Science.gov

Sample records for project reactor module

  1. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  2. International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leopando, Leonardo; Warnecke, Ernst

    2008-01-15

    Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

  3. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    SciTech Connect

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  4. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I; Kapernick, Richard J; Dixon, David D; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO{sub 2}-fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  5. Reactor Physics Characterization of the HTR Module with UCO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HTR Module [1] is a graphite-moderated, helium cooled pebble bed High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design that has been extensively used as a reference template for the former South African and current Chinese HTR [2] programs. This design utilized spherical fuel elements packed into a dynamic pebble bed, consisting of TRISO coated uranium oxide (UO2) fuel kernels with a U-235 enrichment of 7.8% and a Heavy Metal loading of 7 grams per pebble. The main objective of this study is to compare several important reactor physics and core design parameters for the HTR Module and an identical design utilizing UCO fuel kernels. Fuel kernels of this type are currently being tested in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the larger Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The PEBBED-THERMIX [3] code, which was developed specifically for the analysis of pebble bed HTRs, was used to compare the coupled neutronic and thermal fluid performance of the two designs.

  6. Support arrangement for core modules of nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1987-01-01

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  7. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  8. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A.

    1994-02-01

    This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

  9. Sodium Based Heat Pipe Modules for Space Reactor Concepts: Stainless Steel SAFE-100 Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    A heat pipe cooled reactor is one of several candidate reactor cores being considered for advanced space power and propulsion systems to support future space exploration applications. Long life heat pipe modules, with designs verified through a combination of theoretical analysis and experimental lifetime evaluations, would be necessary to establish the viability of any of these candidates, including the heat pipe reactor option. A hardware-based program was initiated to establish the infrastructure necessary to build heat pipe modules. This effort, initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory and referred to as the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) project, set out to fabricate and perform non-nuclear testing on a modular heat pipe reactor prototype that can provide 100 kilowatt from the core to an energy conversion system at 700 C. Prototypic heat pipe hardware was designed, fabricated, filled, closed-out and acceptance tested.

  10. Projects of High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmanis, J.; Tomsons, E.; Zeltiņš, N.

    2013-04-01

    Part 2 of the overview gives emphasis to the projects of high-temperature NRs, whose development is an area of active engagement for the specialists from the USA, France, Japan, Russia, China, the Netherlands, and Germany. Projects of several powerful NRs of the HTGR type for commercial use had been worked out in the USA and Germany already by 1970 but not yet implemented. Augstas temperatūras ar gāzes dzesēšanu HTGR (High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor) tipa kodolreaktoru (KR) izstrādes koncepcija bija piedāvāta 1956. gadā Lielbritānijā. Apmēram tanī pašā laikā minētā tipa KR izstrādi uzsāka Vācijā un ASV. HTGR tipa KR kodoldegviela un kodoldegvielas atražošanas materiāla sīkās daļiņas ar diametru apmēram 0.5 mm pārklātas ar vairākām aizsargkārtām un atrodas grafīta neitronu palēninātājā, kas aizsargā daļiņas no neitronu palēninātāja un dzesētāja iedarbes. Augstas temperatūras KR bez hēlija gāzes siltumnesēja var izmantot šķidrus metālus (nātriju, svinu vai svina-bismuta sakausējumu) un izkausētu sāli. Pašlaik darbojās divi augstas temperatūras ar hēlija gāzi dzesēti eksperimentālie HTGR tipa KR. Viens Japānā "HTTR" no 1998. gada oktobra (sākts būvēt 1991. gada 15. martā) ar 30 MWth siltuma jaudu. Otrs Ķīnā "HTR-10" no 2000.gada decembra (sākts būvēt 1995. gada14. jūnijā) ar 10 MWth siltuma jaudu. Ķīnā Shandong provincē 2011.gada aprīlī uzsāka augstas temperatūras "HTR-PM" (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor - Pebble bed Module) tipa kodolreaktora celtniecību ar 250 MWth siltuma jaudu. Augstas temperatūras kodolreaktoru izstrādē pašlaik aktīvi iesaistīti ASV, Francijas, Japānas, Krievijas, Ķīnas, Nīderlandes un Vācijas speciālisti.

  11. Introduction to Reactor Statics Modules, RS-1. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edlund, Milton C.

    The nine Reactor Statics Modules are designed to introduce students to the use of numerical methods and digital computers for calculation of neutron flux distributions in space and energy which are needed to calculate criticality, power distribution, and fuel burn-up for both slow neutron and fast neutron fission reactors. The diffusion…

  12. JANUS reactor d and d project.

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C. R.

    1998-02-16

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) has recently completed the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the JANUS Reactor Facility located in Building 202. The 200 KW reactor operated from August 1963 to March 1992. The facility was used to study the effects of both high and low doses of fission neutrons in animals. There were two exposure rooms on opposite sides of the reactor and the reactor was therefore named after the two-faced Roman god. The High Dose Room was capable of specimen exposure at a dose rate of 3,600 rads per hour. During calendar year 1996 a detailed characterization of the facility was performed by ANL-E Health Physics personnel. ANL-E Analytical Services performed the required sample analysis. An Auditable Safety Analysis and an Environmental Assessment were completed. D and D plans, procedures and procurement documents were prepared and approved. A D and D subcontractor was selected and a firm, fixed price contract awarded for the field work and final survey effort. The D and D subcontractor was mobilized to ANL-E in January 1997. Electrical isolation of all reactor equipment and control panels was accomplished and the equipment removed. A total of 207,230 pounds (94,082 Kg) of lead shielding was removed, surveyed and sampled, and free-released for recycle. All primary and secondary piping was removed, size reduced and packaged for disposal or recycled as appropriate. The reactor vessel was removed, sized reduced and packaged as radioactive waste in April. The activated graphite block reflector was removed next, followed by the bioshield concrete and steel. All of this material was packaged as low level waste. Total low level radioactive waste generation was 4002.1 cubic feet (113.3 cubic meters). Mixed waste generation was 538 cubic feet (15.2 cubic meters). The Final Release Survey was completed in September. The project field work was completed in 38 weeks without any lost-time accidents, personnel contaminations or unplanned

  13. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  14. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L.; Roof, David R.; Kikta, Thomas J.; Wilczynski, Rosemarie; Nilsen, Roy J.; Bacvinskas, William S.; Fodor, George

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  15. Health Activities Project (HAP): Breathing Fitness Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) learning packet are activities for children in grades 5-8. Design of the activities centers around the idea that students can control their own health and safety. Within this module are teacher and student folios describing four activities which involve students in learning how to measure their…

  16. Reference Reactor Module for the Affordable Fission Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.; Marcille, Thomas F.

    2008-01-21

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The requirements of many surface power applications allow the consideration of systems with much less development risk than most other space reactor applications, because of modest power (10s of kWe) and no driving need for minimal mass (allowing temperatures <1000 K). The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. This paper describes the reference AFSPS reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based, UO{sub 2}-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. One of the important 'affordability' attributes is that the concept has been designed to minimize both the technical and programmatic safety risk.

  17. Update on ORNL TRANSFORM Tool: Simulating Multi-Module Advanced Reactor with End-to-End I&C

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Richard Edward; Fugate, David L.; Cetiner, Sacit M.; Qualls, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Dynamic System Modeling Tool project is in the fourth year of development. The project is designed to support collaborative modeling and study of various advanced SMR (non-light water cooled reactor) concepts, including the use of multiple coupled reactors at a single site. The focus of this report is the development of a steam generator and drum system model that includes the complex dynamics of typical steam drum systems, the development of instrumentation and controls for the steam generator with drum system model, and the development of multi-reactor module models that reflect the full power reactor innovative small module design concept. The objective of the project is to provide a common simulation environment and baseline modeling resources to facilitate rapid development of dynamic advanced reactor models; ensure consistency among research products within the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface technical area; and leverage cross-cutting capabilities while minimizing duplication of effort. The combined simulation environment and suite of models are identified as the TRANSFORM tool. The critical elements of this effort include (1) defining a standardized, common simulation environment that can be applied throughout the Advanced Reactors Technology program; (2) developing a library of baseline component modules that can be assembled into full plant models using available geometry, design, and thermal-hydraulic data; (3) defining modeling conventions for interconnecting component models; and (4) establishing user interfaces and support tools to facilitate simulation development (i.e., configuration and parameterization), execution, and results display and capture.

  18. A hybrid anode reactor for the SLAC modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.

    1994-06-01

    The SLAC modulators operate at 150 MW ak outputs at 120 pps with an average power of 87 kW. In an effect to improve modulator performance and reliability, we describe the design of a hybrid anode reactor using ferrite to decrease the ringing of the output pulse, and incidentally reduce thyratron commutation loss. The design uses MnZn ferrite as a saturable lossy element to decrease the ringing in combination with NiZn ferrite as a saturable reactor for reducing the switching loss. The output ringing is product of the PFN stray capacitance and the leakage inductance of the pulse transformer, and if not suppressed causes premature failures of the output cable. The saturable switch aspect then offers the necessary rise time and pulse width recovery. While these two goals seem contrary, our initial performance objectives were met Ringing on the output pulse is decreased by 50%. Switching loss reduction is measured by a thyratron temperature decrease of 15% as measured on the anode with a cathode reference temperature. The reactor packaging is very simple, and it is separated from the thyratron space so not to complicate thyratron replacement or modulator repairs and maintenance.

  19. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  20. Orion Project Crew Module Analyses Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the efforts at analyzing the Crew Module (CM) for the Orion Project. The Integrated Thermal Model is described, and the on-orbit analysis for the 4 different mission phases is also described. The four mission phases are: Mission phase (1) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) International Space Station (ISS) mission (2) ISS docked (3) LEO, lunar mission and (4) Low Lunar Orbit (LLO).

  1. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  2. Neutron Dosimetry Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderl, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment.

  3. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS ) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code.

  4. The Angra Project: Monitoring Nuclear Reactors with Antineutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, J. C.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Chimenti, P.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Kemp, E.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Lima, H. P.; Lima, R. M.; Nunokawa, H.

    2010-03-01

    We present the status of the Angra Neutrino project, describing the development of an antineutrino detector aimed at monitoring nuclear reactor activity. The experiment will take place at the Brazilian nuclear power plant located in Angra dos Reis. The Angra II reactor, with 4 GW of thermal power, will be used as a source of antineutrinos. A water Cherenkov detector will be placed above ground in a commercial container outside the reactor containment, about 30 m from the reactor core. With a detector of one ton scale a few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. We intend, in a first step, to use the measured neutrino event rate to monitor the on—off status and the thermal power delivered by the reactor. In addition to the safeguards issues the project will provide an alternative tool to have an independent measurement of the reactor power.

  5. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1987-2020

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.C.; Heeb, C.M.; Purcell, W.L.

    1988-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from U.S. commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water eactors (BWR), and one existing high temperature gas reactor (HTGR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the U.S. reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: No New Orders (assumes increasing burnup), No New Orders with No Increased Burnup, Upper Reference (assumes increasing burnup), Upper Reference with No Increased Burnup, and Lower Reference (assumes increasing burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 8 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections: 1986 to 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Walling, R.C.; Purcell, W.L.

    1987-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from US commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent-fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the US reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Agency (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: (1) No new orders with extended burnup, (2) No new orders with constant burnup, (3) Upper reference (which assumes extended burnup), (4) Upper reference with constant burnup, and (5) Lower reference (which assumes extended burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 6 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Reactor Statics Module, RS-9: Multigroup Diffusion Program Using an Exponential Acceleration Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macek, Victor C.

    The nine Reactor Statics Modules are designed to introduce students to the use of numerical methods and digital computers for calculation of neutron flux distributions in space and energy which are needed to calculate criticality, power distribution, and fuel burnup for both slow neutron and fast neutron fission reactors. The last module, RS-9,…

  8. Korea Research Reactor -1 & 2 Decommissioning Project in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. K.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. J.; Park, J. H.

    2003-02-24

    Korea Research Reactor 1 (KRR-1), the first research reactor in Korea, has been operated since 1962, and the second one, Korea Research Reactor 2 (KRR-2) since 1972. The operation of both of them was phased out in 1995 due to their lifetime and operation of the new and more powerful research reactor, HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor; 30MW). Both are TRIGA Pool type reactors in which the cores are small self-contained units sitting in tanks filled with cooling water. The KRR-1 is a TRIGA Mark II, which could operate at a level of up to 250 kW. The second one, the KRR-2 is a TRIGA Mark III, which could operate at a level of up 2,000 kW. The decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) project of these two research reactors, the first D & D project in Korea, was started in January 1997 and will be completed to stage 3 by 2008. The aim of this decommissioning program is to decommission the KRR-1 & 2 reactors and to decontaminate the residual building structure s and the site to release them as unrestricted areas. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) submitted the decommissioning plan and the environmental impact assessment reports to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) for the license in December 1998, and was approved in November 2000.

  9. MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2009-04-28

    The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

  10. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-1: Pressurized Water Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is the PWR…

  11. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-2: Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating the use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is…

  12. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H.

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  13. Particle bed reactor central to SDI nuclear rocket project

    SciTech Connect

    Asker, J.R.

    1991-04-01

    A classified SDI project designated 'Timberwind' and funded with an estimated $7-8 billion over the project's life is charged with the development and flight testing of nuclear reactor-powered rockets. Timberwind's novel 'particle-bed reactor' technology will employ small pellets of reactor fuel to heat a low molecular weight working fluid, such as hydrogen. The fuel pellets would be 0.5 mm in diameter and may be composed of a kernel of fissionable U together with a carbon alloy, coated by layers of carbon and a sealant. A covering of zirconium carbide would prevent chemical degradation of the pellets by the hydrogen working fluid. Performace projection comparisons are conducted for Timberwind, an advanced Atlas-Centaur, and an advanced Titan launch vehicle.

  14. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  15. Animal Guts as Ideal Reactors: An Open-Ended Project for a Course in Kinetics and Reactor Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric D.; Gast, Alice P.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an open-ended project tailored for a senior kinetics and reactor design course in which basic reactor design equations are used to model the digestive systems of several animals. Describes the assignment as well as the results. (DDR)

  16. In-place nuclear reactor vessel annealing demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this paper was a discussion of the proposed annealing demonstration project at the canceled Marble Hill-1 reactor. The discussion, which was a compilation of transparencies on the noted subject, included overall objectives, scope of work, staging of equipment, and analytical objectives. Current status, including funding was summarized.

  17. ADVANTAGES, DISADVANTAGES, AND LESSONS LEARNED FROM MULTI-REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, M.R.; Nielson, R.R.; Trevino, R.A.

    2003-02-27

    This paper discusses the Reactor Interim Safe Storage (ISS) Project within the decommissioning projects at the Hanford Site and reviews the lessons learned from performing four large reactor decommissioning projects sequentially. The advantages and disadvantages of this multi-reactor decommissioning project are highlighted.

  18. Project BIOTECH: Use of Modules in Technician Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    Describes Project Biotech, a program that utilizes the audio-tutorial principle to develop skill-oriented modules. The modules are self-pacing, independent units of instruction which concentrate on a few well-defined objectives and allow the student to learn at his own rate with minimal supervision. (PB)

  19. A Project-Based Biologically-Inspired Robotics Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, R. M.; Zauner, K.-P.

    2013-01-01

    The design of any robotic system requires input from engineers from a variety of technical fields. This paper describes a project-based module, "Biologically-Inspired Robotics," that is offered to Electronics and Computer Science students at the University of Southampton, U.K. The overall objective of the module is for student groups to…

  20. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

    1985-04-01

    The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair Briggs, J.; Sartori, E.; Scott, L.

    2006-07-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined. (authors)

  2. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Enrico Sartori; Lori Scott

    2006-09-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined.

  3. RAPHAEL: The European Union's (Very) High Temperature Reactor Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fuetterer, Michael A.; Besson, D.; Bogusch, E.; Carluec, B.; Hittner, D.; Verrier, D.; Billot, Ph.; Phelip, M.; Buckthorpe, D.; Casalta, S.; Chauvet, V.; Van Heek, A.; Von Lensa, W.; Pirson, J.; Scheuermann, W.

    2006-07-01

    Since the late 1990, the European Union (EU) was conducting work on High Temperature Reactors (HTR) confirming their high potential in terms of safety (inherent safety features), environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (high efficiency, potential suitability for various fuel cycles), and economics (simplifications arising from safety features). In April 2005, the EU Commission has started a new 4-year Integrated Project on Very High Temperature Reactors (RAPHAEL: Reactor for Process Heat And Electricity) as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The European Commission and the 33 partners from industry, R and D organizations and academia finance the project together. After the successful performance of earlier HTR-related EU projects which included the recovery of some earlier German experience and the re-establishment of strategically important R and D capabilities in Europe, RAPHAEL focuses now on key technologies required for an industrial VHTR deployment, both specific to very high temperature and generic to all types of modular HTR with emphasis on combined process heat and electricity generation. Advanced technologies are explored in order to meet the performance challenges required for a VHTR (900-1000 deg C, up to 200 GWd/tHM). To facilitate the planned sharing of significant parts of RAPHAEL results with the signatories of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR projects, RAPHAEL is structured in a similar way as the corresponding GIF VHTR projects. (authors)

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Johansen

    2011-09-01

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  5. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  6. Metric freeness and projectivity for classical and quantum normed modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helemskii, A. Ya

    2013-07-01

    In functional analysis, there are several diverse approaches to the notion of projective module. We show that a certain general categorical scheme contains all basic versions as special cases. In this scheme, the notion of free object comes to the foreground, and, in the best categories, projective objects are precisely retracts of free ones. We are especially interested in the so-called metric version of projectivity and characterize the metrically free classical and quantum (= operator) normed modules. Informally speaking, so-called extremal projectivity, which was known earlier, is interpreted as a kind of 'asymptotical metric projectivity'. In addition, we answer the following specific question in the geometry of normed spaces: what is the structure of metrically projective modules in the simplest case of normed spaces? We prove that metrically projective normed spaces are precisely the subspaces of l_1(M) (where M is a set) that are denoted by l_1^0(M) and consist of finitely supported functions. Thus, in this case, projectivity coincides with freeness. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  7. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules: Reactor Dynamics, RD-1 and RD-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    The objective of the Reactor Dynamics Module, RD-1, is to obtain the kinetics equation without feedback and solve the kinetics equations numerically for one to six delayed neutron groups for time varying reactivity insertions. The computer code FUMOKI (Fundamental Mode Kinetics) will calculate the power as a function of time for either uranium or…

  8. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  9. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Project summary report, Elk River Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Adams, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Elk River Reactor. Decommissioning data from available documents were input into a computerized data-handling system in a manner that permits specific information to be readily retrieved. The information is in a form that assists the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in its assessment of decommissioning alternatives and ALARA methods for future decommissionings projects. Samples of computer reports are included in the report. Decommissioning of other reactors, including NRC reference decommissioning studies, will be described in similar reports.

  10. Sodium Heat Pipe Module Processing For the SAFE-100 Reactor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James; Salvail, Pat

    2004-02-01

    To support development and hardware-based testing of various space reactor concepts, the Early Flight Fission-Test Facility (EFF-TF) team established a specialized glove box unit with ancillary systems to handle/process alkali metals. Recently, these systems have been commissioned with sodium supporting the fill of stainless steel heat pipe modules for use with a 100 kW thermal heat pipe reactor design. As part of this effort, procedures were developed and refined to govern each segment of the process covering: fill, leak check, vacuum processing, weld closeout, and final ``wet in''. A series of 316 stainless steel modules, used as precursors to the actual 321 stainless steel modules, were filled with 35 +/-1 grams of sodium using a known volume canister to control the dispensed mass. Each module was leak checked to <10-10 std cc/sec helium and vacuum conditioned at 250 °C to assist in the removal of trapped gases. A welding procedure was developed to close out the fill stem preventing external gases from entering the evacuated module. Finally the completed modules were vacuum fired at 750 °C allowing the sodium to fully wet the internal surface and wick structure of the heat pipe module.

  11. Sodium Heat Pipe Module Processing For the SAFE-100 Reactor Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James; Salvail, Pat

    2003-01-01

    To support development and hardware-based testing of various space reactor concepts, the Early Flight Fission-Test Facility (EFF-TF) team established a specialized glove box unit with ancillary systems to handle/process alkali metals. Recently, these systems have been commissioned with sodium supporting the fill of stainless steel heat pipe modules for use with a 100 kW thermal heat pipe reactor design. As part of this effort, procedures were developed and refined to govern each segment of the process covering: fill, leak check, vacuum processing, weld closeout, and final "wet in". A series of 316 stainless steel modules, used as precursors to the actual 321 stainless steel modules, were filled with 35 +/- 1 grams of sodium using a known volume canister to control the dispensed mass. Each module was leak checked to less than10(exp -10) std cc/sec helium and vacuum conditioned at 250 C to assist in the removal of trapped gases. A welding procedure was developed to close out the fill stem preventing external gases from entering the evacuated module. Finally the completed modules were vacuum fired at 750 C allowing the sodium to fully wet the internal surface and wick structure of the heat pipe module.

  12. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor-fuel-module construction. [LWBR

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, G.K.; DiGuiseppe, C.P.

    1982-10-28

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wherein the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements.

  13. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure, (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  14. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  15. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 7: Module encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the Encapsulation Task was to develop, demonstrate, and qualify photovoltaic (PV) module encapsulation systems that would provide 20 year (later decreased to 30 year) life expectancies in terrestrial environments, and which would be compatible with the cost and performance goals of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project. The scope of the Encapsulation Task included the identification, development, and evaluation of material systems and configurations required to support and protect the optically and electrically active solar cell circuit components in the PV module operating environment. Encapsulation material technologies summarized include the development of low cost ultraviolet protection techniques, stable low cost pottants, soiling resistant coatings, electrical isolation criteria, processes for optimum interface bonding, and analytical and experimental tools for evaluating the long term durability and structural adequacy of encapsulated modules. Field testing, accelerated stress testing, and design studies have demonstrated that encapsulation materials, processes, and configurations are available that meet the FSA cost and performance goals.

  16. REACTOR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA635. CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. BUILDING PROJECTS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635. CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. BUILDING PROJECTS FROM AND CONNECTS TO SOUTH WALL OF MTR BUILDING. EARTH BERM SHIELDING PLUG STORAGE BUILDING IS AT RIGHT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9913. Unknown Photographer, 2/23/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  19. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew

    2000-07-01

    This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for

  20. Catalog of experimental projects for a fissioning plasma reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzo, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were carried out to determine the feasibility of using a small scale fissioning uranium plasma as the power source in a driver reactor. The driver system is a light water cooled and moderated reactor of the MTR type. The eight experiments and proposed configurations for the reactor are outlined.

  1. An Optical Demonstration Project For The HESSI Rotating Modulation Collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe-Schmahl, B.; Schmahl, K.; Mengel, T.; Schmahl, E.

    2000-05-01

    Our 4-7th grade Workshop students made a working prototype of a HESSI rotating modulation collimator (RMC) using PVC pipe, PVC couplers, grid transparencies, a dot matrix (tractor feed) printer, and a slide projector. The idea is to rotate two four-inch long telescopes end-to-end on the same printer roller. Each telescope has two grids and are placed an inch or two apart. They have the same rotational axis and all the grids are parallel. The light beam comes in and hits the imaging telescope. The light going out of it hits a diffusion screen (translucent plastic) and then continues, diffused, into the back-projection telescope. Polaroid film and a modified Polaroid camera sum the back-projection data. The camera is modified by removing the front focusing lens, replacing it with a 4-inch lens, creating a shutter system using layered cardboard and gluing the shutter system to the front of the camera. The shutter system is opened and the film exposed through one complete rotation of the model HESSI Telescope. To our students' amazement a back projection was successfully obtained on the print! The HESSI Telescope Demonstration project provides the impetus for students to stretch their mental boundaries. This project promotes the goals of ``learn one, do one, teach one": 1) Learn one: students must research the field and subject matter for the telescope; 2) Do one: By designing, developing and implementing their project, they are in essence performing valid research, which is the end result of all scientific inquiries; 3) Teach one: By incorporating both written and oral presentations of their projects and through interaction with a scientist and/or engineering mentor, students are given the unique opportunity to experience the peer review process that all scientists and engineers must undergo. We would like to thank the HESSI team of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for their on-going support of our students' project.

  2. Overview of the E-ELT MCAO module project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diolaiti, Emiliano

    2013-12-01

    MAORY is the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) module for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is designed to feed the E-ELT high angular resolution camera. Both the MCAO module and the camera are currently included in the telescope's first light instrumentation set. The MCAO module is required to relay the telescope focal plane to the client instrument and to compensate the wavefront errors due to atmospheric turbulence and other effects such as telescope windshake. The performance is optimized on the wavelength range 0.8-2.4 µm over an angular field of view of about 1 arcminute. In the current baseline design, wavefront correction is performed by the telescope's adaptive mirror M4 and tip-tilt mirror M5 and by two post-focal deformable mirrors integrated in the MCAO module and conjugated to high altitude turbulent layers. Wavefront sensing is performed by a Laser Guide Star (LGS) wavefront sensor using 6 Sodium artificial sources, complemented by a Natural Guide Star (NGS) wavefront sensor using 3 natural stars. The NGS wavefront sensor is devoted to the measurement of the orders of wavefront aberration that the LGS wavefront sensor alone cannot measure in a reliable way, such as tip-tilt, focus, low/medium orders induced by the Sodium layer density profile variations coupled with instrumental effects. The MCAO system architecture is based on a robust closed loop approach, ensuring reliable peak performance as well as high sky coverage. An overview of the baseline design and expected performance of the MCAO module is given. The on-going activities in preparation for the project phase B are described.

  3. Project management plan, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1, Project W-026

    SciTech Connect

    Starkey, J.G.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Project (WRAP 1) has been established to support the retrieval and final disposal of approximately 400K grams of plutonium and quantities of hazardous components currently stored in drums at the Hanford Site.

  4. Projection two-photon polymerization using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Li, Jiawen; Hu, Yanlei; Zhang, Chenchu; Lao, Zhaoxin; Huang, Wenhao; Chu, Jiaru

    2014-11-01

    The development of a high-efficiency projection two-photon polymerization (P2PP) process by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is presented. Rapid fabrication of 2D patterned microstructures with P2PP is demonstrated, and the effect of laser pattern and exposure dose on the surface roughness of the fabricated microstructures is investigated. It is found that the distribution of laser intensity at the focal plane of objective has a significant effect on the profiles of microstructures. This unique technology has a promising approach to increase the efficiency of two-photon polymerization (2PP) and a parallel fabrication of complex 2D and 3D microstructures.

  5. Projective Module Description of the q-Monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajac, Piotr M.; Majid, Shahn

    The Dirac q-monopole connection is used to compute projector matrices of quantum Hopf line bundles for arbitrary winding number. The Chern-Connes pairing of cyclic cohomology and K-theory is computed for the winding number -1. The non-triviality of this pairing is used to conclude that the quantum principal Hopf fibration is non-cleft. Among general results, we provide a left-right symmetric characterization of the canonical strong connections on quantum principal homogeneous spaces with an injective antipode. We also provide for arbitrary strong connections on algebraic quantum principal bundles (Hopf-Galois extensions) their associated covariant derivatives on projective modules.

  6. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  7. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery

  8. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  9. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-3: High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module…

  10. Job task and functional analysis of the Division of Reactor Projects, office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, J.A.; Gilmore, W.; Hahn, H.A.

    1998-07-10

    A job task and functional analysis was recently completed for the positions that make up the regional Divisions of Reactor Projects. Among the conclusions of that analysis was a recommendation to clarify roles and responsibilities among site, regional, and headquarters personnel. As that analysis did not cover headquarters personnel, a similar analysis was undertaken of three headquarters positions within the Division of Reactor Projects: Licensing Assistants, Project Managers, and Project Directors. The goals of this analysis were to systematically evaluate the tasks performed by these headquarters personnel to determine job training requirements, to account for variations due to division/regional assignment or differences in several experience categories, and to determine how, and by which positions, certain functions are best performed. The results of this analysis include recommendations for training and for job design. Data to support this analysis was collected by a survey instrument and through several sets of focus group meetings with representatives from each position.

  11. Status of power-reactor projects undergoing licensing review

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.G.

    1982-07-01

    Recent regulatory and other actions relating to power reactors undergoing licensing review are summarized in Table 1 as of May 1, 1982. Except as otherwise noted, all the information presented in this article is taken from NRC press releases or from the reactor docket file, both of which are available at the NRC Public Document Room, 1717 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20555.

  12. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes.

  13. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  14. Spatial light modulators for high-brightness projection displays.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, K; Fujii, T; Kikuchi, H; Fujikake, H; Kawakita, M; Hirano, Y; Sato, F

    1999-09-10

    We fabricated polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal light valves (PDLCLV's) consisting of a 30-microm-thick hydrogenated amorphous-silicon film and a 10-microm-thick polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film composed of nematic liquid-crystal (LC) microdroplets surrounded by polymer. The device can modulate high-power reading light, because the PDLC becomes transparent or opalescent independent of the polarization state of the reading light when either sufficient or no writing light is incident on the PDLCLV. This device has a limiting resolution of 50 lp/mm (lp indicates line pairs), a reading light efficiency of 60%, a ratio of intensity of light incident on the PDLC layer to intensity of light radiated from the layer, and an extinction ratio of 130:1. The optically addressed video projection system with three PDLCLV's, LC panels of 1048 x 480 pixels as input image sources, a 1-kW Xe lamp, and a schlieren optical system projected television (TV) pictures of 600 and 450 TV lines in the horizontal and the vertical directions on a screen with a diagonal length of 100 in. The total output flux of this system was 1500 lm. PMID:18324076

  15. Passive shutdown device for gas cooled fast reactor: Lithium injection module

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; Van Dam, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper a passive reactivity control system for a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is proposed. The Generation IV GCFR features a core with a relatively high power density, and control of transients and adequate shutdown under accidental situations must be assured for safe operation. Using a passive shutdown device rules out the possibility of unprotected transients. The proposed devices work by the passive introduction of {sup 6}Li into the core (Lithium Injection Module). Control is by the outlet temperature of the coolant gas in the fuel assemblies, employing a freeze seal. The proposed devices can be integrated into the regular control assemblies. A total of four LIMs is proposed in the core. Thermohydraulic calculations were done using the CATHARE code for a 600 MWth GCFR, for 2 types of transients: a loss of flow, and a control rod withdrawal. The calculations show that activation of one LIM is sufficient to keep the reactor power bounded, while activation of all LIMs in the core will shut down the reactor. The passive LIM devices are able to exclude unprotected transients in the GCFR core. (authors)

  16. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sam A; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Daniel J; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L; Russo, Scott J

    2016-06-30

    Maladaptive aggressive behaviour is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders and is thought to result partly from the inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus, extended amygdala and limbic circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behaviour. Here we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors develop a CPP, whereas non-aggressors develop a conditioned place aversion to the intruder-paired context. Furthermore, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of aggressors with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of non-aggressors with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Finally, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behaviour. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit has a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behaviour and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing. PMID:27357796

  17. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Fundementals of Workplace Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraeling, Vicki

    This module is one of a series of instructional guides developed by Project TEAM (Technical Education Advancement Modules), a cooperative demonstration program for high technology training for unemployed, underemployed, and existing industrial employees whose basic technical skills are in need of upgrading. The module is a 27-hour overview course…

  18. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Decision Making Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The decision making teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the units, the activities in…

  19. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Economic Awareness Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The economic awareness teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the units, the activities in…

  20. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Employability Skills Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The employability skills teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the units, the activities…

  1. Project SEISMIC--Sex Equity in Schools: Modules in Careers. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitayat, Deanna

    Project SEISMIC (Sex Equity in Schools: Modules in Careers) grew out of a federal mandate to the New York State Educational Department to reduce sex bias in its educational system. Under the project a kit was developed containing four modules for use in staff development, secondary school classrooms, and workshops with the business community.…

  2. [Project EXCEL: Curriculum for Just Desserts, Inc.: Modules 1-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Resources Development Center, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    Six curriculum modules for Just Desserts, a San Francisco wholesale bakery company, are presented. Just Desserts was one of four small businesses involved in Project EXCEL, a workplace literacy project that focused on literacy and basic skills training for limited-English-proficient (LEP) workers. The modules are as follows: (1) Bakery Vocabulary…

  3. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel.

  4. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project: construction schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, W.J.; Martin, E.M.; Shivley, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The construction schedule for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant and its evolution are described. The initial schedule basis, changes necessitated by the evaluation of the overall plant design, and constructability improvements that have been effected to assure adherence to the schedule are presented. The schedule structure and hierarchy are discussed, as are tools used to define, develop, and evaluate the schedule.

  5. Working Smart. The Los Angeles Unified School District Workplace Literacy Project. Performance Modules. Communication Modules, Manual/Workbook. Computational Modules, Manual/Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    This document consists of performance, computational, and communication modules used by the Working Smart workplace literacy project, a project conducted for the hotel and food industry in the Los Angeles area by a public school district and several profit and nonprofit companies. Literacy instruction was merged with job requirements of the…

  6. Evaluation of performance of select fusion experiments and projected reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of NASA Lewis fusion experiments (SUMMA and Bumpy Torus) is compared with other experiments and that necessary for a power reactor. Key parameters cited are gain (fusion power/input power) and the time average fusion power, both of which may be more significant for real fusion reactors than the commonly used Lawson parameter. The NASA devices are over 10 orders of magnitude below the required powerplant values in both gain and time average power. The best experiments elsewhere are also as much as 4 to 5 orders of magnitude low. However, the NASA experiments compare favorably with other alternate approaches that have received less funding than the mainline experiments. The steady-state character and efficiency of plasma heating are strong advantages of the NASA approach. The problem, though, is to move ahead to experiments of sufficient size to advance in gain and average power parameters.

  7. A summary of lessons learned activities conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hallbert, B.P.

    1997-02-01

    A series of lessons learned studies have been conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The purpose of these lessons learned reports are to summarize knowledge and experience gained across a number of research project. This paper presents a summary of main issues addressed in four of these lessons learned projects. These are concerned with software development and quality assurance, software reliability, methods for test and evaluation of developed systems, and the evaluation of system design features.

  8. Neutron dosimetry qualification experiments for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderi, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment and the use of such data in neutron spectrum adjustment and in predicting integral performance parameters, e.g., tritium production.

  9. Integral Reactor Physics Benchmarks - the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (icsbep) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (irphep)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.; Sartori, Enrico

    2006-04-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear industry, thousands of integral experiments related to reactor physics and criticality safety have been performed. Many of these experiments can be used as benchmarks for validation of calculational techniques and improvements to nuclear data. However, many were performed in direct support of operations and thus were not performed with a high degree of quality assurance and were not well documented. For years, common validation practice included the tedious process of researching integral experiment data scattered throughout journals, transactions, reports, and logbooks. Two projects have been established to help streamline the validation process and preserve valuable integral data: the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP). The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. A short history of these two projects and their common purpose are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the ICSBEP are highlighted and the future of the two projects outlined.

  10. GIF sodium fast reactor project R and D on safety and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Vasile, A.; Sofu, T.; Jeong, H. Y.; Sakai, T.

    2012-07-01

    The 'Safety and Operation' project is started in 2009 within the framework of Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) research and development program. In the safety area, the project involves R and D activities on phenomenological model development and experimental programs, conceptual studies in support of the design of safety provisions, preliminary assessment of safety systems, framework and methods for analysis of safety architecture. In the operation area, the project involves R and D activities on fast reactors safety tests and analysis of reactor operations, feedback from decommissioning, in-service inspection technique development, under-sodium viewing and sodium chemistry. This paper presents a summary of such activities and the main achievements. (authors)

  11. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Apollo 11 Facts Project [On-Orbit Lunar Module Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Footage is shown of the crew of Apollo 11 (Commander Neil Armstrong, Lunar Module Pilot Edwin Aldrin Jr., and Command Module Pilot Michael Collins) inside the spacecraft as they fly from the Earth to the Moon. The Moon is seen in its entirety and in close detail. Aldrin gives a brief demonstration on how the astronauts eat in space.

  13. Streaming analysis of gap between blanket modules for fusion experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Seki, Yasushi; Utsumi, Toshihisa

    1996-12-31

    Shielding analyses of the inboard blanket, the vacuum vessel and the Toroidal Field Coil (TFC) in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were performed by Monte Carlo and 2-dimensional discrete ordinate methods taking the radiation streaming through the 20 mm wide gap between the adjacent blanket modules into account, and their peak nuclear responses were evaluated. The nuclear responses of the TFC could fully satisfy the radiation limits. On the other hand, the helium production rates of the branch pipe, the leg and the front surface of the vacuum vessel behind the gap were about 2 - 3 times higher than the radiation limit at the end of the operation, i.e. the neutron fluence of 3 MWa/m{sup 2}. So the shielding module is required to be increased by 80 mm to satisfy the radiation limit. Also, shielding analyses for 20 - 100 mm wide gaps were performed, and it was found that the gap width could be increased by up to 50 mm from the TFCs protection for their peak nuclear responses point of view. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  15. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E. Eric; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  16. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  17. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Paul H.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 6-hour introductory module on statistical process control (SPC), designed to develop competencies in the following skill areas: (1) identification of the three classes of SPC use; (2) understanding a process and how it works; (3)…

  18. Language Assessment. Module 2. Bilingual/ESOL Special Education Collaboration and Reform Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maya, Elias; Fradd, Sandra H.

    This instructional module is part of a project to reform current school curricula, improve instructional services for handicapped and at-risk limited-English-proficient (LEP) and language minority students, and provide innovative leadership in higher education related to programs for LEP persons. The materials contained in the module are designed…

  19. The Procter and Gamble Decaffeination Project: A Multimedia Instruction Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, R. G.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Purdue University (Indiana) is developing a series of computer modules of state-of-the-art chemical engineering processes to serve as the basis for computer-simulated experiments. One, sponsored by Procter and Gamble, models the extraction step in the decaffeination process and allows students to determine the optimal extraction conditions for…

  20. Evaluation of Three Microcomputer Teaching Modules. SUMIT Courseware Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soldan, Ted

    The purpose of this series of experiments was to examine two questions related to the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction (CAI). Can microcomputer modules teach effectively, and do they enhance learning when used as a supplement to traditional teaching methods? Part 1 of this report addresses the former question and part 2 addresses the…

  1. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  2. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Industrial Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisenhunt, James E.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour introduction to industrial physics that explains and demonstrates to industrial maintenance mechanics the direct relationship of physics to machinery. Project TEAM is intended to upgrade basic technical competencies of…

  3. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies. PMID:26786848

  4. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies.

  5. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion–fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies. PMID:26786848

  6. Permitting plan for project W-236B, initial pretreatment module

    SciTech Connect

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1995-01-25

    The Tank Waste Remediation System pretreatment process mission is to separate high-level and low-level waste fractions. A comprehensive review of environmental regulations has indicated that several environmental reviews, permits, and approvals are required before construction and operation of the facility. This revised document provides a summary of permit application data requirements, alternative strategies for permit completion and approval, as well as the probability of success for each alternative for the Initial Pretreatment Module resulting from recent revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement.

  7. Search for eV sterile neutrinos at a nuclear reactor — the Stereo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haser, J.; Stereo Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The re-analyses of the reference spectra of reactor antineutrinos together with a revised neutrino interaction cross section enlarged the absolute normalization of the predicted neutrino flux. The tension between previous reactor measurements and the new prediction is significant at 2.7 σ and is known as “reactor antineutrino anomaly”. In combination with other anomalies encountered in neutrino oscillation measurements, this observation revived speculations about the existence of a sterile neutrino in the eV mass range. Mixing of this light sterile neutrino with the active flavours would lead to a modification of the detected antineutrino flux. An oscillation pattern in energy and space could be resolved by a detector at a distance of few meters from a reactor core: the neutrino detector of the Stereo project will be located at about 10 m distance from the ILL research reactor in Grenoble, France. Lengthwise separated in six target cells filled with 2 m3 Gd-loaded liquid scintillator in total, the experiment will search for a position-dependent distortion in the energy spectrum.

  8. Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1. 11, September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts.

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency support of research reactor highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel conversion projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2008-07-15

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non- proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly assisted efforts to convert research reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects differ significantly depending on several factors including the design of the reactor and fuel, technical needs of the member state, local nuclear infrastructure, and available resources. To support such diverse endeavours, the IAEA tailors each project to address the relevant constraints. This paper presents the different approaches taken by the IAEA to address the diverse challenges involved in research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects. Examples of conversion related projects in different Member States are fully detailed. (author)

  10. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Thomas; DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt

    2012-07-01

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  11. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  12. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  13. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  14. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

  15. NASA. Lewis Research Center Advanced Modulation and Coding Project: Introduction and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1992-02-01

    The Advanced Modulation and Coding Project at LeRC is sponsored by the Office of Space Science and Applications, Communications Division, Code EC, at NASA Headquarters and conducted by the Digital Systems Technology Branch of the Space Electronics Division. Advanced Modulation and Coding is one of three focused technology development projects within the branch's overall Processing and Switching Program. The program consists of industry contracts for developing proof-of-concept (POC) and demonstration model hardware, university grants for analyzing advanced techniques, and in-house integration and testing of performance verification and systems evaluation. The Advanced Modulation and Coding Project is broken into five elements: (1) bandwidth- and power-efficient modems; (2) high-speed codecs; (3) digital modems; (4) multichannel demodulators; and (5) very high-data-rate modems. At least one contract and one grant were awarded for each element.

  16. NASA. Lewis Research Center Advanced Modulation and Coding Project: Introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Modulation and Coding Project at LeRC is sponsored by the Office of Space Science and Applications, Communications Division, Code EC, at NASA Headquarters and conducted by the Digital Systems Technology Branch of the Space Electronics Division. Advanced Modulation and Coding is one of three focused technology development projects within the branch's overall Processing and Switching Program. The program consists of industry contracts for developing proof-of-concept (POC) and demonstration model hardware, university grants for analyzing advanced techniques, and in-house integration and testing of performance verification and systems evaluation. The Advanced Modulation and Coding Project is broken into five elements: (1) bandwidth- and power-efficient modems; (2) high-speed codecs; (3) digital modems; (4) multichannel demodulators; and (5) very high-data-rate modems. At least one contract and one grant were awarded for each element.

  17. The design of the optical modules of the KM3NeT-Italia project towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, Emanuele; Aiello, Sebastiano; Giordano, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    The KM3NeT-Italia project aims to construct a large volume underwater neutrino telescope, to be installed in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. The R&D and mass production phases of the detection elements of the telescope, the optical modules, were entirely performed in the INFN-LNS site in the harbour of Catania. In November 2014 a first tower of 14 storeys equipped with 84 optical modules was successfully deployed in the Mediterranean Sea site. The design of the optical modules and their main components are described in this paper.

  18. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory

  19. A review of design concepts for the Advanced Fluids Module (AFM) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Myron E.; Tschen, Peter S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews preliminary fluid module design concepts for the Advanced Fluids Module (AFM) project. The objective of this effort is to provide a facility that can handle a wide variety of fluids experiments. Sample science requirements were written and conceptual designs were subsequently generated during the last year. Experiments from the following fluid physics subject areas were used as conceptual design drivers: static and dynamic interfacial phenomena; bubble/droplet thermocapillary migration; surface tension convection and instabilities; thermal/solutal convection; pool boiling; and multiphase flow. After the conceptual designs were completed, the next phase attempted to combine experiments capabilities into a multipurpose, multiuser apparatus configured for the Space Station Freedom. It was found that all the fluid subject areas considered could be accommodated by three basic types of fluids modules. These modules are the Static Fluid Cell Module, the Dynamic Fluid Cell Module, and the Multiphase Flow Module. Descriptions of these preliminary modules designs and their particular sub-systems (e.g., fluid and thermal systems) are discussed. These designs will be refined as the nature of the flight program becomes clearer over the next six to twelve months.

  20. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  1. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  2. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  3. Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model''

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  4. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  5. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPh

  6. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5{times}10{sup 19}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}sec{sup {minus}1}. Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities.

  7. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Brenda

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 3-hour introduction to computers. The purpose is to develop the following competencies: (1) orientation to data processing; (2) use of data entry devices; (3) use of computer menus; and (4) entry of data with accuracy and…

  8. 75 FR 79008 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Study of Substance Abuse doc.com Module Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Study of Substance... approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Study of Substance Abuse doc.com Module Project. Type of Information... clearance to a conduct research study to assess the efficacy of a specific interactive web-based...

  9. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level II Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  10. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level I Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  11. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Advanced Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Dale

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour advanced statistical process control (SPC) and quality improvement course designed to develop the following competencies: (1) understanding quality systems; (2) knowing the process; (3) solving quality problems; and (4)…

  12. Crosscutting Requirements in the International Project on Innovative Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    SciTech Connect

    Steur, Ronald; Lyubenov Yaven, Yanko; Gueorguiev, Boris; Mahadeva, Rao; Shen, Wenquan

    2002-07-01

    There are two categories of requirements: (i) user requirements that need to be met by the designers and manufacturers of innovative reactors and fuel cycles, and (ii) a wide spectrum of requirements that need to be met by countries, willing to successfully deploy innovative nuclear reactors for energy production. This part of the International Project on Innovative Reactors and Fuel Cycles will mainly deal with the second category of requirements. Both categories of requirements will vary depending on the institutional development, infrastructure availability and social attitude in any given country. Out of the need for sustainable development requirements will also more specific in the future. Over a 50-year time frame both categories of requirements will evolve with social and economic development as nuclear technology develops further. For example, the deployment of innovative reactors in countries with marginal or non-existing nuclear infrastructures would be possible only if the reactors are built, owned and operated by an international nuclear utility or if they are inherently safe and can be delivered as a 'black box - nuclear battery'. A number of issues will need to be addressed and conditions and requirements developed if this is going to become a reality. One general requirement for wider utilization of innovative nuclear power will be the public and environmental considerations, which will play a role in the decision making processes. Five main clusters of topics will be handled: - Infra-structural aspects, typology and consequences for nuclear development. - Industrial requirements for the different innovative concepts. - Institutional developments and requirements for future deployment of nuclear energy. (National as well as international) - Socio-political aspects, a.o. public acceptance and role of governments. - Sustainability: requirements following the need for sustainability Analysis will be made of the evolution of national and international

  13. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Rights and Responsibility Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The rights and responsibility teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the activities, and…

  14. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Self-Awareness Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The self awareness teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the units, the activities in each…

  15. Project S.P.I.C.E.: Special Partnership in Career Education. Career/Educational Awareness Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Debby H.; And Others

    The career/educational awareness teaching module is one of a series of six modules prepared by Project SPICE (Special Partnership in Career Education) as a means of providing career awareness information to educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-to-13 years). After an overview, a module profile is provided which charts the activities and…

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

  17. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The system conteraplates ohmically heating a gas to high temperatures such as are useful in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. To this end the gas is ionized and an electric current is applied to the ionized gas ohmically to heat the gas while the ionized gas is confined to a central portion of a reaction chamber. Additionally, means are provided for pumping impurities from the gas and for further heating the gas. (AEC)

  18. Projections from the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area to regions involved in pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, I; Reiner, K; Govrin-Lippmann, R; Belenky, M; Lu, J; Hopkins, D A; Saper, C B; Devor, M

    2006-12-01

    Pentobarbital microinjected into a restricted locus in the upper brainstem induces a general anesthesia-like state characterized by atonia, loss of consciousness, and pain suppression as assessed by loss of nocifensive response to noxious stimuli. This locus is the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA). Although anesthetic agents directly influence spinal cord nociceptive processing, antinociception during intracerebral microinjection indicates that they can also act supraspinally. Using neuroanatomical tracing methods we show that the MPTA has multiple descending projections to brainstem and spinal areas associated with pain modulation. Most prominent is a massive projection to the rostromedial medulla, a nodal region for descending pain modulation. Together with the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the MPTA is the major mesopontine input to this region. Less dense projections target the PAG, the locus coeruleus and pericoerulear areas, and dorsal and ventral reticular nuclei of the caudal medulla. The MPTA also has modest direct projections to the trigeminal nuclear complex and to superficial layers of the dorsal horn. Double anterograde and retrograde labeling at the light and electron microscopic levels shows that MPTA neurons with descending projections synapse directly on spinally projecting cells of rostromedial medulla. The prominence of the MPTA's projection to the rostromedial medulla suggests that, like the PAG, it may exert antinociceptive actions via this bulbospinal relay. PMID:17049433

  19. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East project final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.; Garlock, G.; Mathiesen, J.

    1998-12-02

    The ATSR D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: (1) Removal of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the ATSR Reactor facility; (2) Decontamination of the ATSR Reactor facility to unrestricted use levels; and (3)Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure). These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the ATSR Reactor facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The reactor aluminum, reactor lead, graphite piles in room E-111, and the contaminated concrete in room E-102 were the primary areas of concern. NES, Incorporated (Danbury, CT) characterized the ATSR Reactor facility from January to March 1998. The characterization identified a total of thirteen radionuclides, with a total activity of 64.84 mCi (2.4 GBq). The primary radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Eu{sup 152}, Cs{sup 137}, and U{sup 238}. No additional radionuclides were identified during the D&D of the facility. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the reactor tank and shield tank. Contact radiation levels of 30 mrem/hr (0.3 mSv/hr) were measured on reactor internals during dismantlement of the reactor. A level of 3 mrem/hr (0.03 mSv/hr) was observed in a small area (hot spot) in room E-102. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem/yr (50 mSv/yr); the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

  20. Welding and cutting characteristics of blanket/first wall module to back plate for fusion experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, T.; Furuya, K.; Sato, S.

    1995-12-31

    A modular blanket/first wall has been proposed for a fusion experimental reactor, e.g., International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), with support ribs connecting to a strong back plate. For the connection method, a welding approach has been investigated. Welding and cutting tests of the support ribs have been performed with three types of test specimens; flat plate (200 mm x 400 mm), partial model (700 mm x 200 mm), and full-box model (600 mm x 1000 mm x 430 mm). The support ribs were made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 50 mm in all these tests. The welding method applied to these tests was narrow gap TIG, and water jet for cutting. Through these tests, engineering data including optimum welding conditions, welding distortion, and welding/cutting speeds have been obtained. Transverse shrinkage was about 10 mm for the welding of 50 mm thick rib. However, the difference in distortion at the first wall surface was within 1--2 mm. Therefore, the blanket/first wall module can be installed with quite a high accuracy by taking into account the module moving to the back plate during the welding.

  1. IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K.; Aksan, S. N.

    2012-07-01

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

  2. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  3. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  4. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  5. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  6. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N.; Burns, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

  7. Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

    2005-09-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

  8. DAZZLE project: UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nicholas; Erry, Gavin

    2014-10-01

    The advent of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has generated the need for reduced size, weight and power (SWaP) requirements for communications systems with a high data rate, enhanced security and quality of service. This paper presents the current results of the DAZZLE project run by Airbus Group Innovations. The specifications, integration steps and initial performance of a UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector are detailed. The laser operates at the wavelength of 1550nm and at power levels that keep it eye safe. It is directed using a FLIR pan and tilt unit driven by an image processing-based system that tracks the UAV in flight at a range of a few kilometers. The modulated retro-reflector is capable of a data rate of 20Mbps over short distances, using 200mW of electrical power. The communication system was tested at the Pershore Laser Range in July 2014. Video data from a flying Octocopter was successfully transmitted over 1200m. During the next phase of the DAZZLE project, the team will attempt to produce a modulated retro-reflector capable of 1Gbps in partnership with the research institute Acreo1 based in Sweden. A high speed laser beam steering capability based on a Spatial Light Modulator will also be added to the system to improve beam pointing accuracy.

  9. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  10. Robotic dismantlement systems at the CP-5 reactor D&D project.

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, L. S.

    1998-10-28

    The Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) Research Reactor Facility is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Illinois site. CP-5 was the principle nuclear reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research at Argonne from 1954 to 1979. The CP-5 reactor was a heavy-water cooled and moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor with a graphite reflector. The CP-5 D&D project includes the disassembly, segmentation and removal of all the radioactive components, equipment and structures associated with the CP-5 facility. The Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program and the Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown Office provided teleoperated, remote systems for use in the dismantlement of the CP-5 reactor assembly for tasks requiring remote dismantlement as part of the EM-50 Large-Scale Demonstration Program (LSDP). The teleoperated systems provided were the Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP), the Rosie Mobile Teleoperated Robot Work System (ROSIE), and a remotely-operated crane control system with installed swing-reduction control system. Another remotely operated apparatus, a Brokk BM250, was loaned to ANL by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). This machine is not teleoperated and was not part of the LSDP, but deserves some mention in this discussion. The DAWP is a robotic dismantlement system that includes a pair of Schilling Robotic Systems Titan III hydraulic manipulator arms mounted to a specially designed support platform: a hydraulic power unit (HPU) and a remote operator console. The DAWP is designed to be crane-suspended for remote positioning. ROSIE, developed by RedZone Robotics, Inc. is a mobile, electro-hydraulic, omnidirectional platform with a heavy-duty telescoping boom mounted to the platform's deck. The work system includes the mobile platform (locomotor), a power distribution unit (PDU) and a remote operator console. ROSIE moves about the reactor building floor

  11. Waste receiving and processing facility module 1 data management system software project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.E.

    1994-11-02

    This document provides the software development plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store, and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  12. Spatial optical modulator (SOM): high-density diffractive laser projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, SangKyeong; Song, JongHyeong; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Yurlov, Victor; An, SeungDo; Park, HeungWoo; Yang, HaengSeok; Lee, YeongGyu; Han, KyuBum; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Oh, KwanYoung; Ryu, SeungWon; Jang, JaeWook; Park, ChangSu; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, SunKi; Kim, EungJu; Woo, KiSuk; Yang, JeongSuong; Kim, EuiJoong; Kim, JooHong; Byun, SungHo; Lee, SeungWoo; Lim, OhkKun; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Byun, GiYoung; Kyoung, JeHong; Yoon, SangKee; Lee, JaeKwang; Lee, TaeWon; Hong, SeokKee; Hong, YoonShik; Park, DongHyun; Kang, JungChul; Shin, WooChul; Lee, SungIl; Oh, SungKyung; Song, ByungKi; Kim, HeeYeoun; Koh, ChongMann; Ryu, YungHo; Lee, HyunKee; Baek, YoungKi

    2007-02-01

    A new type of diffractive spatial optical modulators, named SOM, has been developed by Samsung Electro-Mechanics for laser projection display. It exhibit inherent advantages of fast response time and high-performance light modulation, suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. The calculated efficiency and contrast ratio are 75 % and 800:1 respectively in case of 0 th order, 67 % and 1000:1 respectively in case of +/-1st order. The response time is as fast as 0.7 μs. Also we get the displacement of 400 nm enough to display full color with single panel in VGA format, as being 10 V driven. Optical module with VGA was successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as cellular phone, digital still camera and note PC product. Electrical power consumption is less than 2 W, volume is less than 13 cc. Brightness is enough to watch TV and movie in the open air, being variable up to 6 lm. Even if it's optimal diagonal image size is 10 inch, image quality does not deteriorate in the range of 5 to 50 inch because of the merit of focus-free. Due to 100 % fill factor, the image is seamless so as to be unpleasant to see the every pixel's partition. High speed of response time can make full color display with 24-bit gray scale and cause no scan line artifact, better than any other devices.

  13. Inter-reflection Compensation of Immersive Projection Display by Spatio-Temporal Screen Reflectance Modulation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shoichi; Iwai, Daisuke; Sato, Kosuke

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel inter-reflection compensation technique for immersive projection displays wherein we spatially modulate the reflectance pattern on the screen to improve the compensation performance of conventional methods. As the luminance of light reflected on a projection surface is mathematically represented as the multiplication of the illuminance of incident light and the surface reflectance, we can reduce undesirable intensity elevation because of inter-reflections by decreasing surface reflectance. Based on this principle, we improve conventional inter-reflection compensation techniques by applying reflectance pattern modulation. We realize spatial reflectance modulation of a projection screen by painting it with a photochromic compound, which changes its color (i.e., the reflectance of the screen) when ultraviolet (UV) light is applied and by controlling UV irradiation with a UV LED array placed behind the screen. The main contribution of this paper is a computational model to optimize a reflectance pattern for the accurate reproduction of a target appearance by decreasing the intensity elevation caused by inter-reflection while maintaining the maximum intensity of the target appearance. Through simulation and physical experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model and confirm its advantage over conventional methods. PMID:26780805

  14. Development and Evaluation of an On-Line Educational Module for Volunteer Leaders on Bio-Security in Washington State 4-H Livestock Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jill L.; Moore, Dale A.; Newman, Jerry; Schmidt, Janet L.; Smith, Sarah M.; Smith, Jean; Kerr, Susan; Wallace, Michael; BoyEs, Pat

    2011-01-01

    An on-line module on disease prevention was created for 4-H volunteer leaders who work with livestock projects in Washington to better prepare them to teach youth about bio-security and its importance in 4-H livestock projects. Evaluation of the module and usage statistics since the module's debut were collected and evaluated. The module increases…

  15. Development and Evaluation of an On-Line Educational Module for Volunteer Leaders on Bio-Security in Washington State 4-H Livestock Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jill L.; Moore, Dale A.; Newman, Jerry; Schmidt, Janet L.; Smith, Sarah M.; Smith, Jean; Kerr, Susan; Wallace, Michael; BoyEs, Pat

    2011-01-01

    A module on disease prevention was created for 4-H volunteer leaders who work with livestock projects in Washington to better prepare them to teach youth about bio-security and its importance in 4-H livestock projects. Evaluation of the module and usage statistics since the module's debut were collected and evaluated. The module increases…

  16. Cholinergic modulation of fast inhibitory and excitatory transmission to pedunculopontine thalamic projecting neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Hayar, Abdallah; Strotman, Beau; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and rapid-eye movement sleep. The PPN projects to the thalamus and receives cholinergic inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus and contralateral PPN. We employed retrograde labeling and whole cell recordings to determine the modulation of GABAergic, glycinergic, and glutamatergic transmission to PPN thalamic projecting neurons, and their postsynaptic responses to the nonspecific cholinergic agonist carbachol. M2 and M4 muscarinic receptor-modulated inhibitory postsynaptic responses were observed in 73% of PPN output neurons; in 12.9%, M1 and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation was detected; and muscarinic and nicotinic-modulated fast inhibitory followed by slow excitatory biphasic responses were evident in 6.7% of cells. A significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and inhibitory postsynaptic currents during carbachol application was observed in 66.2% and 65.2% of efferent neurons, respectively. This effect was blocked by a M1 antagonist or nonselective muscarinic blocker, indicating that glutamatergic, GABAergic, and/or glycinergic neurons projecting to PPN output neurons are excited through muscarinic receptors. Decreases in the frequency of miniature EPSCs, and amplitude of electrical stimulation-evoked EPSCs, were blocked by a M2 antagonist, suggesting the presence of M2Rs at terminals of presynaptic glutamatergic neurons. Carbachol-induced multiple types of postsynaptic responses, enhancing both inhibitory and excitatory fast transmission to PPN thalamic projecting neurons through muscarinic receptors. These results provide possible implications for the generation of different frequency oscillations in PPN thalamic projecting neurons during distinct sleep-wake states. PMID:20181729

  17. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, Edward; Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2013-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  19. Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R.; Carson, S.D.; Peterson, P.K.

    1997-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

    2010-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  1. Future technological tests on large-scale mock-ups of ITER blanket modules at IVV-2M reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zyrianov, A.P.; Tokarev, V.I.; Zlokazov, S.B.

    1994-12-31

    A multisection core of water-cooled water-moderated reactor IVV-2M facilities testing of large scale mock-ups of ITER breeder blanket modules, the reactor arrangement in a building provides a maximum close position of tritium {open_quotes}in-pile{close_quotes} measurement station {open_quotes}RITM{close_quotes} to the core (in-pile testing of tritium producing mock-ups). Mock-ups of ceramic and liquid metal blankets are planned to be tested complying the following requirements: mock-up dimensions maximum close to those of ITER, distributions of nuclear power density, temperature fields, tritium release modes at continuous helium purging, provision of cyclic neutron and thermal loading variations. Variants of location of large ({approximately}150x200 mm) mock-up of ceramic blanket and a submerged loop facility containing liquid lithium and a vanadium alloy as a structure material are described. A technological scheme of {open_quotes}RITM{close_quotes} measurement station to study tritium system operation modes are presented.

  2. Plan for Demonstration of Online Monitoring for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Magdy S. Tawfik; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2011-09-01

    Condition based online monitoring technologies and development of diagnostic and prognostic methodologies have drawn tremendous interest in the nuclear industry. It has become important to identify and resolve problems with structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents in the aging fleet of reactors. The Machine Condition Monitoring (MCM) test bed at INL will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness to advancement in online monitoring, sensors, diagnostic and prognostic technologies on a pilot-scale plant that mimics the hydraulics of a nuclear plant. As part of this research project, INL will research available prognostics architectures and their suitability for deployment in a nuclear power plant. In addition, INL will provide recommendation to improve the existing diagnostic and prognostic architectures based on the experimental analysis performed on the MCM test bed.

  3. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  4. Preparing teachers to address climate change with project-based instructional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. E.; DeWaters, J.; Small, M.; Dhaniyala, S.

    2012-12-01

    Clarkson University's Project-Based Global Climate Change Education project funded by NASA has created and disseminated several instructional modules for middle and high school teachers. The modules were developed by a team of teachers and university students and faculty. Fundamental to these inquiry-based modules are questions about climate change or mitigation efforts, use of real-world data to explore historical climate changes, and review of IPCC model results to understand predictions of further changes over the next century. As an example, the Climate Connections module requires middle school students to investigate a geographic region, learn about the culture and likely carbon footprint, and then acquire and analyze data sets of historical and predicted temperature changes. The findings are then interpreted in relation to the impact of these changes on the region's culture. NOAA, NASA, IPCC and DOE databases are used extensively. The inquiry approach and core content included in these modules are well aligned with the new Framework for K-12 Science Education. The climate change science in these modules covers aspects of the disciplinary core subjects (dimension 3) and most of the cross cutting concepts (dimension 2). Our approach for inquiry and analysis are also authentic ways to include most of the science and engineering practices (dimension 1) included in the framework. Dissemination of the modules to teachers in New York State has been a joint effort by NYSERDA (New York State Energy Research and Development Authority) and Clarkson. Half-day and full-day workshops and week-long institutes provided opportunities to either introduce the modules and the basics of finding and using temperature data, or delve into the science concepts and integration of the modules into an instructional plan. A significant challenge has been identified by the workshop instructors - many science teachers lack the skills necessary to fully engage in the science and engineering

  5. Probabilistic margin evaluation on accidental transients for the ASTRID reactor project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquès, Michel

    2014-06-01

    ASTRID is a technological demonstrator of Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) under development. The conceptual design studies are being conducted in accordance with the Generation IV reactor objectives, particularly in terms of improving safety. For the hypothetical events, belonging to the accidental category "severe accident prevention situations" having a very low frequency of occurrence, the safety demonstration is no more based on a deterministic demonstration with conservative assumptions on models and parameters but on a "Best-Estimate Plus Uncertainty" (BEPU) approach. This BEPU approach ispresented in this paper for an Unprotected Loss-of-Flow (ULOF) event. The Best-Estimate (BE) analysis of this ULOFt ransient is performed with the CATHARE2 code, which is the French reference system code for SFR applications. The objective of the BEPU analysis is twofold: first evaluate the safety margin to sodium boiling in taking into account the uncertainties on the input parameters of the CATHARE2 code (twenty-two uncertain input parameters have been identified, which can be classified into five groups: reactor power, accident management, pumps characteristics, reactivity coefficients, thermal parameters and head losses); secondly quantify the contribution of each input uncertainty to the overall uncertainty of the safety margins, in order to refocusing R&D efforts on the most influential factors. This paper focuses on the methodological aspects of the evaluation of the safety margin. At least for the preliminary phase of the project (conceptual design), a probabilistic criterion has been fixed in the context of this BEPU analysis; this criterion is the value of the margin to sodium boiling, which has a probability 95% to be exceeded, obtained with a confidence level of 95% (i.e. the M5,95percentile of the margin distribution). This paper presents two methods used to assess this percentile: the Wilks method and the Bootstrap method ; the effectiveness of the two methods

  6. Field Validation of the Career Education Curriculum Project Modules. Phase II. K-6 Validation. Final Report. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Earl; Wellman, Frank

    Field validation of the Missouri Career Education Curriculum Project Modules, K-6, was conducted in two phases. In phase 1, three sets of evaluation instruments were produced: K-1, 2-3, and 4-6. In phase 2, the field validation of the K-6 modules was conducted (reported here). (An additional goal of phase 2 was to develop evaluation instruments…

  7. Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1998-06-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site`s K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients.

  8. License Structure for Multi-Module Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hicks

    2010-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is intended to be the prototype for multi-module commercial high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) for process heat and/or electricity generation. Part of the objectives of the project are to establish the conditions that would govern or enhance the design, licensing, construction and operation of numerous, modular nuclear plants, particularly suited for industrial applications or that could reduce the risk of such projects. A determination is desired regarding whether a multi-module reactor plant can be licensed with a single Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review, hearing, and safety evaluation report. If it is determined that a multi-modular reactor plant can be licensed under a single review/hearing process, the structure and the duration of the license for each module will also need to be determined. The purpose of this paper is to describe for the NRC the NGNP position on these two issues and obtain either NRC general concurrence or comments on the approach to these issues. While the current NGNP planning provides for only a single reactor module, the project is intended to provide the basis and establish a licensing framework that can be used by future commercial HTGRs and other reactor designs, including a variety of small modular reactor technologies, with configurations reflecting design standardization of multi-module plants. Therefore, it is important to identify a path for addressing these modular reactor plant issues so that the resolution can be factored into the NGNP Project planning. The NGNP position is that a single combined license (COL) application can be submitted for a multi-modular reactor facility, the COL application can undergo a single NRC review/hearing process, and each module should be issued a separate license.

  9. Design and mass production of the optical modules for KM3NeT-Italia project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, Emanuele; Aiello, Sebastiano; Giordano, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT European project aims at constructing a km3 underwater neutrino telescope in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. The first phase that is under construction will comprise eight tower-like detection structures (KM3NeT-Italia), which will form the internal core of a km3-scale detector. The detection element of KM3NeT-Italia, the optical module, is made of a 13-inch pressure-resistant glass-vessel that contains a single 10-inch photomultiplier and the relative electronics. The design of the whole optical module, the main results obtained from the massive photomultipliers measurements, and the foremost phases of the mass production procedure performed at the production site of Catania are also presented.

  10. The Disk Mass project; science case for a new PMAS IFU module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheijen, M. A. W.; Bershady, M. A.; Andersen, D. R.; Swaters, R. A.; Westfall, K.; Kelz, A.; Roth, M. M.

    2004-03-01

    We present our Disk Mass project as the main science case for building a new fiber IFU-module for the PMAS spectrograph, currently mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.5m telescope on Calar Alto. Compared to traditional long-slit observations, the large light collecting power of 2-dimensional Integral Field Units dramatically improves the prospects for performing spectroscopy on extended low surface brightness objects with high spectral resolution. This enables us to measure stellar velocity dispersions in the outer disk of normal spiral galaxies. We describe some results from a PMAS pilot study using the existing lenslet array, and provide a basic description of the new fiber IFU-module for PMAS.

  11. Fabrication of a He-cooled divertor module for DEMO reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Ihli, T.; Krauss, W.; Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Norajitra, P.; Yablokov, N.

    2007-08-01

    One current design of the divertor for a fusion reactor like DEMO uses He-cooled thimble-like tungsten, which is covered by sacrificial tungsten tile. Each thimble has to be connected with a supporting unit made from ferritic steel. This paper describes the development of joining techniques between tungsten thimbles and steel supporting units. Paper also provides an evaluation of simple geometries up to more complex conical interlocks filled with cast copper. Four candidates tungsten alloys (WL10, W-single crystal, W-Cu composite and chemical vapour deposited (CVD) tungsten) were experimentally checked by 'non-isothermal' heating to characterize the thermal gradient in the range 600 °C (for joint) and more than 1000 °C (for thimble top) using a special testing procedure. Basing on the test results, several mock-ups were manufactured for future high heat flux testing in a helium loop.

  12. The optical modules of the phase-2 of the NEMO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, S.; Leonora, E.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anzalone, A.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Bersani, A.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bonori, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Costa, M.; D'Amico, A.; De Asmundis, R.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; De Vita, R.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Giovanetti, G.; Grella, G.; Grimaldi, A.; Habel, R.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovsky, V.; Lattuada, D.; Leotta, G.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Maugeri, F.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pappalardo, V.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Raffaelli, F.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Russo, A.; Russo, G. V.; Sapienza, P.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Sgura, I.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Spina, M.; Spurio, M.; Stefani, F.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2013-07-01

    A 13-inch Optical Module (OM) containing a large-area (10-inch) photomultiplier was designed as part of Phase-2 of the NEMO project. An intense R&D activity on the photomultipliers, the voltage supply boards, the optical coupling as well as the study of the influences of the Earth's magnetic field has driven the choice of each single component of the OM. Following a well-established production procedure, 32 OMs were assembled and their functionality tested. The design, the testing and the production phases are thoroughly described in this paper.

  13. Project-based Modules from two STEM Learning Teams in Howard County, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, L. N.; Bradley, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, two Maryland school districts-Howard County Public School System and Prince George's County Public Schools-and the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnered with the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) to develop NASA 21st Century Learning Studios. In 2010, NCTAF expanded the program to include Learning Studios at two additional Maryland school districts (Anne Arundel County Public Schools and Baltimore County Public Schools), partnering with the United States Naval Academy and the University of Maryland. Overall, the focus of these Learning Studios is to combine the expertise of scientists with that of educators through Learning Teams to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, while delivering project-based modules to be implemented in other school districts. The focus of this paper is to summarize the experience and outcomes from two Learning Teams from the Howard County Public School System. STEM Learning Teams were established at Centennial High School and Hammond High School in Maryland. Each Team worked together for two years to create interdisciplinary units of study for their students with a focus on Earth Science. To maximize student interest, teachers worked with NASA scientists five times a year to develop four learning modules using practical examples and incorporating real scientific observations. A weathering and erosion module challenges students to collect appropriate field observations and determine erosion and deposition rates in a nearby lake. A plate tectonics module requires students to use measures of plate motion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to estimate rates of convergence in southern Asia. A third module for lessons in climate change requires students to find open source climate data, determine changes in the atmosphere and estimate anthropogenic impacts. A follow

  14. Review of Halden Reactor Project high burnup fuel data that can be used in safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenack, W.

    1996-03-01

    The fuels and materials testing programmes carried out at the OECD Halden Reactor Project are aimed at providing data in support of a mechanistic understanding of phenomena, especially as related to high burnup fuel. The investigations are focused on identifying long term property changes, and irradiation techniques and instrumentation have been developed over the years which enable to assess fuel behaviour and properties in-pile. The fuel-cladding gap has an influence on both thermal and mechanical behaviour. Improved gap conductance due to gap closure at high exposure is observed even in the case of a strong contamination with released fission gas. On the other hand, pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, which is measured with cladding elongation detectors and diameter gauges, is re-established after a phase with less interaction and is increasing. These developments are exemplified with data showing changes of fuel temperature, hydraulic diameter and cladding elongation with burnup. Fuel swelling and cladding primary and secondary creep have been successfully measured in-pile. They provide data for, e.g., the possible cladding lift-off to be accounted for at high burnup. Fuel conductivity degradation is observed as a gradual temperature increase with burnup. This affects stored heat, fission gas release and temperature dependent fuel behaviour in general. The Halden Project`s data base on fission gas release shows that the phenomenon is associated with an accumulation of gas atoms at the grain boundaries to a critical concentration before appreciable release occurs. This is accompanied by an increase of the surface-to-volume ratio measured in-pile in gas flow experiments. A typical observation at high burnup is also that a burst release of fission gas may occur during a power decrease. Gas flow and pressure equilibration experiments have shown that axial communication is severely restricted at high burnup.

  15. Pulse-width modulation in defocused three-dimensional fringe projection.

    PubMed

    Ayubi, Gastón A; Ayubi, Jaime A; Di Martino, J Matías; Ferrari, José A

    2010-11-01

    Shape measurements by fringe projection methods require high-quality sinusoidal fringes. We present a sinusoidal fringe generation technique that utilizes slightly defocused binary fringe projection. The proposed method is a spatial version of the well-known pulse-width modulation (PWM) technique of electrical engineering. PWM is easy to implement using off-the-shelf projectors, and it allows us to overcome the gamma problem (i.e., the nonlinear projector response) in the output light intensity. We will demonstrate that, with a small defocusing level--lower than with other techniques proposed in the literature--a high-quality sinusoidal pattern is obtained. Validation experiments using a commercial video projector are presented. PMID:21042390

  16. Articulated Instruction Objectives Guide for Accounting (Module 5.0--Accounting I) (Module 6.0--Accounting II). Project Period, March 1981-February 1982 (Pilot Model). Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Wylda; And Others

    Developed during a project designed to provide a continuous, competency-based line of vocational training in business and office education programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this package consists of an instructor's guide and learning modules for use in Accounting I and II. Various aspects of implementing and articulating secondary…

  17. Articulated Instruction Objectives Guide for Typewriting (Module 1.0--Typewriting I) (Module 2.0--Typewriting II). Project Period, March 1981-February 1982 (Pilot Model). Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Barbara; And Others

    Developed during the course of a project designed to provide a continuous, competency-based line of vocational training in business and office education programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this package consists of an instructor's guide and learning modules for use in Typewriting I and Typewriting II. Various aspects of implementing…

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a

  19. Colour hologram projection with an SLM by exploiting its full phase modulation range.

    PubMed

    Jesacher, Alexander; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate independent and simultaneous manipulation of light beams of different wavelengths by a single hologram, which is displayed on a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The method uses the high dynamic phase modulation range of modern SLMs, which can shift the phase of each pixel in a range between 0 up to 10π, depending on the readout wavelength. The extended phase range offers additional degrees of freedom for hologram encoding. Knowing the phase modulation properties of the SLM (i.e. the so-called lookup table) in the entire exploited wavelength range, an exhaustive search algorithm allows to combine different independently calculated 2π-holograms into a multi-level hologram with a phase range extending over several multiples of 2π. The combined multi-level hologram then reconstructs the original diffractive patterns with only small phase errors at preselected wavelengths, thus projecting the desired image fields almost without any crosstalk. We demonstrate this feature by displaying a static hologram at an SLM which is read out with an incoherent red-green-blue (RGB) beam, projecting a color image at a camera chip. This is done for both, a Fourier setup which needs a lens for image focusing, and in a "lensless" Fresnel setup, which also avoids the appearance of a focused zero-order spot in the image center. The experimentally obtained efficiency of a two-colour combination is on the order of 83% for each wavelength, with a crosstalk level between the two colour channels below 2%, whereas a three-colour combination still reaches an efficiency of about 60% and a crosstalk level below 5%. PMID:25321258

  20. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core

  1. Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R&D Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian G. Williams; Jim C. P. Liou; Hiral Kadakia; Bill Phoenix; Richard R. Schultz

    2007-02-27

    This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems.

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Server, W. L.; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

  3. Preliminary design requirements document (DRD) for Project W-236B, ``Initial Pretreatment Module``

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-02-15

    The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify and define the functions, with associated requirements, which must be performed to separate Hanford Site tank waste supernatants into low-level and high-level fractions. This documents sets forth function requirements, performance requirements, and design constraints necessary to begin conceptual design for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). System and physical interfaces between the IPM project and the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) are identified. The constraints, performance requirements, and transfer of information and data across a technical interface will be documented in an Interface Control Document. Supplemental DRDs will be prepared to provide more detailed requirements specific to systems described in the DRD.

  4. Green laser modules to fit laser projection out of your pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steegmüller, U.; Kühnelt, M.; Unold, H.; Schwarz, T.; Schulz, R.; Illek, S.; Pietzonka, I.; Lindberg, H.; Schmitt, M.; Strauss, U.

    2008-02-01

    Among enabling key components for mobile laser projection, the green laser plays an outstanding role: We present green laser modules based on frequency doubled optically pumped semiconductor disk lasers. In these lasers with twofold conversion, from 808nm over 1060nm to 530nm, active semiconductor components and second harmonic generation have to be carefully optimized to realize good efficiency at moderate output powers. The concept was developed not only to meet power and efficiency targets, but also to provide simple operation and control by pump diode current. The latest concept targets green output powers of more than 50mW at wall plug efficiencies >7%, limiting total electrical power consumption to less than 1W. Consequent use of micro optical components allows for a package volume of less than 0.5cm 3.

  5. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  6. Project Luna Succendo: The Lunar Evolutionary Growth-Optimized (LEGO) Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bess, John Darrell

    A final design has been established for a basic Lunar Evolutionary Growth-Optimized (LEGO) Reactor using current and near-term technologies. The LEGO Reactor is a modular, fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled, clustered-reactor system for lunar-surface power generation. The reactor is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched within lunar shipments from the Earth, and then emplaced directly into holes drilled into the lunar regolith to form a critical reactor assembly. The regolith would not just provide radiation shielding, but serve as neutron-reflector material as well. The reactor subunits are to be manufactured using proven and tested materials for use in radiation environments, such as uranium-dioxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and structural support, and liquid-sodium heatpipes. The LEGO Reactor system promotes reliability, safety, and ease of manufacture and testing at the cost of an increase in launch mass per overall rated power level and a reduction in neutron economy when compared to a single-reactor system. A single unshielded LEGO Reactor subunit has an estimated mass of approximately 448 kg and provides 5 kWe using a free-piston Stirling space converter. The overall envelope for a single unit with fully extended radiator panels has a height of 8.77 m and a diameter of 0.50 m. The subunits can be placed with centerline distances of approximately 0.6 m in a hexagonal-lattice pattern to provide sufficient neutronic coupling while allowing room for heat rejection and interstitial control. A lattice of six subunits could provide sufficient power generation throughout the initial stages of establishing a lunar outpost. Portions of the reactor may be neutronically decoupled to allow for reduced power production during unmanned periods of base operations. During later stages of lunar-base development, additional subunits may be emplaced and coupled into the existing LEGO Reactor network Future improvements include advances in reactor control

  7. Particle-bed gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) design. Project final technical report (Sept 2001 - Aug 2003).

    SciTech Connect

    Taiwo, T. A.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Feldman, E. E.; Hoffman, E. A.; Fatone, M.; Holland, J. W.; Prokofiev, I. G.; Yang, W. S.; Palmiotti, G.; Hill, R. N.; Todosow, M.; Salvatores, M.; Gandini, A.

    2003-10-27

    The objective of this project is to develop a conceptual design of a particle-bed, gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) core that meets the advanced reactor concept and enhanced proliferation-resistant goals of the US Department of Energy's NERI program. The key innovation of this project is the application of a fast neutron spectrum environment to enhance both the passive safety and transmutation characteristics of the advanced particle-bed and pebble-bed reactor designs. The PB-GCFR design is expected to produce a high-efficiency system with a low unit cost. It is anticipated that the fast neutron spectrum would permit small-sized units ({approx} 150 MWe) that can be built quickly and packaged into modular units, and whose production can be readily expanded as the demand grows. Such a system could be deployed globally. The goals of this two-year project are as follows: (1) design a reactor core that meets the future needs of the nuclear industry, by being passively safe with reduced need for engineered safety systems. This will entail an innovative core design incorporating new fuel form and type; (2) employ a proliferation-resistant fuel design and fuel cycle. This will be supported by a long-life core design that is refueled infrequently, and hence, reduces the potential for fuel diversion; (3) incorporate design features that permit use of the system as an efficient transmuter that could be employed for burning separated plutonium fuel or recycled LWR transuranic fuel, should the need arise; and (4) evaluate the fuel cycle for waste minimization and for the possibility of direct fuel disposal. The application of particle-bed fuel provides the promise of extremely high burnup and fission-product protection barriers that may permit direct disposal.

  8. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  9. "Module 9": A New Course to Help Students Develop Interdisciplinary Projects Using the Framework of Experiential Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canboy, Basak; Montalvo, Adolfo; Buganza, M. Carmen; Emmerling, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers an example of how to introduce student-centred knowledge creation and competency development in a systematic way into a master's programme. The curriculum of a new course called Module 9 was framed according to experiential learning theory. While student teams work on self-selected projects, their learning processes are…

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-12-20

    As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

  11. Development of a reactor-coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Project management report, October 1980-November 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerfield, G. A.; Morris, D. J.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system and collect sufficient data to permit analysts to determine why high outleakage and failures occur at Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. This report summarizes the work completed during the first period of performance, October 1, 1980, through November 30, 1981. During this period the members of the Project Team were selected and the detailed work management plans developed to take this project from conception, through detailed engineering, and finally to construction in the early part of 1982. The scope of work described includes system design, equipment selection for the computer-based data collection and diagnostic system, and computer software development to permit data collection and analysis.

  12. Transport reactor development status

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, R.E.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Campbell, W.M.

    1994-10-01

    This project is part of METC`s Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary objective of the Advanced Gasifier module is to produce vitiated gases for intermediate-term testing of Particulate Control Devices (PCDs). The Transport reactor potentially allows particle size distribution, solids loading, and particulate characteristics in the off-gas stream to be varied in a number of ways. Particulates in the hot gases from the Transport reactor will be removed in the PCDs. Two PCDs will be initially installed in the module; one a ceramic candle filter, the other a granular bed filter. After testing of the initial PCDs they will be removed and replaced with PCDs supplied by other vendors. A secondary objective is to verify the performance of a Transport reactor for use in advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IG-FC), and Pressurized Combustion Combined Cycle (PCCC) power generation units. This paper discusses the development of the Transport reactor design from bench-scale testing through pilot-scale testing to design of the Process Development Unit (PDU-scale) facility at Wilsonville.

  13. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

  14. Selective Modulation of Histaminergic Inputs on Projection Neurons of Cerebellum Rapidly Promotes Motor Coordination via HCN Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Wu, Guan-Yi; Yung, Wing-Ho; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Insights into function of central histaminergic system, a general modulator originating from the hypothalamus for whole brain activity, in motor control are critical for understanding the mechanism underlying somatic-nonsomatic integration. Here, we show a novel selective role of histamine in the cerebellar nuclei, the final integrative center and output of the cerebellum. Histamine depolarizes projection neurons but not interneurons in the cerebellar nuclei via the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels coupled to histamine H2 receptors, which are exclusively expressed on glutamatergic and glycinergic projection neurons. Furthermore, blockage of HCN channels to block endogenous histaminergic afferent inputs in the cerebellar nuclei significantly attenuates motor balance and coordination. Therefore, through directly and quickly modulation on projection neurons but not interneurons in the cerebellar nuclei, central histaminergic system may act as a critical biasing force to not only promptly regulate ongoing movement but also realize a rapid integration of somatic and nonsomatic response. PMID:25633097

  15. A SCALE 5.0 Reactor Physics Assessment using the Module TRITON against Mixed Oxide (MOX) OECD/NEA Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Saccheri, J.G.B.; Diamond, D.J.

    2006-07-01

    Reactor physics numerical benchmarks have been performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with the software package SCALE 5.0 and its TRITON module to assess their capability to predict neutronics parameters for mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. The results of such calculations are herein presented. Specifically, BNL results for neutron multiplication factors (kINF), neutron fluxes and fuel burnup have been added to published OECD/NEA benchmarks for MOX fuels and particular emphasis has been given to the impact of cross-section libraries and their energy structure on the results. Among the OECD/NEA published benchmarks two have been considered here: the first one models a fuel pin surrounded by moderator, in which two different MOX fuels can be introduced, and for each one of them kINF and neutron fluxes as a function of burnup are calculated. The second one includes both a fuel pin case and a macro-cell case (a heterogeneous 30 by 30 configuration of fuel pins), for which the void coefficient is determined by calculating kINF at zero burnup as a function of moderation. The calculations are repeated for several combinations of MOX and uranium oxide fuels using several different cross-section libraries. The final results have been compared with each other. This study shows that SCALE 5.0 (with TRITON) overall performs in line with the other codes in the benchmark, but the results are dependent on the energy group structure of the cross section libraries used. For instance, when fissile plutonium is increased in the fuel, TRITON results become slightly divergent with burnup (with respect to the other codes in the benchmark) and if the standard 44-group library provided with SCALE 5.0 is used void coefficient calculations become inadequate for very low void (below 10% of the operating value of moderator density). Moreover, the prediction capabilities of the code are shown to be dependent on the MOX fuel enrichment and the MOX isotopic composition. (authors)

  16. A Trio of modulators for the Fermilab tevatron electron lens project

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Wildman et al.

    2001-07-25

    Three high voltage modulators used during testing and operation of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) at Fermilab will be described. Short high voltage (0 to {approximately} 20kV) pulses from these modulators vary the anode-cathode voltage of the TEL electron gun to control the magnitude of the electron beam current. The trio of modulators include a low repetition rate MOSFET-based pulser, a fast ionization device, and a high average power tetrode modulator. The characteristics of each device will be discussed and typical outputs from each type of modulator is shown.

  17. An experimental substantiation of the emergency cooldown system project for the KLT-40S reactor installation of a floating nuclear cogeneration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balunov, B. F.; Shcheglov, A. A.; Il'in, V. A.; Saikova, E. N.; Bol'Shukhin, M. A.; Bykh, O. A.; Khizbullin, A. M.; Sokolov, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    Results from thermal-hydraulic tests of a full-scale module of the emergency cooldown system for a KLT-40S reactor installation are presented. The validity of the solutions adopted in its design is shown. Recommendations for calculating the heat transfer coefficients during steam flow condensation and condensate cooling are given.

  18. It's difficult to change the way we teach: lessons from the Integrative Themes in Physiology curriculum module project.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Thorn, Patti M; Svinicki, Marilla D

    2006-12-01

    The Integrative Themes in Physiology (ITIP) project was a National Science Foundation-funded collaboration between the American Physiological Society (APS) and the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS). The project goal was to create instructional resources that emphasized active learning in undergraduate anatomy and physiology classrooms. The resources (activity modules and professional development) addressed two factors thought to be limiting science education reform: instructors' knowledge of how to implement active learning instruction and time to design innovative curricula. Volunteer instructors with a strong interest in using active learning in their classrooms were recruited to use the ITIP modules and provide ease-of-use feedback and student assessment data. As the study unfolded, instructor attrition was higher than had been anticipated, with 17 of 36 instructors withdrawing. More surprisingly, instructors remaining with the project failed to use the modules and reported specific obstacles that precluded module use, including lack of support from academic leadership, unplanned class size increases and heavy teaching loads, a union strike, insufficient time to develop a mindset for change, inadequate technology/funding, an adverse human subjects ruling, incompatibility of modules with instructors' established content and expectations, and personal factors. Despite the lack of module use and obstacles, 8 of 19 site testers began independently to introduce new active learning instruction into their classrooms. In the larger picture, however, it is important to note that only 8 of the initial 36 volunteers (22%) actually ended up changing their instruction to include opportunities for student active learning. These findings underscore the difficulty of implementing instructional change in college classrooms. PMID:17108248

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Vapor Explosions: A Study with Potential Interest to the Safety of Fusion Reactor Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, F. J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the possibility of vapor explosions in superheat liquids in presence of a magnetic field that undergo sudden variation of magnetic field is discussed. This possible phenomenon may play a very important role in the blanket design of future fusion reactors, where transients in magnetic field on liquid metals, could will be a potential hazard for safety.

  20. A surface profile reconstruction system using sinusoidal phase-modulating interferometry and fiber-optic fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Bo; Fa-jie, Duan; Chang-rong, Lv; Fan, Feng; Xiao, Fu

    2014-06-01

    A fiber-optic sinusoidal phase modulating (SPM) interferometer for surface profile reconstruction is presented. Sinusoidal phase modulation is created by modulating the drive voltage of the piezoelectric transducer. The surface profile is constructed basing on fringe projection. Fringe patterns are vulnerable to external disturbances such as temperature fluctuation and mechanical vibration, which cause phase drift and decrease measuring accuracy. We build a closed-loop feedback phase compensation system, the bias value of external disturbances superimposed on fringe patterns can be reduced to about 50 mrad, and the phase stability for interference fringes is less than 5.76 mrad. By measuring the surface profile of a paper plate for two times, the repeatability is estimated to be about 11 nm, and is equivalent to be about λ/69. For a plane with 100 × 100 points, a single measurement takes less than 140 ms, and the feasibility for real-time profile measurement with high accuracy has been verified.

  1. The hybrid reactor project based on the straight field line mirror concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Hagnestâl, A.; Källne, J.; Anglart, H.

    2012-06-01

    The straight field line mirror (SFLM) concept is aiming towards a steady-state compact fusion neutron source. Besides the possibility for steady state operation for a year or more, the geometry is chosen to avoid high loads on materials and plasma facing components. A comparatively small fusion hybrid device with "semi-poor" plasma confinement (with a low fusion Q factor) may be developed for industrial transmutation and energy production from spent nuclear fuel. This opportunity arises from a large fission to fusion energy multiplication ratio, Qr = Pfis/Pfus>>1. The upper bound on Qr is primarily determined by geometry and reactor safety. For the SFLM, the upper bound is Qr≈150, corresponding to a neutron multiplicity of keff=0.97. Power production in a mirror hybrid is predicted for a substantially lower electron temperature than the requirement Te≈10 keV for a fusion reactor. Power production in the SFLM seems possible with Q≈0.15, which is 10 times lower than typically anticipated for hybrids (and 100 times smaller than required for a fusion reactor). This relaxes plasma confinement demands, and broadens the range for use of plasmas with supra-thermal ions in hybrid reactors. The SFLM concept is based on a mirror machine stabilized by qudrupolar magnetic fields and large expander tanks beyond the confinement region. The purpose of the expander tanks is to distribute axial plasma loss flow over a sufficiently large area so that the receiving plates can withstand the heat. Plasma stability is not relying on a plasma flow into the expander regions. With a suppressed plasma flow into the expander tanks, a possibility arise for higher electron temperature. A brief presentation will be given on basic theory for the SFLM with plasma stability and electron temperature issues, RF heating computations with sloshing ion formation, neutron transport computations with reactor safety margins and material load estimates, magnetic coil designs as well as a discussion on

  2. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  3. Dynamic holographic three-dimensional projection based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator and cylindrical fog screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenxiang; Zheng, Huadong; Lu, Xiaoqian; Gao, Hongyue; Yu, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic holographic three-dimensional (3D) projection based on phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) and cylindrical fog 3D screen is introduced. Sequential kinoforms of a 3D real existing object are calculated from sixty viewing angles using the slice-based fresnel diffraction algorithm. To suppress speckle noise of reconstructed images, sub-kinoforms for each viewing angle are calculated by adding dynamic pseudorandom initial phase factor into each object plane. The sequential kinoforms are reconstructed by a holographic reconstruction system based on phase-only LC-SLM. A specially designed cylindrical fog 3D screen is used as the scattered carrying medium to project the dynamic 3D images. Through our holographic 3D projection system, a vivid dynamic holographic reconstructed projection image can be observed by some observers at the same time.

  4. Pittsburgh Science Technology Society Project: Instruction Modules. Interrelationships Science--Technology--Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, George, Ed.

    This collection of instruction modules studies the interactions of science, technology, and society (STS) using five activity sets. The introduction module includes activities which show students the STS relationships in their world, develop good organizational skills, develop an understanding of who and what a scientist is, develop graphing…

  5. Module performance and failure analysis area: Flat-plate solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornstrom, E.

    1984-01-01

    A redesign of the initial (Group I) Mobile Solar Block V module was done and documented. Manufacturing experience and accelerated test data from Group I formed the basis for the redesign. Ten Block V Group II modules were submitted for evaluation and the results are presented.

  6. Renting a Place to Live. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 9. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, focuses on renting a place to live. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills addressed in the…

  7. Teenagers' Access to Higher Education. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 7. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, focuses on teenagers' access to higher education. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  8. Unemployment Insurance. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 3. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on the Unemployment Insurance (UI) system. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  9. Children's Changing Roles. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 28. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses children's changing roles. It is designed to help parents to support their children's roles--becoming bicultural, being learners, and creating oneself. The module contains the…

  10. Making Choices about Jobs. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 1. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on building the basic decision skills workers need to choose among potential jobs. The following items are included: overview of the module; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal,…

  11. Women's Work Issues. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 2. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on the problems faced by immigrant women in their work lives and legal provisions to protect employed women. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic,…

  12. Support Systems for Injured Workers. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 5. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on support systems for injured workers. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  13. Access to Adult Learning Opportunities. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 6. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on access to adult learning opportunities. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  14. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the object; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  15. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object, such as an anatomical feature. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the anatomical feature; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  16. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration Lead Project strategy plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    The strategy for developing the HTGR system and introducing it into the energy marketplace is based on using the most developed technology path to establish a HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) Lead Project. Given the status of the HTGR-SC/C technology, a Lead Plant could be completed and operational by the mid 1990s. While there is remaining design and technology development that must be accomplished to fulfill technical and licensing requirements for a Lead Project commitment, the major barriers to the realization a HTGR-SC/C Lead Project are institutional in nature, e.g. Project organization and management, vendor/supplier development, cost/risk sharing between the public and private sector, and Project financing. These problems are further exacerbated by the overall pervading issues of economic and regulatory instability that presently confront the utility and nuclear industries. This document addresses the major institutional issues associated with the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project and provides a starting point for discussions between prospective Lead Project participants toward the realization of such a Project.

  17. Porous Structure Analysis of the Packed Beds in a High-Temperature Reactor Pebble Bed Modules Heat Transfer Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cheng; Yang, Xing-Tuan; Sun, Yan-Fei

    2013-02-01

    We analyse the porous structure of the packed beds in the heat transfer test facility built for high temperature gas cooled reactors from several aspects, such as oscillatory porosity, average porosity, thickness effect, coordination number and contact angle. An understanding and comparison of the porous structure of the facility bed and the real reactor core are developed to make recommendations for the design and analysis of the heat transfer test facility. The results show that there is very little difference between the porous characteristics of the two packed beds of spheres.

  18. Description of the docking module ECS for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. W.; Jaax, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The role of the Docking Module ECS (Environmental Control System) to be used on the Apollo-Soyuz Test mission is to provide a means for crewmen to transfer safely between the Apollo and Soyuz vehicles in a shirtsleeve environment. This paper describes the Docking Module ECS and includes the philosophy and rationale used in evaluating and selecting the capabilities that are required to satisfy the Docking Module's airlock function: (1) adjusting the pressure and composition of the atmosphere to effect crew transfer and (2) providing a shirtsleeve environment during transfer operations. An analytical evaluation is given of the environmental parameters (including CO2 level, humidity, and temperature) during a normal transfer timeline.

  19. 150t/d PP project of NEDOL process and design of reactor, catalyst facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamori, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masatoshi

    1995-12-31

    The development of coal liquefaction technology in Japan is being undertaken as one of the New Sunshine Program of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Nippon Coal Oil Co., Ltd. (NCOL) has been commissioned by NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, which is playing a central role in this program) to design, construct and conduct operation researches on the 150t/d bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant of NEDOL process. The pilot plant design and some technical topics such as design of reactor and liquefaction catalyst are presented in this report.

  20. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, F.

    2015-09-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) methods. Uncertainty originates from errors in physical data, manufacturing uncertainties, modelling and computational algorithms. (The interested reader is referred to the large body of published SA and UA literature for a more complete overview of the various types of uncertainties, methodologies and results obtained). SA is helpful for ranking the various sources of uncertainty and error in the results of core analyses. SA and UA are required to address cost, safety, and licensing needs and should be applied to all aspects of reactor multi-physics simulation. SA and UA can guide experimental, modelling, and algorithm research and development. Current SA and UA rely either on derivative-based methods such as stochastic sampling methods or on generalized perturbation theory to obtain sensitivity coefficients. Neither approach addresses all needs. In order to benefit from recent advances in modelling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Only a parallel effort in advanced simulation and in nuclear data improvement will be able to provide designers with more robust and well validated calculation tools to meet design target accuracies. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (TWG-GCR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommended that the proposed Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on

  1. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: summary report. Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    This document summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility, which was placed in a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved safe storage configuration. The data were placed in a computerized information retrieval/manipulation system which permits future utilization of this information in decommissioning of similar facilities. The information is presented both in computer output form and a manually assembled summarization. Complete cost data were not readily available and decommissioning activities did not in all cases conform with current criteria for the SAFSTOR decommissioning mode, therefore no cost comparisons were made.

  2. Learning in Small Groups in University Geography Courses: Designing a Core Module around Group Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, Mick; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that cooperative learning produces higher achievement, more positive relationships among students, and healthier psychological adjustment than do competitive or individualistic experiences. Describes a cooperative learning core module complete with course content and assessment strategies. Discusses advantages, disadvantages, and student…

  3. Nuclear reactor power for a space-based radar. SP-100 project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey; Heller, Jack; Jaffe, Leonard; Beatty, Richard; Bhandari, Pradeep; Chow, Edwin; Deininger, William; Ewell, Richard; Fujita, Toshio; Grossman, Merlin

    1986-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft, using a 300 kWe nuclear reactor power system, has been examined, with emphasis on aspects affecting the power system. The radar antenna is a horizontal planar array, 32 X 64 m. The orbit is at 61 deg, 1088 km. The mass of the antenna with support structure is 42,000 kg; of the nuclear reactor power system, 8,300 kg; of the whole spacecraft about 51,000 kg, necessitating multiple launches and orbital assembly. The assembly orbit is at 57 deg, 400 km, high enough to provide the orbital lifetime needed for orbital assembly. The selected scenario uses six Shuttle launches to bring the spacecraft and a Centaur G upper-stage vehicle to assembly orbit. After assembly, the Centaur places the spacecraft in operational orbit, where it is deployed on radio command, the power system started, and the spacecraft becomes operational. Electric propulsion is an alternative and allows deployment in assembly orbit, but introduces a question of nuclear safety.

  4. Self-Cleaning Boudouard Reactor for Full Oxygen Recovery from CO2 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Muscatello, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen recovery from respiratory CO2 is an important aspect of human spaceflight. Methods exist to sequester the CO2, but production of oxygen needs further development. The current ISS Carbon Dioxide Reduction System (CRS) uses the Sabatier reaction to produce water (and ultimately breathing air). Oxygen recovery is limited to 50% because half of the hydrogen used in the Sabatier reactor is lost as methane, which is vented overboard. The Bosch reaction is the only real alternative to the Sabatier reaction, but in the last reaction in the cycle (Boudouard) the resulting carbon buildup will eventually foul the nickel or iron catalyst, reducing reactor life and increasing consumables. To minimize this fouling, find a use for this waste product, and increase efficiency, we propose testing various self-cleaning catalyst designs in an existing MSFC Boudouard reaction test bed and to determine which one is the most reliable in conversion and lack of fouling. Challenges include mechanical reliability of the cleaning method and maintaining high conversion efficiency with lower catalyst surface area. The above chemical reactions are well understood, but planned implementations are novel (TRL 2) and haven't been investigated at any level.

  5. Direct energy conversion in fission reactors: A U.S. NERI project

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; BESENBRUCH,G.; BROWN,L.C.; PARISH,T.A.; ANGHAIE,S.; BELLER,D.E.

    2000-05-30

    In principle, the energy released by a fission can be converted directly into electricity by using the charged fission fragments. The first theoretical treatment of direct energy conversion (DEC) appeared in the literature in 1957. Experiments were conducted over the next ten years, which identified a number of problem areas. Research declined by the late 1960's due to technical challenges that limited performance. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative the authors are determining if these technical challenges can be overcome with todays technology. The authors present the basic principles of DEC reactors, review previous research, discuss problem areas in detail, and identify technological developments of the last 30 years that can overcome these obstacles. As an example, the fission electric cell must be insulated to avoid electrons crossing the cell. This insulation could be provided by a magnetic field as attempted in the early experiments. However, from work on magnetically insulated ion diodes they know how to significantly improve the field geometry. Finally, a prognosis for future development of DEC reactors will be presented .

  6. Intermediate load modules for test and evaluation: Flat-Plate Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two versions of a 36 stainless steel solar module were built. The first version was built as a commercial module for marine applications and was purchased for evaluation by JPL. Design deficiencies were identified as a result of the evaluation. The second version was built and the improvements that resulted from design changes are described. Assembly problems, electrical performance, and qualification test results are provided.

  7. The SERMON project: 48 new field Blazhko stars and an investigation of modulation-period distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarka, M.; Liška, J.; Auer, R. F.; Prudil, Z.; Juráňová, A.; Sódor, Á.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigated 1234 fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars observed by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) to identify the Blazhko (BL) effect. A sample of 1547 BL stars from the literature was collected to compare the modulation-period distribution with stars newly identified in our sample. Methods: A classical frequency spectra analysis was performed using Period04 software. Data points from each star from the ASAS database were analysed individually to avoid confusion with artificial peaks and aliases. Statistical methods were used in the investigation of the modulation-period distribution. Results: Altogether we identified 87 BL stars (48 new detections), 7 candidate stars, and 22 stars showing long-term period variations. The distribution of modulation periods of newly identified BL stars corresponds well to the distribution of modulation periods of stars located in the Galactic field, Galactic bulge, Large Magellanic Cloud, and globular cluster M5 collected from the literature. As a very important by-product of this comparison, we found that pulsation periods of BL stars follow Gaussian distribution with the mean period of 0.54 ± 0.07 d, while the modulation periods show log-normal distribution with centre at log (Pm [d]) = 1.78 ± 0.30 dex. This means that 99.7% of all known modulated stars have BL periods between 7.6 and 478 days. We discuss the identification of long modulation periods and show, that a significant percentage of stars showing long-term period variations could be classified as BL stars.

  8. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program.

  9. Water Gas Shift Reaction with A Single Stage Low Temperature Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ciora, Richard J; Liu, Paul KT

    2013-12-31

    Palladium membrane and Palladium membrane reactor were developed under this project for hydrogen separation and purification for fuel cell applications. A full-scale membrane reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated for the reformate produced from a commercial scale methanol reformer. In addition, the Pd membrane and module developed from this project was successfully evaluated in the field for hydrogen purification for commercial fuel cell applications.

  10. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.

    1998-05-01

    The scope of this project includes the development, design, procurement/fabrication, testing, and installation of all of the components necessary to produce a working cold source within an existing HFIR beam tube hole in the pressure vessel. All aspects of the cold source design will be based on demonstrated technology adapted to the HFIR design and operating conditions.

  11. OECD MCCI project enhancing instrumentation for reactor materials experiments, Rev. 0 September 3, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Reactor safety experiments for studying the reactions of a molten core (corium) with water and/or concrete involve materials at extremely high temperature. Such high temperature severely restricts the types of sensors that can be employed to measure characteristics of the corium itself. Yet there is great interest in improving instrumentation so that the state of the melt can be established with more precision. In particular, it would be beneficial to increase both the upper range limit and accuracy of temperature measurements. The poor durability of thermocouples at high temperature is also an important issue. For experiments involving a water-quenched melt, direct measurements of the growth rate of the crust separating the melt and water would be of great interest. This is a key element in determining the nature of heat transfer between the melt and coolant. Despite its importance, no one has been able to directly measure the crust thickness during such tests. This paper considers three specialized sensors that could be introduced to enhance melt characterization: (1) A commercially fabricated, single point infrared temperature measurement with the footprint of a thermowell. A lens assembly and fiber optic cable linked to a receiver and amplifier measures the temperature at the base of a tungsten thermowell. The upper range limit is 3000 C and accuracy is {+-}0.25% of the reading. (2) In-house development of an ultrasonic temperature sensor that would provide multipoint measurements at temperatures up to {approx}3000 C. The sensors are constructed from tungsten rods and have a high temperature durability that is superior to that of thermocouples. (3) In-house development of an ultrasonic probe to measure the growth rate of the corium crust. This ultrasonic sensor would include a tungsten waveguide that transmits ultrasonic pulses up through the corium melt towards the crust and detects reflections from the melt/crust interface. A measurement of the echo time

  12. New concept for coal wettability evaluation and modulation. Technical progress report for the project, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.

    1995-12-31

    This project is concerned with the new concept for coal surface wettability and floatability evaluation and modulation. the objective of the work is the fundamental surface chemistry features about the evaluation of the surface wettability and floatability of coal and pyrite, and establish a new separation strategy which could contribute to advanced coal-cleaning for premium fuel application. In this quarter, the mini-cell flotation tests are conducted to study kinetic floatability and kinetic collectability of coal and pyrite. The kinetic floatability of the five samples have been tested with methanol, butanol, and hexanol as collector.

  13. Diversifying Assessment through Multimedia Creation in a Non-Technical Module: Reflections on the MAIK Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew M.; Vasconcelos, Ana Cristina; Holdridge, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Creation of multimedia (MM) could be a valuable diversification of assessment methods within non-technical modules. The apparent popularity of sites based on user-generated video content such as YouTube and also of podcasting suggests that relevant skills and interest are becoming more mainstream. Translating book learned knowledge into visual…

  14. Dealing with Stress. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 16. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, focuses on dealing with stress on the job and in daily life in the United States. Topics covered include the following: analyzing one's schedule and listing stressful times; applying four…

  15. Dealing with Taxes. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 17. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, addresses how to file and pay federal income taxes. Topics covered include the following: defining tax-related vocabulary; analyzing tax credits and selecting the most appropriate ones;…

  16. Collaborating with Neighbors. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 19. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses how to become involved in the communities and advocate with neighbors for needs. Topics covered include the following: researching and analyzing information; preparing a survey…

  17. Women in Non Traditional Occupations. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 26. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses women in nontraditional occupations. It is designed to help women consider the option of working in nontraditional occupations and to recognize that access to these jobs is…

  18. Using Information Resources. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 14. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, addresses how to access and use information resources in order to function in the workplace and in daily living. Topics covered include the following: analyzing newspaper articles; preparing…

  19. Women's Changing Roles. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 11. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, addresses the different roles of women in the United States. Topics covered include the following: identifying problematic lifestyle differences; defining solutions to such problems;…

  20. Learning to Learn. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 30. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, addresses learning to learn. It is designed to help instructors explain and demonstrate how learning is part of life and provide a valuable opportunity for them to engage their students in…

  1. Issues in Accessing Services. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 13. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses how to access the formalized human service delivery systems in the United States, which often replace the networks of extended families and friends that immigrants relied on in…

  2. Dealing with Law Enforcement Authorities. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 22. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses dealing with law enforcement authorities. It is designed to teach immigrants the following: understand laws and consequences of breaking them; how the law enforcement agencies…

  3. Becoming a Citizen. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 29. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, focuses on becoming a citizen. It is designed to teach immigrants the requirements for applying for naturalization, how children become citizens, and the complex legal definition of "good…

  4. Civic Participation. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 15. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses how and why to get involved in political and community life in the United States. Topics covered include the following: local political involvement, writing letters, reading the…

  5. Supervisors and Teamwork. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 24. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses supervisors and teamwork. It is designed to teach about differences between supervision in different kinds of workplaces; getting along and ahead with mainstream supervisors; and…

  6. Analyzing and Debating Issues. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 18. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, focuses on how to evaluate the facts, opinions, and positions on social issues held by family and friends, neighbors, authority figures, and the media. Topics covered include the following:…

  7. Career Advancement. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 25. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, addresses career advancement. It is designed to provide a framework for thinking about career advancement in terms of three kinds of trajectories: education-based, vertical, and horizontal; a…

  8. Men's Changing Roles. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 27. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses men's changing roles. It is designed to provide a framework for exploring how differences in language, laws, and ways for participating in the community and differences in the way…

  9. Urban Environmental Education Project, Curriculum Module VI: Solid Waste - Trash or Treasure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biglan, Barbara

    Included in this module are four activities dealing with issues of solid waste disposal relative to urban concerns. Included activities are: (1) sources and composition of solid waste; (2) a "garbage game"; (3) disposal options for solid waste; and (4) an example county plan for solid waste disposal. Also included are an overview, teacher…

  10. Urban Environmental Education Project, Curriculum Module VII: Urban Ecology - Our Future Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nous, Albert P.; Biglan, Barbara

    Included in this module are four activities dealing with ecology and applications of ecological principles in the urban environment. Activities included are: (1) the study of ecology; (2) study of consequences of activities within an ecosystem; (3) environmental impacts--benefits and detriments; and (4) choices for the future. Also included are an…