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Sample records for projectile electronic structure

  1. Effects of the projectile electronic structure on stopping parameters for nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Moussa, D.; Dib, A.

    2006-08-01

    The stopping powers of nickel foils for 1H+, 2H+ and 4He2+ ions have been accurately measured over the energy range E ≈ (0.166-2.725) MeV/amu. The data were compared to those reported in the literature and to values derived by the SRIM-2003 code. They were analysed in the framework of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionisation potential, I, and the Barkas effect parameter, b. The values derived from the proton and the alpha particle data are {I = (311.11 ± 2.61) eV, b = 1.38 ± 0.01} and {I = (276.12 ± 2.84) eV, b = 1.58 ± 0.01}, respectively. They thus show opposite variations of the I and b parameters as the projectile charge increases, presumably due only to the incident ions electronic structure. Besides, the reduced stopping power data for incident deuterons show to be fully consistent with those for protons indicating no effect of the projectile isotopic structure on the target stopping parameters. These results are discussed in comparison with ones reported in the literature.

  2. Effects of the projectile electronic structure on Bethe-Bloch stopping parameters for Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, D.; Damache, S.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2010-06-01

    Energy losses of protons and alpha particles in silver have been accurately measured under the same experimental conditions over the velocity range E=(0.192-2.595) MeV/amu using the transmission method. Deduced S(E) stopping powers are compared to most accurate ones from the literature, to values generated by the SRIM-2008 computer code and to ICRU-49 compilation. They were analyzed in the framework of modified Bethe-Bloch theory for extracting Ag target mean excitation and ionization potential, I, and Barkas effect parameter, b. Values of ( 466±5) eV and 1.20±0.01 for these two parameters were inferred from the proton S(E) data while the alpha particle data yielded values of (438±4) eV and 1.38±0.01, respectively. The ( I, b) stopping parameters thus exhibit opposite variations as the projectile charge increases, similarly as we have found previously for nickel [6]. This can be ascribed only to an effect of the projectile electronic structure at low velocities. The obtained results are discussed in comparison to previous ones reported in the literature.

  3. Multielectron transitions resulting from interactions between target and projectile electrons in ionizing collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T. ); DuBois, R.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Interactions between target and projectile electrons leading to ionization of one of the collision partners and simultaneous excitation of the other are investigated for fast clothed-particle--clothed-particle collisions. For H-atom impact, the first Born approximation is used to demonstrate that the low-energy-electron emission is dominated by electron-electron rather than by electron-nucleus interaction processes. For a broad class of structured particle collision systems, the electron-electron interaction is shown to play an important, non-neglibible, role. Doubly differential cross sections for energetic H-He collisions illustrate this point.

  4. 73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE CAR, CAMERA TOWER, CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS AND ELECTRICAL GEAR, August 17, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  6. Damage tolerance of composite sandwich structures subjected to projectile impact. [of low velocity foreign object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of low velocity projectile impact on the strength carrying ability of secondary aerospace structural components fabricated with graphite/epoxy composite materials. The preload and the impact energy combinations necessary to cause catastrophic failure were determined. Those specimens that survived the projectile impact were evaluated for the residual strength.

  7. On the universal scaling in the electronic stopping cross section for heavy ion projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Martínez-Flores, C.; Trujillo-López, L. N.; Serkovic-Loli, L. N.

    2016-02-01

    Energy deposition of heavy ions when penetrating a material is of crucial importance in determining the damage to materials with implications in areas such as material science, plasma physics, radiotherapy and dosimetry. Due to the N-body electron problem, it has been thought that the electronic stopping cross section is unique for a given projectile-target combination and differs from system to system. In this work, we show that within the Bethe theory, there is a universal scaling when the electronic stopping cross sections and projectile kinetic energy are scaled properly in terms of the target mean excitation energy, ?, for all projectile-target combinations. We show that the scaling is given by ? as a function of ?, thus showing the importance of the characterization of the mean excitation energy. The scaling law expresses a systematic and universal behavior among complex projectile-target systems in the energy deposition, characterized by the minimum momentum transfer during the slowing down process. We provide an analytic expression for the universal scaling law for the stopping cross section of any projectile-target combination valid at high collision energies. Finally, we verify the universal scaling law by comparison to atomic and molecular experimental data available in the literature. We expect our findings will motivate further experimental work to verify our universal scaling for more complex systems in the absence of experimental data.

  8. Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns of matter-wave scattering of projectiles: Electron transfer in energetic ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, Hicham

    2015-07-01

    We present results for single and double electron captures in intermediate energies H+ and 2H+ projectiles colliding with a helium target. The processes under investigations are treated using a nonperturbative semiclassical approach in combination with Eikonal approximation to calculate the scattering differential cross sections. The latter reveals pronounced minima and maxima in the scattering angles, in excellent agreement with the recent experimental data. It turns out that the present structure depends strongly on the projectile energy and shows only slight variations with different capture channels. The observed structure demonstrates the analogy of atomic de Broglie's matter-wave scattering with λd B=1.3 -3.2 ×10-3 a.u. and Fraunhofer-type diffraction of light waves.

  9. Projectile charge state effects on electron emission in transfer ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. T.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Guo, D. L.; Gao, Y.; Qian, D. B.; Li, B.; Yan, S. C.; Xu, S.; Zhang, P.; Ma, X.

    2015-07-01

    Electron emissions in transfer ionization processes were studied for 75 keV u-1 He2+, and 80 keV u-1 Ne8+on He collisions, using the well-developed reaction microscope techniques. Momentum distributions in the scattering plane, doubly differential distributions as a function of longitudinal momentum and emission angles of the ejected electrons were obtained. An apparent enhancement of electrons distributed around the projectile in the scattering plane was found for the Ne8+ incident case. Furthermore, we report the ratio of doubly differential distributions at the emission angle of 0° between these two transfer ionization processes, in which an abrupt rise is found at and above the electron capture to the continuum peak. This rise qualitatively agrees with the prediction within the framework of Dettmann’s theory. We conclude that this kind of enhancement was caused by the charge state effect of the projectile.

  10. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  11. Role of elastic projectile-electron scattering in double ionization of helium by fast proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, M.; Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.; Fischer, D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2009-04-01

    We present a systematic study of atomic four-body fragmentation dynamics. To this end we have measured a variety of multiple differential double ionization cross sections for 6 MeV p+He collisions. The data are compared to a first-order calculation with correlated electrons and to a simulation representing a second-order process, with some experimental results seemingly in favor of the first, others in agreement with the second approach. This apparent conflict can be resolved by accounting for elastic scattering between the projectile and one electron already promoted to the continuum through electron-electron correlation in the first-order process.

  12. Absolute cross sections for projectile electron loss accompanied by target multiple ionization in collisions of He+ with noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Sigaud, G. M.; Melo, W. S.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2011-02-01

    Absolute cross sections for projectile electron loss accompanied by target multiple ionization in collisions between He+ ions and noble gases have been measured for energies between 1.0 and 3.5 MeV. The data have been compared with other absolute cross sections that exist in the literature for the same projectile, and with calculations for the screening mode (nucleus-electron interaction) using both perturbative (plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA)) and non-perturbative (extended classical-impulse free-collision model, sudden approximation and coupled-channel method) approaches, and for the antiscreening mode (electron-electron interaction) within the PWBA. The energy dependence of the average number of active electrons for the antiscreening has been described by means of a simple function, which is 'universal' for noble gases but projectile dependent. A previously developed method has been employed to obtain the number of active electrons for each target subshell in the high-velocity regime.

  13. Differential studies and projectile charge effects in ionization of molecular nitrogen by positron and electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucio, O. G.; DuBois, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    Singly, doubly, and triply differential information, obtained from coincidence measurements, are presented for 250-eV positron- and electron-impact ionization of molecular nitrogen. Comparisons of these data as functions of energy loss, scattering, and emission angles illustrate differences associated with the sign of the projectile charge. Via a deconvolution and normalization procedure, the triply differential data are converted to absolute cross sections. By fitting the triply differential cross sections for single ionization with simple functions, the intensities, directions, and peak to background intensities of the binary peaks plus the ratio of recoil to binary interactions are compared for positron and electron impact. Formulas for the binary and recoil intensities plus for the orientation of the binary peak as a function of momentum transfer are extracted from the data. Differences in the relative amount of fragmentation as a function of energy loss are also observed.

  14. A new method to measure the velocity dependence of electronic stopping for low velocity hydrogen projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semrad, D.; Golser, R.; Steinbauer, E.

    1994-12-01

    We propose a new method by which the velocity dependence of the electronic stopping cross section for low energy projectiles can be determined accurately. The measurement is done in backscattering geometry and needs a high resolution detector; we intend to use an existing time-of-flight assembly with a resolution of {T}/{ΔT} ≈ 500 . The basic idea is that corrections due to plural and multiple scattering can be avoided by using protons and deuterons of equal energy, since they follow the same multiple scattering distribution. Using the Monte-Carlo code TRBS, we have simulated the energy spectra of 7 keV protons and 7 keV deuterons backscattered from 6.7 μg/cm 2 Cu. Our evaluation procedure applied to the simulated spectra yields good agreement with the input data.

  15. Role of projectile charge state in convoy electron emission by fast protons colliding with LiF(0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldazabal, I.; Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Arnau, A.; Ponce, V. H.

    2005-05-01

    Target ionization and projectile ionization differential cross sections are used to calculate the electron emission spectra by fast proton impact on ionic crystal surfaces under grazing incidence conditions. Both bare protons and neutral hydrogen species are considered. We use a planar potential approach to determine the projectile trajectory that later on allows us to calculate the charge state fractions. We show that, although the fraction of protons is significantly higher, the contribution from neutral hydrogen ionization has to be considered. The energy and angular dependence of the spectra is analyzed.

  16. The EMET railgun projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Goldstein, S.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the EMET projectile which uses joule heating to accelerate the projectile in a railgun with a predominantly electrothermal driving force. The structure is designed to conduct armature current within a thin annular band around the shank of the large L/D dumbbell-shaped projectile. Current is initiated by a fuse located around the shank, and an impedance of 8 m{Omega} is achieved, compared to the 1-2 m{Omega} observed for EM guns. A supersonic nozzle in the projectile tail section expands and cools the armature plasma to raise its resistivity, prevent secondary arcs and provide additional accelerating thrust. Experimental data is presented for 9.5 mm diameter, 5 gm projectiles, accelerated to nearly 600 m/sec at 55 kA in a 0.9 m railgun. The armature remains confined in the projectile structure, and 75% of the acceleration is provided electrothermally.

  17. Electron correlations in single-electron capture into any state of fast projectiles from heliumlike atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-11-01

    State-selective and total single-electron capture cross sections in fast collisions of a bare projectile with a heliumlike target are examined in the four-body formalism. A special emphasis is given to a proper inclusion of dynamic electron-electron correlation effects. For this purpose, the post form of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B) is utilized. With regard to our related previous study, where the prior version has been considered, in the present work an extensive analytical study of the post-transition amplitude for electron capture into the arbitrary final states nflfmf of the projectile is carried out. The post-transition amplitude for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions is derived in terms of five-dimensional integrals over real variables. The dielectronic interaction V12=1/r12≡1/|r⃗1-r⃗2| explicitly appears in the perturbation potential Vf of the post-transition probability amplitude Tif+, such that the CB1-4B method can provide information about the relative significance of the dynamic interelectron correlation in the collisions under study. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p-He collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. The so-called post-prior discrepancy, which plagues almost all the existing distorted wave approximations, is presently shown to be practically nonexistent in the CB1-4B method. The validity of our findings is critically assessed in comparisons with the available experimental data for both state-selective and total cross sections summed over all the discrete energy levels of the hydrogenlike atom formed with the projectile. Overall, excellent performance of the CB1-4B method is recorded, thus robustly establishing this formalism as the leading first-order description of high-energy single charge exchange, which is a collision of paramount theoretical and practical

  18. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into concrete target. Part II: Structural stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Fang, Qin; He, Li-Lin

    2014-12-01

    The initial oblique and attacking angles as well as the asymmetrical nose abrasion may lead to bending or even fracture of a projectile, and the penetration efficiency decreases distinctly. The structural stability of a high-speed projectile non-normally penetrating into concrete and the parametric influences involved are analyzed with the mass abrasion taken into account. By considering the symmetrical or asymmetrical nose abrasion as well as the initial oblique and attacking angles, both the axial and the transverse drag forces acting on the projectile are derived. Based on the ideal elastic-plastic yield criterion, an approach is proposed for predicting the limit striking velocity (LSV) that is the highest velocity at which no yielding failure has occurred and the projectile can still maintain its integral structural stability. Furthermore, some particular penetration scenarios are separately discussed in detail. Based on the engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nose projectiles established in Part I of this study, the above approach is validated by several high-speed penetration tests. The analysis on parametric influences indicates that the LSV is reduced with an increase in the asymmetrical nose abrasion, the length-diameter-ratio, and the concrete strength, as well as the oblique and attacking angles. Also, the LSV raises with an increase in the initial caliber-radius-head (CRH) and the dimensionless cartridge thickness of a projectile.

  19. Projectiles Impact Assessment of Aircraft Wing Structures with Real Dynamic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lu; Han, Qing; Wang, Changlin

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis to achieve the impact damage of the wing structure under real dynamic load. MPCCI tools are utilized to convert wing aerodynamic load into structural Finite Element Method (FEM) node load. The ANSYS/LS-DYNA code is also used to simulate the dynamic loading effects of the wing structure hit by several projectiles, including both active damage mechanism and common damage mechanism. In addition, structural node force on the leading edge and the midline is compared to the aerodynamic load separately. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the penetrating size and the stress concentration around the damage holes indicates that under the same load situation, the structural damage efficiency of active damage mechanism is significantly higher than the one of common damage mechanism.

  20. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOEpatents

    Jones, James F.; Kast, Brian A.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Rose, Scott E.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Woods, James W.; Greene, Ronald W.

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  1. Projectile stopping system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.; Pittenger, L.C.

    1996-11-26

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile. 13 figs.

  2. Projectile stopping system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.; Pittenger, Lee C.

    1996-01-01

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile.

  3. Projectile energy and atomic number dependence of electron capture from pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, A.; Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, B.; Bossingham, R.; Meyerhof, W. E.

    1994-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the energy dependence of electron capture from electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions. For a La57+ beam incident on Au, Ag, and Cu targets at energies of 0.405, 0.956, and 1.3 GeV/u we find that the cross sections for capture from pair production and the free pair production process increase with increasing collision energy at similar rates. Combining with uranium data reported previously gives a projectile atomic number dependence for 0.956 GeV/u ions on a Au target of Z6.54+/-0.65p for capture from pair production and Z1.53+/-0.80p for the free pair production process.

  4. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.

    1989-04-20

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF{sub 6}. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has traveled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 9 figs.

  5. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  6. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  7. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  8. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  9. High-resolution study of electron capture by 72- and 52-MeV 3He projectiles from targets of high atomic number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, I.; Ikegami, H.; Ogawa, H.; Haruyama, Y.; Tozaki, M.; Aoki, A.; Fukuzawa, F.; Yoshida, K.; Sugai, I.

    1996-01-01

    An electron capture at the cyclotron energy has been explored by using a high-resolution magnetic spectrograph. The K-shell electron capture from heavy elements (V, Cr, Cu, Ge, Nb, Ag, and Sn) by 3He2+ projectiles at 52 and 72 MeV was measured. The dependence of the cross sections on the atomic number of the target obtained at these two energies are compared with current electron-capture theories.

  10. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Hughs, Chance G; Todd, Steven N

    2013-06-11

    A method for generating a projectile using an explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  11. A model for debris clouds produced by impact of hypervelocity projectiles on multiplate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingming; Long, Renrong; Huang, Fenglei; Chen, Li; Fu, Yuesheng

    2008-11-01

    Hypervelocity impact of spherical and cylindrical projectiles on multipate shields at velocities between 4 and 6km/s was investigated experimentally. A model was developed to describe the motion of the debris clouds generated. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and simulation results. The model is capable of predicting damage induced by the impact and can be applied to the optimization and design of multiplate shields.

  12. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  13. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Todd, Steven N.

    2011-10-18

    An explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  14. Osmium-isotope Evidence for a Projectile Component in Impact-melt Rocks, Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Horton, J. W.; Walker, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS) is preserved beneath post-impact sediments on the Atlantic margin of Virginia. This 85-km-diameter complex crater formed on the continental shelf of a passive margin in a layered target consisting of ocean water, Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments (mainly siliciclastic), and crystalline basement rocks. The basement rocks include Neoproterozoic granitoids and felsite as well as gneiss of undetermined age. In May, 2004, the USGS drilled an 823-m test hole in the central uplift of the CBIS at Cape Charles, Va., providing drill cuttings and limited core. The core from 744 to 823 m depth contains crystalline-clast breccia and brecciated gneiss that are distinct from sediment-clast breccias recovered from coreholes in the annular trough of the CBIS. Rocks interpreted to be impact-melt clasts and dikes in the crystalline-clast breccia were sampled for analyses of osmium (Os) concentrations and 187Os/188Os ratios to test for evidence of the projectile. These analyses were conducted on samples from a dike (aphanitic to partly hyaline, ST2440.8C) within a gneissic block, from a block of holocrystalline mafic rock (aphanitic, ST2453.3C), and from a flow-laminated bomb (aphanitic to partly hyaline, ST2570.0C). The Os concentrations and 187Os/188Os ratios for samples ST2440.8C, ST2453.3C and ST2570.0C are 0.928, 0.711 and 0.312 ppb, and 0.15205, 0.15545 and 0.22345, respectively. These values are much higher (Os) or lower (187Os/188Os) than those reported for rocks of the upper continental crust, suggesting a significant contribution of osmium from the projectile in these impact-melt rocks. Moreover, a strong negative correlation between 187Os/188Os and Os for these samples suggests that it may be possible to use mixing curves to calculate the proportions of projectile and target-rock components. Our results from the CBIS contrast with those from the Chicxulub crater, where there is little or no evidence for the

  15. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  16. Determination of the solid angle and response function of a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens for Auger electrons emitted from long lived projectile states

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, S.; Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Laoutaris, A.; Benis, E. P.

    2015-04-15

    We present SIMION 8.1 Monte Carlo type simulations of the response function and detection solid angle for long lived Auger states (lifetime τ ∼ 10{sup −9} − 10{sup −5} s) recorded by a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens and position sensitive detector used for high resolution Auger spectroscopy of ion beams. Also included in these simulations for the first time are kinematic effects particular to Auger emission from fast moving projectile ions such as line broadening and solid angle limitations allowing for a more accurate and realistic line shape modeling. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with measured electron line shapes of both long lived 1s2s2p{sup 4}P and prompt Auger projectile states formed by electron capture in collisions of 25.3 MeV F{sup 7+} with H{sub 2} and 12.0 MeV C{sup 4+} with Ne recorded at 0{sup ∘} to the beam direction. These results are important for the accurate evaluation of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P/{sup 2}P ratio of K-Auger cross sections whose observed non-statistical production by electron capture into He-like ions, recently a field of interesting interpretations, awaits further resolution.

  17. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  18. Strong asymmetry of the electron-loss-to-continuum cusp of multielectron U28 + projectiles in near-relativistic collisions with gaseous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Hagmann, S.; Monti, J. M.; Rivarola, R. D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; DuBois, R. D.; Gumberidze, A.; Guo, D. L.; Lestinsky, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spillmann, U.; Trotsenko, S.; Weber, G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-04-01

    The process of electron-loss to the continuum (ELC) has been studied for the collision systems U28 ++H2 at a collision energy of 50 MeV/u, U28 ++N2 at 30 MeV/u, and U28 ++Xe at 50 MeV/u. The energy distributions of cusp electrons emitted at an angle of 0∘ with respect to the projectile beam were measured using a magnetic forward-angle electron spectrometer. For these collision systems far from equilibrium charge state, a significantly asymmetric cusp shape is observed. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on first-order perturbation theory, which predict an almost symmetric cusp shape. Some possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  19. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  20. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Sauve, G.L.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experience at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  1. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S. ); Ang, J.A.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H. ); Sauve, G.L. . Rocky Flats Plant); Hickman, R.J. )

    1992-03-20

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experiment at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  2. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susoeff, A. R.; Hawke, R. S.; Ang, J. A.; Asay, J. R.; Hall, C. A.; Konrad, C. H.; Sauve, G. L.

    1992-03-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experimentation at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  3. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  4. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  5. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  6. Electron-impact ionization of neon at low projectile energy: an internormalized experiment and theory for a complex target.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Thomas; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Senftleben, Arne; Ren, Xueguang; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2013-04-12

    As a fundamental test for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches, we have studied the single ionization (2p) of neon at a projectile energy of 100 eV. The experimental data were acquired using an advanced reaction microscope that benefits from high efficiency and a large solid-angle acceptance of almost 4π. We put special emphasis on the ability to measure internormalized triple-differential cross sections over a large part of the phase space. The data are compared to predictions from a second-order hybrid distorted-wave plus R-matrix model and a fully nonperturbative B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates approach. For a target of this complexity and the low-energy regime, unprecedented agreement between experiment and the BSR model is found. This represents a significant step forward in the investigation of complex targets. PMID:25167263

  7. A Gas-Actuated Projectile Launcher for High-Energy Impact Testing of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Lawson, Robin E.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Lyle, Karen H.

    1999-01-01

    A gas-act,uated penetration device has been developed for high-energy impact testing of structures. The high-energy impact. t,estiiig is for experimental simulation of uncontained engine failures. The non-linear transient finite element, code LS-DYNA3D has been used in the numerical simula.tions of a titanium rectangular blade with a.n aluminum target, plate. Threshold velocities for different combinations of pitch and yaw angles of the impactor were obtained for the impactor-target, t8est configuration in the numerica.1 simulations. Complet,e penet,ration of the target plate was also simulat,ed numerically. Finally, limited comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for complete penetration of the target by the impactor.

  8. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Shahinpoor, M.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1993-03-02

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasma blowby.

  9. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Asay, James R.; Hall, Clint A.; Konrad, Carl H.; Sauve, Gerald L.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1993-01-01

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.

  10. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  11. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  12. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  13. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  14. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  15. Hypervelocity projectile design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Sauve, G.L.; Vasey, A.R.; Gosling, S.M.; Hickman, R.J.

    1990-12-31

    The projectile is the easiest element of a railgun system to modify. The projectile design can also play a major role in the successful operation of a railgun. This paper presents the design and fabrication techniques that have been used to increase the strength of the projectiles used in the STARFIRE Project. In addition, various diagnostics that have been used to guide our projectile development and monitor projectile integrity are reviewed. 10 refs.

  16. Hign-speed penetration of projectile with cavitator into sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurskikh, Anna; Veldanov, Vladislav

    2011-06-01

    Cavitators are used in underwater projectiles design to form a cavern in which projectile could move with no or significantly reduced drag. An investigation of possible application of this structural element for penetration into porous media was conducted. High-speed impact of a conical-shaped head projectile with cavitator was studied in terms of its influence on penetration capacity and projectile stability in sand for impact velocity about 1500 m/s. Cavitators were manufactured of steel with different strength moduli, and thus two penetration regimes (with eroding/non-eroding cavitator) were compared. Numerical simulations showing wave propagation in target and projectile were performed in AUTODYN with Johnson-Cook model for projectile and granular model for sand.

  17. More on Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    Mathematically explains why the range of a projectile is most insensitive to aiming errors when the initial angle is close to 45 degrees, whereas other observables such as maximum height or flight time are most insensitive for near-vertical launching conditions. (WRM)

  18. Projectiles and Aerodynamic Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the air resistance on projectiles, examining (in separate sections) air resistance less than gravity and air resistance greater than gravity. Also considers an approximation in which a trajectory is divided into two parts, the first part neglecting gravity and the second part neglecting the air resistance. (JN)

  19. Flight dynamics of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1989-02-01

    During the past twenty years Sandia National Laboratories and the US Army have vertically gun launched numerous 155mm and eight-inch diameter flight test projectiles. These projectiles are subsequently recovered using an on-board parachute recovery system which is attached to the forward case structure of the projectile. There have been at least five attempts to describe, through analytical and numerical simulations, the translational and rotational motions of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. However, none of these investigations have correctly described the large nutational motion of the projectile since all of them overlooked the fundamental mechanism which causes these angular motions. Numerical simulations as well as a closed form analytical solution show conclusively that the Magnus moment is responsible for the large nutational motion of the projectile. That is, when the center of pressure for the Magnus force is aft of the center of mass for the projectile, the Magnus moment causes an unstable (or large) nutational motion which always tends to turn the spinning projectile upside down while it is descending on the parachute. Conversely, when the center of mass for the projectile is aft of the center of pressure for the Magnus force, the Magnus moment stabilizes the nutational motion tending to always point the base of the spinning projectile down. The results of this work are utilized to render projectile parachute recovery systems more reliable and to explain what initially may appear to be strange gyrodynamic behavior of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. 14 refs., 20 figs.

  20. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Ang, J.A.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Hickman, R.J.

    1992-03-20

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experiment at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  1. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  2. Subcaliber discarding sabot airgun projectiles.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Schönekeß, Holger; Herbst, Jörg; Staats, Hans-Georg; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Nguyen, Thanh Tien; Bockholdt, Britta

    2014-03-01

    Medical literature abounds with reports on injuries and fatalities caused by airgun projectiles. While round balls or diabolo pellets have been the standard projectiles for airguns for decades, today, there are a large number of different airgun projectiles available. A very uncommon--and until now unique--discarding sabot airgun projectile (Sussex Sabo Bullet) was introduced into the market in the 1980s. The projectile, available in 0.177 (4.5 mm) and 0.22 (5.5 mm) caliber, consists of a plastic sabot cup surrounding a subcaliber copper-coated lead projectile in typical bullet shape. Following the typical principle of a discarding sabot projectile, the lightweight sabot is supposed to quickly loose velocity and to fall to the ground downrange while the bullet continues on target. These sabot-loaded projectiles are of special forensic interest due to their non-traceability and ballistic parameters. Therefore, it is the aim of this work to investigate the ballistic performance of these sabot airgun projectiles by high-speed video analyses and by measurement of the kinetic parameters of the projectile parts by a transient recording system as well as observing their physical features after being fired. While the sabot principle worked properly in high-energy airguns (E > 17 J), separation of the core projectile from the sabot cup was also observed when discharged in low-energy airguns (E < 7.5 J). While the velocity of the discarded Sussex Sabo core projectile was very close to the velocity of a diabolo-type reference projectile (RWS Meisterkugel), energy density was up to 60 % higher. To conclude, this work is the first study to demonstrate the regular function of this uncommon type of airgun projectile. PMID:24263305

  3. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1994-01-04

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  4. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1994-01-01

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  5. Microcraters formed in glass by projectiles of various densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, J. F.; Mandeville, J.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment was conducted investigating the effect of projectile density on the structure and size of craters in soda lime glass and fused quartz. The projectiles were spheres of polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB), aluminum, and iron with velocities between 0.5 and 15 km/sec and diameters between 0.4 and 5 microns. The projectile densities spanned the range expected for primary and secondary particles of micrometer size at the lunar surface, and the velocities spanned the lower range of micrometeoroid velocities and the upper range of secondary projectile velocities. There are changes in crater morphology as the impact velocity increases, and the transitions occur at lower velocities for the projectiles of higher density. The sequence of morphological features of the craters found for PS-DVB impacting soda lime glass for increasing impact velocity, described in a previous work (Mandeville and Vedder, 1971), also occurs in fused quartz and in both targets with the more dense aluminum and iron projectiles. Each transition in morphology occurs at impact velocities generating a certain pressure in the target. High density projectiles require a lower velocity than low-density projectiles to generate a given shock pressure.

  6. Theoretical electronic structure of structurally modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc David

    Graphene has emerged as a promising replacement for silicon in next-generation electronics and optoelectronic devices. If graphene is to be used in semiconductor devices, however, it must acquire an electronic band gap. Numerous approaches have been proposed to control the band gap of graphene, including the periodic patterning of defects. However, the mechanism for band gap opening and the associated physics in graphene patterned with defects remain unclear. Using both analytic theory and first-principles calculations, we show that periodic patterning of defects on graphene can open a large and tunable band gap, induce strong absorption peaks at optical wavelengths, and host a giant band gap quantum spin Hall phase. First, a geometric rule is analytically derived for the arrangements of defects that open a band gap in graphene, with one ninth of all possible patterns opening a band gap. Next, we perform ab-initio density functional calculations to compare the effects of structural vacancies, hexagonal BN dopants, and passivants on the electronic structure of graphene. Qualitatively, these three types of structural defects behave the same, with only slight differences in their resulting band structures. By adjusting the shape of structural defects, we show how to move the Dirac cones in reciprocal space in accordance with the tight-binding model for the anisotropic honeycomb lattice, while the fundamental mechanism for band gap opening remains the same. To quantitatively predict the band gap and optical properties of these materials, we employ many-body perturbation theory with Green's functions (GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation) to directly include electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. Structurally modified graphene shows a strong renormalization of the fundamental band gap over single particle descriptions, and a strong electron-hole interaction as indicated by strong exciton binding energies (> 0.5 eV). Finally, we show that structurally modified graphene

  7. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A {approx_equal} 182 region, structure of {sup 182}Hg and {sup 182}Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm and the anomalous h{sub 11/2} proton crossing in the A{approximately}135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier {alpha} particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4{pi} channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  8. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. [Dept. of Chemistry, Washington Univ. , St. Louis, Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research program described touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin (hyperdeformation in the mass A [approx equal] 182 region, structure of [sup 182]Hg and [sup 182]Au at high spin, a highly deformed band in [sup 136]Pm and the anomalous h[sub 11/2] proton crossing in the A[approximately]135 superdeformed region), studies at the interface between structure and reactions (population of entry states in heavy-ion fusion reactions, nuclear structure effects in proton evaporation spectra, nuclear structure- dependent entry state population by total spectroscopy, entrance channel effects in fusion near the barrier, lifetimes of subbarrier [alpha] particles by the atomic clock method), production and study of hot nuclei (the statistical model evaporation code EVAP, statistical emission of deuterons and tritons from highly excited compound nuclei, heavy-fragment emission as a probe of the thermal properties of highly excited compound nuclei, use of incoming-wave boundary condition transmission coefficients in the statistical model: implications in the particle evaporation spectra, study of transparency in the optical model), reaction mechanism studies (binary character of highly dissipative [sup 209]Bi + [sup 136]Xe collisions at E/A=28.2 MeV), and development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in these areas of research (including a 4[pi] channel selection device, a novel x-ray detector, and a simple channel-selecting detector).

  9. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  10. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  11. Electron Scattering and Nuclear Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trower, W. P.; Ficenec, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents information about the nucleus gained by studies of electron scattering. Discusses what can be implied about the shape of the charge distribution, the nucleus positions, the vibrational modes of the nucleus, the momentum of the nucleus, and the granularity and core structures of the nucleus. (DS)

  12. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-05-20

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile. 8 figs.

  13. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media. PMID:11538362

  15. Double-peak structures in transmission of H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries in a polymer: Projectile-energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. T.; Zhou, X. M.; Cheng, R.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ren, J. R.; Duan, J. L.; Liu, J.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission experiments of 7 -200 keV H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries with inlet or outlet diameters of 4/2 μ m and a length of 30 μ m etched in a PC polymer are reported. The yield of the transmitted particles as a function of the capillary tilt angle was measured. The results show that for 200 keV H2+ ions the guiding effect disappears but a focusing effect is obtained with a density enhancement factor of 3.5. For 7 -50 keV H2+ ions their transmitted particle curves exhibit a pair of shoulder peaks on the left- and right-hand side of the center angle 0∘. As the ion energy increases, the shoulder-peak structure is found to vanish leaving one peak at 0∘.

  16. Electronic structure of black sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Lenosky, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    The electronic structure of black sodalite, Na8(AlSiO4)6, is determined in the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA). This structure has six Na atoms to compensate the six Al atoms, leaving two excess Na atoms. A band-gap electronic state is induced in the wide oxide gap by the excess sodium, and has ``particle in a box'' behavior. Magnetic orderings of these gap states are studied. Analytic models show that an antiferromagnetic ordering is lowest in energy in the LSDA. A self-consistent LSDA calculation shows the system to change from a metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator when spin orderings are allowed. Hopping and Hubbard-U parameters are estimated, and the many-body correlated Hubbard model is solved using a constrained path Monte Carlo technique, which again predicts the system to be antiferromagnetic with a Tc of order 50 K.

  17. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  18. Experimental and numerical study on fragmentation of steel projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Råkvaag, K. G.; Børvik, T.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Westermann, I.

    2012-08-01

    A previous experimental study on penetration and perforation of circular Weldox 460E target plates with varying thicknesses struck by blunt-nose projectiles revealed that fragmentation of the projectile occurred if the target thickness or impact velocity exceeded a certain value. Thus, numerical simulations that do not account for fragmentation during impact can underestimate the perforation resistance of protective structures. Previous numerical studies have focused primarily on the target plate behaviour. This study considers the behaviour of the projectile and its possible fragmentation during impact. Hardened steel projectiles were launched at varying velocities in a series of Taylor tests. The impact events were captured using a high-speed camera. Fractography of the fragmented projectiles showed that there are several fracture mechanisms present during the fragmentation process. Tensile tests of the projectile material revealed that the hardened material has considerable variations in yield stress and fracture stress and strain. In the finite element model, the stress-strain behaviour from tensile tests was used to model the projectile material with solid elements and the modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation. Numerical simulations incorporating the variations in material properties are capable of reproducing the experimental fracture patterns, albeit the predicted fragmentation velocities are too low.

  19. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  20. Electronic structure of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae Kyung; Yang, Cheolsoo; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of graphite oxide by photoelectron spectroscopy at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea. The typical sp 2 hybridization states found in graphite were also seen in graphite oxide. However, the π state disappeared near the Fermi level because of bonding between the π and oxygen-related states originating from graphite oxide, indicating electron transfer from graphite to oxygen and resulting in a downward shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state to higher binding energies. The band gap opening increased to about 1.8 eV, and additional oxygen-related peaks were observed at 8.5 and 27 eV. This research was supported by the Basic Science Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0004592), and partly by the MEST (2009-0087138). Experiments at the PLS were supported in part by POSTECH and MEST.

  1. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  2. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  3. Initiation of Gaseous Detonation by Conical Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    qualitatively well with the experimental results for relatively blunt projectiles (cone half-angle larger than 35°) and low mixture pressures (lower than 100 kPa). The trend of the critical Damköhler number calculated along the projectile cone surface was similar to that of the experimental results for slender cones (cone half-angles lower 35°) and high mixture pressures (higher than 100 kPa). Steady 2D simulations of reacting flows over finite wedges using the method of characteristics with a one-step Arrhenius chemical reaction model reproduced the three regimes observed for direct initiation of a detonation: the subcritical, critical and supercritical regimes. It is shown that in order for a 2D wedge to be equivalent to the problem of blast initiation of a detonation (which is the essence of the Lee-Vasiljev model), the Mach number normal to the oblique shock needs to be greater than 50 and the wedge angle has to be smaller than 30°. Simulations of reacting flows over semi-infinite wedges and cones were validated with CFD results. Excellent agreement was reached between the angle of overdriven oblique detonations obtained from the simulations and those from a polar analysis. For wedge or cone angles equal or lower than the minimum angle for which an oblique detonation is attached (according to the polar analysis), a Chapman-Jouguet oblique detonation was initiated. In the conical configuration, the curvature around the cone axis allowed an oblique detonation to be self-sustained at an angle less than without the curvature effect. At larger activation energies, the initiation process of an oblique detonation wave at the tip of a semi-infinite wedge or cone was identified. Unsteady 2D computational simulations were also conducted and showed the cellular structure of an oblique detonation wave. Instabilities in the form of transverse shock waves along the oblique detonation front arise for large activation energies.

  4. Projectile penetration into ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Swain, M V; Kieser, D C; Shah, S; Kieser, J A

    2014-01-01

    Ballistic gelatin is frequently used as a model for soft biological tissues that experience projectile impact. In this paper we investigate the response of a number of gelatin materials to the penetration of spherical steel projectiles (7 to 11mm diameter) with a range of lower impacting velocities (<120m/s). The results of sphere penetration depth versus projectile velocity are found to be linear for all systems above a certain threshold velocity required for initiating penetration. The data for a specific material impacted with different diameter spheres were able to be condensed to a single curve when the penetration depth was normalised by the projectile diameter. When the results are compared with a number of predictive relationships available in the literature, it is found that over the range of projectiles and compositions used, the results fit a simple relationship that takes into account the projectile diameter, the threshold velocity for penetration into the gelatin and a value of the shear modulus of the gelatin estimated from the threshold velocity for penetration. The normalised depth is found to fit the elastic Froude number when this is modified to allow for a threshold impact velocity. The normalised penetration data are found to best fit this modified elastic Froude number with a slope of 1/2 instead of 1/3 as suggested by Akers and Belmonte (2006). Possible explanations for this difference are discussed. PMID:24184862

  5. Fusion and direct reactions for strongly and weakly bound projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugi, M.; Lang, J.; Müller, R.; Ungricht, E.; Bodek, K.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Magiera, A.; Strzałkowski, A.; Willim, G.

    1981-09-01

    The interaction of 6Li, 9Be and 12C projectiles with a 28Si target was investigated by measuring the angular distributions of the elastically scattered projectiles and of the emitted protons, deuterons and α-particles. The experiment was performed in order to deduce direct and compound nucleus process contributions to the total reaction cross section and to study the influence of the projectile structure on the relative importance of these two mechanisms. Optical model parameters and therefore the total reaction cross section are strongly influenced by the binding energy of the projectile. The parameters of the Glas-Mosel model describing the fusion reaction vary smoothly with the atomic number. In the system 9Be + 28Si around 50% of all reactions are direct processes even at energies near the Coulomb barrier, whereas in the other systems the direct part amounts to 15 % ( 12C) and 30 % ( 6Li) only.

  6. Electronic structure of lithium amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, N.; Takeda, Y.; Saitoh, Y.; Yamagami, H.; Tsubota, M.; Paik, B.; Ichikawa, T.; Kojima, Y.; Muro, T.; Kato, Y.; Kinoshita, T.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of the insulator lithium amide (LiNH2), which is a lightweight complex hydride being considered as a high-capacity hydrogen storage material, is investigated by N 1s soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XES and XAS spectra show a band gap between the valence and conduction bands. The valence band in the XES spectrum consists of three peaks, which extend up to ~-8 eV from the valence band top. The band calculation within the local-density approximation (LDA) for LiNH2shows energetically separated three peaks in the occupied N 2p partial density of states (pDOS) and the band gap. The energy distribution of three peaks in the XES spectrum agrees with that in the calculated pDOS except for the peak at the highest binding energy, which is attributed to the strongly hybridized state between N 2p and H 1s. The XES experiment has clarified that the strongly hybridized state with H 1s in LiNH2is located at binding energy higher than that of the LDA calculation, while the overall feature of the electronic structure of LiNH2experimentally obtained by XES and XAS is consistent with the calculated result.

  7. Fragmentation of hypervelocity aluminum projectiles on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Schäfer, Frank; Destefanis, Roberto; Faraud, Moreno; Lambert, Michel

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents work performed for a study investigating the ability of different flexible materials to induce fragmentation of a hypervelocity projectile. Samples were chosen to represent a wide range of industrially available types of flexible materials like ceramic, aramid and carbon fabrics as well as a thin metallic mesh. Impact conditions and areal density were kept constant for all targets. Betacloth and multi-layer insulation (B-MLI) are mounted onto the targets to account for thermal system engineering requirements. All tests were performed using the Space light-gas gun facility (SLGG) of the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI. Projectiles were aluminum spheres with 5 mm diameter impacting at approximately 6.3 km/s. Fragmentation was evaluated using a witness plate behind the target. An aramid and a ceramic fabric lead the ranking of fabrics with the best projectile fragmentation and debris cloud dispersion performance. A comparison with an equal-density rigid aluminum plate is presented. The work presented can be applied to optimize the micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) shielding structure of inflatable modules.

  8. a Study of Ricochet Phenomenon for Inclined Impact of Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Young-Shin

    In this study, the numerical simulation using AUTODYN-3D program was investigated for trajectory prediction for inclined impacts of projectiles. The penetration and perforation of polycarbonate(PC) plate by 7.62 mm projectile was investigated numerically. The characteristic structure of the projectile's trajectory in the PC plates was studied. Two combined failure criteria were used in the target plate, and the target plate was modeled with the properties of polycarbonate for simulating the ricochet phenomenon. The numerical analyses were used to study the effect of the angle of inclination on the trajectory and kinetic energy of the projectile. The dynamic deformation behaviors tests of PC were compared with numerical simulation results which can be used for predictive purpose. Ricochet phenomenon for angles of inclination of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 20° in the analysis. The projectile perforated the plate for θ > 30°, thus defined a failure envelope for numerical configuration. The numerical analyses was used to study the effect under the projectile impact velocity on the depth of penetration(DOP).

  9. Multiple impacts of dusty projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jurgen

    In the context of early stages of planetesimal formation we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small dust-aggregate projectiles into solid sintered dust targets. Both collision partners consisted of 1.5 µm monodisperse spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 (projectiles) and 0.35 (targets), respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid accelerator with a linear projectile magazine, which enabled us to perform 25 impacts within 4.5 s of microgravity time in the Bremen drop tower. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency for different impact velocities between 3 and 5 m s-1 , using an analytical balance and imaging methods. Furthermore, we observed random collisions among small dust aggregates with sizes around 1 mm and collision velocities of the order of 0.25 m s-1 and used them to improve the dust-aggregate collision model of Güttler et al. (2010). u

  10. Projectile Motion Without Trigonometric Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; Kohneh, Zahra A.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we provide a treatment of projectile motion that is accessible to students who are unfamiliar with trigonometry but do have a minimal knowledge of elementary algebra and know the Pythagorean theorem. In this approach, we view the initial velocity of the projectile as being a combination of a vertical part (component) v0V and a horizontal component v0H (see Fig. 1). This is in contrast to the usual approach of taking the initial speed v0 and the launch angle as being given. We let the initial position be the origin and neglect air drag. Assuming that the constant acceleration kinematics equations are known, we may write vH = v0H, and the horizontal distance traveled is x = v0H t, where t is the elapsed time. We also have vV = v0V - gt, where g is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. And the vertical displacement is y = v0V t - ½ gt2. These equations may be used to find the location and velocity of the projectile at any time t. We can also find the equation of the path of the projectile by combining Eq. [1(b)] and Eq. [2(b)] to get y = -(g/2v0H2)x2 + (v0V/v0H) x, which is the equation of a concave-down parabola.

  11. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  12. Having Fun with a 3-D Projectile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammi, Matthew; Greenhalgh, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The use of projectiles is a concept familiar to most students, whether it is a classic slingshot, bow and arrow, or even a spit wad through a straw. Perhaps the last thing a teacher wants is more projectiles in the classroom. However, the concept of projectiles is relevant to most students and may provide a means of bringing more authenticity into…

  13. Precision Measurement of the Hyperfine Structure of Laser-Cooled Radioactive {sup 7}Be{sup +} Ions Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K.; Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Takamine, A.; Schury, P.; Ishida, Y.; Sonoda, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kojima, T. M.; Lioubimov, V.; Ogawa, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Kubo, T.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2008-11-21

    The ground state hyperfine splitting of {sup 7}Be{sup +} has been measured by laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy in the online rf trap of RIKEN's slow RI-beam facility. Be ions produced by projectile fragmentation of {sup 13}C at {approx_equal}1 GeV were thermalized in a rf ion guide gas cell and subsequently laser cooled in the ion trap to {approx_equal}1 {mu}eV. This 10{sup 15}-fold reduction of the kinetic energy allows precision spectroscopy of these ions. A magnetic hfs constant of A=-742.772 28(43) MHz was measured for {sup 7}Be{sup +}, from which a nuclear magnetic moment of {mu}{sub I}=-1.399 28(2){mu}{sub N} was deduced.

  14. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsäss, H.

    2012-09-01

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 × 106 atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between ˜12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp3 to sp2 bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp3 contribution.

  15. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-10

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

  16. Four-body charge transfer processes in collisions of bare projectile ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2015-02-01

    Single-electron capture by a bare ion from a helium atom at intermediate and high energies in the framework of four-body distorted wave (DW-4B) approximation in both prior and post form has been considered. In the entrance channel, the initial bound state wave function is distorted by the incoming projectile ion, and the corresponding distortion is related to the Coulomb continuum states of the active electron and the residual target ion in the field of the projectile ion respectively. Continuum states of the active electron and the projectile ion in the field of the residual target ion are also included in the exit channel. It may be mentioned that the effect of dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The total single-electron capture cross sections are obtained by summing over all contributions up to n = 3 shells and sub-shells respectively. In addition, the differential cross sections for alpha particle-helium collision are calculated at impact energies of 60, 150, 300, 450, and 630 keV amu-1, respectively. The cross sections exhibit a monotonically decreasing angular dependence, with clear peak structures around 0.1 to 0.2 mrad being found at low impact energies. The current theoretical results, both in prior and post forms of the transition amplitude for symmetric and asymmetric collision, are compared with the available theoretical and experimental results. Current computed results have been found to be satisfactory in comparison with other theoretical and experimental findings.

  17. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  18. Electronic structure of lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David J.

    Due to many of its attributes, Li2B4O7 provides a possible material for incorporation as either a primary or companion material in future solid state neutron detectors. There is however a lack of fundamental characterization information regarding this useful material, particularly its electronic configuration. To address this, an investigation of Li2B4O7(110) and Li2B 4O7(100) was undertaken, utilizing photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopic techniques. The measured band gap depended on crystallographic direction with the band gaps ranging from 8.9+/-0.5 eV to 10.1+/-0.5 eV. The measurement yielded a density of states that qualitatively agreed with the theoretical results from model bulk band structure calculations for Li2B4O7; albeit with a larger band gap than predicted, but consistent with the known deficiencies of Local Density Approximation and Density Functional Theory calculations. The occupied states of both surfaces were extremely flat; to the degree that resolving periodic dispersion of the occupied states was inconclusive, within the resolution of the system. However, both surfaces demonstrated clear periodic dispersion within the empty states very close to theoretical Brillouin zone values. These attributes also translated to a lighter charge carrier effective mass in the unoccupied states. Of the two surfaces, Li2B4O 7(110) yielded the more consistent values in orthogonal directions for energy states. The presence of a bulk band gap surface state and image potential state in Li2B4O7(110) was indicative of a defect-free surface. The absence of both in the more polar, more dielectric Li2B4O7(100) was attributed to the presence of defects determined to be O vacancies. The results from Li2B 4O7(110) were indicative of a more stable surface than Li 2B4O7(100). In addition, Li 1s bulk and surface core level components were determined at the binding energies of -56.5+0.4 and -53.7+0.5 eV. Resonance features were observed along the [001

  19. Deformation and Melting of Iron-Rich Projectiles in Hypervelocity MEMIN Cratering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, T.; Ebert, M.; Trullenque, G.; Deutsch, A.; Hecht, L.; Salge, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.

    2013-09-01

    We conducted 23-54 kJ impact experiments using projectiles composed of steel and iron meteorite Campo del Cielo to study the structural changes that occur upon impact in these projectiles. Extensive melting is largely the result of plastic deformation.

  20. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  1. Wind-influenced projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian; Perico Esguerra, Jose; Day Vallejos, Jazmine; Jerard Canda, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We solved the wind-influenced projectile motion problem with the same initial and final heights and obtained exact analytical expressions for the shape of the trajectory, range, maximum height, time of flight, time of ascent, and time of descent with the help of the Lambert W function. It turns out that the range and maximum horizontal displacement are not always equal. When launched at a critical angle, the projectile will return to its starting position. It turns out that a launch angle of 90° maximizes the time of flight, time of ascent, time of descent, and maximum height and that the launch angle corresponding to maximum range can be obtained by solving a transcendental equation. Finally, we expressed in a parametric equation the locus of points corresponding to maximum heights for projectiles launched from the ground with the same initial speed in all directions. We used the results to estimate how much a moderate wind can modify a golf ball’s range and suggested other possible applications.

  2. [The dynamics of projectile wounding. Concepts in ballistic injuries].

    PubMed

    Houdelette, P

    1998-04-01

    Analysis of the structure and terminal ballistic behavior of bullets provides a better understanding of their wounding power. The studies of ballistics specialists serve as a base. The concept of "scientific shot" remains an intellectual approach to a random phenomenon. Wound ballistic studies examine the behavior of projectiles in vivo or in a simulation medium. War events, in which projectiles do not meet requirements of international conventions, sport or hunting accidents, urban violence may confront the surgeon with various types of ballistic pathologies. The appropriate saying of Lindsey that the surgeons has to treat a wound and not a weapon should not justify etiologic ignorance. PMID:9768076

  3. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  4. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  5. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  6. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  7. About zitterbewegung and electron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Waldyr A.; Vaz, Jayme; Recami, Erasmo; Salesi, Giovanni

    1993-12-01

    We start from the spinning electron model by Barut and Zanghi, which has been recently translated into the Clifford algebra language. We ``complete'' such a translation, first of all, by expressing in the Clifford formalism a particular Barut-Zanghi (BZ) solution, which refers (at the classical limit) to an ``internal'' helical motion with a time-like speed (and is here shown to originate from the superposition of positive and negative frequency solutions of the Dirac equation). Then, we show how to construct solutions of the Dirac equation describing helical motions with light-like speed, which meet very well the standard interpretation of the velocity operator in the Dirac equation theory (and agree with the solution proposed by Hestenes, on the basis - however - of ad-hoc assumptions that are unnecessary in the present approach). The above results appear to support the conjecture that the zitterbewegung motion (a helical motion, at the classical limit) is responsible for the electron spin.

  8. 22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD TOP OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING DRIVE CABLES, DRIVE GEAR, BOTTOM OF CAMERA TOWER AND 'CROWS NEST' CONTROL ROOM. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  10. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  11. Electron-phonon renormalization of the electronic structure of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustino, Feliciano; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2011-03-01

    The calculation of band structures from first-principles has reached a high level of accuracy. Calculations combining density-functional theory with many-body perturbation theory often are in good agreement with measurements by photoemission, tunneling, and other spectroscopic probes. While significant efforts have been devoted to improving the description of electron-electron interactions in these calculations, the effect of lattice vibrations has largely been overlooked so far. In this work we study from first principles the electron-phonon renormalization of the band gap of diamond. The calculated temperature dependence of the gap and the broadening of the absorption edge are in excellent agreement with spectroscopic ellipsometry data. Interestingly we find a gap renormalization due to zero-point vibrations as large as 0.6 eV. We discuss the implications of our findings for the electronic structure of other carbon-based bulk materials and nanostructures.

  12. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  13. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  14. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  15. Electronic structure and photophysical properties of polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P.; Kafafi, S.A.

    1992-04-01

    The quantum mechanical AM1 and CNDO/S3 models were used to examine the effect of isoelectronic substitutions on the conformation, electronic structure, and optical absorption spectra for a series of aromatic polyimides. An analysis of the geometric changes at the substitution site and its effect on the electronic structure allowed for the prediction of changes in the ICT band of the optical absorption spectra.

  16. MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2007-01-29

    The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

  17. Projectile Motion Gets the Hose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Liyanage, Chinthaka

    2011-10-01

    Students take a weekly quiz in our introductory physics course. During the week in which material focused on projectile motion, we not-so-subtly suggested what problem the students would see on the quiz. The quiz problem was an almost exact replica of a homework problem we worked through in the class preceding the quiz. The goal of the problem is to find the launch speed if the final horizontal and vertical positions and launch angle are given. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the trajectory.

  18. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-10-12

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant investigated for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development and the development of the electric launch system design.

  19. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-01-09

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development experiments and the development of the electric launch system design.

  20. Impact response of graphite-epoxy flat laminates using projectiles that simulate aircraft engine encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, J. L., Jr.; Cook, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the response of a graphite-epoxy material to foreign object impact was made by impacting spherical projectiles of gelatin, ice, and steel normally on flat panels. The observed damage was classified as transverse (stress wave delamination and cracking), penetrative, or structural (gross failure): the minimum, or threshold, velocity to cause each class of damage was established as a function of projectile characteristics. Steel projectiles had the lowest transverse damage threshold, followed by gelatin and ice. Making use of the threshold velocities and assuming that the normal component of velocity produces the damage in nonnormal impacts, a set of impact angles and velocities was established for each projectile material which would result in damage to composite fan blades. Analysis of the operating parameters of a typical turbine fan blade shows that small steel projectiles are most likely to cause delamination and penetration damage to unprotected graphite-epoxy composite fan blades.

  1. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  2. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  3. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  4. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-05-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  5. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-01-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  6. Graphical Method for Determining Projectile Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. C.; Baker, J. C.; Franzel, L.; McMahon, D.; Songer, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a nontrigonometric graphical method for predicting the trajectory of a projectile when the angle and initial velocity are known. Students enrolled in a general education conceptual physics course typically have weak backgrounds in trigonometry, making inaccessible the standard analytical calculation of projectile range. Furthermore,…

  7. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-12

    The hypothesis to be tested is that the addition of steel or other synthetic fiber and/or high strength, low cost aggregate to strong grouts or concrete will result in a projectile of sufficient strength to produce cracking and spall enough to make its use cost effective for mining. Based on experiments conducted to date, no conclusions can yet be reached. Results of the experiments conducted suggest that reinforcement of a concrete projectile can yield performance that portends cost effective projectile based excavation. It is recognized that the projectile is but one component of the matrix. The electric launch system to be developed in the next phase of the program is the other factor that weighs heavily in the cost effectiveness equation. At this point, however, emerging low cost options for the projectile are very promising.

  8. Structure and Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwick, Bradley

    In this talk I will describe how combining ultrafast lasers and electron microscopes in novel ways makes it possible to directly `watch' the time-evolving structure of condensed matter, both at the level of atomic-scale structural rearrangements in the unit cell and at the level of a material's nano- microstructure. First, I will briefly describe my group's efforts to develop ultrafast electron diffraction using radio- frequency compressed electron pulses in the 100keV range, a system that rivals the capabilities of xray free electron lasers for diffraction experiments. I will give several examples of the new kinds of information that can be gleaned from such experiments. In vanadium dioxide we have mapped the detailed reorganization of the unit cell during the much debated insulator-metal transition. In particular, we have been able to identify and separate lattice structural changes from valence charge density redistribution in the material on the ultrafast timescale. In doing so we uncovered a previously unreported optically accessible phase/state of vanadium dioxide that has monoclinic crystallography like the insulator, but electronic structure and properties that are more like the rutile metal. We have also combined these dynamic structural measurements with broadband ultrafast spectroscopy to make detailed connections between structure and properties for the photoinduced insulator to metal transition. Second, I will show how dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) can be used to make direct, real space images of nano-microstructural evolution during laser-induced crystallization of amorphous semiconductors at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. This is a remarkably complex process that involves several distinct modes of crystal growth and the development of intricate microstructural patterns on the nanosecond to ten microsecond timescales all of which can be imaged directly with DTEM.

  9. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  10. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  11. Non-invasive timing of gas gun projectiles with light detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, P. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Wu, M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of a gas gun launch tube in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore diameter single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos. A 655 nm pulsed diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~ 3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a velocity of 489 m/s prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The time-to-amplitude conversion electronics used enable the LIDAR data to be processed in real-time to generate trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target.

  12. Membrane protein structure determination by electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Stokes, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the past year, electron crystallography of membrane proteins has provided structural insights into the mechanism of several different transporters and into their interactions with lipid molecules within the bilayer. From a technical perspective there have been important advances in high-throughput screening of crystallization trials and in automated imaging of membrane crystals with the electron microscope. There have also been key developments in software, and in molecular replacement and phase extension methods designed to facilitate the process of structure determination. PMID:22572457

  13. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  14. The influence of projectile ion induced chemistry on surface pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    We report the critical role of projectile induced chemical inhomogeneity on surface nanostructure formation. Experimental inconsistency is common for low energy ion beam induced nanostructure formation in the presence of uncontrolled and complex contamination. To explore the precise role of contamination on such structure formation during low energy ion bombardment, a simple and clean experimental study is performed by selecting mono-element semiconductors as the target and chemically inert or reactive ion beams as the projectile as well as the source of controlled contamination. It is shown by Atomic Force Microscopy, Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements that bombardment of nitrogen-like reactive ions on Silicon and Germanium surfaces forms a chemical compound at impact zones. Continuous bombardment of the same ions generates surface instability due to unequal sputtering and non-uniform re-arrangement of the elemental atom and compound. This instability leads to ripple formation during ion bombardment. For Argon-like chemically inert ion bombardment, the chemical inhomogeneity induced boost is absent; as a result, no ripples are observed in the same ion energy and fluence.

  15. Ionization of water molecules by fast charged projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Carniato, S.; Fainstein, P. D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    Single-ionization cross sections of water molecules colliding with fast protons are calculated from lowest-order perturbation theory by taking all electrons and molecular orientations consistently into account. Explicit analytical formulas based on the peaking approximation are obtained for differential ionization cross sections with the partial contribution from the various electron orbitals accounted for. The results, which are in very good agreement with total and partial cross sections at high electron and projectile energies, display a strong variation on molecular orientation and molecular orbitals.

  16. Electronic structure in the crossover regimes in lower dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, R.; Dev, B. N.

    2014-11-01

    Modern growth and fabrication techniques can produce lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes. Such structures in the crossover regimes can provide tunability of various properties of materials. For example, a zero-dimensional (0-D) structure (quantum dot) evolving towards a 3-D structure (bulk) shows electronic structure, which is neither 0-D-like, nor 3-D-like in the dimensional crossover regime. Within the crossover regime the electronic density of states (DOS) at Fermi level (Ef) keeps on changing as the size of the system changes. DOS at Ef determines many properties of materials, such as electronic specific heat, spin susceptibility, etc. Such properties can be tuned by controlling the size of the system in the crossover regimes. Keeping the importance of DOS at Ef in mind, we determine their values and other details of electronic structure of lower dimensional structures, in the 0-D to 1-D, 1-D to 2-D, 2-D to 3-D, 0-D to 2-D, 0-D to 3-D and 1-D to 3-D crossover regimes, in a simple free electron model. We compare our results with analytical theory and experimental results, wherever available. We also present some results obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on Ag islands on Si(1 1 1) substrates evolving from a 0-D to a 2-D structure. This simple model is quite useful in understanding lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes and, in general, in nanoscale science. Fabrication of such structures would provide control on materials properties.

  17. Cavity dynamics and particle alignment in the wake of a supersonic projectile penetrating a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Caliebe, D.; Piel, A.

    2011-06-15

    The penetration of a projectile into a strongly coupled dusty plasma was studied in a radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions. A supersonic projectile produces an elongated dust-free cavity in its wake. The dynamics of the cavity is analyzed and compared with Langevin dynamics simulations. Besides a three-dimensional Mach cone structure, the simulation shows that the cavity dynamics can be subdivided into three phases: An opening phase with fixed time scale, a closing phase, whose duration is affected by the projectile speed and, finally, a phase of particle realignment in the target cloud, which persists for a long time after the closure of the cavity.

  18. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two. PMID:23403968

  19. Projectile channeling in chain bundle dusty plasma liquids: Wave excitation and projectile-wave interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Tseng, Yu-Ping; I, Lin

    2011-03-15

    The microscopic channeling dynamics of projectiles in subexcitable chain bundle dusty plasma liquids consisting of long chains of negatively charged dusts suspended in low pressure glow discharges is investigated experimentally using fast video-microscopy. The long distance channeling of the projectile in the channel formed by the surrounding dust chain bundles and the excitation of a narrow wake associated with the elliptical motions of the background dusts are demonstrated. In the high projectile speed regime, the drag force due to wake wave excitation increases with the decreasing projectile speed. The excited wave then leads the slowed down projectile after the projectile speed is decreased below the resonant speed of wave excitation. The wave-projectile interaction causes the increasing projectile drag below the resonant speed and the subsequent oscillation around a descending average level, until the projectile settles down to the equilibrium point. Long distance projectile surfing through the resonant crest trapping by the externally excited large amplitude solitary wave is also demonstrated.

  20. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27334095

  1. Projectile dynamics at low barrel pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chankaev, S. K.; Yakovlev, V. Ya.

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model for a projectile shot at low pressures in the space behind the projectile space is developed. The pressure rise is limited because of the nonsimultaneity of propellant ignition and combustion and the discharge of the propellant combustion products through the gap between the projectile and the walls of the gun barrel. The kinetic characteristics of flame propagation over the propellant particles are determined. A comparison of calculation and experimental data is performed. The calculation results are used in designing 2A85 self-propelled launchers and upgrading 2A30 self-propelled launchers.

  2. Effects of barrel joints on hypervelocity projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.; Asay, J.R.; Dixon, W.R.; Hawke, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Development of new hypervelocity launchers is necessary for equation of state (EOS) studies at high impact velocities. The requirements for barrel joint alignment and concentricity at high velocities place severe constraints on fabrication and assembly procedures; small steps or longitudinal direction changes at joints may cause major damage to precision projectiles. Research has been initiated to identify the technical limits of fabrication and assembly tolerances for hypervelocity gun barrels. Numerical and experimental studies have evaluated projectile performance at velocities of 6 to 15 km/s and have identified failure modes for Lexan projectiles with thin metal facings.

  3. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaleb, A. M.; Mohammad, F. M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B. L.

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  4. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  5. Electronic structures of carbon nanotube peopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuk, Young

    2003-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometer-sized devices such as diodes and transistors. These discrete devices utilize the spatially varying electronic structures of processed nanotubes by creating defect junctions or introducing substitutional or interstitial dopants. It was recently found that adsorption or insertion of molecules inside or outside of a nanotube modifies the electronic structure as observed with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LTSTM). We report a method to form spatial variation of the electronic structure by inserting various molecules such as fullerenes, metallo-fullerenes, metals or insulators. The results suggest that one can synthesize this band gap-engineered 1-dimensional wire by self-assembly instead of epitaxial growth. We propose a new type of device structure made by this processing technology. 1. J. Lee, H.J. Kim, G. Kim, Y.-W. Son, J. Ihm, S.J. Kahng, H. Kato, Z.W. Wang, T. Okazaki, H. Shinohara, and Y. Kuk, Nature, 415, 1005 (2002)

  6. Electronic structure theory: Applications and geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa

    This thesis contains several applications of the first-principles electronic-structure theory with special emphasis in parts of the thesis on the geometrical aspects of the theory. We start by reviewing the basics of the first-principles electronic-structure methods which are then used throughout the thesis. The first application of these methods is on the analysis of the stability and lattice dynamics of alpha- and beta-cristobalite phases of SiO2. We also map the complete low-energy landscape connecting these two structures and give implications on the phase transition in this compound. Next we study a family of Pbnm perovskites that are promising candidates for silicon-compatible high-K dielectrics. We calculate their structure and dielectric response, and compare with experimental results where available. The third application of these methods is to the large isosymmetric reorientation of oxygen octahedra rotation axes in epitaxially strained perovskites. We explain the origin of the peculiar energy landscape topology as a function of epitaxial strain. In the part of the thesis devoted to the geometrical aspects of electronic structure theory, we begin by extending the concept of electronic polarization to a Chern insulators. These insulators are characterized by a non-zero off-diagonal sigma_xy conductivity tensor component, quantized in units of e 2/h. Finally we discuss another geometrical quantity, the Chern-Simons orbital magnetoelectric coupling. We present a first-principles based calculation of this quantity in several compounds, and motivated by recent developments in the theory of topological insulators, we speculate about the existence of "large-theta materials," in which this kind of coupling could be unusually large.

  7. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  8. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2003-06-06

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the program findings through the first two phases. It presents projectile design and experiment data and the preliminary design for electric launch system. Advanced Power Technologies, Inc., now BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technologies, Inc., was forced to withdraw from the program with the loss of one of our principal mining partners, however, the experiments conducted suggest that the approach is feasible and can be made cost effective.

  9. Electromagnetic theta gun and tubular projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, T.J.; Cnare, E.C.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Beard, S.G.; Cowan, M.

    1980-12-01

    Unlike the better known rail gun, the theta gun applies the propelling force along the length of its projectile. This is shown to allow much greater acceleration of high fineness ratio projectiles for a given barrel pressure, allowing much shorter barrels for military applications. A computer code which simulates performance of the theta gun is described and experimental results from a few simple, low energy experiments show close agreement with code predictions. Trajectories and aerodynamic heating for three candidate military projectiles are calculated for vertical and horizontal atmospheric launches where initial velocity is as high as 3 km/s. The calculations indicate that in some cases a thin layer of heatshield (ablator) will be required to control projectile heating.

  10. Electronic structure of oxygen functionalized graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbeck, Adam; Gu, Deyang; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons whose edges are passivated by oxygen. Using a first-principles density functional approach and the many-body GW method we find that oxygen-passivation results in a rich geometrical environment which in turn determines the electronic and magnetic properties of the ribbon. For planar systems we report magnetic ground states whose electronic structure depends upon the magnetic coupling between edges. For non-planar ribbons we report a nonmagnetic ground state with a band gap that decreases as a function of increasing ribbon width. Our results will be discussed in light of previous experimental and computational studies. Interconnect Focus Center (MARCO program), State of New York, NSF IGERT program, Grant no. 0333314, and computing resources of the Computationial Center for Nanotechnology Innovation (CCNI), RPI

  11. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  12. Graphical Method for Determining Projectile Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Baker, J. C.; Franzel, L.; McMahon, D.; Songer, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present a nontrigonometric graphical method for predicting the trajectory of a projectile when the angle and initial velocity are known. Students enrolled in a general education conceptual physics course typically have weak backgrounds in trigonometry, making inaccessible the standard analytical calculation of projectile range. Furthermore, research shows that standard instructional techniques fail to confront student misconceptions about motion in a gravitational field.1-4 We have designed a guided inquiry-based lesson that specifically addresses these misconceptions with minimal mathematics.

  13. Elastic scattering with weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Testoni, J. E.; Barbara, E. de; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-02-12

    Possible effects of the break-up channel on the elastic scattering threshold anomaly has been investigated. We used the weakly bound 6,7Li nuclei, which is known to undergo break-up, as projectiles in order to study the elastic scattering on a 27Al target. In this contribution we present preliminary results of these experiments, which were analyzed in terms of the Optical Model and compared with other elastic scattering data using weakly bound nuclei as projectile.

  14. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  15. Structural and electronic properties of sodium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Luis A.; Reyes-Nava, Juan A.; Garzon, Ignacio L.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances on mass selection of sodium nanoclusters and their characterization by photoemission electron spectroscopy [1] have given useful data for a variety of clusters sizes. These data may lead to assignments of the relevant structures by comparing the measured photoelectron spectra (PES) with the electronic density of states (DOS) obtained from DFT calculations. In this work, the lowest energy structures modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, are obtained by using molecular dynamics simulations for Nan (n= 178, 204, 271, 298-300, 309). DFT calculations were then performed for neutral, positively- and negatively-charged Nan clusters. A comparison between the DOS of clusters of the same size but different charge will be presented, as well as between the available experimental PES and the theoretical obtained DOS.[1] H. Haberland, T. Hippler, J. Donges, O. Kostko, M. Schmidt, B. von Issendorff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 035701 (2005).

  16. Electronic structure of the multivacancies in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shang Yuan; Mao, Deqiang; Li, Mingfu

    A complete set of equations for determining the energy levels and the wavefunctions with different symmetries of electronic states of several well-known multivacancies in Si is given using the Koster-Slater Green's function method. By using an empirical tight binding Hamiltonian for the band structure of the host and the central-cell perturbation approximation for the defect, only the on-site and the off-site Green's functions of the host and their derivatives with respect to energy E appear in these equations. The electronic structure of the ideal multivacancies, especially the divacancy, are investigated and compared with known experimental results and previous qualitative analyses. Some misunderstandings of the experimental results are analyzed. The wavefunctions of some multivacancy states are accurately evaluated and compared with the EPR and ENDOR data for the first time.

  17. Electronic structure tuning of diamondoids through functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rander, Torbjörn; Staiger, Matthias; Richter, Robert; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Wolter, David; Dahl, Jeremy E.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokina, Natalie A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the changes in electronic structures induced by chemical functionalization of the five smallest diamondoids using valence photoelectron spectroscopy. Through the variation of three parameters, namely functional group (thiol, hydroxy, and amino), host cluster size (adamantane, diamantane, triamantane, [121]tetramantane, and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane), and functionalization site (apical and medial) we are able to determine to what degree these affect the electronic structures of the overall systems. We show that unlike, for example, in the case of halobenzenes, the ionization potential does not show a linear dependence on the electronegativity of the functional group. Instead, a linear correlation exists between the HOMO-1 ionization potential and the functional group electronegativity. This is due to localization of the HOMO on the functional group and the HOMO-1 on the diamondoid cage. Density functional theory supports our interpretations.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  19. Polycrystalline graphene with single crystalline electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward B; Avila, José; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Ogawa, Yui; Havener, Robin W; Kim, Dong-Ki; Monkman, Eric J; Shai, Daniel E; Wei, Haofei I; Levendorf, Mark P; Asensio, María; Shen, Kyle M; Park, Jiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We report the scalable growth of aligned graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on commercial copper foils, where each film originates from multiple nucleations yet exhibits a single orientation. Thorough characterization of our graphene reveals uniform crystallographic and electronic structures on length scales ranging from nanometers to tens of centimeters. As we demonstrate with artificial twisted graphene bilayers, these inexpensive and versatile films are ideal building blocks for large-scale layered heterostructures with angle-tunable optoelectronic properties. PMID:25207847

  20. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  1. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  2. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles. Progress report for the period September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1993-09-06

    This is a progress report on activities of the Washington University group in nuclear reaction studies for the period Sept 1, 1992 to Aug 31, 1993. This group has a research program which touches five areas of nuclear physics: nuclear structure studies at high spin; studies at the interface between structure and reactions; production and study of hot nuclei; reaction mechanism studies; development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. Specific activities of the group include in part: superdeformation in {sup 82}Sr; structure of and identical bands in {sup 182}Hg and {sup 178}Pt; a highly deformed band in {sup 136}Pm; particle decay of the {sup 164}Yb compound nucleus; fusion reactions; proton evaporation; two-proton decay of {sup 12}O; modeling and theoretical studies; excited {sup 16}O disassembly into four alpha particles; {sup 209}Bi + {sup 136}Xe collisions at 28.2 MeV/amu; and development work on 4{pi} solid angle gamma detectors, and x-ray detectors.

  3. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  4. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  5. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  6. Resolving presynaptic structure by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Guy A; Jackson, Dakota R; Spirou, George A

    2015-05-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological, and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last 15 years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  7. Electronic structure theory of weakly interacting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-06-01

    We derive electronic structure models for weakly interacting bilayers such as graphene-graphene and graphene-hexagonal boron nitride, based on density functional theory calculations followed by Wannier transformation of electronic states. These transferable interlayer coupling models can be applied to investigate the physics of bilayers with arbitrary translations and twists. The functional form, in addition to the dependence on the distance, includes the angular dependence that results from higher angular momentum components in the Wannier pz orbitals. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to a rotated graphene bilayer, which produces the analytically predicted renormalization of the Fermi velocity, Van Hove singularities in the density of states, and moiré pattern of the electronic localization at small twist angles. We further extend the theory to obtain the effective couplings by integrating out neighboring layers. This approach is instrumental for the design of van der Walls heterostructures with desirable electronic features and transport properties and for the derivation of low-energy theories for graphene stacks, including proximity effects from other layers.

  8. Spin Structure Functions from Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seonho Choi

    2012-09-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon can play a key testing ground for Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) at wide kinematic ranges from smaller to large four momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The pioneering experiments have confirmed several QCD sum rules at high Q{sup 2} where a perturbative picture holds. For a full understanding of QCD at various scales, various measurements were made at intermediate and small Q{sup 2} region and their interpretation would be a challenging task due to the non-perturbative nature. Jefferson Lab has been one of the major experimental facilities for the spin structure with its polarized electron beams and various polarized targets. A few QCD sum rules have been compared with the measured spin structure functions g{sub 1}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}) at low Q{sup 2} and surprising results have been obtained for the spin polarizabilities, {gamma}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub LT} . As for the proton spin structure functions, the lack of data for g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure functions has been complemented with a new experiment at Jefferson Lab, SANE. The results from SANE will provide a better picture of the proton spin structure at a wide kinematic range in x and Q{sup 2}.

  9. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  10. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  11. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  12. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  13. Electronic and magnetic structures of chain structured iron selenide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Setty, Chandan; Chen, X. H.; Hu, Jiangping

    2014-08-01

    Electronic and magnetic structures of iron selenide compounds Ce2O2FeSe2 (2212*) and BaFe2Se3 (123*) are studied by the first-principles calculations. We find that while all these compounds are composed of one-dimensional (1D) Fe chain (or ladder) structures, their electronic structures are not close to be quasi-1D. The magnetic exchange couplings between two nearest-neighbor (NN) chains in 2212* and between two NN two-leg-ladders in 123* are both antiferromagnetic (AFM), which is consistent with the presence of significant third NN AFM coupling, a common feature shared in other iron-chalcogenides, FeTe (11*) and K y Fe2- x Se2 (122*). In magnetic ground states, each Fe chain of 2212* is ferromagnetic and each two-leg ladder of 123* form a block-AFM structure. We suggest that all magnetic structures in iron-selenide compounds can be unified into an extended J 1- J 2- J 3 model. Spin-wave excitations of the model are calculated and can be tested by future experiments on these two systems.

  14. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  15. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Electronic Structure Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Succi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Recently, a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory has been proposed. In particular, it was shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. By using a discrete version of this new formalism, the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule were calculated accurately. Here, we discuss the main ideas behind the lattice kinetic approach to electronic structure computations, offer some considerations for prospective extensions, and also show additional numerical results, namely the geometrical configuration of the water molecule.

  17. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  18. Pepper spray projectile/disperser for countering hostage and barricade situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Roy

    1997-01-01

    An improved less-than-lethal projectile for use in hostage, barricade and tactical assault situations has been developed. The projectile is launched from a standoff position and disperse the incapacitating agent oleoresin capsicum in the form of atomized droplets. A literature search followed by an experimental study were conducted of the mechanism of barrier defeat for various shaped projectiles against the targets of interest in this work: window glass, plasterboard and plywood. Some of the trade- offs between velocity, standoff, projectile shape and size, penetration, and residual energy were quantified. Analysis of the ballistic trajectory and recoil, together with calculations of he amount of pepper spray needed to incapacitate the occupants of a typical barricaded structure, indicated the suitability of using a fin stabilized projectile fired from a conventional 37 mm riot control gas gun. Two projectile designs were considered, manufactured and tested. The results of static tests to simulate target impact, together with live firing trials against a variety of targets, showed that rear ejection of the atomized spray was more reproducible and effective than nose ejection. The performance characteristics of the finalized design were investigated in trials using the standard barrier for testing barrier penetrating tear gas agents as defined by the National Institute of Justice.

  19. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  20. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  1. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  2. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  3. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  4. Electronic structure of rare-earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Nanba, T.; Tomikawa, M.; Kunii, S.; Kasuya, T.

    1992-11-01

    Reflectivity spectra of all rare-earth hexaboride RB6 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, and Y) single crystals have been measured systematically in the energy region from 1 meV to 40 eV at 300 K in order to investigate the electronic state and the contribution of the 4f electron to the band structure. The analysis of the optical conductivity and the loss-function spectra, which were derived from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of the reflectivity spectra, allowed us to make clear the origin of the peak structure in the spectrum due to the various interband transitions. The origins of the main peaks in the spectrum were assigned to the interband transitions from the bonding to the antibonding bands of the boron 2s and 2p states and to the rare-earth 5d state. The intra-atomic transition from the 4f and the 5p to the 5d(t2g) states in the rare-earth ion was also observed.

  5. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  6. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  7. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  8. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  9. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  10. Flight trajectory simulation of fluid payload projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree of freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  11. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-12-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based problem solving in a team environment provides a terrific backdrop for fostering communication, analysis, and critical thinking skills. One such activity, inspired jointly by the museum exhibit "CSI: The Experience"2 and David Bonner's TPT article "Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene,"3 provides students with three different crime scenes, each requiring an analysis of projectile motion. In this lesson students socially engage in higher-order analysis of two-dimensional projectile motion problems by collecting information from 3-D scale models and collaborating with one another on its interpretation, in addition to diagramming and mathematical analysis typical to problem solving in physics.

  12. Ocular injuries due to projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Scott, W R; Lloyd, W C; Benedict, J V; Meredith, R

    2000-01-01

    An animal model has been developed using enucleated porcine eyes to evaluate ocular trauma. The eyes were pressurized to approximately 18 mmHg and mounted in a container with a 10% gelatin mixture. The corneas of sixteen pressurized eyes were impacted by a blunt metal projectile (mass of 2.6 gm, 3.5 gm or 45.5 gm) at velocities of 4.0 to 38.1 m/s. The impacted eyes were evaluated by an ophthalmologist. A numerical classification scheme was used to categorize the severity of the ocular injury. A chi-squared test indicates that the injury level is associated with the kinetic energy (KE) and not the momentum of the projectile. The enucleated eyes began to experience lens dislocations when the KE of the projectile was approximately 0.75 Nm, and retinal injuries when the KE was approximately 1.20 Nm. PMID:11558084

  13. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  14. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  15. Meso-scale hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project): Characterization of projectile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Isabelle; Deutsch, Alex; Hecht, Lutz; Kenkmann, Thomas; Berndt, Jasper

    2010-05-01

    The DFG-funded "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modelling impact crater research network) research group is aimed at a better understanding of the impact cratering process by combining (i) numerical modelling of crater formation, (ii) investigation of terrestrial craters and (iii) meso-scale hypervelocity impact experiments using the large two-stage light gas gun at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI; Efringen-Kirchen, Germany). In the framework of MEMIN, 1 cm-sized projectiles of the steel SAE 4130 (mass of 4.1 g) have been fired with a velocity of ~ 5.3 km s-1 onto blocks of Seeberger sandstone (size 100 x 100 x 50 cm, grain size 169+/-8 μm; porosity 12-20 vol.%). One goal of MEMIN is to document, analyze, and understand the fate of the projectile and its distribution between crater and ejecta; hence, the use of well-analyzed projectile material is mandatory. For this purpose, we use optical, and electron microscopy, electron microprobe (WWU, and MfN), and LA-ICP-MS microanalysis (WWU). Currently we evaluate which steel or iron meteorite is adequate for the intended use. Important properties of a projectile are (i) textural and chemical homogeneity, (ii) clear chemical distinction to the target sandstone, (iii) presence of elements such as Co, Ni, Cr, PGE that as "meteoritic component" are used in terrestrial craters to trace projectile matter, and characterize the type of the projectile (i.e., meteorite group), and finally (iv) mechanical properties that guarantee stability during sphere production, launch and flight. Strong chemical differences to the target material and geochemical homogeneity of the projectile will allow detection of small volumes of projectile matter by high spatial resolution in-situ analysis with the LA-ICP-MS. Steel SAE 4130 is heterogeneous at the 100-µm scale and has low trace element contents. In future, we plan the use of the alloyed heat treatable steel D290-1 as projectile as its texture is quite homogenous at the scale of

  16. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile`s initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  17. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  18. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  19. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  20. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  1. Dynamic effects of interaction of composite projectiles with targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    The process of high-speed impact of projectiles against targets of finite thickness is experimentally investigated. Medium-hard steel plates are used as targets. The objective of this research is to carry out a comparative analysis of dynamic effects of interaction of various types of projectiles with targets, such as characteristics of destruction of the target, the state of the projectile behind the target, and particularities of the after-penetration stream of fragments after the target has been pierced. The projectiles are made of composites on the basis of tungsten carbide obtained by caking and the SHS-technology. To compare effectiveness of composite projectiles steel projectiles are used. Their effectiveness was estimated in terms of the ballistic limit. High density projectiles obtained by means of the SHS-technology are shown to produce results comparable in terms of the ballistic limit with high-strength projectiles that contain tungsten received by caking.

  2. Speed, Acceleration, Chameleons and Cherry Pit Projectiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Likar, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the mechanics of cherry pit projectiles and ends with showing the similarity between cherry pit launching and chameleon tongue projecting mechanisms. The whole story is written as an investigation, following steps that resemble those typically taken by scientists and can therefore serve as an illustration of scientific…

  3. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2011-01-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the…

  4. Speed, acceleration, chameleons and cherry pit projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Likar, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the mechanics of cherry pit projectiles and ends with showing the similarity between cherry pit launching and chameleon tongue projecting mechanisms. The whole story is written as an investigation, following steps that resemble those typically taken by scientists and can therefore serve as an illustration of scientific reasoning and how scientific knowledge is built.

  5. Ballistics projectile image analysis for firearm identification.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongguang

    2006-10-01

    This paper is based upon the observation that, when a bullet is fired, it creates characteristic markings on the cartridge case and projectile. From these markings, over 30 different features can be distinguished, which, in combination, produce a "fingerprint" for a firearm. By analyzing features within such a set of firearm fingerprints, it will be possible to identify not only the type and model of a firearm, but also each and every individual weapon just as effectively as human fingerprint identification. A new analytic system based on the fast Fourier transform for identifying projectile specimens by the line-scan imaging technique is proposed in this paper. This paper develops optical, photonic, and mechanical techniques to map the topography of the surfaces of forensic projectiles for the purpose of identification. Experiments discussed in this paper are performed on images acquired from 16 various weapons. Experimental results show that the proposed system can be used for firearm identification efficiently and precisely through digitizing and analyzing the fired projectiles specimens. PMID:17022254

  6. Developing Impact Marking Projectiles Using Triboluminescent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William; Fontenot, Ross; Broussard, Brady; Goedeke, Shawn; Guidry, Corey

    2011-06-01

    In 1888, Wiedemann and Schmidt defined triboluminescence as the emission of light produced by mechanical action. In 1999, Sage and Geddes patented a design for a sensor capable of discerning the locations of impacts. Their design involved embedding a sensor inside a material coated with a triboluminescent crystal. Using this idea, the authors have been investigating the triboluminescent properties of several materials (like ZnS:Mn) for their possible use as the active element in ballistic projectiles. These new and improved rounds would be very useful because triboluminescence would mark the landing point of the projectile. This light would be ``cold'' in the sense it was not generated as a result of burning gunpowder or similar pyrotechnics. This light emission would also have a relatively short duration compared to other new projectiles, which generate long-term phosphorescence when two chemicals are mixed at impact (chemiluminescence). This presentation will give a status report in our efforts to develop practical impact marking ballistic projectiles using a triboluminescent charge.

  7. High School Students' Understanding of Projectile Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilber, Refik; Karaman, Ibrahim; Duzgun, Bahattin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change-based instruction and traditionally designed physics instruction on students' understanding of projectile motion concepts. Misconceptions related to projectile motion concepts were determined by related literature on this subject. Accordingly, the Projectile Motion…

  8. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into concrete target. Part I: Engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nosed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Wei; He, Li-Lin; Fang, Qin

    2014-12-01

    The mass loss and nose blunting of a projectile during high-speed deep penetration into concrete target may cause structural destruction and ballistic trajectory instability of the penetrator, obviously reducing the penetration efficiency of penetrator. Provided that the work of friction between projectile and target is totally transformed into the heat to melt penetrator material at its nose surface, an engineering model is established for the mass loss and nose-blunting of the ogive-nosed projectile. A dimensionless formula for the relative mass loss of projectile is obtained by introducing the dimensionless impact function I and geometry function N of the projectile. The critical value V {0/c} of the initial striking velocity is formulated, and the mass loss of projectile tends to increase weakly nonlinearly with I/ N when V 0 < V {0/c}, whilst the mass loss is proportional to the initial kinetic energy of projectile when V 0 < V {0/c}. The theoretical prediction of V {0/c} is further confirmed to be very close to the experimental value of 1.0 km/s based on 11 sets of different penetration tests. Also the validity of the proposed expressions of mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients of a projectile are verified by the tests. Therefore, a theoretical basis is for the empirical conclusions drawn in previous publications. Regarding the completely empirical determinations of the mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients given in previous papers, the present analysis reveals its physical characteristic and also guarantees its prediction accuracy. The engineering model established in the present paper forms the basis for further discussions on the structural stability and the terminal ballistic stability of ogive-nosed projectiles high-speed penetrating into concrete targets, which will respectively be elaborated in Part II and Part III of the present study.

  9. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  10. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  11. Impact Features and Projectile Residues in Aerogel Exposed on Mir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörz, F.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Warren, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    Approximately 0.63 m 2 of SiO 2-based aerogel (0.02 g cm -3) was exposed for 18 months on the Mir Station to capture hypervelocity particles from both man-made and natural sources. Optical inspection revealed two major classes of hypervelocity impact features in the aerogel: (1) long, carrot-shaped tracks, well known from laboratory impact experiments, that exhibit a depth- ( t) to-diameter ( D) relationship of t/ D>10, typically 20-30, and (2) shallow pits ( t/ D<10; typically 1-3) that have no laboratory analog. Blunt-nosed, yet deep ( t/ D=5-10), cylindrically shaped cavities suggest the existence of transitional morphologies between these tracks and pits. All tracks contain projectile residues that are unmelted, while pits rarely contain even traces of projectile material. These and other observations suggest that slender tracks form at lower impact velocities than the shallow pits. In addition, we observed that the measured track-length does not systematically correlate with the size of the projectile residue. This renders the reconstruction of encounter velocity and/or projectile mass from measured track dimensions not feasible at present. Recovery of particles from individual tracks is time-consuming, yet readily accomplished by operators familiar with the handling of individual, micrometer-sized particles. Compositional analyses by SEM-EDS identified a variety of man-made and natural particles. A few natural particles were embedded in epoxy, microtomed, and analyzed by TEM. All were polymineralic aggregates that contained olivine exhibiting sharp electron-diffraction spots, and suggesting that the materials had experienced only minimal shock-deformation, if any. One natural particle contained olivine, augite, diopside, troilite, chromite/magnetite, and hercynite, the latter existing as pristine, undeformed octahedral crystals. The olivine in two of the particles were Fo 60-70 and Fo 39-53, and thus, more equilibrated than olivines in most stratospheric

  12. Method of and apparatus for accelerating a projectile

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Yeshayahu S. A.; Tidman, Derek A.

    1986-01-01

    A projectile is accelerated along a confined path by supplying a pulsed high pressure, high velocity plasma jet to the rear of the projectile as the projectile traverses the path. The jet enters the confined path at a non-zero angle relative to the projectile path. The pulse is derived from a dielectric capillary tube having an interior wall from which plasma forming material is ablated in response to a discharge voltage. The projectile can be accelerated in response to the kinetic energy in the plasma jet or in response to a pressure increase of gases in the confined path resulting from the heat added to the gases by the plasma.

  13. Apparatus and method for the acceleration of projectiles to hypervelocities

    DOEpatents

    Hertzberg, Abraham; Bruckner, Adam P.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    1990-01-01

    A projectile is initially accelerated to a supersonic velocity and then injected into a launch tube filled with a gaseous propellant. The projectile outer surface and launch tube inner surface form a ramjet having a diffuser, a combustion chamber and a nozzle. A catalytic coated flame holder projecting from the projectile ignites the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber thereby accelerating the projectile in a subsonic combustion mode zone. The projectile then enters an overdriven detonation wave launch tube zone wherein further projectile acceleration is achieved by a formed, controlled overdriven detonation wave capable of igniting the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber. Ultrahigh velocity projectile accelerations are achieved in a launch tube layered detonation zone having an inner sleeve filled with hydrogen gas. An explosive, which is disposed in the annular zone between the inner sleeve and the launch tube, explodes responsive to an impinging shock wave emanating from the diffuser of the accelerating projectile thereby forcing the inner sleeve inward and imparting an acceleration to the projectile. For applications wherein solid or liquid high explosives are employed, the explosion thereof forces the inner sleeve inward, forming a throat behind the projectile. This throat chokes flow behind, thereby imparting an acceleration to the projectile.

  14. Study of critical ricochet angle for conical nose shape projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Vijayalakshmi; Law, Manish G.; Naik, Smita D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to formulate a generic analytical model to assess the phenomena of water ricochet for a conical nose shaped projectile. A theoretical model is analyzed to study the critical angle of conical nose shaped projectile entering in water and is extended for different mediums as normal sand and mercury. Numerical Simulation has been carried out to find the effect of tip angle of the conical nose shaped projectile on the critical angle. Critical angle is defined as that angle of impact of the projectile above which ricochet will occur. This angle is obtained by balancing the momentums acting on the projectile at the time of impact on the basis of Newtonian theory. Major factors affecting critical angle are impact velocity, impact angle, density of the projectile and the target. An attempt has been made to study the effect of longitudinal spin of the projectile on the critical angle.

  15. Shallow-angle water entry of ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Gomez, Jason T.; Beal, David N.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2008-11-01

    The water-entry of ballistic projectiles is investigated using high-speed digital imaging. Projectiles enter the water at shallow angles to the free surface, 5^o-15^o, without ricochet at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 2.0. Projectile dynamics, critical entry angle, and cavity growth are discussed. Geometric modifications to a projectile allow it to travel large distances underwater assuming a sufficiently large air-cavity is formed after impact, which dramatically decreases drag on the projectile. Results show that successful water-entry occurs for projectiles with modified tip geometries at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2; these projectile modifications include tip geometry and material properties. A theoretical cavity model compares well with the experimental data and will be discussed for a range of experimental conditions.

  16. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Negre, Christian F. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.; Swart, Pieter J.; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C.; Wall, Michael E.; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H.; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-01

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  18. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  19. An experimental, metallurgical and modelling analysis of silver and copper explosively formed projectiles (EFPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, J.; Church, P.; Cullis, I.; Findlay, S.; Hart, A.; Wickenden, M.

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental, metallurgical and modelling study into the structure and properties of silver and copper explosively fonned projectiles. The project started with the conditioning, processing and characterisation of the non-shocked silver and copper materials. Here, the material constants were derived for the Goldthorpe path-dependant constitutive model[1]. For the purposes of this study the warhead designs produced some conservative EFP projectiles. These were designed using the indigenous Eulerian hydrocode GRIM. Due to the ductile nature of both silver and copper, care was taken with respect to the equation of state, in particular with the temperature supplied to the constitutive models. The EFP projectiles were then experimentally recovered using soft-capturing techniques[2]. The comparison of the code predictions with the experimental radiography results was very good, suggesting that there could not be large material phase changes or significant changes to the microstructure of the material due to the explosively applied shock. Finally, the sectioning and metallurgical analysis of the recovered projectiles showed that although there were some variations in both grain size, microstructure and material hardness throughoutlacross the sectioned projectiles, these were not significant.

  20. Projectile Density Effects on Shield Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana; Lyons, Frankel; Davis, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In the past, the orbital debris environment was modeled as consisting entirely of aluminum particles. As a consequence, most of the impact test database on spacecraft micro-meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shields, and the resulting ballistic limit equations used to predict shielding performance, has been based on using aluminum projectiles. Recently, data has been collected from returned spacecraft materials and other sources that indicate higher and lower density components of orbital debris also exist. New orbital debris environment models such as ORDEM2008 provide predictions of the fraction of orbital debris in various density bins (high = 7.9 g/cu cm, medium = 2.8 g/cu cm, and low = 0.9-1.1 g/cu cm). This paper describes impact tests to assess the effects of projectile density on the performance capabilities of typical MMOD shields. Updates to shield ballistic limit equations are provided based on results of tests and analysis.

  1. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations, are discussed.

  2. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations are discussed.

  3. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2011-05-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the calculations. What do our students see? Likely, most see no deeper than the operational understanding needed to use the kinematic equations. Described below is a device (shown in Fig. 1) that illustrates the physicist's view of projectile motion. It can be used as a classroom demonstration or as a project for your students, and it costs less than three dollars to make.

  4. Modeling projectile impact onto prestressed ceramic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2003-09-01

    This work presents computed results for the responses of ceramic targets, with and without prestress, subjected to projectile impact. Also presented is a computational technique to include prestress. Ceramic materials have been considered for armor applications for many years because of their high strength and low density. Many researchers have demonstrated that providing confinement enhances the ballistic performance of ceramic targets. More recently, prestressing the ceramic is being considered as an additional enhancement technique. This work investigates the effect of prestressing the ceramic for both thin and thick target configurations subjected to projectile impact. In all cases the targets with ceramic prestress provided enhanced ballistic performance. The computed results indicate that prestressed ceramic reduces and/or delays failure, resulting in improved ceramic performance and ballistic efficiency.

  5. Projectile compositions and modal frequencies on the chemistry of micrometeoroids LDEF experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; See, Thomas H.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids Experiment (LDEF instrument A0187-1) exposed witness plates of high-purity gold (greater than 99.99 percent Au) and commercial aluminum (greater than 99 percent Al) with the objective of analyzing the residues of cosmic-dust and orbital-debris particles associated with hypervelocity impact craters. The gold substrates were located approximately 8 deg off LDEF's trailing edge (Bay A03), while the aluminum surfaces resided in Bay A11, approximately 52 deg from LDEF's leading edge. SEM-EDX techniques were employed to analyze the residues associated with 199 impacts on the gold and 415 impacts on the aluminum surfaces. The residues that could be analyzed represent natural or man-made materials. The natural particles dominate at all particle sizes less than 5 micron. It is possible to subdivide both particle populations into subclasses. Chondritic compositions dominate the natural impactors (71 percent), followed by monomineralic, mafic-silicate compositions (26 percent), and by Fe-Ni rich sulfides (approximately 3 percent). Approximately 30 percent of all craters on the gold collectors were caused by man-made debris such as aluminum, paint flakes, and other disintegrated, structural and electronic components. Equations-of-state and associated calculations of shock stresses for typical LDEF impacts into the gold and aluminum substrates suggest that substantial vaporization may have occurred during many of the impacts and is the reason why approximately 50 percent of all craters did not contain sufficient residue to permit analysis by the SEM-EDX technique. After converting the crater diameters into projectile sizes using encounter speeds typical for the trailing-edge and forward-facing (Row 11) directions, and accounting for normalized exposure conditions of the CME collectors, we derived the absolute and relative fluxes of specific projectile classes. The natural impactors encounter all LDEF pointing directions with comparable, modal

  6. Energy loss of hydrogen projectiles in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefermueller, A.; Golser, R.; Stohl, R.; Semrad, D. )

    1993-12-01

    The stopping cross sections of H[sub 2], D[sub 2], He, and Ne for hydrogen projectiles in the energy range 3--20 keV per nucleon have been measured by time of flight. We compare our experimental result to the sum of the individual contributions due to excitation and ionization of the target and of the projectile, respectively, and due to charge exchange, using published cross-section data. Satisfactory agreement is found only for the He target and only at moderate projectile velocities, whereas for H[sub 2] and D[sub 2] the calculated values are about 30% too low. A Monte Carlo program allows us to simulate the measured time-of-flight spectra and to explain minor trends in the experimental data: for increased Ne gas pressure, an increased specific energy loss has been found that can be traced to different regions of impact parameters selected in our transmission geometry. This also explains, in part, the increased specific energy loss for deuterons compared to protons of equal velocity that is most evident for Ne. In contrast, a decrease of the specific energy loss with increasing pressure for He may be explained by impurities in the target gas. If we correct for the effect of impurities, the stopping cross section of He at 4 keV per nucleon is slightly smaller (0.60[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) than published earlier (0.72[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) and depends on the 3.8th power of projectile velocity.

  7. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  8. Improvements to a model of projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das Gupta, S.

    2011-11-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.044612 83, 044612 (2011)] we proposed a model for calculating cross sections of various reaction products which arise from disintegration of projectile-like fragments resulting from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate or higher energy. The model has three parts: (1) abrasion, (2) disintegration of the hot abraded projectile-like fragment (PLF) into nucleons and primary composites using a model of equilibrium statistical mechanics, and (3) possible evaporation of hot primary composites. It was assumed that the PLF resulting from abrasion has one temperature T. Data suggested that, while just one value of T seemed adequate for most cross-section calculations, a single value failed when dealing with very peripheral collisions. We have now introduced a variable T=T(b) where b is the impact parameter of the collision. We argue that there are data which not only show that T must be a function of b but, in addition, also point to an approximate value of T for a given b. We propose a very simple formula: T(b)=D0+D1[As(b)/A0] where As(b) is the mass of the abraded PLF and A0 is the mass of the projectile; D0 and D1 are constants. Using this model we compute cross sections for several collisions and compare with data.

  9. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Spin alignment of excited projectiles due to target spin-flip interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    The sequential breakup of E /A =65.5 -MeV7Be and E /A =36.6 -MeV6Li projectiles excited through inelastic interactions with 9Be target nuclei has been studied. For events where the target nucleus remained in its ground state, significant alignment of the excited projectile's spin axis parallel or antiparallel to the beam direction was observed. This unusual spin alignment was found to be largely independent of the projectile's scattering angle and it was deduced that the target nucleus has a significant probability of changing its spin orientation during the interaction. It is proposed that the unusual spin alignment is a consequence of the molecular structure of the 9Be nucleus.

  11. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  12. Spatial and electron structure of substituted gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Dyakov, Y. A.; Kosheleva, O. K.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of intermetallic clusters Au12M (M=Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and features of their interaction with electron donors and acceptor atoms, i.e. H and F, were investigated making use computer calculation based of density functional theory. In was found that metal clusters with effective electron number equal to 18 have more symmetrical shape then that with a number of electrons differing from 18. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with silica was modeled by attachment of SiO4H groups and the connection of the electronic structure with electronic transitions in spaser is discussed.

  13. Forensic and clinical issues in the use of frangible projectile.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Jan; Hejna, Petr; Rydlo, Martin; Novák, Miroslav; Krajsa, Jan; Racek, František; Rejtar, Pavel; Jedlička, Luděk

    2013-08-01

    Frangible projectiles for firearms, which break apart on impact, are mainly used by law enforcement agencies for training purposes, but can also be used for police interventions. Apart from the usual absence of lead in the projectiles, the main advantage of using frangible projectiles is the reduced risk of ricochet after impact with a hard target. This article describes the design and function of frangible projectiles, and describes gunshot wounds caused by ultra-frangible projectiles which fragment after penetration of soft tissues. Shooting experiments performed by the authors confirmed that differences in the geometry and technology of frangible projectiles can significantly modify their wounding effects. Some frangible projectiles have minimal wounding effects because they remain compact after penetration of soft tissues, comparable to standard fully jacketed projectiles. However, a number of ultra-frangible projectiles disintegrate into very small fragments after impact with a soft tissue substitute. In shooting experiments, we found that the terminal behavior of selected ultra-frangible projectiles was similar in a block of ballistic gel and the soft tissues of the hind leg of a pig, except that the degree of disintegration was less in the gel. PMID:23910864

  14. On the forces produced by oblique projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    A mathematical model for calculating the force produced by projectile impact on terrestrial target was developed based on assumptions that (1) the projectile was rigid, and (2) the target material near the nose section was displaced normally to the nose surface by the penetrating projectile. The assumption suggested that the crater or tunnel produced by the penetrating projectile was similar to that produced by a series of dynamic spherical cavity expansions initiated at the nose tip, and the growth rate of cavities was restricted by the nose shape of the projectile and its penetrating velocity vector. The model allowed the calculation of pressure against the penetrating projectile by taking the inertia and the resistant pressure of the moving soil into consideration. The effect of projectile obliquity on pressure distribution on the nose section of projectile could also be calculated by relating the angle of attack and the angle of incidence to the rate of local radius change of the expanding cavity. Using this model, the time history of force vector exerted on the projectile as well as the corresponding trajectory of penetration were calculated. For a small angle of incidence, the calculated axial and lateral forces exerted on the nose of projectile showed a reasonable agreement with those measured from reverse ballistic impact tests. It was demonstrated that the magnitude of forces depended upon the impact velocity, the shape of projectile`s nose section, and the relative density between the projectile and the target material. There were no quantitative measurement of forces when the angle of incidence was large i.e., a shallow impact. For this case, the calculated forces were compared and discussed with the results from similitude analysis.

  15. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  16. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile's initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of sputtering of Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers by keV C60 projectiles

    PubMed Central

    Paruch, R.; Rzeznik, L.; Czerwinski, B.; Garrison, B. J.; Winograd, N.; Postawa, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics computer simulations are applied to investigate fundamental processes induced by an impact of keV C60 projectile at an organic overlayer composed of long, well-organized linear molecules. The energy transfer pathways, sputtering yields, and the damage induced in the irradiated system, represented by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) multilayers composed from molecules of bariated arachidic acid, are investigated as a function of the kinetic energy and impact angle of the projectile and the thickness of the organic system. In particular, the unique challenges of depth profiling through a LB film vs. a more isotropic solid are discussed. The results indicate that the trajectories of projectile fragments and, consequently, the primary energy can be channeled by the geometrical structure of the overlayer. Although, a similar process is known from sputtering of single crystals by atomic projectiles, it has not been anticipated to occur during C60 bombardment due to the large size of the projectile. An open and ordered molecular structure of LB films is responsible for such behavior. Both the extent of damage and the efficiency of sputtering depend on the kinetic energy, the impact angle, and the layer thickness. The results indicate that the best depth profiling conditions can be achieved with low-energy cluster projectiles irradiating the organic overlayer at large off-normal angles. PMID:20174461

  18. Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) test program. Supplemental environmental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    The proposed action is to modify previously planned Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) Test Program activities (LEAP EA, July 1991, Ref 32) at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico; Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR), U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA); and Wake Island. The proposed action includes modifications of flight trajectories for LEAP flights 3, 5, and 6. Two additional flights, LEAP-X and LEAP-7 have been added to the program. LEAP-X is a single rocket test flight from KMR and LEAP-7 is a two-rocket test flight from KMR and Wake Island. Component/assembly ground tests will take place at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), Space Data Division (SDD), Chandler, Arizona; Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, California; Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International; Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, Kent, Washington; Hughes Aircraft Corporation, Missile Systems Group, Canoga Park California; Aerojet, Sacramento, California; and Thiokol Corporation, Elkton, Maryland.

  19. Computational studies of projectile melt in impact with typical whipple shields

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, C.E. Jr.; Alme, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    Protecting space-based structures against the impact of orbital debris is an important problem of current interest. This paper presents scaling results based on simulations with the CALE computer program of aluminum projectile impacting typical aluminum Whipple shields at speeds of 6 to 14 km/s. The objective was to determine the extent of projectile and shield material melting. The approach was to perform a matrix of computer simulations varying the impact speed from 6 to 14 km/s and varying the areal density of the shield from 5 percent to 80 percent of the centerline areal density of the projectile. The projectile radius was fixed at 9.5 mm (mass = 1.27 grams). The melt state of the projectile material and the shield material was assessed after release of the initial shock. The post-release specific energy in the projectile and in the shield was compared with the enthalpy of incipient melt and the enthalpy of complete melt provided in the Hultgren Tables. Material with specific energy greater than the enthalpy of complete melt was assumed to be fully melted. Material with specific energy greater than the enthalpy of incipient melt but less than that of complete melt was assumed to be partially solid and partially melted mixed phase material with no strength. Material with specific energy less than the enthalpy of incipient melt was assumed to be in a solid state with strength. It is likely that this solid material is in a highly fragmented state as a result of the initial shock.

  20. Railgun using plasma initiation separated from the projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Eguchi, N.; Maeda, S.; Sato, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Preacceleration of a projectile is quite important to reduce the erosion of the bore surface in a railgun. Gas guns, electrothermal guns and other railguns have been used to preaccelerate the projectile. Here, the new method using Plasma Initiation Separated from the Projectile (PISP method) is proposed, and its effectiveness is confirmed experimentally. A thin copper is placed near the edge of the railgun, which explodes and forms a plasma that has a fast flow velocity due to the Lorentz force. This fast flowing plasma collides with the projectile which obtains an initial velocity mainly by the momentum transfer. Since the current increases while only the plasma is accelerated, the driving force of the projectile just after the collision of the plasma with the projectile is large. In other words, the PISP method works as an inductive energy storage circuit with an opening switch.

  1. Design and fabrication of projectiles for round bore railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.

    1985-03-07

    A hypervelocity railgun system which operates in a vacuum and uses a gas gun injector to pre-accelerate the projectiles required that the projectile seal operate over wide pressure and velocity ranges. In our case, the helium gas gun injector operated at up to 35 MPa (5 ksi) while the railgun, using a plasma arc armature, operated at up to 150 MPa (22 ksi). In addition to gas and arc sealing, it was necessary that a metal fuse be attached to the rear of the projectile in order to electrically commutate the rails upon entry to the railgun. This paper discusses procedures and techniques in the design and fabrication of projectiles for a round bore railgun. It is divided into three sections: (1) machining the projectile; (2) fuse fabrication; and (3) assembly of the projectile/fuse package.

  2. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.

    1984-03-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the lowstrength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magneticflux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed by Kerrisk.

  3. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.; Cummings, C.E.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Parker, J.V.; Marsh, S.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1983-01-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the low-strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magnetic-flux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed.

  4. Ionization of small molecules induced by H+, H e+ , and N+ projectiles: Comparison of experiment with quantum and classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, S. T. S.; Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Sarkadi, L.; Gulyás, L.; Sulik, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of ejected electrons from C H4 and H2O molecules impacted by 1 MeV H+, H e+ , and 650 keV N+ ions. Spectra were measured at different observation angles, from 2 to 2000 eV. The obtained absolute double-differential electron-emission cross sections (DDCSs) were compared with the results of classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave, eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculations. For the bare H+ projectile both theories show remarkable agreement with the experiment at all observed angles and energies. The CTMC results are in similarly good agreement with the DDCS spectra obtained for impact by dressed H e+ and N+ ions, where screening effects and electron loss from the projectile gain importance. The CDW-EIS calculations slightly overestimate the electron loss for 1 MeV H e+ impact, and overestimate both the target and projectile ionization at low emitted electron energies for 650 keV N+ impact. The contribution of multiple electron scattering by the projectile and target centers (Fermi shuttle) dominates the N+-impact spectra at higher electron energies, and it is well reproduced by the nonperturbative CTMC calculations. The contributions of different processes in medium-velocity collisions of dressed ions with molecules are determined.

  5. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene ((eta-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mn or (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)) is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, /sup 2/E/sub 2g/ (e/sub 2g//sup 3/ a/sub 1g//sup 2/) ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)PF/sub 6/ (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/ is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M ..-->.. ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)/sup +/ (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)/sup -/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup +/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup 2 +/ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/V(CO)/sub 2/)/sup +/. The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported.

  6. Approximate analysis of balloting motion of railgun projectiles. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.H.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final of three reports dealing with the in-bore balloting motion of a projectile fired from an electromagnetic railgun. Knowledge of projectile in-bore motion is important to its design and the design of the railgun. It is a complicated problem since many parameters are involved and it is not easy to determine the interacting relationships between them. To make the problem easier to understand it was analyzed on several levels. Beginning from the basic simple model which computed only the axial motion, more complicated models were introduced in upper levels that included the more significant lateral forces and gun tube vibration effects. This report deals with the approximate analysis of balloting motion. This model considers the effects of the propulsion force, the friction force of the projectile package (projectile and armature), air resistance, gravity, the elastic forces, and the projectile/barrel clearance. To simplify the modeling, a plane motion configuration is assumed. Though the projectile is moving with a varying yaw angle, the axes of the barrel and the projectile package, and the projectile center of gravity are always considered in a plane containing the centerlines of the rails. Equations of motion are derived and solved. A sample computation is performed and the results plotted to give a clearer understanding of projectile in-bore motion.

  7. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Shahinpoor, M.; Hickman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A. ); Shahinpoor, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Hickman, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed.

  9. Penetration into limestone targets with ogive-nose steel projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, D.J.; Green, M.L.; Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments into limestone targets with 3.0 caliber-radius-head, 4340 Rc 45 steel projectiles. Powder guns launched two projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios of ten to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.5 km/s. Projectiles had diameters and masses of 12.7 mm, 0. 117 kg and 25.4 mm, 0.610 kg. Based on data sets with these two projectile scales, we proposed an empirical penetration equation that described the target by its density and an empirical strength constant determined from penetration depth versus striking velocity data.

  10. Prediction of projectile ricochet behavior after water impact.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Yves; Bergeron, Guy

    2012-11-01

    Although not very common, forensic investigation related to projectile ricochet on water can be required when undesirable collateral damage occurs. Predicting the ricochet behavior of a projectile is challenging owing to numerous parameters involved: impact velocity, incident angle, projectile stability, angular velocity, etc. Ricochet characteristics of different projectiles (K50 BMG, 0.5-cal Ball M2, 0.5-cal AP-T C44, 7.62-mm Ball C21, and 5.56-mm Ball C77) were studied in a pool. The results are presented to assess projectile velocity after ricochet, ricochet angle, and projectile azimuth angle based on impact velocity or incident angle for each projectile type. The azimuth ranges show the highest variability at low postricochet velocity. The critical ricochet angles were ranging from 15 to 30°. The average ricochet angles for all projectiles were pretty close for all projectiles at 2.5 and 10° incident angles for the range of velocities studied. PMID:22536929