, and on the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 512 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 37% (512/1,380) of the entire 1999-2000 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments ({approx}240 days from capture), 91 fish (18%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 87 (96%) of 91 specimens were female, and we estimated 62 fish (12% of the total collected) had successfully reconditioned. Unfortunately, the majority (82%) of the kelts collected died during the experiment, with the bulk of the moralities occurring during the first 100 days of captivity. Much was learned from the mortalities and modifications were made to the facility to reduce loss for future <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Overall, the kelts reconditioned during this <span class="hlt">project</span> will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although the reconditioning success rate achieved (estimated at 12%) was substantially lower than we initially hoped yet still six times higher than the natural rate of respawning and the authors are encouraged by the results of this innovative <span class="hlt">project</span>. Information collected during this feasibility study will be incorporated into the experimental design for the upcoming year of research and is expected to increase survival.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Allen F.; Beaty, Roy E.; Hatch, Douglas R. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10188728"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combustion Engineering Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering <span class="hlt">Project</span> -- Clean Coal II <span class="hlt">Project</span>. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> report, November 20, 1990--December 31, 1991</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown, entrained-flow, two-stage, pressurized coal gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup process; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu coal gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment. The IGCC will include CE`s slogging, entrained-flow, gasifier operating in a pressurized mode and using air as the oxidant. The hot gas will be cleaned of particulate matter (char) which is recycled back to the gasifier. After particulate removal, the product gas will be cleaned of sulfur prior to burning in a gas turbine. The proposed <span class="hlt">project</span> includes design and demonstration of two advanced hot gas cleanup processes for removal of sulfur from the product gas of the gasifier. The primary sulfur removal method features a newly developed moving-bed zinc ferrite system downstream of the gasifier. The process data from these pilot tests is expected to be sufficient for the design of a full-scale system to be used in the proposed demonstration. A second complementary process is in situ desulfurization achieved by adding limestone or dolomite directly to the coal feed. The benefit, should such an approach prove viable, is that the downstream cleanup system could be reduced in size. In this plant, the gasifier will be producing a low-Btu gas (LBG). The LBG will be used as fuel in a standard GE gas turbine to produce power. This gas turbine will have the capability to fire LBG and natural gas (for start-up). Since firing LBG uses less air than natural gas, the gas turbine air compressor will have extra capacity. This extra compressed air will be used to pressurize the gasifier and supply the air needed in the gasification process. The plant is made of three major blocks of equipment as shown in Figure 2. They are the fuel gas island which includes the gasifier and gas cleanup, gas turbine power block, and the steam turbine block which includes the steam turbine and the HRSG.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/901439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fisheries Enhancement in the Fish Creek Basin; Evaluation of In-Channel and Off-Channel <span class="hlt">Projects</span>, 1984 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This S-year <span class="hlt">project</span> which began in 1983 is designed to construct and evaluate habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin by personnel of the Estacada Ranger District, Ht. Hood National Forest, and the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. The work is jointly funded by BPA and USDA-Forest Service. The evaluation has focused on activities designed to improve spawning and rearing habitat for chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout. Specific habitat improvements being evaluated include: boulder berms, an off-channel pond, a side-channel, addition of large woody debris to stream edge habitats, and hardwood plantings to improve riparian vegetation. The initial phases of habitat work have proceeded cautiously in concert with the evaluation so that knowledge gained could be immediately applied to future proposed habitat work. The evaluation has been conducted at the basin level, rather than reach or site level, and has focused intensely on identification of factors limiting production of salmonids in Fish Creek, as well as physical and biological changes resulting from habitat improvement. Identification of limiting factors has proven to be difficult and requires several years of all-season investigation. Results of this work to date indicate that spawning habitat is not limiting production of steelhead or coho in the basin. Coho habitat is presently underseeded because of inadequate escapement. Key summer habitats for coho, age 0 and age 1+ steelhead are beaver ponds, side channels, and pools, respectively. Key winter habitats appear to be groundwater-fed side channels and boulder-rubble stream margins with 30+ cm depth and low velocity water. Additional work is needed to determine whether summer habitat or winter habitat is limiting steelhead and coho production. Chinook use of the basin appears to be related to the timing of fall freshets that control migratory access into the system. Instream habitat improvements show varying degrees of promise for meeting their Intended objectives, but all will require some modification to the original design for future use. Boulder berms designed to increase spawning habitat have already Impounded small amounts of gravel and are providing spawning areas for steelhead. Some winter habitat was lost, however, due to construction at each berm site. An off-channel coho rearing pond produced a few exceptionally large coho smolts the first year after construction. A side channel development was used by spawning coho and chinook soon after construction in 1984, but few juvenile salmonids were found there in the winter of 1984-85. It is too soon to evaluate riparian plantings or addition of woody debris to stream edges. Comprehensive benefits or losses are difficult to determine for <span class="hlt">projects</span> only one or two years old since fish response to improvements often takes several years. The success of each improvement must be measured in terms of increased smolt outputs. Our work indicates that the risk of failure associated with habitat improvement <span class="hlt">projects</span> is very high without: (1) a detailed analysis of limiting factors in a basin, and (2) an evaluation of physical and biological changes in a basin, including smolts produced, resulting from improvements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Everest, Fred H.; Sedell, James R. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Wolfe, John (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/964261"> <span id="translatedtitle">Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span> (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued <span class="hlt">project</span> tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/903055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kelt Reconditioning: A Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2004 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of three study groups (direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 15 March to 21 June 2004. In total, 842 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.5% (842 of 2,755) of the entire 2003-2004 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially or for the duration of the experiment. All steelhead kelts received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement as a means to improve initial nutrition. Long-term steelhead kelts received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used, first, after initial capture an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Next, a Formalin drip was used for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. Captured kelts were separated into three experimental groups: short-term reconditioning, long-term reconditioning, and direct transport and release. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on May 11, 2004. Survival-to-release was good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 79.0%. Long-term steelhead kelts are currently being held for a 6-9 month period with a scheduled release in December 2004. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts has not been determined and will be presented in the 2005 <span class="hlt">annual</span> report. Direct transport and release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts were radio or acoustic tagged to assess their travel time and migratory behaviors below Bonneville Dam. A total of 29 direct-transport and release kelts and 29 short-term reconditioned kelts received surgically implanted radio tags, and a total of 28 direct-transport/release and 26 short-term reconditioned fish received surgically implanted hydro acoustic tags. These tags will allow us to determine outm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/808621"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement and Modeling of Energetic Material Mass Transfer to Soil Pore Water - <span class="hlt">Project</span> CP-1227 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Technical Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization <span class="hlt">projects</span> have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g. weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. Experimental work to date with Composition B explosive has shown that column tests typically produce effluents near the temperature dependent solubility limits for RDX and TNT. The influence of water flow rate, temperature, porous media saturation and mass loading is documented. The mass transfer model formulation uses a mass transfer coefficient and surface area function and shows good agreement with the experimental data. Continued experimental work is necessary to evaluate solid phase particle size and 2-dimensional effects, and actual low order detonation debris. Simulation model improvements will continue leading to a capability to complete screening assessments of the impacts of military range operations on groundwater quality.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PHELAN, JAMES M.; WEBB, STEPHEN W.; ROMERO, JOSEPH V.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; GRIFFIN, FAWN A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/875976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement and modeling of energetic material mass transfer to soil pore water :<span class="hlt">project</span> CP-1227 FY03 <span class="hlt">annual</span> technical report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization <span class="hlt">projects</span> have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. This report documents the results of the Phase III experimental effort, which evaluated the impacts of surface deposits versus buried deposits, energetic material particle size, and low order detonation debris. Next year, the energetic material mass transfer model will be refined and a 2-d screening model will be developed for initial site-specific applications. A technology development roadmap was created to show how specific R&D efforts are linked to technology and products for key customers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phelan, James M.; Barnett, James L.; Kerr, Dayle R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/890117"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2002-2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average <span class="hlt">annual</span> precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop <span class="hlt">project</span> objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/850184"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries <span class="hlt">Project</span> Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the third in a series of <span class="hlt">annual</span> reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery <span class="hlt">Project</span>'s spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kelt Reconditioning: A Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2001 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are artificially and in some cases severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea-trout (S. trutta). The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To address recovery, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and tested reconditioning and the effects of several diet formulations on its success at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakama Reservation. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from 12 March to 5 July 2001. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus and we tested the use of Ivermectin{trademark}to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups on 15 November 2001 and 18 January 2002. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived in captivity, gained weight, and the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 551 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 18.7% (551 of 2,942) of the entire 2000-2001Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments (208-323 days from capture), 108 fish (19.6%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 100 (94.3%) of 106 sex-identified specimens were female and we estimated that 96% of the reconditioned releases gained weight and developed mature gonads. Nearly one quarter (24.3%) of all reconditioned kelts survived for the duration of the experiment. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this <span class="hlt">project</span> will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding Kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although higher survival rates would have been desirable, the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative <span class="hlt">project</span>. Nearly 20% of the kelts collected were successfully reconditioned, and radio telemetry allowed us to track some of these fish to the spawning grounds and to obtain documentation of successful redd construction. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatch, Douglas R.; Anders, Paul J., Evans, Allen F. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nigel+AND+cross&id=ED536614"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variable Tuition Fees in England: Assessing Their Impact on Students and Higher Education Institutions--A <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Report. Research Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> <span class="hlt">annual</span> report on the effects of the introduction of variable fees arrangements for UK and EU-domiciled full-time undergraduates attending higher education institutions in England. This report, like its predecessors, brings together a range of information from publicly accessible sources and the institutions themselves about the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Nigel; Ramsden, Brian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/441715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Smolt Migration Characteristics and Mainstem Snake and Columbia River Detection Rates of PIT-Tagged Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon, <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Reports 1993, 1994, 1995 : Fish Research <span class="hlt">Project</span>, Oregon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This reports on the second, third, and <span class="hlt">fourth</span> years of a multi-year study to assess smolt migration characteristics and cumulative detection rates of naturally produced spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Northeast Oregon streams. The goal of this <span class="hlt">project</span> is to develop an understanding of interpopulational and interannual variation in several early life history parameters of naturally produced spring and summer chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River subbasins. This <span class="hlt">project</span> will provide information to assist chinook salmon population recovery efforts. Specific populations included in the study are: (1) Catherine Creek; (2) Upper Grande Ronde River; (3) Lostine River; (4) Imnaha River; (5) Wenaha River; and (6) Minam River. In this document, the authors present findings and activities from research completed in 1993, 1994, and 1995.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walters, Timothy R.; Carmichael, Richard W.; Keefe, MaryLouise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962133"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span>; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. <span class="hlt">Project</span> objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish <span class="hlt">annually</span>. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement <span class="hlt">Project</span> was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962433"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation <span class="hlt">Project</span>, 2007 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following <span class="hlt">project</span> initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for <span class="hlt">annual</span> data collection and <span class="hlt">annual</span> reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15641594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clear cell ependymoma of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> ventricle.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two cases of clear cell ependymoma (CCE) of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> ventricle are reported in a 49-year-old woman with dysphagia and a 59-year-old woman with dizziness and gait disturbance. CCE is a relatively new variant of ependymoma added to the WHO classification of tumors in 1993. Tumor cells display an oligodendroglioma-like appearance with a clear perinuclear halo. Most infratentorial CCE tumors are located in the cerebellum. There are only three cases, including the present two cases, that have been reported to affect the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> ventricle. PMID:15641594</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katoh, Masahito; Satoh, Tsukasa; Nishiya, Mikio; Murata, Junichi; Ishii, Nobuaki; Saitoh, Hisatoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Ohnishi, Akiko; Nagashima, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kelt Reconditioning: A Research <span class="hlt">Project</span> to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2003 <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 12 March to 28 May 2003. In total, 690 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.8% (690 of 2,235) of the entire 2002-2003 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks, fed freeze-dried krill and received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement; long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets. Oxytetracycline was administered to reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. Formalin was also administered to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 7 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on June 4, 2003. Survival-to-release was very good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 89.9%. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for 5-9 months then released on December 8, 2003. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts increased as well with 62.4% surviving to release and 91.7% rematuring. A total of 47 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this <span class="hlt">project</span> will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. The authors were very pleased with the high survival rates. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival of long-term reconditioned fish and successful expression of iteroparity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.1101F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes and <span class="hlt">Projections</span> in the <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Cycle of the Southern Hemisphere Circulation, Storm Tracks and Australian Rainfall</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large changes in the seasonal cycle of the Southern Hemisphere circulation over the last sixty years are shown to have impacted on the properties of weather systems associated with mid-latitude storms and consequently reductions in rainfall particularly in the southern Australian region. In particular, there have been significant negative trends in the baroclinic instability of the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation resulting in a reduction in storm formation at these latitudes, while increases in baroclinicity further poleward has led to increased storm development. These effects have become more pronounced with time and are likely to worsen under future climate change scenarios. We consider the observed changes in the baroclinicity of the Southern Hemisphere circulation in all months and examine the corresponding changes in the growth rate and structure of dynamical modes of variability with emphasis on the mid-latitude storm track modes, in the four seasons. We focus on the periods 1949-1968, 1975-1994 and 1997-2006, and relate the reduction in the rainfall in the southwest of Western Australia since the mid-1970s and in South-eastern Australia since the mid-1990s to changes in growth rate and structures of the leading storm track modes. Southwest of Western Australia get most of it's rainfall in autumn and winter. We find that in winter there are considerable reductions in the growth rates (by around 30%) of the leading storm track modes that cross southern Australia between the periods 1969-68 and 1975-94 and that these reductions continue into the period 1997-2007. In autumn growth rates of leading cyclogenesis modes with peak amplitudes across southern Australia decrease by between 10% and 20% between 1949-68 and the latter periods. Importantly, during the more recent periods, storm activity increasingly moves from the latitudes of the subtropical jet to the latitudes of the polar jet. These changes in storm activity are consistent with and provide an explanation of the reduced rainfall over southwest of Western Australia since the mid 1970s. In southeastern Australia the rainfall is spread more evenly throughout the year. We find that in spring there is only a very modest reduction (of around 5%) in growth rates of the leading storm track modes that cross southern Australia between 1949-68 and 1975-94. However during the period 1997-2006 of drought the leading modes of storm activity tracked south of the Australian continent. Again, in summer there is a modest reduction (of around 10%), between 1949-68 and 1975-94, in growth rates of the leading cyclogenesis modes that influence southeastern Australia. However, for the period 1997-2006 the storm activity largely misses southeastern Australia as the storm track has moved poleward. Again these changes in storm activity during 1997-2006 provide an explanation for the causes of the recent prolonged drought in southeastern Australia. Future <span class="hlt">projections</span> using CMIP3 and CMIP5 models under different climate change scenarios show similar trend patterns in baroclinicity and associated reductions in southern Australian rainfall, and hemispheric reductions in rainfall in a zonal band north of 40S and increases further south.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frederiksen, Carsten; Frederiksen, Jorgen; Sisson, Janice; Osbrough, Stacey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+defect&pg=6&id=ED402017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oversight of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Hearing on the Implementation of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> of the Department of Health and Human Services, Created To Reduce Infant Mortality, and Its Proposed Authorization for Fiscal Year 1997 of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Congress, Second Session.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This hearing transcript presents statements and testimony regarding effectiveness of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> to reduce U.S. infant mortality rates and authorization for funding to establish new sites and to enable exiting programs to act as mentors for and to disseminate information to new <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Opening statements are presented…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=edwards+AND+harvard&pg=2&id=ED402017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oversight of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span>. Hearing on the Implementation of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> of the Department of Health and Human Services, Created To Reduce Infant Mortality, and Its Proposed Authorization for Fiscal Year 1997 of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Congress, Second Session.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This hearing transcript presents statements and testimony regarding effectiveness of the Healthy Start Demonstration <span class="hlt">Project</span> to reduce U.S. infant mortality rates and authorization for funding to establish new sites and to enable exiting programs to act as mentors for and to disseminate information to new <span class="hlt">projects</span>. Opening statements are…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60596273"> <span id="translatedtitle">This Letter is a Non-Technical <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report of Activities on <span class="hlt">Project</span> 2007-275-00, Impact of American Shad for the Period February 1, 2008 through January 31, 2009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This letter is a non-technical <span class="hlt">annual</span> report of activities on <span class="hlt">Project</span> 2007-275-00, Impact of American Shad for the period February 1, 2008 through January 31, 2009. A non-technical report is appropriate at this time since data collection is ongoing and results are preliminary. This report is intended to highlight accomplishments during this performance period. Progress on administrative work elements in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parsley; Michael J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=types+AND+salt&pg=4&id=ED378756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal Studies of the Effects of Alternative Types of Early Intervention for Children with Disabilities. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for <span class="hlt">Project</span> Period October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This report is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> in a series of follow-up analyses of nine longitudinal studies addressing the costs and effectiveness of alternative types of early intervention for children with disabilities. An introduction provides an historical perspective and conceptual framework for the studies, including common study elements and how research…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Innocenti, Mark S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=SMA&pg=3&id=ED378756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal Studies of the Effects of Alternative Types of Early Intervention for Children with Disabilities. <span class="hlt">Annual</span> Report for <span class="hlt">Project</span> Period October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report is the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> in a series of follow-up analyses of nine longitudinal studies addressing the costs and effectiveness of alternative types of early intervention for children with disabilities. An introduction provides an historical perspective and conceptual framework for the studies, including common study elements and how research…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Innocenti, Mark S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://anthropologylabs.umn.edu/docs/d3444d3900anatomicalrecord.2006pdf.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">fourth</span> hominin skull from Dmanisi, Georgia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Newly discovered Homo remains, stone artifacts, and animal fossils from Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia, provide a basis for better understand- ing patterns of hominin evolution and behavior in Eurasia ca. 1.77 mil- lion years ago. Here we describe a <span class="hlt">fourth</span> skull that is nearly complete, lacking all but one of its teeth at the time of death. Both the maxillae</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Lordkipanidze; Abesalom Vekua; Reid Ferring; G. Philip Rightmire; Christoph P. E. Zollikofer; Marcia S. Ponce de León; Jordi Agusti; Gocha Kiladze; Alexander Mouskhelishvili; Medea Nioradze; Martha Tappen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=brain+AND+sex&id=ED533212"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> edition of "Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities" critically examines the breadth of research on this complex and controversial topic, with the principal aim of helping the reader to understand where sex differences are found--and where they are not. Since the publication of the third edition, there have been many exciting and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halpern, Diane F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=constitutional+AND+law+AND+the+AND+fourth+AND+amendment&pg=5&id=ED217427"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Egyptian Press: An Official <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Estate.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A descriptive study based on Egyptian law, printed sources, and interviews clarifies our picture of the Egyptian Press by examining its status as a constitutionally mandated "<span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Estate." The constitutional amendment, the resultant Egyptian Press Law, and the "Law Of Shame" (all passed in 1980), are designed to create a heavily controlled press…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawhorne, Clifton O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animal+AND+therapy&pg=4&id=ED512184"> <span id="translatedtitle">Children, Play, and Development. <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Children, Play, and Development, <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Edition, discusses the relationship of play to the physical, social, intellectual, and emotional growth of the child. Author Fergus P. Hughes focuses on the historical, sociocultural, and ethological context of play; the role of development in play; and the wide range of theories that provide a framework…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hughes, Fergus P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=harvin&id=ED289703"> <span id="translatedtitle">Problem Solving Skills of Selected <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Grades.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|A comparison of three approaches to problem solving in <span class="hlt">fourth</span> grade mathematics is presented. Three classes participated in the study. Class One studied problem solving in a structured classroom setting, Class Two studied problem solving incidentally, and Class Three studied problem solving when it appeared in the text. The structured study of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harvin, Virginia R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD656692"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proceedings, <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> AFCRL Scientific Balloon Symposium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The document is comprised of a series of papers presented at the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> AFCRL Scientific Balloon Symposium in September 1966. The range of subject matter was purposely selected to cover both the major branches of balloon technology and a limited number of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. F. Dwyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED018844.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUGGESTED SCHOOL HEALTH POLICIES. <span class="hlt">FOURTH</span> EDITION.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|THE <span class="hlt">FOURTH</span> EDITION OF A GUIDE FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1940 OUTLINES IMPORTANT FEATURES OF AN ACCEPTABLE SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAM. HEALTH EDUCATION IS DEFINED AS AN APPLIED SCIENCE CONCERNED WITH MAN'S UNDERSTANDING OF HIMSELF IN RELATION TO HEALTH MATTERS IN A CHANGING SOCIETY. SUGGESTIONS ARE GIVEN FOR DEVELOPING A HEALTH EDUCATION CURRICULUM. POLICIES…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">REICHERT, JOHN L.; AND OTHERS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56111938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mars vehicle design: The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Powerful new computational tools and small, expert teams have produced unprecedented levels of design detail in the latest cycle of engineering planning for human expeditions to Mars. This article reports on a study contract for NASA-MSFC which evolved mature <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-generation Mars mission vehicle concepts, a set based on nuclear electric, solar electric, and nuclear thermal propulsion methods. The concept described</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brent Sherwood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53318944"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mars vehicle design - The <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> generation of Mars mission vehicle concepts which are based on nuclear electric (NEP), solar electric (SEP), and nuclear thermal (NTP) propulsion methods are discussed. These concepts combine powerful computational tools with the tight coordination and multiple iterations to obtain high level of detail and cost-effective craftsmanship. Topics addressed include NTP vehicle and lander design, transfer vehicle design, engines and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brent Sherwood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21421066"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lepton sector of a <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In extensions of the standard model with a heavy <span class="hlt">fourth</span> generation, one important question is what makes the <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by choosing the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burdman, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da Rold, L. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Bariloche (Argentina); Matheus, R. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA442343"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span>-Generation War and Other Myths.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Generation War (4GW) emerged in the late 1980s, but has become popular due to recent twists in the war in Iraq and terrorist attacks worldwide. Despite reinventing itself several times, the theory has several fundamental flaws that need to be expos...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. A. Echevarria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60159299"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span>-generation photovoltaic concentrator system development</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1991, under a contract with Sandia for the Concentrator Initiative, the ENTECH team initiated the design and development of a <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-generation concentrator module. In 1992, Sandia also contracted with ENTECH to develop a new control and drive system for the ENTECH array. This report documents the design and development work performed under both contracts. Manufacturing processes for the new</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. McDanal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19732650"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span> order magnetic moment of the electron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A more complete account is given of an estimation, by rigorous upper and ; lower bounds, of the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> order magnetic moment of the electron which has ; already been published by the author. The method is illustrated for one typical ; term. Then the results of a more elaborate estimation are given. In the ; terminology used by Karplus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Petermann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1958-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59007320"> <span id="translatedtitle">Terry and <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment First Principles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty years after the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Terry v. Ohio and almost seven-times-thirty years after the adoption of the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment, many lawyers, scholars, and judges still fail to grasp the basic insights of the case and the first principles of the Amendment. Chief Justice Warren's opinion for the Court in Terry must bear some of the blame</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akhil Reed Amar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://stats.bls.gov/news.release/mslo.toc.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extended Mass Layoffs, <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Quarter 1998</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data from the <span class="hlt">fourth</span> quarter 1998 release from the BLS, Extended Mass Layoffs, reveals that 1,660 mass layoff actions by employers resulted in 342,010 worker-job separations of more than 30 days from October through December of 1998.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58850244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arrest Efficiency and the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years, legal scholars have utilized the science of implicit social cognition to reveal how unconscious biases affect perceptions, behaviors, and judgments. Employing this science, scholars critique legal doctrine and challenge courts to take accurate theories of human behavior into account or to explain their failure to do so. Largely absent from this important conversation, however, are <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Song Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58981497"> <span id="translatedtitle">Police Efficiency and the <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Much of our <span class="hlt">Fourth</span> Amendment jurisprudence is premised upon a profound misunderstanding of the nature of suspicion. When determining whether law enforcement officers had the reasonable suspicion necessary to justify a “stop and frisk,” courts currently assume that, in any given case, the presence or absence of reasonable suspicion can objectively be determined simply by examining the factual circumstances that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Song Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Clewell&pg=2&id=EJ587444"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fourth</span>-Grade Researchers: Helping Children Develop Strategies for Finding and Using Information.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Finds significant improvements (at both a Title I school and a middle-income school) in <span class="hlt">fourth</span>-grade students' ability to find and use information after a year of research-strategy instruction that was integrated with the demands of inquiry-based content-area <span class="hlt">projects</span>, rather than skills taught out of context. (SR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dreher, Mariam Jean; Davis, Kathryn Ann; Waynant, Priscilla; Clewell, Suzanne F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/eserv/UQ:159735/aaee08_submission_T1C2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Light bulb moments: identifying information research threshold concepts for <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year engineering students</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The librarians in the Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library undertook a <span class="hlt">project</span> to identify information research threshold concepts which <span class="hlt">fourth</span> year undergraduate students must know to produce high quality research assignments. The methodology used to identify threshold concepts was to survey students, librarians and academics. A suggested threshold concept in information research is the critical evaluation of information</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phil Yorke-Barber; Loretta Atkinson; Gisela Possin; Leith Woodall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer r