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Sample records for proline-based neuraminidase inhibitor

  1. Neuraminidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Pharmaceutical companies have been developing drugs that can inhibit the function of neuraminidase hoping to create an effective weapon against the flu. Researchers from the pharmaceutical industry and from the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography have grown crystals of neuraminidase in space. These improved, space-grown crystals have provided information that have helped design drugs which form a stronger interaction with the enzyme. These drugs inhibit neuraminidase by attaching themselves to the enzyme. Since the drugs are less likely to detach from the enzyme, they are more effective, require smaller dosages, and have fewer side effects. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  2. Influenza virus neuraminidase: structure, antibodies, and inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the 3-dimensional structure of the influenza virus neuraminidase in 1983 has served as a platform for understanding interactions between antibodies and protein antigens, for investigating antigenic variation in influenza viruses, and for devising new inhibitors of the enzyme. That work is reviewed here, together with more recent developments that have resulted in one of the inhibitors entering clinical trials as an anti-influenza virus drug. PMID:7849585

  3. Novel Potent Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease Inhibitors Derived from Proline-Based Macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Arasappan, Ashok; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Yang, Weiying; Parekh, Tejal N.; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Yao, Nanhua; Madison, Vincent; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease is essential for viral replication. It has been a target of choice for intensive drug discovery research. On the basis of an active pentapeptide inhibitor, 1, we envisioned that macrocyclization from the P2 proline to P3 capping could enhance binding to the backbone Ala156 residue and the S4 pocket. Thus, a number of P2 proline-based macrocyclic {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitors were prepared and investigated in an HCV NS3 serine protease continuous assay (K*{sub i}). The biological activity varied substantially depending on factors such as the ring size, number of amino acid residues, number of methyl substituents, type of heteroatom in the linker, P3 residue, and configuration at the proline C-4 center. The pentapeptide inhibitors were very potent, with the C-terminal acids and amides being the most active ones (24, K*{sub i} = 8 nM). The tetrapeptides and tripeptides were less potent. Sixteen- and seventeen-membered macrocyclic compounds were equally potent, while fifteen-membered analogues were slightly less active. gem-Dimethyl substituents at the linker improved the potency of all inhibitors (the best compound was 45, K*{sub i} = 6 nM). The combination of tert-leucine at P3 and dimethyl substituents at the linker in compound 47 realized a selectivity of 307 against human neutrophil elastase. Compound 45 had an IC{sub 50} of 130 nM in a cellular replicon assay, while IC{sub 50} for 24 was 400 nM. Several compounds had excellent subcutaneous AUC and bioavailability in rats. Although tripeptide compound 40 was 97% orally bioavailable, larger pentapeptides generally had low oral bioavailability. The X-ray crystal structure of compounds 24 and 45 bound to the protease demonstrated the close interaction of the macrocycle with the Ala156 methyl group and S4 pocket. The strategy of macrocyclization has been proved to be successful in improving potency (>20-fold greater than that of 1) and in structural depeptization.

  4. Peramivir Phosphonate Derivatives as Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Cheng; Fang, Jim-Min; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Wang, Shi-Yun; Huang, Wen-I; Tseng, Yin-Chen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-06-01

    Peramivir is a potent neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor for treatment of influenza infection by intravenous administration. By replacing the carboxylate group in peramivir with a phosphonate group, phosphono-peramivir (6a), the dehydration and deoxy derivatives (7a and 8a) as well as their corresponding monoalkyl esters are prepared from a pivotal intermediate epoxide 12. Among these phosphonate compounds, the dehydration derivative 7a that has a relatively rigid cyclopentene core structure exhibits the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.3-4.1 nM) against several NAs of wild-type human and avian influenza viruses (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, and H7N9), although the phosphonate congener 6a is unexpectedly less active than peramivir. The inferior binding affinity of 6a is attributable to the deviated orientations of its phosphonic acid and 3-pentyl groups in the NA active site as inferred from the NMR, X-ray diffraction, and molecular modeling analyses. Compound 7a is active to the oseltamivir-resistant H275Y strains of H1N1 and H5N1 viruses (IC50 = 73-86 nM). The phosphonate monoalkyl esters (6b, 6c, 7b, 7c, 8b, and 8c) are better anti-influenza agents (EC50 = 19-89 nM) than their corresponding phosphonic acids (EC50 = 50-343 nM) in protection of cells from the viral infection. The phosphonate monoalkyl esters are stable in buffer solutions (pH 2.0-7.4) and rabbit serum; furthermore, the alkyl group is possibly tuned to attain the desired pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:27167096

  5. Neuraminidase Inhibitors from the Fruiting Body of Phellinus igniarius

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Jeong, Kyeong-Woon; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    During our ongoing investigation of neuraminidase inhibitors from medicinal fungi, we found that the fruiting bodies of Phellinus igniarius exhibited significant inhibitory activity against neuraminidase from recombinant H3N2 influenza viruses. Two active compounds were isolated from the methanolic extract of P. igniarius through solvent partitioning and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The active compounds were identified as phelligridins E and G on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and electrospray ionization mass measurements. These compounds inhibited neuraminidases from recombinant rvH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza viruses, with IC50 values in the range of 0.7~8.1 µM. PMID:27433123

  6. Proline-Based Macrocyclic Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus: Stereoselective Synthesis and Biological Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Prongay, Andrew; Pichardo, John; Madison, Vincent; Buevich, Alexei; Chan, Tze-Ming

    2008-06-30

    Macrocyclization through a Mitsunobu reaction was used to synthesize a 17-membered macrocycle. The bicyclic acetal core was prepared completely diastereoselectively. The macrocyclic peptidomimetic surrogate of the P2-P3 dipeptide moiety was designed to function as a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 serine protease inhibitor, and the pentapeptide {alpha}-ketoamides derived from the macrocycle were shown to be potent HCV inhibitors.

  7. Exploring the chemical space of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    The fight against the emergence of mutant influenza strains has led to the screening of an increasing number of compounds for inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase. This study explores the chemical space of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), which provides an opportunity to obtain further molecular insights regarding the underlying basis of their bioactivity. In particular, a large set of 347 and 175 NAIs against influenza A and B, respectively, was compiled from the literature. Molecular and quantum chemical descriptors were obtained from low-energy conformational structures geometrically optimized at the PM6 level. The bioactivities of NAIs were classified as active or inactive according to their half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) value in which IC50 < 1µM and ≥ 10µM were defined as active and inactive compounds, respectively. Interpretable decision rules were derived from a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model established using a set of substructure descriptors via decision tree analysis. Univariate analysis, feature importance analysis from decision tree modeling and molecular scaffold analysis were performed on both data sets for discriminating important structural features amongst active and inactive NAIs. Good predictive performance was achieved as deduced from accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient values in excess of 81% and 0.58, respectively, for both influenza A and B NAIs. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed to investigate the binding modes and their moiety preferences of active NAIs against both influenza A and B neuraminidases. Moreover, novel NAIs with robust binding fitness towards influenza A and B neuraminidase were generated via combinatorial library enumeration and their binding fitness was on par or better than FDA-approved drugs. The results from this study are anticipated to be beneficial for guiding the rational drug design of novel NAIs for treating influenza infections. PMID

  8. Exploring the chemical space of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    The fight against the emergence of mutant influenza strains has led to the screening of an increasing number of compounds for inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase. This study explores the chemical space of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), which provides an opportunity to obtain further molecular insights regarding the underlying basis of their bioactivity. In particular, a large set of 347 and 175 NAIs against influenza A and B, respectively, was compiled from the literature. Molecular and quantum chemical descriptors were obtained from low-energy conformational structures geometrically optimized at the PM6 level. The bioactivities of NAIs were classified as active or inactive according to their half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) value in which IC50 < 1µM and ≥ 10µM were defined as active and inactive compounds, respectively. Interpretable decision rules were derived from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model established using a set of substructure descriptors via decision tree analysis. Univariate analysis, feature importance analysis from decision tree modeling and molecular scaffold analysis were performed on both data sets for discriminating important structural features amongst active and inactive NAIs. Good predictive performance was achieved as deduced from accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient values in excess of 81% and 0.58, respectively, for both influenza A and B NAIs. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed to investigate the binding modes and their moiety preferences of active NAIs against both influenza A and B neuraminidases. Moreover, novel NAIs with robust binding fitness towards influenza A and B neuraminidase were generated via combinatorial library enumeration and their binding fitness was on par or better than FDA-approved drugs. The results from this study are anticipated to be beneficial for guiding the rational drug design of novel NAIs for treating influenza infections. PMID

  9. Using Support Vector Machine (SVM) for Classification of Selectivity of H1N1 Neuraminidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Kong, Yue; Zhang, Mengdi; Yan, Aixia; Liu, Zhenming

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of the neuraminidase is one of the most promising strategies for preventing influenza virus spreading. 479 neuraminidase inhibitors are collected for dataset 1 and 208 neuraminidase inhibitors for A/P/8/34 are collected for dataset 2. Using support vector machine (SVM), four computational models were built to predict whether a compound is an active or weakly active inhibitor of neuraminidase. Each compound is represented by MASSC fingerprints and ADRIANA.Code descriptors. The predication accuracies for the test sets of all the models are over 78 %. Model 2B, which is the best model, obtains a prediction accuracy and a Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 89.71 % and 0.81 on test set, respectively. The molecular polarizability, molecular shape, molecular size and hydrogen bonding are related to the activities of neuraminidase inhibitors. The models can be obtained from the authors. PMID:27491921

  10. Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex from human placenta with a photoreactive neuraminidase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Louie, A.; Potier, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex in human placenta was carried out using the radioactive photoprobe, 9-S-(4-azido-3,5-3H-2-nitrophenyl)-5-acetamido-2,6 anhydro-2,3,5,9- tetradeoxy-9- thio-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-enonic acid. Two intensely labeled bands at 61 and 46 kD were detected with autoradiography. Labeling of the 46 kD protein was blocked with the inclusion of the surfactant Triton X-100 in the photolysis mixture, indicating a nonspecific, hydrophobic interaction. The 61 kD protein was protected from labeling only when the neuraminidase inhibitor 2,3 dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (1 mM) was present during photolysis. These results suggest that the neuraminidase activity resides among the proteins in the 61 kD molecular weight range comigrating with the lysosomal beta-galactosidase, under denaturing conditions.

  11. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  12. RWJ-270201 (BCX-1812): a novel neuraminidase inhibitor for influenza.

    PubMed Central

    Young, D; Fowler, C; Bush, K

    2001-01-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is important in the pathogenesis of infection and, thus, is an attractive target for agents used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. This article describes preclinical and early clinical data related to RWJ-270201 (BCX-1812), a novel, orally active NA inhibitor that was rationally designed for having potent and selective activity against influenza A and B viruses. RWJ-270201 is a unique NA inhibitor with a cyclopentane ring structure and high selectivity for the influenza NA. RWJ-270201 has efficacy comparable to or better than earlier NA inhibitors against a wide range of influenza A and B isolates, including recently emerged and avian strains, both in vitro and in a lethal murine model of influenza. Based on the high selectivity and efficacy of RWJ-270201 against both type A and B influenza strains in preclinical studies as well as murine pharmacodynamic studies supporting the potential for once-daily administration, clinical trials were initiated in order to determine the tolerability and antiviral activity of RWJ-270201 in humans. To date, clinical studies have indicated that RWJ-270201 is well tolerated and has antiviral activity in human experimental influenza models when administered orally once daily. PMID:11779391

  13. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza B virus infection: efficacy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Baranovich, Tatiana; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology and epidemiology of influenza B viruses are far less studied than for influenza A viruses, and one of these aspects is effectiveness and resistance to the clinically available antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Acute respiratory infections are one of the leading causes of death in children and adults, and influenza is among the few respiratory infections that can be prevented and treated by vaccination and antiviral treatment. Recent data has suggested that influenza B virus infections are of specific concern to pediatric patients because of the increased risk of severe disease. Treatment of influenza B is a challenging task for the following reasons: NAIs (e.g., oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the only FDA-approved class of antivirals available for treatment;the data suggest that oseltamivir is less effective than zanamivir in pediatric patients;zanamivir is not prescribed to patients younger than 7;influenza B viruses are less susceptible than influenza A viruses to NAIs in vitro;although the level of resistance to NAIs is low, the number of different molecular markers of resistance is higher than for influenza A viruses, and they are not well defined;the relationship between levels of NAI phenotypic resistance and known molecular markers, frequency of emergence, transmissibility, and fitness of NAI-resistant variants are not well established. This review presents current knowledge of the effectiveness of NAIs for influenza B virus and antiviral resistance in clinical, surveillance, and experimental studies. PMID:24013000

  14. A Rigid Bicyclic Platform for the Generation of Conformationally Locked Neuraminidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rapid mutation of the influenza virus through genetic mixing raises the prospect of new strains that are both highly transmissible and highly lethal, and which have the ability to evade both immunization strategies (through mutation of hemagglutinin) and current therapies (through mutation of neuraminidase). Inspired by a need for next-generation therapeutics, a synthetic strategy for a new class of rigid, bicyclic inhibitors of influenza neuraminidase is reported. PMID:23181823

  15. A novel influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitor AV5027.

    PubMed

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Ivanenkov, Yan A; Mitkin, Oleg D; Yamanushkin, Pavel M; Bichko, Vadim V; Leneva, Irina A; Borisova, Olga V

    2013-10-24

    A medium-sized focused library of novel Oseltamivir structural analogues with promising antiviral activity was successfully synthesized using a combinatorial approach. The synthesized compounds were then thoroughly evaluated in neuraminidase- and cell-based assays. As a result, (3R,4R,5S)-4-(2,2-difluoroacetylamino)-5-amino-3-(1-ethyl-propoxy)-cyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid (AV5027) was identified as novel Hit-compound with picomolar potency. QSAR analysis was carried out based on the obtained biological data. Computational modeling was performed using a 3D-molecular docking approach and classical regression analysis. The developed integral model demonstrated a sufficient prediction accuracy and tolerance to evaluate compounds based on their potential activity against neuraminidase (NA) at least within the scaffold. Several compounds from the series can be reasonably regarded as promising anti-influenza drug-candidates. PMID:24513312

  16. Pyrrolidinobenzoic Acid Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase: the Hydrophobic Side Chain Influences Type A Subtype Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwu; Silamkoti, Arundutt; Kolavi, Gundurao; Mou, Liyuan; Gulati, Shelly; Air, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) plays a critical role in the life cycle of influenza virus and is a target for new therapeutic agents. A series of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors with the pyrrolidinobenzoic acid scaffold containing lipophilic side chains at the C3 position have been synthesized and evaluated for influenza neuraminidase inhibitory activity. The size and geometry of the C3 side chains have been modified in order to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results indicated that size and geometry of the C3-side chain are important for selectivity of inhibition against N1 vs N2 NA, important type A influenza variants that infect man, including the highly lethal avian influenza. PMID:22677529

  17. Pyrrolidinobenzoic acid inhibitors of influenza virus neuraminidase: the hydrophobic side chain influences type A subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanwu; Silamkoti, Arundutt; Kolavi, Gundurao; Mou, Liyuan; Gulati, Shelly; Air, Gillian M; Brouillette, Wayne J

    2012-07-15

    Neuraminidase (NA) plays a critical role in the life cycle of influenza virus and is a target for new therapeutic agents. A series of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors with the pyrrolidinobenzoic acid scaffold containing lipophilic side chains at the C3 position have been synthesized and evaluated for influenza neuraminidase inhibitory activity. The size and geometry of the C3 side chains have been modified in order to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results indicated that size and geometry of the C3-side chain are important for selectivity of inhibition against N1 versus N2 NA, important type A influenza variants that infect man, including the highly lethal avian influenza. PMID:22677529

  18. Neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 - A promising drug for treating influenza virus: Steered molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Binh Khanh; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We study binding affinity of R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958 to neuraminidase of pathogenic influenza viruses by molecular dynamics simulations. {yields} It is shown that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. {yields} We predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus. {yields} The high correlation between theoretical and experimental data implies that SMD is a very promising tool for drug design. -- Abstract: Two neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, are important drug treatments for influenza. Oseltamivir-resistant mutants of the influenza virus A/H1N1 and A/H5N1 have emerged, necessitating the development of new long-acting antiviral agents. One such agent is a new neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958. An atomic level understanding of the nature of this antiviral agents binding is still missing. We address this gap in our knowledge by applying steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to different subtypes of seasonal and highly pathogenic influenza viruses. We show that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. Based on results obtained by SMD and the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method, we predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus as its binding affinity does not vary much across these systems. The high correlation level between theoretically determined rupture forces and experimental data on binding energies for the large number of systems studied here implies that SMD is a promising tool for drug design.

  19. Reduced susceptibility to all neuraminidase inhibitors of influenza H1N1 viruses with haemagglutinin mutations and mutations in non-conserved residues of the neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L.; Williams, Janelle; Barrett, Susan; Jachno, Kim; McDonald, Mandy; Mohr, Peter G.; Saito, Takehiko; Tashiro, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We characterized human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Hokkaido/15/02, which has haemagglutinin and neuraminidase mutations that reduce drug susceptibility to oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir. Methods One wild-type and three mutant viruses were isolated by plaque purification. Viruses were tested in MUNANA-based enzyme assays, cell culture and receptor binding assays. Results Two viruses had a neuraminidase Y155H mutation that reduced susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay to all inhibitors by 30-fold to >100-fold. The Y155H mutation reduced plaque size and affected the stability, Km and pH activity profile of the enzyme. In contrast to previous mutants, this neuraminidase demonstrated a slower rate of inhibitor binding in the IC50 kinetics assay. One virus had both the Y155H mutation and a haemagglutinin D225G mutation that rescued the small-plaque phenotype of the Y155H virus and affected receptor binding and drug susceptibility in cell culture and binding assays. We also isolated a third mutant virus, with both neuraminidase V114I and haemagglutinin D225N mutations, which affected susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay and receptor binding, respectively, but to lesser extents than the Y155H and D225G mutations. Conclusions Neither Y155 nor V114 is conserved across neuraminidase subtypes. Furthermore, Y155 is not conserved even among avian and swine N1 viruses. Structurally, both residues reside far from the neuraminidase active site. D225 forms part of the receptor binding site of the haemagglutinin. We believe this is the first demonstration of a specific haemagglutinin mutation correlating with reduced drug susceptibility in plaque assays in both Madin Darby Canine Kidney and SIAT cells. PMID:23759505

  20. Structural basis for a class of nanomolar influenza A neuraminidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Philip S.; Mohan, Sankar; Russell, Rupert J. M.; Bance, Nicole; Niikura, Masahiro; Pinto, B. Mario

    2013-10-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the virus life cycle. The rise of resistance mutations against current antiviral therapies has increased the need for the development of novel inhibitors. Recent efforts have targeted a cavity adjacent to the catalytic site (the 150-cavity) in addition to the primary catalytic subsite in order to increase specificity and reduce the likelihood of resistance. This study details structural and in vitro analyses of a class of inhibitors that bind uniquely in both subsites. Crystal structures of three inhibitors show occupation of the 150-cavity in two distinct and novel binding modes. We believe these are the first nanomolar inhibitors of NA to be characterized in this way. Furthermore, we show that one inhibitor, binding within the catalytic site, offers reduced susceptibility to known resistance mutations via increased flexibility of a pendant pentyloxy group and the ability to pivot about a strong hydrogen-bonding network.

  1. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, PV Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  2. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, Pv Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  3. Characterization of Human Influenza Virus Variants Selected In Vitro in the Presence of the Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chun Y.; Escarpe, Paul A.; Sidwell, Robert W.; Williams, Matthew A.; Lew, Willard; Wu, Huiwei; Kim, Choung U.; Mendel, Dirk B.

    1998-01-01

    An oral prodrug of GS 4071, a potent and selective inhibitor of influenza neuraminidases, is currently under clinical development for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections in humans. To investigate the potential development of resistance during the clinical use of this compound, variants of the human influenza A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) virus with reduced susceptibility to the neuraminidase inhibitor GS 4071 were selected in vitro by passaging the virus in MDCK cells in the presence of inhibitor. After eight passages, variants containing two amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (A28T in HA1 and R124M in HA2) but no changes in the neuraminidase were isolated. These variants exhibited a 10-fold reduction in susceptibility to GS 4071 and zanamivir (GG167) in an in vitro plaque reduction assay. After 12 passages, a second variant containing these hemagglutinin mutations and a Lys substitution for the conserved Arg292 of the neuraminidase was isolated. The mutant neuraminidase enzyme exhibited high-level (30,000-fold) resistance to GS 4071, but only moderate (30-fold) resistance to zanamivir and 4-amino-Neu5Ac2en, the amino analog of zanamivir. The mutant enzyme had weaker affinity for the fluorogenic substrate 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid and lower enzymatic activity compared to the wild-type enzyme. The viral variant containing the mutant neuraminidase did not replicate as well as the wild-type virus in culture and was 10,000-fold less infectious than the wild-type virus in a mouse model. These results suggest that although the R292K neuraminidase mutation confers high-level resistance to GS 4071 in vitro, its effect on viral virulence is likely to render this mutation of limited clinical significance. PMID:9835519

  4. Aurintricarboxylic Acid Is a Potent Inhibitor of Influenza A and B Virus Neuraminidases

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Brown, Earl G.; Van Domselaar, Gary; He, Runtao; Li, Xuguang

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses cause serious infections that can be prevented or treated using vaccines or antiviral agents, respectively. While vaccines are effective, they have a number of limitations, and influenza strains resistant to currently available anti-influenza drugs are increasingly isolated. This necessitates the exploration of novel anti-influenza therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the potential of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), a potent inhibitor of nucleic acid processing enzymes, to protect Madin-Darby canine kidney cells from influenza infection. We found, by neutral red assay, that ATA was protective, and by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively, confirmed that ATA reduced viral replication and release. Furthermore, while pre-treating cells with ATA failed to inhibit viral replication, pre-incubation of virus with ATA effectively reduced viral titers, suggesting that ATA may elicit its inhibitory effects by directly interacting with the virus. Electron microscopy revealed that ATA induced viral aggregation at the cell surface, prompting us to determine if ATA could inhibit neuraminidase. ATA was found to compromise the activities of virus-derived and recombinant neuraminidase. Moreover, an oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 strain with H274Y was also found to be sensitive to ATA. Finally, we observed additive protective value when infected cells were simultaneously treated with ATA and amantadine hydrochloride, an anti-influenza drug that inhibits M2-ion channels of influenza A virus. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these data suggest that ATA is a potent anti-influenza agent by directly inhibiting the neuraminidase and could be a more effective antiviral compound when used in combination with amantadine hydrochloride. PMID:20020057

  5. A Novel Potent and Highly Specific Inhibitor against Influenza Viral N1-N9 Neuraminidases: Insight into Neuraminidase-Inhibitor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Magesh, Sadagopan; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Sakai, Miho; Ishitsubo, Erika; Hori, Takanori; Moriya, Setsuko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Miyagi, Taeko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kiso, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-05-26

    People throughout the world continue to be at risk for death from influenza A virus, which is always creating a new variant. Here we present a new effective and specific anti-influenza viral neuraminidase (viNA) inhibitor, 9-cyclopropylcarbonylamino-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (cPro-GUN). Like zanamivir, it is highly effective against N1-N9 avian and N1-N2 human viNAs, including H274Y oseltamivir-resistant N1 viNA, due to its C-6 portion still being anchored in the active site, different from the disruption of oseltamivir's C-6 anchoring by H274Y mutation. Unlike zanamivir, no sialidase inhibitory activity has been observed for cPro-GUN against huNeu1-huNeu4 enzymes. Broad efficacy of cPro-GUN against avian and human influenza viruses in cell cultures comparable to its sialidase inhibitory activities makes cPro-GUN ideal for further development for safe therapeutic or prophylactic use against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27095056

  6. Susceptibility of influenza viruses circulating in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tolah, Ahmed M.; Azhar, Esam I.; Hashem, Anwar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the sensitivity of circulating influenza viruses in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs); mainly, zanamivir and oseltamivir. Methods: Respiratory samples were collected from patients presenting with respiratory symptoms to King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) between September 2013 and October 2014. All samples were tested prospectively by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza A and B viruses. Positive samples were then inoculated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and isolated viruses were examined for their sensitivity to NAIs using fluorescent neuraminidase inhibition assay. Results: Out of 406 tested samples, 25 samples (6.2%) were positive for influenza A/pdmH1N1 virus, one sample (0.25%) was positive for influenza A/H3N2 virus, and 7 samples (1.7%) were positive for influenza B Yamagata-like virus. Screening of isolated influenza A and B viruses (9 out of 33) for their sensitivity to NAIs showed no significant resistance to available NAIs. Conclusion: Our results show that circulating influenza viruses in Jeddah are still sensitive to NAIs. PMID:27052292

  7. Structure-guided design of a novel class of benzyl-sulfonate inhibitors for influenza virus neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Platis, Dimitris; Smith, Brian J.; Huyton, Trevor; Labrou, Nikolaos E.

    2006-01-01

    Influenza NA (neuraminidase) is an antiviral target of high pharmaceutical interest because of its essential role in cleaving sialic acid residues from cell surface glycoproteins and facilitating release of virions from infected cells. The present paper describes the use of structural information in the progressive design from a lead binding ion (a sulfate) to a potent submicromolor inhibitor (Ki 0.13 μM). Structural information derived from the X-ray structure of an NA complexed with several sulfate ions, in combination with results derived from affinity labelling and molecular modelling studies, was used to guide design of potent sulfonic acid-based inhibitors. These inhibitors are structural fragments of the polysulfonate triazine dye Cibacron Blue 3GA and represent novel lead scaffolds for designing non-carbohydrate inhibitors for influenza neuraminidases. PMID:16776653

  8. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  9. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. PMID:27344026

  10. Efficacy of the New Neuraminidase Inhibitor CS-8958 against H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kiso, Maki; Kubo, Shuku; Ozawa, Makoto; Le, Quynh Mai; Nidom, Chairul A.; Yamashita, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Currently, two neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, which must be administrated twice daily for 5 days for maximum therapeutic effect, are licensed for the treatment of influenza. However, oseltamivir-resistant mutants of seasonal H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses have emerged. Therefore, alternative antiviral agents are needed. Recently, a new neuraminidase inhibitor, R-125489, and its prodrug, CS-8958, have been developed. CS-8958 functions as a long-acting NA inhibitor in vivo (mice) and is efficacious against seasonal influenza strains following a single intranasal dose. Here, we tested the efficacy of this compound against H5N1 influenza viruses, which have spread across several continents and caused epidemics with high morbidity and mortality. We demonstrated that R-125489 interferes with the NA activity of H5N1 viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant and different clade strains. A single dose of CS-8958 (1,500 µg/kg) given to mice 2 h post-infection with H5N1 influenza viruses produced a higher survival rate than did continuous five-day administration of oseltamivir (50 mg/kg twice daily). Virus titers in lungs and brain were substantially lower in infected mice treated with a single dose of CS-8958 than in those treated with the five-day course of oseltamivir. CS-8958 was also highly efficacious against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus and oseltamivir-resistant variants. A single dose of CS-8958 given seven days prior to virus infection also protected mice against H5N1 virus lethal infection. To evaluate the improved efficacy of CS-8958 over oseltamivir, the binding stability of R-125489 to various subtypes of influenza virus was assessed and compared with that of other NA inhibitors. We found that R-125489 bound to NA more tightly than did any other NA inhibitor tested. Our results indicate that CS-8958 is highly effective for the treatment and prophylaxis of infection with H5N1 influenza viruses

  11. QSAR modeling and molecular interaction analysis of natural compounds as potent neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Mei, Hu

    2016-04-26

    Different QSAR models of 40 natural compounds as neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are developed to comprehend chemical-biological interactions and predict activities against neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens. Based on the constitutional, topological and conformational descriptors, R(2) and Q(2) values of the obtained SRA model are 0.931 and 0.856. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the constructed HQSAR and almond models are 0.903 and 0.767, 0.904 and 0.511, respectively. Based on the pharmacophore alignment, R(2) and Q(2) values of the optimal CoMSIA model are 0.936 and 0.654. Moreover, Rtest(2) and Qext(2) of values of SRA, HQSAR, almond and CoMSIA models are 0.611 and 0.565, 0.753 and 0.750, 0.612 and 0.582, 0.582 and 0.571, respectively. So, QSAR models have good predictive capability. They can be further used to evaluate and screen new compounds. Moreover, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic factors have high contributions to activities. To understand molecular interactions between natural compounds and NA from Clostridium perfringens, molecular docking is investigated. The docking results elucidate that Arg266, Asp291, Asp328, Tyr485, Glu493, Arg555, Arg615 and Tyr655 are especially the key residues in the active site of 2bf6. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatics are key factors, which impact the interactions between NIs and NA. So, the influential factors of interactions between NIs and NA in the docking results are in agreement with the QSAR results. PMID:27008437

  12. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Adam; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Correia, Vanessa; Besselaar, Terry; Drager-Dayal, Renu; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Gubareva, Larisa; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Lackenby, Angie; Lo, Janice; Odagiri, Takato; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Wong, Sun; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Emergence of influenza viruses with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) is sporadic, often follows exposure to NAIs, but occasionally occurs in the absence of NAI pressure. The emergence and global spread in 2007/2008 of A(H1N1) influenza viruses showing clinical resistance to oseltamivir due to neuraminidase (NA) H275Y substitution, in the absence of drug pressure, warrants continued vigilance and monitoring for similar viruses. Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 11,387 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres (NIC) between May 2012 and May 2013 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. The data were evaluated using normalized IC50 fold-changes rather than raw IC50 data. Nearly 90% of the 11,387 viruses were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Only 0.2% (n=27) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, usually oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=39) showed reduced inhibition (RI). NA sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3661), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=18), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=3) or NA R292K (n=1) and B/Victoria-lineage with NA H273Y (n=2); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Overall, approximately 99% of circulating viruses tested during the 2012-2013 period were sensitive to all four NAIs. Consequently, these drugs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections. PMID:25043638

  13. Characterization of Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Korean Papaver rhoeas Bee Pollen Contributing to Anti-Influenza Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Ji-Yul; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Choi, Hwa Jung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2016-04-01

    The active constituents of Korean Papaver rhoeas bee pollen conferring neuraminidase inhibitory activities (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1) were investigated. Six flavonoids and one alkaloid were isolated and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data. These included kaempferol-3-sophoroside (1), kaempferol-3-neohesperidoside (2), kaempferol-3-sambubioside (3), kaempferol-3-glucoside (4), quercetin-3-sophoroside (5), luteolin (6), and chelianthifoline (7). All compounds showed neuraminidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 151.1 µM. The most potent neuraminidase inhibitor was luteolin, which was the dominant content in the ethyl acetate fraction. All tested compounds displayed noncompetitive inhibition of H3N2 neuraminidase. Furthermore, compounds 1-7 all reduced the severity of virally induced cytopathic effects as determined by the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell-based assay showing antiviral activity with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 33.4 µM (zanamivir: 58.3 µM). The active compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the total amount of compounds 1-7 made up about 0.592 g/100 g bee pollen, contributing a rich resource of a natural antiviral product. PMID:26848705

  14. Synergistic Effect of Nitazoxanide with Neuraminidase Inhibitors against Influenza A Viruses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Belardo, Giuseppe; Cenciarelli, Orlando; La Frazia, Simone; Rossignol, Jean Francois

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant influenza A virus (IAV) strains represents a serious threat to global human health and underscores the need for novel approaches to anti-influenza chemotherapy. Combination therapy with drugs affecting different IAV targets represents an attractive option for influenza treatment. We have previously shown that the thiazolide anti-infective nitazoxanide (NTZ) inhibits H1N1 IAV replication by selectively blocking viral hemagglutinin maturation. Herein we investigate the anti-influenza activity of NTZ against a wide range of human and avian IAVs (H1N1, H3N2, H5N9, H7N1), including amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant strains, in vitro. We also investigate whether therapy with NTZ in combination with the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir exerts synergistic, additive, or antagonistic antiviral effects against influenza viruses. NTZ was effective against all IAVs tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 0.9 to 3.2 μM, and selectivity indexes (SIs) ranging from >50 to >160, depending on the strain and the multiplicity of infection (MOI). Combination therapy studies were performed in cell culture-based assays using A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1), A/WSN/1933 (H1N1), or avian A/chicken/Italy/9097/1997 (H5N9) IAVs; dose-effect analysis and synergism/antagonism quantification were performed using isobologram analysis according to the Chou-Talalay method. Combination index (CI) analysis indicated that NTZ and oseltamivir combination treatment was synergistic against A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and A/WSN/1933 (H1N1) IAVs, with CI values ranging between 0.39 and 0.63, independently of the MOI used. Similar results were obtained when NTZ was administered in combination with zanamivir (CI = 0.3 to 0.48). NTZ-oseltamivir combination treatment was synergistic also against the avian A/chicken/Italy/9097/1997 (H5N9) IAV (CI = 0.18 to 0.31). Taken together, the results suggest that regimens that combine

  15. Peramivir: A Novel Intravenous Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Acute Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alame, Malak M.; Massaad, Elie; Zaraket, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Peramivir is a novel cyclopentane neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza virus. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients 18 years and older. For several months prior to approval, the drug was made clinically available under Emergency Use authorization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Peramivir is highly effective against human influenza A and B isolates as well as emerging influenza virus strains with pandemic potential. Clinical trials demonstrated that the drug is well-tolerated in adult and pediatric populations. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and similar in frequency to patients receiving placebo. Common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders and decreased neutrophil counts but are self-limiting. Peramivir is administered as a single-dose via the intravenous route providing a valuable therapeutic alternative for critically ill patients or those unable to tolerate other administration routes. Successful clinical trials and post-marketing data in pediatric populations in Japan support the safety and efficacy of peramivir in this population where administration of other antivirals might not be feasible. PMID:27065996

  16. Prescribing of neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza in UK primary care since the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Hardelid, P; Rait, G; Gilbert, R; Petersen, I

    2016-03-01

    We determined prescribing rates of neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) for influenza in UK primary care since 2009 in relation to national prescribing guidelines. All NI prescriptions issued during the influenza seasons between October 2010 and May 2013 were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large UK primary-care database. We calculated NI prescribing rates per 100,000 person-weeks (pw) by age group, sex, deprivation level, influenza season and presence of chronic conditions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and used negative binomial regression models to determine the independent association between these variables and NI prescribing. NI prescribing was rare. The prescribing rate was 1·7/100,000 pw (95% CI 1·7-1·8) during influenza-active periods, and 0·1/100,000 (95% CI 0·1-0·1) during non-active periods. Prescribing rates were highest in 25- to 44-year-olds in 2010/2011 and in persons aged ⩾85 years in 2011/2012 and 2012/2013. Individuals with chronic conditions had significantly higher prescribing rates than persons without (rate ratio 2·62, 95% CI 2·27-3·03). GPs are more likely to prescribe NIs to high-risk individuals and during influenza active periods, as per national guidelines. We could not assess the proportion of patients with influenza-like illness who were prescribed an NI. PMID:26364671

  17. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Besselaar, Terry G; Daniels, Rod S; Ermetal, Burcu; Fry, Alicia; Gubareva, Larisa; Huang, Weijuan; Lackenby, Angie; Lee, Raphael T C; Lo, Janice; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Nguyen, Ha T; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Tilmanis, Danielle; Wang, Dayan; Zhang, Wenqing; Meijer, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 13,312 viruses collected by WHO recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2014 and May 2015 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. Ninety-four per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 0.5% (n = 68) of viruses showed either highly reduced inhibition (HRI) or reduced inhibition (RI) (n = 56) against at least one of the four NAIs. Of the twelve viruses with HRI, six were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, three were A(H3N2) viruses and three were B/Yamagata-lineage viruses. The overall frequency of viruses with RI or HRI by the NAIs was lower than that observed in 2013-14 (1.9%), but similar to the 2012-13 period (0.6%). Based on the current analysis, the NAIs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections. PMID:27265623

  18. Peramivir: A Novel Intravenous Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Acute Influenza Infections.

    PubMed

    Alame, Malak M; Massaad, Elie; Zaraket, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Peramivir is a novel cyclopentane neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza virus. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients 18 years and older. For several months prior to approval, the drug was made clinically available under Emergency Use authorization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Peramivir is highly effective against human influenza A and B isolates as well as emerging influenza virus strains with pandemic potential. Clinical trials demonstrated that the drug is well-tolerated in adult and pediatric populations. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and similar in frequency to patients receiving placebo. Common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders and decreased neutrophil counts but are self-limiting. Peramivir is administered as a single-dose via the intravenous route providing a valuable therapeutic alternative for critically ill patients or those unable to tolerate other administration routes. Successful clinical trials and post-marketing data in pediatric populations in Japan support the safety and efficacy of peramivir in this population where administration of other antivirals might not be feasible. PMID:27065996

  19. The accuracy and timeliness of neuraminidase inhibitor dispensing data for predicting laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    PubMed

    Papenburg, J; Charland, K M; DE Serres, G; Buckeridge, D L

    2016-06-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitor (NI) dispensing has emerged as a possible automated data source for influenza surveillance. We aimed to evaluate its timeliness, correlation, and predictive accuracy in relation to influenza activity in Quebec, Canada, 2010-2013. Our secondary objective was to use the same metrics to compare NI dispensing to visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) in emergency departments (EDs). Provincial weekly counts of positive influenza laboratory tests were used as a reference measure for the level of influenza circulation. We applied ARIMA models to account for serial correlation. We computed cross-correlations to measure the strengths of association and lead-lag relationships between NI dispensing, ILI ED visits, and our reference indicator. Finally, using an ARIMA model, we evaluated the ability of NI dispensing and ILI ED visits to predict laboratory-confirmed influenza. NI dispensing was significantly correlated (R = 0·68) with influenza activity with no lag. The maximal correlation of ILI ED visits was not as strong (R = 0·50). Both NI dispensing and ILI ED visits were significant predictors of laboratory-confirmed influenza in a multivariable model; predictive potential was greatest when NI counts were lagged to precede laboratory surveillance by 2 weeks. We conclude that NI dispensing data provides timely and valuable information for influenza surveillance. PMID:26611607

  20. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Meijer, Adam; Lackenby, Angie; Gubareva, Larisa; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Besselaar, Terry; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Huang, Weijuan; Lo, Janice; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Wang, Dayan; Mak, Gannon C; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C; Tashiro, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 10,641 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2013 and May 2014 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. In addition, neuraminidase (NA) sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3206), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Ninety-five per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 2% (n=172) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, commonly oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=32) showed reduced inhibition (RI). Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=169), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=1), B/Victoria-lineage with NA E117G (n=1) and B/Yamagata-lineage with NA H273Y (n=1); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Although approximately 98% of circulating viruses tested during the 2013-2014 period were sensitive to all four NAIs, a large community cluster of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with the NA H275Y substitution from patients with no previous exposure to antivirals was detected in Hokkaido, Japan. Significant numbers of A(H1N1)pdm09 NA H275Y viruses were also detected in China and the United States: phylogenetic analyses showed that the Chinese viruses were similar to those from Japan, while the United States viruses clustered separately from those of the Hokkaido outbreak, indicative of multiple resistance-emergence events. Consequently, global surveillance of influenza antiviral susceptibility should be continued from a public health perspective. PMID:25721488

  1. In silico modification of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza A virus subtype H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Rachmania, Rizky Archintya; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research focused on the modification of the functional groups of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor against influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Interactions of three of the best ligands were evaluated in the hydrated state using molecular dynamics simulation at two different temperatures. The docking result showed that AD3BF2D ligand (N-[(1S,6R)-5-amino-5-{[(2R,3S,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]oxy}-4-formylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]acetamide-3-(1-ethylpropoxy)-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate) had better binding energy values than standard oseltamivir. AD3BF2D had several interactions, including hydrogen bonds, with the residues in the catalytic site of neuraminidase as identified by molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that AD3BF2D ligand can be used as a good candidate for neuraminidase inhibitor to cope with influenza A virus subtype H1N1. PMID:25859271

  2. Identification of GS 4104 as an Orally Bioavailable Prodrug of the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixing; Escarpe, Paul A.; Eisenberg, Eugene J.; Cundy, Kenneth C.; Sweet, Clive; Jakeman, Kenneth J.; Merson, James; Lew, Willard; Williams, Matt; Zhang, Lijun; Kim, Choung U.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Chen, Ming S.; Mendel, Dirk B.

    1998-01-01

    GS 4071 is a potent carbocyclic transition-state analog inhibitor of influenza virus neuraminidase with activity against both influenza A and B viruses in vitro. GS 4116, the guanidino analog of GS 4071, is a 10-fold more potent inhibitor of influenza virus replication in tissue culture than GS 4071. In this study we determined the oral bioavailabilities of GS 4071, GS 4116, and their respective ethyl ester prodrugs in rats. Both parent compounds and the prodrug of the guanidino analog exhibited poor oral bioavailability (2 to 4%) and low peak concentrations in plasma (Cmaxs; Cmax <0.06 μg/ml). In contrast, GS 4104, the ethyl ester prodrug of GS 4071, exhibited good oral bioavailability (35%) as GS 4071 and high Cmaxs of GS 4071 (Cmax = 0.47 μg/ml) which are 150 times the concentration necessary to inhibit influenza virus neuraminidase activity by 90%. The bioavailability of GS 4104 as GS 4071 was also determined in mice (30%), ferrets (11%), and dogs (73%). The plasma of all four species exhibited high, sustained concentrations of GS 4071 such that at 12 h postdosing the concentrations of GS 4071 in plasma exceeded those necessary to inhibit influenza virus neuraminidase activity by 90%. These results demonstrate that GS 4104 is an orally bioavailable prodrug of GS 4071 in animals and that it has the potential to be an oral agent for the prevention and treatment of influenza A and B virus infections in humans. PMID:9517946

  3. Long-acting Neuraminidase Inhibitor Laninamivir Octanoate as Post-exposure Prophylaxis for Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Seizaburo; Watanabe, Akira; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Uemori, Mitsutoshi; Awamura, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate, a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, has been proven to be effective in the treatment of influenza but not for post-exposure prophylaxis. Methods. We conducted a double-blind, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine if a single administration of laninamivir octanoate 40 mg was superior to placebo for post-exposure prophylaxis. Eligible participants who had cohabited with an influenza patient within 48 hours of symptom onset were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to 1 of 3 groups: 40 mg of laninamivir octanoate single administration (LO-40SD), 20 mg of laninamivir octanoate once daily for 2 days (LO-20TD), or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of participants who developed clinical influenza (defined as influenza virus positive, an axillary temperature >37.5°C, and at least 2 symptoms) over a 10-day period. Results. A total of 803 participants were enrolled, with 801 included in the primary analysis. The proportions of participants with clinical influenza were 4.5% (12/267), 4.5% (13/269), and 12.1% (32/265) in the LO-40SD, LO-20TD, and placebo groups, respectively. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate 40 mg significantly reduced the development of influenza compared with placebo (P = .001). The relative risk reductions compared with the placebo group were 62.8% and 63.1% for the LO-40SD and LO-20TD groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events in the LO-40SD group was similar to that of the LO-20TD and placebo groups. Conclusions. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate was effective and well tolerated as post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the development of influenza. Clinical Trials Registration. JapicCTI-142679. PMID:27118785

  4. Increasing oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors: a prodrug transporter approach applied to oseltamivir analogue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Varghese Gupta, Sheeba; Dahan, Arik; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-02-01

    showed that the l-valyl prodrug (P(app) = 1.7 × 10(-6) cm/s) has the potential to be rapidly transported across the epithelial cell apical membrane. Significantly, only the parent drug (GOCarb) appeared in the basolateral compartment, indicating complete activation (hydrolysis) during transport. Intestinal rat jejunal permeability studies showed that l-valyl and l-isoleucyl prodrugs are highly permeable compared to the orally well absorbed metoprolol, while the parent drug had essentially zero permeability in the jejunum, consistent with its known poor low absorption. Prodrugs were rapidly converted to parent in cell homogenates, suggesting their ability to be activated endogenously in the epithelial cell, consistent with the transport studies. Additionally, l-valyl prodrug was found to be a substrate for valacyclovirase (K(m) = 2.37 mM), suggesting a potential cell activation mechanism. Finally we determined the oral bioavailability of our most promising candidate, GOC-l-Val, in mice to be 23% under fed conditions and 48% under fasted conditions. In conclusion, GOC-l-Val prodrug was found to be a very promising antiviral agent for oral delivery. These findings indicate that the carrier-mediated prodrug approach is an excellent strategy for improving oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors. These promising results demonstrate that the oral peptide transporter-mediated prodrug strategy has enormous promise for improving the oral mucosal cell membrane permeability of polar, poorly absorbed antiviral agents and treating influenza via the oral route of administration. PMID:23244438

  5. Oral Administration of a Prodrug of the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071 Protects Mice and Ferrets against Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Dirk B.; Tai, Chun Y.; Escarpe, Paul A.; Li, Weixing; Sidwell, Robert W.; Huffman, John H.; Sweet, Clive; Jakeman, Kenneth J.; Merson, James; Lacy, Steven A.; Lew, Willard; Williams, Matthew A.; Zhang, Lijun; Chen, Ming S.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Kim, Choung U.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently described GS 4071, a carbocyclic transition-state analog inhibitor of the influenza virus neuraminidase, which has potent inhibitory activity comparable to that of 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (GG167; zanamivir) when tested against influenza A virus replication and neuraminidase activity in vitro. We now report that GS 4071 is active against several strains of influenza A and B viruses in vitro and that oral GS 4104, an ethyl ester prodrug which is converted to GS 4071 in vivo, is active in the mouse and ferret models of influenza virus infection. Oral administration of 10 mg of GS 4104 per kg of body weight per day caused a 100-fold reduction in lung homogenate viral titers and enhanced survival in mice infected with influenza A or B viruses. In ferrets, a 25-mg/kg dose of GS 4104 given twice daily reduced peak viral titers in nasal washings and eliminated constitutional responses to influenza virus infection including fever, increased nasal signs (sneezing, nasal discharge, mouth breathing), and decreased activity. Consistent with our demonstration that the parent compound is highly specific for influenza virus neuraminidases, no significant drug-related toxicity was observed after the administration of oral dosages of GS 4104 of up to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days in nonclinical toxicology studies with rats. These results indicate that GS 4104 is a novel, orally active antiviral agent with the potential to be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. PMID:9517945

  6. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza: a systematic review and meta-analysis of regulatory and mortality data.

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Carl J; Onakpoya, Igho; Jones, Mark A; Doshi, Peter; Del Mar, Chris B; Hama, Rokuro; Thompson, Matthew J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Mahtani, Kamal R; Nunan, David; Howick, Jeremy; Jefferson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. OBJECTIVES To (1) describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports (CSRs) of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments; and (2) determine the effect of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®), Roche) treatment on mortality in patients with 2009A/H1N1 influenza. METHODS We searched trial registries, electronic databases and corresponded with regulators and sponsors to identify randomised trials of NIs. We requested full CSRs and accessed regulators' comments. We included only those trials for which we had CSRs. To examine the effects of oseltamivir on 2009A/H1N1 influenza mortality, we requested individual patient data (IPD) from corresponding authors of all included observational studies. RESULTS Effect of oseltamivir and zanamivir (Relenza®, GlaxoSmithKline) in the prevention and treatment of influenza: Oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 16.8 hours [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4 to 25.1 hours]. Zanamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 0.60 days (95% CI 0.39 to 0.81 days). Oseltamivir reduced unverified pneumonia in adult treatment [risk difference (RD) 1.00%, 95% CI 0.22% to 1.49%]; similar findings were observed with zanamivir prophylaxis in adults (RD 0.32%, 95% CI 0.09% to 0.41%). Oseltamivir treatment of adults increased the risk of nausea (RD 3.66%, 95% CI 0.90% to 7.39%) and vomiting (RD 4.56%, 95% CI 2.39% to 7.58%). In the treatment of children, oseltamivir induced vomiting (RD 5.34%, 95% CI 1.75% to 10.29%). Both oseltamivir and zanamivir prophylaxis reduced the risk of symptomatic influenza in individuals (oseltamivir RD 3.05%, 95% CI 1.83% to 3.88%; zanamivir RD 1.98%, 95% CI 0.98% to

  7. QSAR study of flavonoids and biflavonoids as influenza H1N1 virus neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Andrew G; Pomilio, Alicia B

    2010-05-01

    We performed a predictive analysis based on Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) of a very important property of flavonoids which is the inhibition (IC50) of influenza H1N1 virus neuraminidase. The best linear model constructed from 20 molecular structures incorporated four molecular descriptors, selected from more than a thousand geometrical, topological, quantum-mechanical and electronic types of descriptors. The obtained model suggests that the activity depends on the electric charges, masses and polarizabilities of the atoms present in the molecule as well as its conformation. The model showed good predictive ability established by the theoretical and external test set validations. PMID:20116898

  8. Different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate: a potent influenza neuraminidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianzhi; Xu, Wenfang

    2008-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is the only orally active anti-influenza drug that potently inhibit neuraminidase. The recent emergence of avian flu, especially the H5N1 type, makes the situation of Tamiflu supply and demand increasingly serious. Further optimization of the current commercial approach and exploration of new synthetic routes are urgent. Here, different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate are reviewed, including discovery and improved synthetic route from (-)-quinic acid or (-)-shikimic acid, new asymmetric synthesis via catalytic desymmetrization of a meso-aziridine (CDMA), Diels-Alder Reaction and from other available materials. PMID:19075659

  9. The structures of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 neuraminidase and its complexes with three inhibitors at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Crennell, S J; Garman, E F; Philippon, C; Vasella, A; Laver, W G; Vimr, E R; Taylor, G L

    1996-06-01

    The structure of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 neuraminidase (STNA) is reported here to a resolution of 1.6 angstroms together with the structures of three complexes of STNA with different inhibitors. The first is 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en or DANA), the second and third are phosphonate derivatives of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (NANA) which have phosphonate groups at the C2 position equatorial (ePANA) and axial (aPANA) to the plane of the sugar ring. The complex structures are at resolutions of 1.6 angstroms, 1.6 angstroms and 1.9 angstroms, respectively. These analyses show the STNA active site to be topologically inflexible and the interactions to be dominated by the arginine triad, with the pyranose rings of the inhibitors undergoing distortion to occupy the space available. Solvent structure differs only around the third phosphonate oxygen, which attracts a potassium ion. The STNA structure is topologically identical to the previously reported influenza virus neuraminidase structures, although very different in detail; the root-mean-square (r.m.s) deviation for 210 C alpha positions considered equivalent is 2.28 angstroms (out of a total of 390 residues in influenza and 381 in STNA). The active site residues are more highly conserved, in that both the viral and bacterial structures contain an arginine triad, a hydrophobic pocket, a tyrosine and glutamic acid residue at the base of the site and a potential proton-donating aspartic acid. However, differences in binding to O4 and to the glycerol side-chain may reflect the different kinetics employed by the two enzymes. PMID:8656428

  10. In-silico structural analysis of the influenza A subtype H7N9 neuraminidase and molecular docking with different neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eweas, Ahmad F; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2015-06-01

    Human infection with H7 influenza subtypes usually resulted in mild disease with a rare mortalities, however, human infection with the avian low pathogenic H7N9 influenza virus resulted in about 38.6 % human fatality. Due to the new cross-species barrier of this virus subtype, there is an urgent need to better understand the susceptibility to commercially available antivirals and their relation to the structural changes of the viral neuraminidase. Neuraminidases derived from 2013 H7N9, H5N1 and H1N1 were subjected to a structural analysis of their catalytic and framework binding sites. The modeling structure of selected neuraminidases from H7N9 and influenza A subtypes were solved and the docking studies with oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir and peramivir were conducted. The active site residues that are responsible for both binding and cleavage of the terminally linked sialic acid receptors were found conserved. Docking studies with oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir and peramivir revealed that the laninamivir and peramivir showed superior energy binding activities in comparison to the commonly used oseltamivir and zanamivir. The results presented in the current study provide data that are useful for the future treatment of different influenza A subtypes including the recently emerged H7N9. PMID:26436118

  11. Discovery of Influenza A virus neuraminidase inhibitors using support vector machine and Naïve Bayesian models.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenwen; Fang, Jiansong; Li, Chao; Pang, Xiaocong; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) is a critical enzyme in the life cycle of influenza virus, which is known as a successful paradigm in the design of anti-influenza agents. However, to date there are no classification models for the virtual screening of NA inhibitors. In this work, we built support vector machine and Naïve Bayesian models of NA inhibitors and non-inhibitors, with different ratios of active-to-inactive compounds in the training set and different molecular descriptors. Four models with sensitivity or Matthews correlation coefficients greater than 0.9 were chosen to predict the NA inhibitory activities of 15,600 compounds in our in-house database. We combined the results of four optimal models and selected 60 representative compounds to assess their NA inhibitory profiles in vitro. Nine NA inhibitors were identified, five of which were oseltamivir derivatives with large C-5 substituents exhibiting potent inhibition against H1N1 NA with [Formula: see text] values in the range of 12.9-185.0 nM, and against H3N2 NA with [Formula: see text] values between 18.9 and 366.1 nM. The other four active compounds belonged to novel scaffolds, with [Formula: see text] values ranging 39.5-63.8 [Formula: see text]M against H1N1 NA and 44.5-114.1 [Formula: see text]M against H3N2 NA. This is the first time that classification models of NA inhibitors and non-inhibitors are built and their prediction results validated experimentally using in vitro assays. PMID:26689205

  12. Neuraminidase Ribbon Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Ribbons is a program developed at UAB used worldwide to graphically depict complicated protein structures in a simplified format. The program uses sophisticated computer systems to understand the implications of protein structures. The Influenza virus remains a major causative agent for a large number of deaths among the elderly and young children and huge economic losses due to illness. Finding a cure will have a general impact both on the basic research of viral pathologists of fast evolving infectious agents and clinical treatment of influenza virus infection. The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  13. In Vitro Characterization of A-315675, a Highly Potent Inhibitor of A and B Strain Influenza Virus Neuraminidases and Influenza Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kati, Warren M.; Montgomery, Debra; Carrick, Robert; Gubareva, Larisa; Maring, Clarence; McDaniel, Keith; Steffy, Kevin; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Hayden, Frederick; Kempf, Dale; Kohlbrenner, William

    2002-01-01

    A-315675 is a novel, pyrrolidine-based compound that was evaluated in this study for its ability to inhibit A and B strain influenza virus neuraminidases in enzyme assays and influenza virus replication in cell culture. A-315675 effectively inhibited influenza A N1, N2, and N9 and B strain neuraminidases with inhibitor constant (Ki) values between 0.024 and 0.31 nM. These values were comparable to or lower than the Ki values measured for oseltamivir carboxylate (GS4071), zanamivir, and BCX-1812, except for the N1 enzymes that were found to be the most sensitive to BCX-1812. The time-dependent inhibition of neuraminidase catalytic activity observed with A-315675 is likely due to its very low rate of dissociation from the active site of neuraminidase. The half times for dissociation of A-315675 from B/Memphis/3/89 and A/Tokyo/3/67 (H3N2) influenza virus neuraminidases of 10 to 12 h are significantly slower than the half times measured for oseltamivir carboxylate (33 to 60 min). A-315675 inhibited the replication of several laboratory strains of influenza virus in cell culture with potencies that were comparable or superior to those for oseltamivir carboxylate and BCX-1812, except for the A/H1N1 viruses that were found to be two- to fourfold more susceptible to BCX-1812. A-315675 and oseltamivir carboxylate exhibited comparable potencies against a panel of A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza virus clinical isolates, but A-315675 was found to be significantly more potent than oseltamivir carboxylate against the B strain isolates. The favorable in vitro results relative to other clinically effective agents provide strong support for the further investigation of A-315675 as a potential therapy for influenza virus infections. PMID:11897583

  14. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Richter, Martina; Kirchmair, Johannes; Grienke, Ulrike; Rollinger, Judith M.; Krumbholz, Andi; Saluz, Hans P.; Pfister, Wolfgang; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA) suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs) will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178) and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB) were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption. PMID:27047471

  15. A randomized, controlled trial comparing traditional herbal medicine and neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment of seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Shigeki; Kashiwagi, Kenichiro; Ajisaka, Kazuhiko; Masui, Shinta; Takeoka, Hiroaki; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2012-08-01

    The herbal medicine, maoto, has been traditionally prescribed to patients with influenza in Japan. To better understand the efficacy of maoto for the treatment of influenza, a randomized trial was conducted for comparison with oseltamivir or zanamivir. Adult patients with influenza symptoms, including fever, positive for quick diagnostic kit for influenza within 48 h of fever onset were assessed for enrollment. The data of 28 patients randomly assigned to maoto (n = 10), oseltamivir (n = 8), or zanamivir (n = 10) were analyzed for the duration of fever (>37.5°C) and total symptom score from symptom cards recorded by the patient. Viral isolation and serum cytokine measurements were also done on days 1, 3, and 5. Maoto granules, a commercial medical dosage form, are made from four plants: Ephedra Herb, Apricot Kernel, Cinnamon Bark, and Glycyrrhiza Root. Median durations of fever of patients assigned maoto, oseltamivir, or zanamivir were 29, 46, or 27 h, respectively, significantly different for maoto and oseltamivir. No significant between-group differences were found in total symptom score among three groups. Viral persistent rates and serum cytokine levels (IFN-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α) during the study period showed no differences among three groups. The administration of oral maoto granules to healthy adults with seasonal influenza was well tolerated and associated with equivalent clinical and virological efficacy to neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:22350323

  16. [Analysis of decrease in sensitivity in influenza A (H5N1) avian and human strains to neuraminidase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Reina, J

    2008-03-01

    The options for efficient control of avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses include specific vaccination and antiviral prophylaxis and treatment. However, because H5N1 viruses undergo continuous antigen mutations, the production of a matched vaccine strain is currently not possible. Thus, during the early pandemic period, specific control measures would rely solely on antiviral drugs. Now only neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) (zanamivir and oseltamivir) are considered for prophylaxis and therapy in patients with H5N1 infection. The sensitivies of H5N1 strains to the NIs fell into 3 groups. The clade I viruses isolated before 2004 were as sensitive to NIs than reference strains (first group). But the clade I viruses isolated from 2004 were 6 to 7-fold less sensitivity to NIs (second group). The clade II strains isolated from 2005 to 2007 demonstrated a 15 to 30 fold decrease in sensitivity to oseltamivir compared with clade I viruses (third group). The specific decrease in sensitivity to oseltamivir of both Cambodian and Indonesian clade 2 influenza H5N1 isolates is disturbing, especially because they maintain their pathogenicity and transmissibility in birds and are clearly pathogenic in humans. No altered sensitivity to zanamivir has been detected. Zanamivir may also play an important role in pandemic stockpiles. Because the clade 2 virus is now spread through parts of Europe and Africa, continued global collaboration and phenotypic testing of NIs sensitivity are critical for a future pandemic. PMID:18443931

  17. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Richter, Martina; Kirchmair, Johannes; Grienke, Ulrike; Rollinger, Judith M; Krumbholz, Andi; Saluz, Hans P; Pfister, Wolfgang; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA) suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs) will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178) and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB) were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption. PMID:27047471

  18. Crystal structure of a new benzoic acid inhibitor of influenza neuraminidase bound with a new tilt induced by overpacking subsite C6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza neuraminidase (NA) is an important target for antiviral inhibitors since its active site is highly conserved such that inhibitors can be cross-reactive against multiple types and subtypes of influenza. Here, we discuss the crystal structure of neuraminidase subtype N9 complexed with a new benzoic acid based inhibitor (2) that was designed to add contacts by overpacking one side of the active site pocket. Inhibitor 2 uses benzoic acid to mimic the pyranose ring, a bis-(hydroxymethyl)-substituted 2-pyrrolidinone ring in place of the N-acetyl group of the sialic acid, and a branched aliphatic structure to fill the sialic acid C6 subsite. Results Inhibitor 2 {4-[2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-5-oxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-3-[(dipropylamino)methyl)]benzoic acid} was soaked into crystals of neuraminidase of A/tern/Australia/G70c/75 (N9), and the structure refined with 1.55 Å X-ray data. The benzene ring of the inhibitor tilted 8.9° compared to the previous compound (1), and the number of contacts, including hydrogen bonds, increased. However, the IC50 for compound 2 remained in the low micromolar range, likely because one propyl group was disordered. In this high-resolution structure of NA isolated from virus grown in chicken eggs, we found electron density for additional sugar units on the N-linked glycans compared to previous neuraminidase structures. In particular, seven mannoses and two N-acetylglucosamines are visible in the glycan attached to Asn200. This long, branched high-mannose glycan makes significant contacts with the neighboring subunit. Conclusions We designed inhibitor 2 with an extended substituent at C4-corresponding to C6 of sialic acid-to increase the contact surface in the C6-subsite and to force the benzene ring to tilt to maximize these interactions while retaining the interactions of the carboxylate and the pyrolidinone substituents. The crystal structure at 1.55 Å showed that we partially succeeded in that the ring in 2 is tilted

  19. Effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors in preventing hospitalization during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Fawziah; Chong, Mei; Henry, Bonnie; Patrick, David M.; Kendall, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In British Columbia (BC), Canada, neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) were publicly funded during the 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic for treatment of high-risk patients and/or anyone with moderate-to-severe illness. We assessed antiviral effectiveness (AVE) against hospitalization in that context. Methods A population-based cohort study was conducted using linked administrative data. The cohort included all individuals living in BC during the study period (1 September to 31 December 2009) with a diagnostic code consistent with influenza or pandemic H1N1. The main study period pertained to the second-wave A(H1N1)pdm09 circulation (1 October to 31 December 2009), with sensitivity analyses around the more specific pandemic peak (18 October to 7 November). Exposure was defined by same-day NI prescription. The main outcome was all-cause hospitalization within 14 days of the outpatient influenza diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models assessed AVE with 1 : 1 propensity-score matching and covariate adjustment. Results After matching, there were 304/58 061 NI-exposed and 345/58 061 unexposed patients hospitalized during the main study period. The very young [<6 months (35.0; 95% CI 16.7–73.4)], the old [65–79 years (13.7; 95% CI 10.1–18.6)] and the very old [≥80 years (38.7; 95% CI 26.6–56.5)] had the highest hospitalization rate per 1000 patients overall. Fully adjusted AVE against all-cause hospitalization during the main study period was 16% (95% CI 2%–28%), similar to the pandemic peak (15%; 95% CI −4%–30%). Conclusions The use of NIs was associated with modest protection against hospitalization during the 2009 pandemic, but appeared underutilized in affected age groups with the highest hospitalization risk. PMID:24346762

  20. Long-Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitor Laninamivir Octanoate (CS-8958) versus Oseltamivir as Treatment for Children with Influenza Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, laninamivir octanoate, with oseltamivir. Eligible patients were children 9 years of age and under who had febrile influenza symptoms of no more than 36-h duration. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: a group given 40 mg laninamivir (40-mg group), a group given 20 mg laninamivir (20-mg group), and an oseltamivir group. Laninamivir octanoate was administered as a single inhalation. Oseltamivir (2 mg/kg of body weight) was administered orally twice daily for 5 days. The primary end point was the time to alleviation of influenza illness. The primary analysis included 184 patients (61, 61, and 62 in the 40-mg group, 20-mg group, and oseltamivir group, respectively). Laninamivir octanoate markedly reduced the median time to illness alleviation in comparison with oseltamivir in patients infected with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus, and the reductions were 60.9 h for the 40-mg group and 66.2 h for the 20-mg group. On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the times to alleviation of illness between the laninamivir groups and oseltamivir group for patients with influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Laninamivir octanoate was well tolerated. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal events. Laninamivir octanoate was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Further study will be needed to confirm clinical efficacy against influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Its ease of administration is noteworthy, because a single inhalation is required during the course of illness. PMID:20368393

  1. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  2. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of influenza A viral neuraminidase candidate inhibitors based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Pinto, B Mario; Bernardi, Anna; Bennet, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    This manuscript describes a novel class of derivatives based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold, proposed as mimics of sialic acid in a distorted boat conformation that is on the catalytic pathway of neuraminidases (sialidases). A general synthetic route for these constrained-ring molecules was developed using a photochemical reaction followed by a Johnson-Corey-Chaykovsky cyclopropanation. Functionalization with the goal of occupying the 150-cavity was also exploited. Inhibition assays demonstrated low micromolar inhibition against both group-1 (H5N1) and group-2 (H9N2) influenza neuraminidase subtypes, indicating good affinity for the alpha and beta sialic acid mimics and 150-cavity-targeted derivatives. These results provide a validation of a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold as a mimic of a distorted sialic acid bound in the neuraminidase active site during catalysis. PMID:27305457

  4. In vitro neuraminidase inhibitory concentration (IC50) of four neuraminidase inhibitors against clinical isolates of the influenza viruses circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2014-2015 Japanese influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kawai, Naoki; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2016-09-01

    To assess the extent of viral resistance to the four neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), we measured their 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for influenza virus isolates from the 2014-2015 influenza season for comparison with those circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2013-2014 influenza seasons. Viral isolation was done with specimens obtained prior to treatment, and the type and subtype of influenza was determined by RT-PCR using type- and subtype-specific primers. The IC50 was determined by a neuraminidase inhibition assay using a fluorescent substrate. IC50 was measured for 200 influenza A(H3N2) and 19 influenza B in the 2014-2015 season, and no virus with highly reduced sensitivity to the four NAIs was detected. The ratios of the geometric means of the A(H3N2) IC50s of 2014-2015 to those of the 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 seasons ranged from 0.72 to 1.05, 0.82 to 1.22, 0.69 to 1.00, and 0.70 to 1.03, respectively. The ratios of the geometric mean of the B IC50s to the previous four seasons ranged from 0.59 to 1.28, 0.66 to 1.34, 0.84 to 1.21, and 1.06 to 1.47, respectively. There was no trend in the change of the IC50s for A(H3N2) or B. Significant differences were found in some seasons, but the differences in the IC50s were all less than two fold. These results show change in the geometric mean IC50 by season but with no trend, which indicates that the influence of viral mutation on the effectiveness of these NAIs was minute for A(H3N2) and B over the past five seasons. PMID:27346379

  5. Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009–2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Roderick J.; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E.; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Penn, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. Methods Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR) = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply). While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase). Conclusion While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. PMID:22984431

  6. Competitive Fitness of Influenza B Viruses Possessing E119A and H274Y Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance-Associated Substitutions in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Burnham, Andrew J; Vogel, Peter; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only antiviral drugs recommended for influenza treatment and prophylaxis. Although NAI-resistant influenza B viruses that could pose a threat to public health have been reported in the field, their fitness is poorly understood. We evaluated in ferrets the pathogenicity and relative fitness of reverse genetics (rg)-generated influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998-like viruses containing E119A or H274Y NA substitutions (N2 numbering). Ferrets inoculated with NAI-susceptible rg-wild-type (rg-WT) or NAI-resistant (rg-E119A or rg-H274Y) viruses developed mild infections. Growth of rg-E119A virus in the nasal cavities was delayed, but the high titers at 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) were comparable to those of the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses (3.6-4.1 log10TCID50/mL). No virus persisted beyond 5 dpi and replication did not extend to the trachea or lungs. Positive virus antigen-staining of the nasal turbinate epithelium was intermittent with the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses; whereas antigen-staining for the rg-E119A virus was more diffuse. Virus populations in ferrets coinoculated with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses (1:1 mixture) remained heterogeneous at 5 dpi but were predominantly rg-WT (>70%). Although the E119A substitution was associated with delayed replication in ferrets, the H274Y substitution did not measurably affect viral growth properties. These data suggest that rg-H274Y has undiminished fitness in single virus inoculations, but neither rg-E119A nor rg-H274Y gained a fitness advantage over rg-WT in direct competition experiments without antiviral drug pressure. Taken together, our data suggest the following order of relative fitness in a ferret animal model: rg-WT > rg-H274Y > rg-E119A. PMID:27466813

  7. Influenza A viruses of swine circulating in the United States during 2009-2014 are susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors but show lineage-dependent resistance to adamantanes.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Bahl, Justin; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Culhane, Marie; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Darnell, Daniel; Kaplan, Bryan S; Lowe, James F; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-05-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility is one of the evaluation criteria of pandemic potential posed by an influenza virus. Influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) can play an important role in generating novel variants, yet limited information is available on the drug resistance profiles of IAV-S circulating in the U.S. Phenotypic analysis of the IAV-S isolated in the U.S. (2009-2011) (n=105) revealed normal inhibition by the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir. Screening NA sequences from IAV-S collected in the U.S. (1930-2014) showed 0.03% (1/3396) sequences with clinically relevant H274Y-NA substitution. Phenotypic analysis of IAV-S isolated in the U.S. (2009-2011) confirmed amantadine resistance caused by the S31N-M2 and revealed an intermediate level of resistance caused by the I27T-M2. The majority (96.7%, 589/609) of IAV-S with the I27T-M2 in the influenza database were isolated from pigs in the U.S. The frequency of amantadine-resistant markers among IAV-S in the U.S. was high (71%), and their distribution was M-lineage dependent. All IAV-S of the Eurasian avian M lineage were amantadine-resistant and possessed either a single S31N-M2 substitution (78%, 585/747) or its combination with the V27A-M2 (22%, 162/747). The I27T-M2 substitution accounted for 43% (429/993) of amantadine resistance in classic swine M lineage. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both S31N-M2 and I27T-M2 emerged stochastically but appeared to be fixed in the U.S. IAV-S population. This study defines a drug-susceptibility profile, identifies the frequency of drug-resistant markers, and establishes a phylogenetic approach for continued antiviral-susceptibility monitoring of IAV-S in the U.S. PMID:25701593

  8. Competitive Fitness of Influenza B Viruses Possessing E119A and H274Y Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance–Associated Substitutions in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Burnham, Andrew J.; Vogel, Peter; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only antiviral drugs recommended for influenza treatment and prophylaxis. Although NAI-resistant influenza B viruses that could pose a threat to public health have been reported in the field, their fitness is poorly understood. We evaluated in ferrets the pathogenicity and relative fitness of reverse genetics (rg)–generated influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998-like viruses containing E119A or H274Y NA substitutions (N2 numbering). Ferrets inoculated with NAI-susceptible rg–wild-type (rg-WT) or NAI-resistant (rg-E119A or rg-H274Y) viruses developed mild infections. Growth of rg-E119A virus in the nasal cavities was delayed, but the high titers at 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) were comparable to those of the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses (3.6–4.1 log10TCID50/mL). No virus persisted beyond 5 dpi and replication did not extend to the trachea or lungs. Positive virus antigen-staining of the nasal turbinate epithelium was intermittent with the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses; whereas antigen-staining for the rg-E119A virus was more diffuse. Virus populations in ferrets coinoculated with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses (1:1 mixture) remained heterogeneous at 5 dpi but were predominantly rg-WT (>70%). Although the E119A substitution was associated with delayed replication in ferrets, the H274Y substitution did not measurably affect viral growth properties. These data suggest that rg-H274Y has undiminished fitness in single virus inoculations, but neither rg-E119A nor rg-H274Y gained a fitness advantage over rg-WT in direct competition experiments without antiviral drug pressure. Taken together, our data suggest the following order of relative fitness in a ferret animal model: rg-WT > rg-H274Y > rg-E119A. PMID:27466813

  9. Neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility profile of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dapat, Clyde; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Two new influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), peramivir and laninamivir, were approved in 2010 which resulted to four NAIs that were used during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan. This study aims to monitor the susceptibility of influenza virus isolates in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan to the four NAIs using the fluorescence-based 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) method. Outliers were identified using box-and-whisker plot analysis and full NA gene sequencing was performed to determine the mutations that are associated with reduction of susceptibility to NAIs. A total of 117 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 59 A(H3N2), and 18 type B viruses were tested before NAI treatment and eight A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1 type B viruses were examined from patients after NAI treatment in the two seasons. NA inhibition assay showed type A influenza viruses were more susceptible to NAIs than type B viruses. The peramivir and laninamivir IC₅₀ values of both type A and B viruses were significantly lower than the oseltamivir and zanamivir IC₅₀ values. Among influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, the prevalence of H274Y viruses increased from 0% in the 2009-2010 season to 3% in the 2010-2011 season. These H274Y viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and peramivir with 200-300 fold increase in IC₅₀ values but remained sensitive to zanamivir and laninamivir. Other mutations in NA, such as I222T and M241I were identified among the outliers. Among influenza A(H3N2) viruses, two outliers were identified with D151G and T148I mutations, which exhibited a reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir, respectively. Among type B viruses, no outliers were identified to the four NAIs. For paired samples that were collected before and after drug treatment, three (3/11; 27.3%) H274Y viruses were identified among A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses after oseltamivir treatment but no outliers were found in the laninamivir-treatment group (n=3). Despite widespread use of

  10. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  11. Proline-based Phosphoramidite Reagents for the Reductive Ligation of S-Nitrosothiols

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    S-Nitrosothiols have many biological implications but are rarely used in organic synthesis. In this work we report the development of proline-based phosphoramidite substrates that can effectively convert S-nitrosothiols to proline-based sulfenamides through a reductive ligation process. A unique property of this method is that the phosphine oxide moiety on the ligation products can be readily removed under acidic conditions. In conjugation with the facile preparation of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) from the corresponding thiols (RSH), this method provides a new way to prepare proline-based sulfenamides from simple thiol starting materials. PMID:26758493

  12. Toll-like receptor 9 ligand D-type oligodeoxynucleotide D35 as a broad inhibitor for influenza A virus replication that is associated with suppression of neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Nagase, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Shigefumi

    2016-05-01

    The most effective drugs available to treat influenza are neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, which provide important additional measures for the control of influenza virus infections. However, since the emergence of NA inhibitor-resistant viruses may compromise the clinical utility of this class of anti-influenza agents, it is very important to develop new anti-influenza agents which target a different region in NA responsible for its sensitivity from that for NA inhibitors and could be used to treat NA inhibitors-resistant isolates. The oligodeoxynucleotide D35, multimerized and aggregated, suppressed replication of influenza A viruses except A/WSN/33 (WSN). The suppressive viral replication by D35 depended on G-terad and multimer formation. The range of the suppressive viral replication at the late stage, including virus assembly and release from infected cells, was much larger than that at the initial stage, viral attachment and entry. D35 suppressed NA activity of influenza A viruses. Furthermore, replacing the NA gene of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8), in which viral replication was inhibited by D35 at the late stage, with the NA gene from WSN, in which viral replication was not inhibited, eliminated the D35-dependent suppression. D35 showed an additive anti-influenza effect with oseltamivir. It was also effective in vivo. These results suggest that the influenza virus NA mainly contributes to the D35-suppressible virus release from infected cells at the late stage. In addition, because administration of D35 into the virus-infected mice suppressed viral replication and weight loss, clinical application of D35 could be considered. PMID:26923882

  13. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations. PMID:25592264

  14. Kinetic, thermodynamic and structural analysis of tamiphosphor binding to neuraminidase of H1N1 (2009) pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Albiñana, Carlos Berenguer; Machara, Aleš; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Pachl, Petr; Konvalinka, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Influenza virus causes severe respiratory infections that are responsible for up to half a million deaths worldwide each year. Two inhibitors targeting viral neuraminidase have been approved to date (oseltamivir, zanamivir). However, the rapid development of antiviral drug resistance and the efficient transmission of resistant viruses among humans represent serious threats to public health. The approved influenza neuraminidase inhibitors have (oxa)cyclohexene scaffolds designed to mimic the oxonium transition state during enzymatic cleavage of sialic acid. Their active forms contain a carboxylate that interacts with three arginine residues in the enzyme active site. Recently, the phosphonate group was successfully used as an isostere of the carboxylate in oseltamivir, and the resulting compound, tamiphosphor, was identified as a highly active neuraminidase inhibitor. However, the structure of the complex of this promising inhibitor with neuraminidase has not yet been reported. Here, we analyzed the interaction of a set of oseltamivir and tamiphosphor derivatives with neuraminidase from the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus. We thermodynamically characterized the binding of oseltamivir carboxylate or tamiphosphor to the neuraminidase catalytic domain by protein microcalorimetry, and we determined crystal structure of the catalytic domain in complex with tamiphosphor at 1.8 Å resolution. This structural information should aid rational design of the next generation of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27236066

  15. Neuraminidase Resistant Sialosides for the Detection of Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Yang, Yang; Iyer, Suri S

    2016-06-15

    We report the synthesis of influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) resistant sialosides that include different glycoside linkages (C-, S-, and triazole). These unnatural sialosides were printed onto glass slides to generate a small focused microarray. We evaluated the binding affinity of multiple lectins and compared the stability of these sialosides with O-linked sialosides toward influenza virus neuraminidase and intact virus. We demonstrated the ability of these molecules to capture eight different strains of influenza virus at ambient temperature without the addition of NA inhibitors. The glycans capture extremely low, clinically relevant concentrations of viruses and each strain gives rise to a specific "fingerprint" binding pattern, which could potentially be used in rapid diagnostic tests. PMID:27139196

  16. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  17. A virtual screening approach for identifying plants with anti H5N1 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Nur Kusaira Khairul; Durrant, Jacob D; Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Zalaludin, Ayunni Salihah; Purwitasari, Neny; Mohamed, Nornisah; Rahim, Aisyah Saad Abdul; Lam, Chan Kit; Normi, Yahaya M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Amaro, Rommie E; Wahab, Habibah A

    2015-02-23

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  18. Glycan specificity of neuraminidases determined in microarray format.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Diaz, Jason P; Luebke, Kevin J; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-06-16

    Neuraminidases hydrolytically remove sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Neuraminidases are produced by both humans and their pathogens, and function in normal physiology and in pathological events. Identification of neuraminidase substrates is needed to reveal their mechanism of action, but high-throughput methods to determine glycan specificity of neuraminidases are limited. Here we use two glycan labeling reactions to monitor neuraminidase activity toward glycan substrates. While both periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL) can be used to monitor neuraminidase activity toward glycans in microtiter plates, only GAL accurately measured neuraminidase activity toward glycans displayed on a commercial glass slide microarray. Using GAL, we confirm known linkage specificities of three pneumococcal neuraminidases and obtain new information about underlying glycan specificity. PMID:27131125

  19. Trypsin inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Trixi; Simic, Oliver; Skaanderup, Philip R; Namoto, Kenji; Berst, Frederic; Ehrhardt, Claus; Schiering, Nikolaus; Mueller, Irene; Woelcke, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Proline-based trypsin inhibitors occupying the S1-S2-S1' region were identified by an HTS screening campaign. It was discovered that truncation of the P1' moiety and appropriate extension into the S4 region led to highly potent trypsin inhibitors with excellent selectivity against related serine proteases and a favorable hERG profile. PMID:27476144

  20. Influenza neuraminidase as a vaccine antigen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase protein of influenza viruses is a surface glycoprotein that has enzymatic activity to remove sialic acid, the viral receptor, from both viral and host proteins. The removal of sialic acid from viral proteins plays a key role in the release of the virus from the cell by preventing ...

  1. Combining Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics to Predict the Binding Modes of Flavonoid Derivatives with the Neuraminidase of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Control of flavonoid derivatives inhibitors release through the inhibition of neuraminidase has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of H1N1 influenza disease. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation techniques to optimize the 2009 H1N1 influenza neuraminidase X-ray crystal structure. Molecular docking of the compounds revealed the possible binding mode. Our molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solvated interaction energies technique was applied to predict the docking models of the inhibitors in the binding pocket of the H1N1 influenza neuraminidase. In the simulations, the correlation of the predicted and experimental binding free energies of all 20 flavonoid derivatives inhibitors is satisfactory, as indicated by R2 = 0.75. PMID:22605992

  2. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  3. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc) is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc) were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media. PMID:22963456

  4. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Antibody Escape Promotes Neuraminidase Antigenic Variation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.; Das, Suman R.; Gibbs, James S.; Bailey, Adam L.; Schmidt, Loren M.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature. PMID:21364978

  5. [Purification of neuraminidase from influenza virus on an immunosorbent].

    PubMed

    Iakubov, L A; Savich, I M; Beklemishev, A B

    1984-10-01

    A procedure for isolation of neuraminidase from influenza virus using the nonionic detergent Triton x-100 was developed. To achieve further purification, the protein mixture was passed through a Sepharose column packed with immobilized antibodies against hemagglutinin. The neuraminidase preparation thus obtained fully retained its enzymatic and antigenic properties and during electrophoretic separation under denaturating conditions gave one protein band. PMID:6440594

  6. Clinical effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors--oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, and peramivir--for treatment of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 infection: an observational study in the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Reiko; Sato, Isamu; Kawashima, Takashi; Dapat, Clyde; Dapat, Isolde Caperig; Kondo, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Saito, Kousuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    The clinical effectiveness of the newly released neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) laninamivir and peramivir has not been sufficiently evaluated in influenza-infected patients in clinical and practical settings. In this study, we analyzed the clinical data of 211 patients infected with influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (A(H3N2)) and 45 patients infected with influenza A virus subtype H1N1pdm (A(H1N1)pdm09) who received the NAIs oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, or peramivir during the 2010-2011 influenza season. The duration of fever from the first dose of the NAI to fever alleviation to <37.5 °C was evaluated as an indicator of the clinical effectiveness of the NAIs in the influenza-infected patients. For the A(H3N2)-infected patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed the peramivir treatment group had the fastest time of fever alleviation to <37.5 °C (median 17.0 h, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 7.2-26.8 h) of the four treatment groups. No significant difference was found in the time to fever alleviation among the other antivirals, oseltamivir, zanamivir, and laninamivir. Results of multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional-hazards model (hazard ratio 3.321) adjusted for the factors age, sex, body weight, vaccination status, time from onset to the clinic visit, and body temperature showed significantly faster fever alleviation in the peramivir treatment group compared with the oseltamivir treatment group. For the A(H1N1)pdm09-infected patients, only the oseltamivir and zanamivir treatment groups were compared, and no significant difference in time to alleviation of fever was observed between the two groups. Based on a cycling probe real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, none of the A(H1N1)pdm09 strains in this study had the H275Y mutation conferring oseltamivir resistance. Further evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of the newly released NAIs for influenza-infected patients, including those infected with A(H1N1)pdm09, is needed. PMID:22644080

  7. Promiscuous catalysis of asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes to β-nitrostyrene by the proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yufeng; Geertsema, Edzard M; Tepper, Pieter G; Zandvoort, Ellen; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-21

    Exploiting catalytic promiscuity: The proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) promiscuously catalyzes asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes--ranging from acetaldehyde to octanal--to trans-β-nitrostyrene in aqueous solvent. The presence of 1.4 mol% of 4-OT effected formation of the anticipated γ-nitroaldehydes in fair to good yields with dr values of up to 93:7 and ee values of up to 81 %. PMID:23303727

  8. A membrane-associated neuraminidase in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Udezulu, I A; Leitch, G J

    1987-01-01

    Trophozoites of the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica HM-1:IMSS possess a surface neuraminidase capable of liberating N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) from N-acetylneuramin-lactose (alpha 2----3 or alpha 2----6) or mucin in their medium. The neuraminidase was found to be membrane associated, with more than 50% of the yield being recovered in the plasma membrane fraction. The neuraminidase specific activity of the plasma membrane fraction was six times that of internal membrane fraction enzyme. The optimum pH and temperature for this enzyme were 6.7 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Neuraminidase activity was inhibited by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, and the optimum Ca2+ concentration was 2 mM. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin D (30 micrograms/ml) inhibited motility and neuraminidase activity of intact Entamoeba trophozoites. The cytochalasin D-induced loss of surface neuraminidase activity was explained in part by a redistribution of enzyme with a loss of plasma membrane enzyme and an increase in intracellular membrane enzyme. A qualitatively similar cytochalasin D effect was observed with two other membrane-associated enzymes, calcium-regulated ATPase and acid phosphatase. Membrane-associated enzyme was minimally affected by Triton X-100 and saponin. An N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, optimum pH, 7.4, was found in trophozoite homogenate supernatant fractions. NANA and NANA-containing compounds stimulated trophozoite-directed motility. This motility stimulation by NANA-containing compounds did not apparently require prior release of free NANA by the trophozoite surface neuraminidase. Entamoeba neuraminidase is one of a series of enzymes that may modify the mucus blanket and target cell surface and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. PMID:2878886

  9. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  10. Neuraminidase of Influenza A Virus Binds Lysosome-Associated Membrane Proteins Directly and Induces Lysosome Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiangwu; Yan, Yiwu; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ning; Sheng, Miaomiao; Zhang, Lifang; Li, Xiao; Liang, Zhu; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Kangtai; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yanxu; Zou, Zhen; Du, Jianchao; Zhong, Ying; Zhou, Huandi; Yang, Peng; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Li, Dangsheng; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a recycling center, lysosomes are filled with numerous acid hydrolase enzymes that break down waste materials and invading pathogens. Recently, lysosomal cell death has been defined as “lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of lysosome contents into cytosol.” Here, we show that the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 influenza A virus markedly deglycosylates and degrades lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs; the most abundant membrane proteins of lysosome), which induces lysosomal rupture, and finally leads to cell death of alveolar epithelial carcinoma A549 cells and human tracheal epithelial cells. The NA inhibitors peramivir and zanamivir could effectively block the deglycosylation of LAMPs, inhibit the virus cell entry, and prevent cell death induced by the H5N1 influenza virus. The NA of seasonal H1N1 virus, however, does not share these characteristics. Our findings not only reveal a novel role of NA in the early stage of the H5N1 influenza virus life cycle but also elucidate the molecular mechanism of lysosomal rupture crucial for influenza virus induced cell death. IMPORTANCE The integrity of lysosomes is vital for maintaining cell homeostasis, cellular defense and clearance of invading pathogens. This study shows that the H5N1 influenza virus could induce lysosomal rupture through deglycosylating lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) mediated by the neuraminidase activity of NA protein. NA inhibitors such as peramivir and zanamivir could inhibit the deglycosylation of LAMPs and protect lysosomes, which also further interferes with the H5N1 influenza virus infection at early stage of life cycle. This work is significant because it presents new concepts for NA's function, as well as for influenza inhibitors' mechanism of action, and could partially explain the high mortality and high viral load after H5N1 virus infection in human beings and why NA inhibitors have more potent therapeutic effects for lethal avian

  11. Photodegradation and inhibition of drug-resistant influenza virus neuraminidase using anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Shuho; Takahashi, Daisuke; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-02-11

    The anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids designed effectively degraded not only non-drug-resistant neuraminidase but also drug-resistant neuraminidase, which is an important target of anti-influenza therapy. Degradation was achieved using long-wavelength UV radiation in the absence of any additives and under neutral conditions. Moreover, the hybrids efficiently inhibited neuraminidase activities upon photo-irradiation. PMID:23282898

  12. Neuraminidase-Dependent Degradation of Polysialic Acid Is Required for the Lamination of Newly Generated Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Mari; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Tanii, Takashi; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal granule cells (GCs) are generated throughout the lifetime and are properly incorporated into the innermost region of the granule cell layer (GCL). Hypotheses for the well-regulated lamination of newly generated GCs suggest that polysialic acid (PSA) is present on the GC surface to modulate GC-to-GC interactions, regulating the process of GC migration; however, direct evidence of this involvement is lacking. We show that PSA facilitates the migration of newly generated GCs and that the activity of N-acetyl-α-neuraminidase 1 (NEU1, sialidase 1) cleaves PSA from immature GCs, terminating their migration in the innermost GCL. Developing a migration assay of immature GCs in vitro, we found that the pharmacological depletion of PSA prevents the migration of GCs, whereas the inhibition of PSA degradation with a neuraminidase inhibitor accelerates this migration. We found that NEU1 is highly expressed in immature GCs. The knockdown of NEU1 in newly generated GCs in vivo increased PSA presence on these cells, and attenuated the proper termination of GC migration in the innermost GCL. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel mechanism that underlies the proper lamination of newly generated GCs through the modulation of PSA presence by neuronal NEU1. PMID:26731280

  13. Selective binding of antiinfluenza drugs and their analogues to 'open' and 'closed' conformations of H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Zhang, John Z H

    2010-10-14

    It was suggested that the open conformation of the 150-loop of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase is intrinsically lower in energy than the closed conformation and that oseltamivir (tamiflu) favors binding to the closed conformation through a relatively slow conformational change [Russell, R. J. Nature 2006, 443, 45-49]. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the binding mechanism of five ligands to H5N1 neuraminidase (H5N1 NA) with the 150-loop in both open and closed conformations through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and MM/PBSA free energy calculation. Our result shows that the electrostatic interactions between polar groups on the 150-loop and the charged groups of the ligands play a key role on the binding selectivity. In particular, ligands having a small positively charged group favor binding to the closed conformation of H5N1 NA, while those having a large positively charged group generally prefer binding to the open conformation. Our analysis suggests that it may be possible to design new inhibitors with large basic groups that are selective for the open conformation and thereby have stronger binding affinity to H5N1 neuraminidase. PMID:20860351

  14. A sialic acid-derived phosphonate analog inhibits different strains of influenza virus neuraminidase with different efficiencies.

    PubMed

    White, C L; Janakiraman, M N; Laver, W G; Philippon, C; Vasella, A; Air, G M; Luo, M

    1995-02-01

    A phosphonate analog of N-acetyl neuraminic acid (PANA) has been designed as a potential neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor and synthesized as both the alpha (ePANA) and beta (aPANA) anomers. Inhibition of type A (N2) and type B NA activity by ePANA was approximately a 100-fold better than by sialic acid, but inhibition of type A (N9) NA was only ten-fold better than by sialic acid. The aPANA compound was not a strong inhibitor for any of the NA strains tested. The crystal structures at 2.4 A resolution of ePANA complexed to type A (N2) NA, type A (N9) NA and type B NA and aPANA complexed to type A (N2) NA showed that neither of the PANA compounds distorted the NA active site upon binding. No significant differences in the NA-ePANA complex structures were found to explain the anomalous inhibition of N9 neuraminidase by ePANA. We put forward the hypothesis that an increase in the ePANA inhibition compared to that caused by sialic acid is due to (1) a stronger electrostatic interaction between the inhibitor phosphonyl group and the active site arginine pocket and (2) a lower distortion energy requirement for binding of ePANA. PMID:7844831

  15. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus Carrying a Q136K Mutation in the Neuraminidase Gene Is Resistant to Zanamivir but Exhibits Reduced Fitness in the Guinea Pig Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Michael M.; Ohnemus, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of influenza A viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors can arise through mutations in the neuraminidase (NA) gene. We show here that a Q136K mutation in the NA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus confers a high degree of resistance to zanamivir. Resistance is accompanied by reduced numbers of NA molecules in viral particles and reduced intrinsic enzymatic activity of mutant NA. Interestingly, the Q136K mutation strongly impairs viral fitness in the guinea pig transmission model. PMID:23192869

  16. A Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase mutation that diminished hemagglutination and neuraminidase activity did not change infectivity and pathogenecity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, requires recognition and attachment of the virions to host cell receptors containing sialic acid residues. Recognition of sialic acid-containing proteins is mediated by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of...

  17. A single amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus results in increased fusion and decreased neuraminidase activities without changes in virus pathotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) attachment to the host cell is mediated by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a multifunctional protein that has receptor recognition, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activities. The process that correlates receptor binding and fusion triggering is poorly understo...

  18. Neuroinflammation Induced by Intracerebroventricular Injection of Microbial Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María D.; Grondona, Jesús M.; Gómez-Roldán, María del Carmen; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Alvarez, Martina; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe the facts that took place in the rat brain after a single injection of the enzyme neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle. After injection, it diffused through the cerebrospinal fluid of the ipsilateral ventricle and the third ventricle, and about 400 μm into the periventricular brain parenchyma. The expression of ICAM1 in the endothelial cells of the periventricular vessels, IBA1 in microglia, and GFAP in astrocytes notably increased in the regions reached by the injected neuraminidase. The subependymal microglia and the ventricular macrophages begun to express IL1β and some appeared to cross the ependymal layer. After about 4 h of the injection, leukocytes migrated from large venules of the affected choroid plexus, the meninges and the local subependyma, and infiltrated the brain. The invading cells arrived orderly: first neutrophils, then macrophage-monocytes, and last CD8α-positive T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Leukocytes in the ventricles and the perivascular zones penetrated the brain parenchyma passing through the ependyma and the glia limitans. Thus, it is likely that a great part of the damage produced by microorganism invading the brain may be due to their neuraminidase content. PMID:25853134

  19. Understanding the cross-resistance of oseltamivir to H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A neuraminidase mutations using multidimensional computational analyses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashona; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2015-01-01

    This study embarks on a comprehensive description of the conformational contributions to resistance of neuraminidase (N1) in H1N1 and H5N1 to oseltamivir, using comparative multiple molecular dynamic simulations. The available data with regard to elucidation of the mechanism of resistance as a result of mutations in H1N1 and H5N1 neuraminidases is not well established. Enhanced post-dynamic analysis, such as principal component analysis, solvent accessible surface area, free binding energy calculations, and radius of gyration were performed to gain a precise insight into the binding mode and origin of resistance of oseltamivir in H1N1 and H5N1 mutants. Three significant features reflecting resistance in the presence of mutations H274Y and I222K, of the protein complexed with the inhibitor are: reduced flexibility of the α-carbon backbone; an improved ΔEele of ~15 (kcal/mol) for H1N1 coupled with an increase in ΔGsol (~13 kcal/mol) from wild-type to mutation; a low binding affinity in comparison with the wild-type of ~2 (kcal/mol) and ~7 (kcal/mol) with respect to each mutation for the H5N1 systems; and reduced hydrophobicity of the overall surface structure due to an impaired hydrogen bonding network. We believe the results of this study will ultimately provide a useful insight into the structural landscape of neuraminidase-associated binding of oseltamivir. Furthermore, the results can be used in the design and development of potent inhibitors of neuraminidases. PMID:26257512

  20. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA) is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity. PMID:26267136

  1. Structure prediction and analysis of neuraminidase sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M

    2016-07-01

    Analyzing protein structure has become an integral aspect of understanding systems of biochemical import. The laboratory experiment endeavors to introduce protein folding to ascertain structures of proteins for which the structure is unavailable, as well as to critically evaluate the quality of the prediction obtained. The model system used is the highly mutable influenza virus protein neuraminidase, which is the key target in the development of therapeutics. In light of recent pandemics, understanding how mutations confer drug resistance, which translates at the molecular level to understanding how different sequence variants differ, constitutes an area of great interest because of the ramifications in public health. This lab targets upper level undergraduate biochemistry students, and aims to introduce tools to be used to explore protein folding and protein visualization in the context of the neuraminidase case study. Students proceed to critically evaluate the folded models by comparison with crystallographic structures. When validity is established, they fold a neuraminidase sequence for which a structure is not available. Through structural alignment and visual inspection of the 150 loop, students gain molecular insight into two possible conformations of the protein, which are actively being studied. Folding the third chosen sequence mimics a true research environment in allowing students to generate a structure from a sequence for which a structure was not previously available, and to assess whether their particular variant has an open or closed loop. From this vantage, they are then challenged to speculate about the connection between loop conformation and drug susceptibility. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):361-376, 2016. PMID:26900942

  2. In silico study on multidrug resistance conferred by I223R/H275Y double mutant neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hua; Wei, Kun; Bao, Jiguang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-11-01

    It was recently reported that an I223R/H275Y double mutant of neuraminidase (NA) creates a multidrug-resistant form of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus. However, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms is still lacking. We conducted a systematic in silico study to explore the structural basis underlying this multidrug resistance. By molecular docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we compared various biochemical and biophysical properties of the wild type, the I223R single mutant and the I223R/H275Y double mutant NA with two inhibitors, zanamivir (ZMR) and oseltamivir (G39). The binding free energy of oseltamivir with all types of NA was substantially lower than its zanamivir counterpart. On the other hand, the binding free energy of each inhibitor with wild type NA was generally higher than that with mutant NAs. MD simulation outcomes exemplify distinct patterns for oseltamivir and zanamivir with all types of NA. In particular, the stronger resistance of the double mutant NA relative to the wild and single mutant types can be ascribed to the overall looser but locally more compact structure of the former. Specifically, as a whole the double mutant NA adapts to the larger gyration radius and greater distance between charged atom groups, which is contrary to the pattern in the local binding site region. The enhanced resistance of all types of NA to oseltamivir rather than zanamivir might be accounted for similarly. We expect these findings to provide significant insights into improving inhibitors for the multidrug-resistant neuraminidase of H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:24056678

  3. Antiviral Susceptibility of Avian and Swine Influenza Virus of the N1 Neuraminidase Subtype▿

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Terri D.; Krauss, Scott; DuBois, Rebecca M.; Negovetich, Nicholas J.; Stallknecht, David E.; Senne, Dennis A.; Gramer, Marie R.; Swafford, Seth; DeLiberto, Tom; Govorkova, Elena A.; Webster, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses of the N1 neuraminidase (NA) subtype affecting both animals and humans caused the 2009 pandemic. Anti-influenza virus NA inhibitors are crucial early in a pandemic, when specific influenza vaccines are unavailable. Thus, it is urgent to confirm the antiviral susceptibility of the avian viruses, a potential source of a pandemic virus. We evaluated the NA inhibitor susceptibilities of viruses of the N1 subtype isolated from wild waterbirds, swine, and humans. Most avian viruses were highly or moderately susceptible to oseltamivir (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], <5.1 to 50 nM). Of 91 avian isolates, 7 (7.7%) had reduced susceptibility (IC50, >50 nM) but were sensitive to the NA inhibitors zanamivir and peramivir. Oseltamivir susceptibility ranged more widely among the waterbird viruses (IC50, 0.5 to 154.43 nM) than among swine and human viruses (IC50, 0.33 to 2.56 nM). Swine viruses were sensitive to oseltamivir, compared to human seasonal H1N1 isolated before 2007 (mean IC50, 1.4 nM). Avian viruses from 2007 to 2008 were sensitive to oseltamivir, in contrast to the emergence of resistant H1N1 in humans. Susceptibility remained high to moderate over time among influenza viruses. Sequence analysis of the outliers did not detect molecular markers of drug-resistance (e.g., H275Y NA mutation [N1 numbering]) but revealed mutations outside the NA active site. In particular, V267I, N307D, and V321I residue changes were found, and structural analyses suggest that these mutations distort hydrophobic pockets and affect residues in the NA active site. We determined that natural oseltamivir resistance among swine and wild waterbirds is rare. Minor naturally occurring variants in NA can affect antiviral susceptibility. PMID:20660186

  4. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a neuraminidase gene from Arcanobacterium pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Jost, B H; Songer, J G; Billington, S J

    2001-07-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes is an opportunistic pathogen, associated with suppurative infections in domestic animals. In addition to pyolysin, a pore-forming, cholesterol-binding toxin, A. pyogenes expresses a number of putative virulence factors, including several proteases and neuraminidase activity. A 3,009-bp gene, nanH, was cloned and sequenced and conferred neuraminidase activity on an Escherichia coli host strain. The predicted 107-kDa NanH protein displayed similarity to a number of bacterial neuraminidases and contained the RIP/RLP motif and five copies of the Asp box motif found in all bacterial neuraminidases. Recombinant His-tagged NanH was found to have pH and temperature optima of 5.5 to 6.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Insertional deletion of the nanH gene resulted in the reduction, but not absence, of neuraminidase activity, indicating the presence of a second neuraminidase gene in A. pyogenes. NanH was localized to the A. pyogenes cell wall. A. pyogenes adhered to HeLa, CHO, and MDBK cells in a washing-resistant manner. However, the nanH mutant was not defective for adherence to epithelial cells. The role of NanH in host epithelial cell adherence may be masked by the presence of a second neuraminidase in A. pyogenes. PMID:11401983

  5. Structural Studies of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Tetramer in Complex with Its Receptor, Sialyllactose

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Thompson, Thomas B.; Wurzburg, Beth A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) functions in virus attachment to cells, cleavage of sialic acid from oligosaccharides, and stimulating membrane fusion during virus entry into cells. The structural basis for these diverse functions remains to be fully understood. We report the crystal structures of the parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) HN and its complexes with sialic acid, the inhibitor DANA, and the receptor sialyllactose. SV5 HN shares common structural features with HN of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and human parainfluenza 3 (HPIV3), but unlike the previously determined HN structures, the SV5 HN forms a tetramer in solution, which is thought to be the physiological oligomer. The sialyllactose complex reveals intact receptor within the active site, but no major conformational changes in the protein. The SV5 HN structures do not support previously proposed models for HN action in membrane fusion and suggest alternative mechanisms by which HN may promote virus entry into cells.

  6. Neuraminidase inhibitory activities of quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids from Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Young Bae; Lee, Woo Song; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes food poisoning. The neuraminidase (NA) protein of C. perfringens plays a pivotal role in bacterial proliferation and is considered a novel antibacterial drug target. Based on screens for novel NA inhibitors, a 95% EtOH extract of Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome showed NA inhibitory activity (68% at 30 μg/ml), which resulted in the isolation of 10 isoquinoline alkaloids; namely, palmatine (1), berberine (2), coptisine (3), pseudodehydrocorydaline (4), jatrorrhizine (5), dehydrocorybulbine (6), pseudocoptisine (7), glaucine (8), corydaline (9) and tetrahydrocoptisine (10). Interestingly, seven quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids 1-7 (IC50 = 12.8 ± 1.5 to 65.2 ± 4.5 μM) showed stronger NA inhibitory activity than the tertiary alkaloids 8-10. In addition, highly active compounds 1 and 2 showed reversible non-competitive behavior based on a kinetic study. Molecular docking simulations using the Autodock 4.2 software increased our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of these compounds. In addition, we demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 suppressed bacterial growth. PMID:25277281

  7. A mutant influenza virus that uses an N1 neuraminidase as the receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Kathryn A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2013-12-01

    In the vast majority of influenza A viruses characterized to date, hemagglutinin (HA) is the receptor-binding and fusion protein, whereas neuraminidase (NA) is a receptor-cleaving protein that facilitates viral release but is expendable for entry. However, the NAs of some recent human H3N2 isolates have acquired receptor-binding activity via the mutation D151G, although these isolates also appear to retain the ability to bind receptors via HA. We report here the laboratory generation of a mutation (G147R) that enables an N1 NA to completely co-opt the receptor-binding function normally performed by HA. Viruses with this mutant NA grow to high titers even in the presence of extensive mutations to conserved residues in HA's receptor-binding pocket. When the receptor-binding NA is paired with this binding-deficient HA, viral infectivity and red blood cell agglutination are blocked by NA inhibitors. Furthermore, virus-like particles expressing only the receptor-binding NA agglutinate red blood cells in an NA-dependent manner. Although the G147R NA receptor-binding mutant virus that we characterize is a laboratory creation, this same mutation is found in several natural clusters of H1N1 and H5N1 viruses. Our results demonstrate that, at least in tissue culture, influenza virus receptor-binding activity can be entirely shifted from HA to NA. PMID:24027333

  8. Biophysical measurement of the balance of influenza a hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities.

    PubMed

    Benton, Donald J; Martin, Stephen R; Wharton, Stephen A; McCauley, John W

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of influenza A viruses with the cell surface is controlled by the surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). These two glycoproteins have opposing activities: HA is responsible for binding the host receptor (sialic acid) to allow infection, and NA is responsible for cleaving the receptor to facilitate virus release. Several studies have demonstrated that compatible levels of HA and NA activity are required for a virus to replicate efficiently. This is consequently of great interest for determining virus transmissibility. The concurrent role of these two proteins in receptor binding has never been directly measured. We demonstrate a novel biophysical approach based on bio-layer interferometry to measure the balance of the activities of these two proteins in real time. This technique measures virus binding to and release from a surface coated with either the human-like receptor analog α2,6-linked sialic acid or the avian-like receptor analog α2,3-linked sialic acid in both the presence and absence of NA inhibitors. Bio-layer interferometry measurements were also carried out to determine the effect of altering HA receptor affinity and NA stalk length on receptor binding. PMID:25586179

  9. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase Substrates Identified through Comparative Proteomics Enabled by Chemoselective Labeling.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-04-20

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) are enzymes that hydrolytically remove sialic acid from sialylated proteins and lipids. Neuraminidases are encoded by a range of human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Many pathogen neuraminidases are virulence factors, indicating that desialylation of host glycoconjugates can be a critical step in infection. Specifically, desialylation of host cell surface glycoproteins can enable these molecules to function as pathogen receptors or can alter signaling through the plasma membrane. Despite these critical effects, no unbiased approaches exist to identify glycoprotein substrates of neuraminidases. Here, we combine previously reported glycoproteomics methods with quantitative proteomics analysis to identify glycoproteins whose sialylation changes in response to neuraminidase treatment. The two glycoproteomics methods-periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL)-rely on chemoselective labeling of sialylated and nonsialylated glycoproteins, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of the combined approaches by identifying substrates of two pneumococcal neuraminidases in a human cell line that models the blood-brain barrier. The methods deliver complementary lists of neuraminidase substrates, with GAL identifying a larger number of substrates than PAL (77 versus 17). Putative neuraminidase substrates were confirmed by other methods, establishing the validity of the approach. Among the identified substrates were host glycoproteins known to function in bacteria adherence and infection. Functional assays suggest that multiple desialylated cell surface glycoproteins may act together as pneumococcus receptors. Overall, this method will provide a powerful approach to identify glycoproteins that are desialylated by both purified neuraminidases and intact pathogens. PMID:26954852

  10. Immunity Against Parainfluenza-3 Virus in Cattle: Anti-Neuraminidase Activity in Serum and Nasal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Morein, B.; Höglund, S.; Bergman, R.

    1973-01-01

    The antigenicity of two parainfluenza=3 virus strains, a “neuraminidasestrong” and a “neuraminidase-weak,” was compared. For both strains the amount of hemagglutinin units was equal. The antibody responses to neuraminidase and hemagglutinin were measured on samples of serum and nasal secretion and were found to be similar, irrespective of the strain used for immunization. Anti-neuraminidase activity was demonstrated in the gel phase of nasal secretion of immunized cattle. Immunglobulin A was found attached to the peplomers of inhibited virus by immuno-electron microscopy. Images PMID:4355138

  11. Interface dynamics explain assembly dependency of influenza neuraminidase catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    von Grafenstein, Susanne; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Kirchmair, Johannes; Fuchs, Julian E.; Huber, Roland G.; Schmidtke, Michaela; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Rollinger, Judith M.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (iNA) is a homotetrameric surface protein of the influenza virus and an established target for antiviral drugs. In contrast to neuraminidases (NAs) of other biological systems (non-iNAs), enzymatic activity of iNA is only observed in a quaternary assembly and iNA needs the tetramerization to mediate enzymatic activity. Obviously, differences on a molecular level between iNA and non-iNAs are responsible for this intriguing observation. Comparison between protein structures and multiple sequence alignment allow the identification of differences in amino acid composition in crucial regions of the enzyme, such as next to the conserved D151 and the 150-loop. These differences in amino acid sequence and protein tetramerization are likely to alter the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate differences in the molecular flexibility of monomers, dimers, and tetramers of iNAs of subtype N1 (avian 2004, pandemic 1918 and pandemic 2009 iNA) and as comparison the non-iNA monomer from Clostridium perfringens. We show that conformational transitions of iNA are crucially influenced by its assembly state. The protein–protein interface induces a complex hydrogen-bonding network between the 110-helix and the 150-loop, which consequently stabilizes the structural arrangement of the binding site. Therefore, we claim that these altered dynamics are responsible for the dependence of iNA’s catalytic activity on the tetrameric assembly. Only the tetramerization-induced balance between stabilization and altered local flexibility in the binding site provides the appropriate arrangement of key residues for iNA’s catalytic activity. PMID:24279589

  12. Purification and properties of rabbit spermatozoal acrosomal neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, P N; Abou-Issa, H

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of rabbit spermatozoa with 50mM-MgCl2 removes the plasma and the outer acrosomal membranes. Subsequent treatment with the detergents Hyamine 2389 and Triton X-100 solubilizes spermatozoal neuraminidase bound to the inner acrosomal membrane. The enzyme was further purified by DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-150 and Bio-Gel P-300 column chromato. The enzyme showed a single major band, with the possibility of some minor contaminants, on disc-gel electrophoresis. It had a specific activity of 0.37 micronmal of sialic acid released/min per mg with purified boar Cowper's-gland mucin as the substrate. The enzyme had marked specificity for 2 leads to 6'-linked sialic acid in glycoproteins. The Km of spermatozoal neuraminidase was 1.72 X 10(-6)M with Cowper's-gland mucin, 1.17 X 10(-5)M with fetuin and 8.8 X 10(-4)M with sialyl-lactose as a substrates. The Vmax. was 0.112 micronmol/min per mg with the Cowper's-gland mucin, 0.071 micronmol/min per mg with fetuin and 0.033 micronmol/min per mg with sialyl-lactose as substrate. The enzyme hydrolysed sheep submaxillary-gland mucin as readily as the Cowper's-gland mucin. The optimum of enzyme activity was at pH 5.0 on the Cowper's-gland mucin and at pH4.3 on sialyl-lactose. The enzyme activity was unaffected by 20mM-Na+ and-K+, but was inhibited by 20mM-Ca2+,-Mn2+,-Co2+ and -Cu2+. The enzyme was unstable in dilute solutions, but could be stored indefinitely freeze-dried at --20 degrees C. Images PLATE 1 PMID:66917

  13. Novel binding patterns between ganoderic acids and neuraminidase: Insights from docking, molecular dynamics and MM/PBSA studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-04-01

    Recently, ganoderic acids (GAs) give rise to the attractive candidates of novel neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. However, there is still no evident conclusion about their binding patterns. To this end, docking, molecular dynamics and MM/PBSA methods were combined to study the binding profiles of GAs with the N1 protein and familiar H274Y and N294S mutations (A/Vietnam/1203/04 stain). It was found that the binding affinities of ganoderic acid DM and Z (ΔGbind, -16.83 and -10.99 kcal mol(-1)) are comparable to that of current commercial drug oseltamivir (-23.62 kcal mol(-1)). Electrostatic interaction is the main driving force, and should be one important factor to evaluate the binding quality and rational design of NA inhibitors. The 150-loop residues Asp151 and Arg152 played an important role in the binding processes. Further analysis revealed that ganoderic acid DM is a potential source of anti-influenza ingredient, with novel binding pattern and advantage over oseltamivir. It had steric hindrance on the 150 cavity of N1 protein, and exerted activities across the H274Y and N294S mutations. This work also pointed out how to effectively design dual-site NA inhibitors and reinforce their affinities. These findings should prove valuable for the in-depth understanding of interactions between NA and GAs, and warrant the experimental aspects to design novel anti-influenza drugs. PMID:26905206

  14. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage. PMID:27255748

  15. Elastin Peptides Signaling Relies on Neuraminidase-1-Dependent Lactosylceramide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Rusciani, Anthony; Duca, Laurent; Sartelet, Hervé; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Bobichon, Hélène; Ploton, Dominique; Le Naour, Richard; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The sialidase activity of neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1) is responsible for ERK 1/2 pathway activation following binding of elastin peptide on the elastin receptor complex. In this work, we demonstrate that the receptor and lipid rafts colocalize at the plasma membrane. We also show that the disruption of these microdomains as well as their depletion in glycolipids blocks the receptor signaling. Following elastin peptide treatment, the cellular GM3 level decreases while lactosylceramide (LacCer) content increases consistently with a GM3/LacCer conversion. The use of lactose or Neu-1 siRNA blocks this process suggesting that the elastin receptor complex is responsible for this lipid conversion. Flow cytometry analysis confirms this elastin peptide-driven LacCer generation. Further, the use of a monoclonal anti-GM3 blocking antibody shows that GM3 is required for signaling. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that Neu-1-dependent GM3/LacCer conversion is the key event leading to signaling by the elastin receptor complex. As a consequence, we propose that LacCer is an early messenger for this receptor. PMID:21103358

  16. On the agglutinogens of red cells developed with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Takahashi, K

    1976-10-01

    It has been known that the agglutinability of human red cells is changed or enhanced by treatments with proteolytic enzymes or neuraminidase. In this paper, the serological properties of agglutinogens developed by proteolytic enzymes (bromelin, ficin, papain, trypsin and pronase) and neuraminidase are investigated by using antisera to trypsin- and neuraminidase-treated red cells. The adsorptions of the antiserum to trypsinized red cells with the cells treated with each of the proteolytic enzymes showed that the agglutinogens uncovered by bromelin, ficin and papain were different from those by pronase and trypsin. It was demonstrated that pronase was the most effective enzyme to uncover the agglutinogen located on deeper site of red cell membrane. This was confirmed by the agglutination with the test cells treated twice with two kinds of the enzymes. The reactions of the antiserum to neuraminidase-treated red cells treated with six kinds of the enzymes indicated that the agglutinogens developed by neuraminidase resembled those by bromelin, ficin and papain more than those by trypsin and pronase. PMID:982434

  17. Distribution of Neuraminidase among Food-poisoning Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Schekter, Marcia A.; Cherry, William B.

    1967-01-01

    A survey was made to determine the distribution of the enzyme neuraminidase among 76 strains of Clostridium perfringens. Representative strains from each toxigenic type (A to F) and atypical C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strains of both American and English (Hobbs types) origin were tested. Both the American food-poisoning and nonfood-poisoning associated cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative strains. Furthermore, American strains which could not be differentiated from the original Hobbs cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative representatives. In contrast, the English (Hobbs) strains uniformly failed to produce an active intracellular or extracellular neuraminidase. No enzyme activity was detected in these strains when cultures were grown in different growth media, when grown in the presence of substrate (neuraminlactose), or upon extended incubation of enzyme preparations with substrate. With the exception of a type F strain, representative strains of the other toxigenic types (A to F) produced neuraminidase; 85% of the typical type A strains contained the enzyme. PMID:4292823

  18. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the Micromonospora viridifaciens neuraminidase gene in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurada, K; Ohta, T; Hasegawa, M

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned the Micromonospora viridifaciens neuraminidase (EC 3.2.1.18) gene (nedA) in Streptomyces lividans. This was accomplished by using the vector pIJ702 and BglII-BclI libraries of M. viridifaciens chromosomal inserts created in S. lividans. The libraries were screened for the expression of neuraminidase by monitoring the cleavage of the fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-alpha-D-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid. Positive clones (BG6, BG7, BC4, and BC8) contained the identical 2-kb BclI-BglII fragment and expressed neuraminidase efficiently and constitutively using its own promoter in the heterologous host. From the nucleotide sequence analysis, an open reading frame of 1,941 bp which encodes a polypeptide with an M(r) of 68,840 was detected. The deduced amino acid sequence has five Asp boxes, -Ser-X-Asp-X-Gly-X-Thr-Trp, showing great similarity to other bacterial and viral neuraminidases. We have also identified the catalytic domain by using truncated proteins produced in S. lividans. Images PMID:1400240

  19. The discovery of (2R,4R)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N- (2-fluoro-4-(2-oxopyridin-1(2H)-yl)phenyl)-4-methoxypyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamide (PD 0348292), an orally efficacious factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Bigge, Christopher F; Bryant, John W; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Chi, Liguo; Cody, Wayne L; Dahring, Tawny; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Haarer, Staci; Heemstra, Ron; Janiczek, Nancy; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; McClanahan, Thomas; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaisheli; Schaum, Robert; Van Huis, Chad A; Welch, Kathleen M; Zhang, Erli; Leadley, Robert J; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-08-01

    Herein, we report the discovery of novel, proline-based factor Xa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. Through the additional incorporation of 1-(4-amino-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-pyridin-2-one 22, as a P4 pharmacophore, we discovered compound 7 (PD 0348292). This compound is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious FXa inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders. PMID:17683371

  20. Microcapsules functionalized with neuraminidase can enter vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weizhi; Wang, Xiaocong; Bai, Ke; Lin, Miao; Sukhorukov, Gleb; Wang, Wen

    2014-12-01

    Microcapsules made of polyelectrolyte multilayers exhibit no or low toxicity, appropriate mechanical stability, variable controllable degradation and can incorporate remote release mechanisms triggered by various stimuli, making them well suited for targeted drug delivery to live cells. This study investigates interactions between microcapsules made of synthetic (i.e. polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt/polyallylamine hydrochloride) or natural (i.e. dextran sulfate/poly-L-arginine) polyelectrolyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells with particular focus on the effect of the glycocalyx layer on the intake of microcapsules by endothelial cells. Neuraminidase cleaves N-acetyl neuraminic acid residues of glycoproteins and targets the sialic acid component of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Three-dimensional confocal images reveal that microcapsules, functionalized with neuraminidase, can be internalized by endothelial cells. Capsules without neuraminidase are blocked by the glycocalyx layer. Uptake of the microcapsules is most significant in the first 2 h. Following their internalization by endothelial cells, biodegradable DS/PArg capsules rupture by day 5; however, there is no obvious change in the shape and integrity of PSS/PAH capsules within the period of observation. Results from the study support our hypothesis that the glycocalyx functions as an endothelial barrier to cross-membrane movement of microcapsules. Neuraminidase-loaded microcapsules can enter endothelial cells by localized cleavage of glycocalyx components with minimum disruption of the glycocalyx layer and therefore have high potential to act as drug delivery vehicles to reach tissues beyond the endothelial barrier of blood vessels. PMID:25339691

  1. A SOE-PCR method of introducing multiple mutations into Mycoplasma gallisepticum neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Hongjun; Yu, Shengqing; Qiu, Xusheng; Song, Cuiping; Chen, Danqing; Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Fanqing; He, Suibin; Shen, Xinyue; Hu, Meirong; Ding, Chan

    2013-08-01

    A modified splicing with overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR) was generated to introduce 21 TGA to TGG at Mycoplasma gallisepticum MGA_0329 gene. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed and retained neuraminidase activities, indicating that SOE-PCR is a rapid and highly efficient method of introducing multiple mutations into large M. gallisepticum genes. PMID:23707236

  2. Biochemical characterisation of the neuraminidase pool of the human gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Mao M; Kulinich, Anna; Yao, Hong L; Ma, Hong Y; Martínez, Juana E R; Duan, Xu C; Chen, Huan; Cai, Zhi P; Flitsch, Sabine L; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2015-10-13

    Since the isolation and identification of Akkermansia muciniphila one decade ago, much attention has been drawn to this gut bacterium due to its role in obesity and type 2 diabetes. This report describes the discovery and biochemical characterisation of all four putative neuraminidases annotated in the A. muciniphila genome. Recombinantly expressed candidate genes, which were designated Am0705, Am0707, Am1757 and Am2085, were shown to cover complementary pH ranges between 4.0 and 9.5. Temperature optima of the enzymes lay between 37 and 42 °C. All four enzymes were strongly inhibited by Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), and loss of activity after the addition of EDTA suggests that all neuraminidases, with the exception of Am0707, require divalent metal ions for their catalytic function. Chemoenzymatically synthesised α2,3- and α2,6-linked indoyl-sialosides were utilised to determine the regioselectivity and substrate promiscuity of the neuraminidases towards C5-modifications of sialic acids with N-acetyl-, N-glycolyl-, N-propionyl-, or hydroxyl-groups. The combination of simple purification procedures and good activities of some of the characterised neuraminidases makes them potentially interesting as tools in bioanalytical or industrial applications. PMID:26340137

  3. Binding mechanism of H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase with ligands and its implication for drug design.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Li, Lin; Wang, Jing-Fang; Cheng, Feng; Wei, Dong-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-05-01

    To simulate new strategies for designing effective drugs against bird flu, we have carried out extensive studies by using various computer-aided drug design tools. Molecule AG7088 was first docked to the active site of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase (PBD code: 2HTY). The results thus obtained were compared with those by docking zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to the same receptor, respectively. It has been found that the compound AG7088 has better binding energy than zanamivir and oseltamivir. Thus, it was adopted as a template to perform the similarity search of 392,698 druggable compounds in order to find the leading candidates for the next step of modeling studies. Nine analogs of AG7088 were singled out through a series of docking studies. Finally, the molecular dynamics simulation technique was utilized to investigate into the binding interactions between the H5N1 receptor and the nine analogs, with a focus on the binding pocket, intermolecular surfaces and hydrogen bonds. This study may be used as a guide for mutagenesis studies for designing new inhibitors against H5N1. PMID:19442214

  4. Structural characterization of a protective epitope spanning A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus neuraminidase monomers

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Yang, Hua; Shore, David A.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Jin; Jiang, Lianlian; Carney, Paul J.; Villanueva, Julie; Stevens, James; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2015-01-01

    A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza A viruses predominated in the 2013–2014 USA influenza season, and although most of these viruses remain sensitive to Food and Drug Administration-approved neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, alternative therapies are needed. Here we show that monoclonal antibody CD6, selected for binding to the NA of the prototypic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, A/California/07/2009, protects mice against lethal virus challenge. The crystal structure of NA in complex with CD6 Fab reveals a unique epitope, where the heavy-chain complementarity determining regions (HCDRs) 1 and 2 bind one NA monomer, the light-chain CDR2 binds the neighbouring monomer, whereas HCDR3 interacts with both monomers. This 30-amino-acid epitope spans the lateral face of an NA dimer and is conserved among circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. These results suggest that the large, lateral CD6 epitope may be an effective target of antibodies selected for development as therapeutic agents against circulating H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:25668439

  5. The 340-cavity in neuraminidase provides new opportunities for influenza drug development: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Han, Nanyu; Mu, Yuguang; Miao, Huabiao; Yang, Yunjuan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Ding, Junmei; Xu, Bo; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-01-29

    Influenza neuraminidase (NA) is a pivotal target for viral infection control. However, the accumulating of mutations compromise the efficacy of NA inhibitors. Thus, it is critical to design new drugs targeted to different motifs of NA. Recently, a new motif called 340-cavity was discovered in NA subtypes close to the calcium binding site. The presence of calcium is known to influence NA activity and thermostability. Therefore, the 340-cavity is a putative ligand-binding site for affecting the normal function of NA. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of different NA subtypes to explore the mechanism of 340-loop formation. Ligand-binding site prediction and fragment library screening were also carried out to provide evidence for the 340-cavity as a druggable pocket. We found that residues G342 and P/R344 in the 340-loop determine the size of the 340-cavity, and the calcium ion plays an important role in maintaining the conformation of the 340-loop through contacts with G345 and Q347. In addition, the 340-cavity is predicted to be a ligand-binding site by metaPocket, and a sequence analysis method is proposed to predict the existence of the 340-cavity. Our study shows that the 340-cavity is not an occasional or atypical domain in NA subtypes, and it has potential to function as a new hotspot for influenza drug binding. PMID:26768362

  6. The role of antigenically different virus neuraminidases as structures implicated in receptor-binding processes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, M V; Luiz, M O; Cabral, M C; Couceiro, J N

    1995-06-01

    Influenza A viruses exhibit segmented nucleic acid coding for eight different proteins, two of them as glycoproteins exposed on their lipoprotein envelopes, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Hemagglutinin exhibits receptor-binding activity while neuraminidase develops sialidase cleavage activity which acts on cell receptors. Influenza A strains responsible for human, avian, equine and porcine respiratory infections all over the world present antigenically different hemagglutinin (H1 to H14) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) structures on their surface. The objective of the present investigation was to study the role of N2, N8, and N9, antigenically diverse neuraminidase structures of human (N2) and animal (N8 and N9) influenza viruses, in the receptor-binding process. Receptor-binding activity of N2 and N8 was analyzed by crossed tests using H3N2 and H3N8 antisera and the hemagglutination inhibition test as a model. Hemagglutinating activity of antigenically different N2 and N8 structures was demonstrable and was inhibited by homologous antisera (N2-H3N2, N8-H3N8) but not by heterologous antisera (N2-H3N8,N8-H3N2). This previously demonstrated N9 hemagglutinating activity was analyzed for receptor-binding specificity using hemagglutination tests and NeuAc alpha2,3Gal and NeuAc alpha2,6Gal derivatized erythrocytes. This highly purified N9 strain was obtained from a virus strain isolated from terns by Dr. Peter Colman (CSIRO Division of Biomolecular Engineering, Parkville, Victoria, Australia). It exhibited receptor-binding specificity for NeuAc alpha2,3Gal sequences, a property similar to that observed in hemagglutinins from avian strains. These results indicate the importance of antigenically different neuraminidase structures as alternative agents for developing receptor-binding activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8547843

  7. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable “hotspots” on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  8. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Jacob D; Bush, Robin M; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-08-25

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable "hotspots" on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  9. Production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa neuraminidase is increased under hyperosmolar conditions and is regulated by genes involved in alginate expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, G; Kays, M; Saiman, L; Prince, A

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex process attributed to specific characteristics of both the host and the infecting organism. In this study, the properties of the PAO1 neuraminidase were examined to determine its potential role in facilitating Pseudomonas colonization of the respiratory epithelium. The PAO1 neuraminidase was 1000-fold more active than the Clostridium perfringens enzyme in releasing sialic acid from respiratory epithelial cells. This effect correlated with increased adherence of PAO1 to epithelial cells after exposure to PAO1 neuraminidase and was consistent with in vitro studies demonstrating Pseudomonas adherence to asialoganglioside receptors. The regulation of the neuraminidase gene nanA was examined in Pseudomonas and as cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. In hyperosmolar conditions neuraminidase expression was increased by 50% (P less than 0.0004), an effect which was OmpR dependent in E. coli. In Pseudomonas the osmotic regulation of neuraminidase production was dependent upon algR1 and algR2, genes involved in the transcriptional activation of algD, which is responsible for the mucoid phenotype of Pseudomonas and pathognomonic for chronic infection in CF. Under the hyperosmolar conditions postulated to exist in the CF lung, nanA is likely to be expressed to facilitate the initial adherence of Pseudomonas to the respiratory tract. Images PMID:1601994

  10. Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza Neuraminidases via Generalized Born Molecular Dynamics and End-Point Free Energy Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Rommie E; Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Xu, Dong; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The comparative dynamics and inhibitor binding free energies of group-1 and group-2 pathogenic influenza A subtype neuraminidase (NA) enzymes are of fundamental biological interest and relevant to structure-based drug design studies for antiviral compounds. In this work, we present seven generalized Born molecular dynamics simulations of avian (N1)- and human (N9)-type NAs in order to probe the comparative flexibility of the two subtypes, both with and without the inhibitor oseltamivir bound. The enhanced sampling obtained through the implicit solvent treatment suggests several provocative insights into the dynamics of the two subtypes, including that the group-2 enzymes may exhibit similar motion in the 430-binding site regions but different 150-loop motion. End-point free energy calculations elucidate the contributions to inhibitor binding free energies and suggest that entropic considerations cannot be neglected when comparing across the subtypes. We anticipate the findings presented here will have broad implications for the development of novel antiviral compounds against both seasonal and pandemic influenza strains.

  11. Antiviral activity of baicalin against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus in cell culture and in mice and its inhibition of neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Dou, Jie; Teng, Zaijin; Yu, Jie; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Na; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Changlin

    2014-12-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a Chinese herbal decoction, has been used for the treatment of the common cold, fever and influenza virus infections. In previous studies, we found that oral administration of baicalein resulted in the inhibition of influenza A virus replication in vivo, which was linked to baicalin in serum. However, the effective dose and underlying mechanisms of the efficacy of baicalin against influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the antiviral effects of baicalin in influenza-virus-infected MDCK cells and mice were examined. The neuraminidase inhibition assay was performed to investigate the mechanism of action of baicalin. In vitro results showed that baicalin exhibited a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 43.3 μg/ml against the influenza A/FM1/1/47 (H1N1) virus and 104.9 μg/ml against the influenza A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) virus. When added to MDCK cell cultures after inoculation with influenza virus, baicalin demonstrated obvious antiviral activity that increased in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that baicalin affected virus budding. Baicalin had clear inhibitory effects against neuraminidases, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 52.3 μg/ml against the influenza A/FM1/1/47 (H1N1) virus and 85.8 μg/ml against the influenza A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) virus. In vivo studies showed that an intravenous injection of baicalin effectively reduced the death rate, prolonged the mean day to death (MDD) and improved the lung parameters of mice infected with influenza A virus. These results demonstrate that baicalin acts as a neuraminidase inhibitor, with clear inhibitory activities that are effective against different strains of influenza A virus in both cell culture and a mouse model, and that baicalin has potential utility in the management of influenza virus infections. PMID:25078390

  12. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Ping; Leser, George P.; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high {alpha}-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  13. Abrogation of Neuraminidase Reduces Biofilm Formation, Capsule Biosynthesis, and Virulence of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Kurniyati; Hu, Bo; Bian, Jiang; Sun, Jianlan; Zhang, Weiyan; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yaping

    2012-01-01

    The oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key etiological agent of human periodontitis, a prevalent chronic disease that affects up to 80% of the adult population worldwide. P. gingivalis exhibits neuraminidase activity. However, the enzyme responsible for this activity, its biochemical features, and its role in the physiology and virulence of P. gingivalis remain elusive. In this report, we found that P. gingivalis encodes a neuraminidase, PG0352 (SiaPg). Transcriptional analysis showed that PG0352 is monocistronic and is regulated by a sigma70-like promoter. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that SiaPg is an exo-α-neuraminidase that cleaves glycosidic-linked sialic acids. Cryoelectron microscopy and tomography analyses revealed that the PG0352 deletion mutant (ΔPG352) failed to produce an intact capsule layer. Compared to the wild type, in vitro studies showed that ΔPG352 formed less biofilm and was less resistant to killing by the host complement. In vivo studies showed that while the wild type caused a spreading type of infection that affected multiple organs and all infected mice were killed, ΔPG352 only caused localized infection and all animals survived. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SiaPg is an important virulence factor that contributes to the biofilm formation, capsule biosynthesis, and pathogenicity of P. gingivalis, and it can potentially serve as a new target for developing therapeutic agents against P. gingivalis infection. PMID:22025518

  14. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  15. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  16. Single-Domain Antibodies Targeting Neuraminidase Protect against an H5N1 Influenza Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Francisco Miguel; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; De Baets, Sarah; Smet, Anouk; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Descamps, Francis J.; Fiers, Walter; Muyldermans, Serge

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is an interesting target of small-molecule antiviral drugs. We isolated a set of H5N1 NA-specific single-domain antibodies (N1-VHHm) and evaluated their in vitro and in vivo antiviral potential. Two of them inhibited the NA activity and in vitro replication of clade 1 and 2 H5N1 viruses. We then generated bivalent derivatives of N1-VHHm by two methods. First, we made N1-VHHb by genetically joining two N1-VHHm moieties with a flexible linker. Second, bivalent N1-VHH-Fc proteins were obtained by genetic fusion of the N1-VHHm moiety with the crystallizable region of mouse IgG2a (Fc). The in vitro antiviral potency against H5N1 of both bivalent N1-VHHb formats was 30- to 240-fold higher than that of their monovalent counterparts, with 50% inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, single-dose prophylactic treatment with bivalent N1-VHHb or N1-VHH-Fc protected BALB/c mice against a lethal challenge with H5N1 virus, including an oseltamivir-resistant H5N1 variant. Surprisingly, an N1-VHH-Fc fusion without in vitro NA-inhibitory or antiviral activity also protected mice against an H5N1 challenge. Virus escape selection experiments indicated that one amino acid residue close to the catalytic site is required for N1-VHHm binding. We conclude that single-domain antibodies directed against influenza virus NA protect against H5N1 virus infection, and when engineered with a conventional Fc domain, they can do so in the absence of detectable NA-inhibitory activity. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses are a zoonotic threat. Outbreaks of avian influenza caused by these viruses occur in many parts of the world and are associated with tremendous economic loss, and these viruses can cause very severe disease in humans. In such cases, small-molecule inhibitors of the viral NA are among the few treatment options for patients. However, treatment with such drugs often results in the emergence of resistant viruses

  17. Epistatic interactions between neuraminidase mutations facilitated the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Bahl, Justin; Zaraket, Hassan; Baranovich, Tatiana; Seiler, Patrick; Prevost, Kristi; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y neuraminidase mutation predominated worldwide during the 2007–2009 seasons. While several neuraminidase substitutions were found to be necessary to counteract the adverse effects of H275Y, the order and impact of evolutionary events involved remain elusive. Here, we reconstruct H1N1 neuraminidase phylogeny during 1999–2009, estimate the timing and order of crucial amino acid changes, and evaluate their impact on the biological outcome of the H275Y mutation. Of the twelve neuraminidase substitutions that occurred during 1999–2009, five (chronologically, V234M, R222Q, K329E, D344N, H275Y, and D354G) are necessary for maintaining full neuraminidase function in the presence of the H275Y mutation by altering protein accumulation or enzyme affinity/activity. The sequential emergence and cumulative effects of these mutations clearly illustrate a role for epistasis in shaping the emergence and subsequent evolution of a drug-resistant virus population, which can be useful in understanding emergence of novel viral phenotypes of influenza. PMID:25297528

  18. Immunobiological properties of influenza A (H7N9) hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Changsom, Don; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Masamae, Wanibtisam; Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses harboring the complete hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) genes from the influenza A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus were constructed (rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses). The HA and NA proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of thymidine-kinase-negative (TK(-)) cells infected with these recombinant viruses. Only one form of the HA protein was expressed in infected TK(-) cells, with a molecular weight (MW) of 75 kDa, but three forms were found when the culture medium was supplemented with trypsin (MWs of 75, 50 and 27 kDa), which was similar to what was found in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with reverse genetic (rg) influenza viruses carrying HA genes of H7N9 virus origin. One form of hyperglycosylated NA protein with a MW of 75 kDa was produced in rVac-N9-NA-virus-infected TK(-) or MDCK cells. The MW decreased to 55 kDa after deglycosylation. The hyperglycosylated recombinant NA protein demonstrated sialidase activity in a fetuin-based neuraminidase assay. The rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses elicited significantly higher anti-HA and anti-NA antibody titers in BALB/c mice that were immunized once than in ICR mice. The anti-HA and anti-NA antibodies showed activity against homosubtypic HA or NA, but not against heterosubtypic HA or NA, as determined by hemagglutination-inhibition and microneutralization assays for anti-HA antibodies and neuraminidase-inhibition and replication-inhibition assays for anti-NA antibodies. Taken together, our data demonstrated immunobiological properties of recombinant HA and NA proteins that might be useful for vaccine development. PMID:27406044

  19. Isolation of a biologically active soluble form of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Sendai virus.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Laver, W G; Murti, K G; Portner, A

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in establishing the three-dimensional structure of the Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), we have isolated and characterized a potentially crystallizable form of the molecule. The sequence of HN, a surface glycoprotein, predicts a protein with an uncharged hydrophobic region near the amino terminus which is responsible for anchorage in the viral envelope. To avoid rosette formation (aggregation), which would preclude crystallization, this hydrophobic tail was removed from a membrane-free form of HN by proteolytic digestion. This digestion resulted in a single product with a molecular weight of about 10,000 less than native HN. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of cleaved HN (C-HN) indicated a single cleavage site at amino acid residue 131, resulting in a product consisting of the carboxyl-terminal 444 amino acids of HN. Functional analyses revealed that C-HN retained full neuraminidase activity and was able to bind erythrocytes, indicating that the N-terminal 131 residues were not necessary for these biological activities. Furthermore, this cleavage product retained the antigenic structure of intact HN, since monoclonal antibodies still bound to C-HN in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western (immuno-) blot analysis. Viewed by electron microscopy, the dimeric and tetrameric forms of intact HN form rosettes while C-HN maintains the oligomeric structure but no longer aggregates. Furthermore, the electron micrographs revealed a C-HN tetramer strikingly similar to the influenza virus neuraminidase in both size and gross structural features. Images PMID:2846877

  20. Flavonol dimers from callus cultures of Dysosma versipellis and their in vitro neuraminidase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ridao; Duan, Ruigang; Wei, Yannan; Zou, Jianhua; Li, Junwei; Liu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Ying; Li, Qiuhong; Dai, Jungui

    2015-12-01

    A chemical investigation of callus cultures of Dysosma versipellis led to the isolation of five new flavonol dimers, dysoverines A-E (1-5), together with 12 known compounds (6-17). The structures of new compounds were determined by the extensive spectroscopic data analyses. The biosynthetic pathway of the new compounds was proposed to involve O-methylation, prenylation, and Diels-Alder cycloaddition, which successively occurred in cultured plant cells. Compounds 1-17 exhibited in vitro neuraminidase inhibitory activities with the IC50 values of 31.0-93.9μM. PMID:26481138

  1. Thermal Inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus I. Coupled Inactivation Rates of Hemagglutinating and Neuraminidase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, John S.; Haywood, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal stability of Newcastle disease virus has been characterized in terms of the rate constants for inactivation of hemagglutinating activity (HA), neuraminidase activity (NA), and infectivity. Inactivation of HA results in the concomitant loss of NA. Infectivity, however, is much more thermolabile. Disintegration of the virus particle is not responsible for the identical rate constants for inactivation of HA and NA, nor is their parallel inactivation uncoupled in envelope fragments produced by pretreating the virus with phospholipase-C. The data indicate that a common envelope factor(s) can influence the thermal stability of both activities. PMID:4734647

  2. Truncation and Sequence Shuffling of Segment 6 Generate Replication-Competent Neuraminidase-Negative Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, Donata; Röhrs, Susanne; Höper, Dirk; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bogs, Jessica; Stech, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses are highly genetically variable and escape from immunogenic pressure by antigenic changes in their surface proteins, referred to as “antigenic drift” and “antigenic shift.” To assess the potential genetic plasticity under strong selection pressure, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 was passaged 50 times in embryonated chicken eggs in the presence of a neutralizing, polyclonal chicken serum. The resulting mutant acquired major alterations in the neuraminidase (NA)-encoding segment. Extensive deletions and rearrangements were detected, in contrast to only 12 amino acid substitutions within all other segments. Interestingly, this new neuraminidase segment resulted from complex sequence shuffling and insertion of a short fragment originating from the PA segment. Characterization of that novel variant revealed a loss of the neuraminidase protein and enzymatic activity, but its replication efficiency remained comparable to that of the wild type. Using reverse genetics, a recombinant virus consisting of the wild-type backbone and the shortened NA segment could be generated; however, generation of this recombinant virus required the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. Two independent repetitions starting with egg passage 30 in the presence of alternative chicken-derived immune sera selected mutants with similar but different large deletions within the NA segment without any neuraminidase activity, indicating a general mechanism. In chicken, these virus variants were avirulent, even though the HPAIV polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site was still present. Overall, the variants reported here are the first HPAIV H5N1 strains without a functional neuraminidase shown to grow efficiently without any helper factor. These novel HPAIV variants may facilitate future studies shedding light on the role of neuraminidase in virus replication and pathogenicity. PMID:24109212

  3. Changes in the Length of the Neuraminidase Stalk Region Impact H7N9 Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haixia; Chen, Quanjiao; Wu, Yan; Fu, Lifeng; Quan, Chuansong; Wong, Gary; Liu, Jun; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The neuraminidase stalk of the newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus possesses a 5-amino-acid deletion. This study focuses on characterizing the biological functions of H7N9 with varied neuraminidase stalk lengths. Results indicate that the 5-amino-acid deletion had no impact on virus infectivity or replication in vitro or in vivo compared to that of a virus with a full-length stalk, but enhanced virulence in mice was observed for H7N9 encoding a 19- to 20-amino-acid deletion, suggesting that N9 stalk length impacts virulence in mammals, as N1 stalk length does. PMID:26656694

  4. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors.

  5. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27125351

  6. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and re...

  7. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  8. Theoretical studies on the susceptibility of oseltamivir against variants of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Youyong; Zhang, Liling; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-10-22

    The outbreak and high speed global spread of the new strain of influenza A/H1N1 virus in 2009 posed a serious threat to global health. It is more likely that drug-resistant influenza strains will arise after the extensive use of anti-influenza drugs. Consequently, the identification of the potential resistant sites for drugs in advance and the understanding of the corresponding molecular mechanisms that cause drug resistance are quite important in the design of new drug candidates with better potency to combat drug resistance. Here, we performed molecular simulations to evaluate the potency of oseltamivir to combat drug resistance caused by the mutations in 2009 A/H1N1 neuraminidase (NA). We examined three representative drug-resistant mutations in NA, consisting of H274Y, N294S, and Y252H. First, a theoretical structure of A/H1N1 NA in complex with oseltamivir was constructed using homology modeling. Then, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition were used to characterize the binding of oseltamivir with the wild type (WT) and three mutated NAs. Our predictions show that N294S and H274Y, two popular drug-resistant mutations in different variants of NA, still cause significant resistance to oseltamivir. However, the Y252H mutation does not impair the interactions between oseltamivir and A/H1N1 NA. An examination of individual energy components shows that the loss of polar interactions is the key source for the resistance of the studied mutations to oseltamivir. Moreover, free energy decomposition analysis and structural analysis reveal that the N294S or H274Y mutation triggers the large-scale conformational changes of the binding pocket and then impairs the affinity of oseltamivir. We expect that our results will be useful for the rational design of NA inhibitors with high potency against drug-resistant A/H1N1 mutants. PMID:22998323

  9. Oseltamivir Resistance in Influenza A(H6N2) Caused by an R292K Substitution in Neuraminidase Is Not Maintained in Mallards without Drug Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Mårdnäs, Andreas; Söderström, Hanna; Fedorova, Ganna; Löwenthal, Max; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild waterfowl is the natural reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV); hosted viruses are very variable and provide a source for genetic segments which can reassort with poultry or mammalian adapted IAVs to generate novel species crossing viruses. Additionally, wild waterfowl act as a reservoir for highly pathogenic IAVs. Exposure of wild birds to the antiviral drug oseltamivir may occur in the environment as its active metabolite can be released from sewage treatment plants to river water. Resistance to oseltamivir, or to other neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), in IAVs of wild waterfowl has not been extensively studied. Aim and Methods In a previous in vivo Mallard experiment, an influenza A(H6N2) virus developed oseltamivir resistance by the R292K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA), when the birds were exposed to oseltamivir. In this study we tested if the resistance could be maintained in Mallards without drug exposure. Three variants of resistant H6N2/R292K virus were each propagated during 17 days in five successive pairs of naïve Mallards, while oseltamivir exposure was decreased and removed. Daily fecal samples were analyzed for viral presence, genotype and phenotype. Results and Conclusion Within three days without drug exposure no resistant viruses could be detected by NA sequencing, which was confirmed by functional NAI sensitivity testing. We conclude that this resistant N2 virus could not compete in fitness with wild type subpopulations without oseltamivir drug pressure, and thus has no potential to circulate among wild birds. The results of this study contrast to previous observations of drug induced resistance in an avian H1N1 virus, which was maintained also without drug exposure in Mallards. Experimental observations on persistence of NAI resistance in avian IAVs resemble NAI resistance seen in human IAVs, in which resistant N2 subtypes do not circulate, while N1 subtypes with permissive mutations can circulate without drug pressure. We

  10. Localization of a new neutralizing epitope on the mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Fischer, S; Sedlmeier, R; Valassina, M; Valensin, P E; Donati, M; Neubert, W J

    2001-04-01

    Four protein fragments which span the entire hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein (HN) of mumps virus were expressed in HeLa cells and cell extracts were tested for their capability to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. Fragment HN3 (aa 213-372) was able to induce the production of hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing antibodies. When a subfragment of HN3, the synthetic peptide NSTLGVKSAREF (aa 329-340 of HN) was used for immunization, hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing antibodies against mumps wild type virus but not against the Urabe Am9 vaccine virus were raised. The peptide could, therefore, contain a new epitope, which may be critical for protective host humoral immune response. PMID:11226581

  11. Hemagglutination and the closest distance of approach of normal, neuraminidase- and papain-treated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J; Absolom, D R

    1984-01-01

    By means of potential energy versus distance diagrams, derived from electrophoretic and surface tension data, the minimum distances of approach of normal (NOR) and of neuraminidase-treated (NEU) and papain-treated (PAP) human erythrocytes could be determined. The minimum distances between the actual cell membranes of two opposing red cells are: 184 A (NOR), 111 A (NEU), and 113 A (PAP), which agrees well with the fact that anti-D (Rho) antibodies of the IgG-class (which have a maximum distance of approximately 120 A between the two antibody-active sites) can hemagglutinate NEU and PAP cells, but are incapable of hemagglutinating normal D (Rho)-positive erythrocytes. PMID:6431697

  12. Effects of pronase and neuraminidase treatment on a myelin-associated glycoprotein in developing brain.

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, R H

    1976-01-01

    Rats (14 days old) were injected with [14c]fucose and young adult rats with [3H]fucose in order to label the myelin-associated glycoproteins. As previously reported, the major [14C]fucose-labelled glycoprotein in the immature myelin had a higher apparent molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels that the [3H]fucose-labelled glycoprotein in mature myelin. This predominant doubly labelled glycoprotein component was partially purified by preparative gel electrophoresis and converted to glycopeptides by extensive Pronase digestion. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 separated the glycopeptides into several clases, which were designted A,B, C AND D, from high to low molecular weight. The 14C-labelled glycopeptides from immature myeline were enriched in the highest-molecular-weight class A relative to the 3H-labelled glycopeptides from mature myelin. Neuraminidase treatment of the glycoprotein before Pronase digestion greatly decreased the proportion of glycopeptides fractionating in the higher-molecular-weight classes and largely eliminated the developmental differences that were apparent by gel filtration. However, neuraminidase treatment did not decrease the magnitude of the developmental difference revealed by electrophoresing the intact glycoprotein on sodium dodecyl sulphate gels, although it did decrease the apparent molecular weight of the glycoprotein from both the 15-day-old and adult rats by an amount comparable in magnitude to that developmental difference. The results from gel filtration of glycopeptides indicate that there is a higher content of large molecular weight, sialic acid-rich oligosaccharide units in the glycoprotein of immature myelin. However, the higher apparent molecular weight for the glycoprotein from 15-day-old rats on sodium dodcyl sulphate gels is not due primarily to its higher sialic acid content. PMID:942396

  13. ZstatFlu-II test: a chemiluminescent neuraminidase assay for influenza viral diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Pence, Lisa M; Appleman, James R; Shimasaki, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    The ZstatFlu-II test is a highly sensitive, specific, rapid, point-of-care chemiluminescent diagnostic test for influenza infection. Influenza viral neuraminidase-specific substrate, spiroadamantyl-1,2-dioxetane-4,7-dimethoxy-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, is at the core of the ZstatFlu-II Test. The enzymatic reaction was carried out at 25 degrees C and neutral pH, representing the optimum assay conditions for influenza types A and B viral neuraminidases. The results were outputted on a Polaroid trade mark High Speed Detector Film. Positive results appeared as a '+'-shaped white film image; negative results produced no image. The 'glow' kinetics, facilitated by a unique combination of light enhancers, also 'tuned' the wavelength of emission to match the spectral properties of the film. The substrate hydrolysed non-enzymatically at acid pH or at temperatures above 25 degrees C. In order to minimize false positives, the ZstatFlu-II Test was formatted with 0.3-0.4 K(m) substrate and freezing the test kit until use. The pH optimization of the ZstatFlu-II test is discussed with reference to model compounds of sialyl-glycosides. A nucleophilic attack or an electrostatic stabilization of a developing carbonium ion under the influence of the adjacent carboxyl group was probably responsible for non-enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate. Intramolecular general acid catalysis is proposed as a mechanism for the lability of the O-glycosidic linkage of the substrate. PMID:12701088

  14. Cross-Reactive Neuraminidase-Inhibiting Antibodies Elicited by Immunization with Recombinant Neuraminidase Proteins of H5N1 and Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Chia-Ying; Tsou, Yung-Ta; Jan, Jia-Tsrong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuraminidase (NA), an influenza virus envelope glycoprotein, removes sialic acid from receptors for virus release from infected cells. For this study, we used a baculovirus-insect cell expression system to construct and purify recombinant NA (rNA) proteins of H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) and pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) (A/Texas/05/2009) influenza viruses. BALB/c mice immunized with these proteins had high titers of NA-specific IgG and NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies against H5N1, pH1N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. H5N1 rNA immunization resulted in higher quantities of NA-specific antibody-secreting B cells against H5N1 and heterologous pH1N1 viruses in the spleen. H5N1 rNA and pH1N1 rNA immunizations both provided complete protection against homologous virus challenges, with H5N1 rNA immunization providing better protection against pH1N1 virus challenges. Cross-reactive NI antibodies were further dissected via pH1N1 rNA protein immunizations with I149V (NA with a change of Ile to Val at position 149), N344Y, and I365T/S366N NA mutations. The I365T/S366N mutation of pH1N1 rNA enhanced cross-reactive NI antibodies against H5N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. It is our hope that these findings provide useful information for the development of an NA-based universal influenza vaccine. IMPORTANCE Neuraminidase (NA) is an influenza virus enzymatic protein that cleaves sialic acid linkages on infected cell surfaces, thus facilitating viral release and contributing to viral transmission and mucus infection. In currently available inactivated or live, attenuated influenza vaccines based on the antigenic content of hemagglutinin proteins, vaccine efficacy can be contributed partly through NA-elicited immune responses. We investigated the NA immunity of different recombinant NA (rNA) proteins associated with pH1N1 and H5N1 viruses. Our results indicate that H5N1 rNA immunization induced more potent cross-protective immunity than pH1N1 rNA immunization, and three mutated residues, I149V

  15. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  16. Influenza A(H7N9) virus acquires resistance-related neuraminidase I222T substitution when infected mallards are exposed to low levels of oseltamivir in water.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  17. Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Acquires Resistance-Related Neuraminidase I222T Substitution When Infected Mallards Are Exposed to Low Levels of Oseltamivir in Water

    PubMed Central

    Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  18. Influenza Neuraminidase Subtype N1: Immunobiological Properties and Functional Assays for Specific Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Changsom, Don; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Siridechadilok, Bunpote; Prasertsopon, Jarunee; Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Masamae, Wanibtisam; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2016-01-01

    Influenza neuraminidase (NA) proteins expressed in TK− cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus carrying NA gene of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus or 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus were characterized for their biological properties, i.e., cell localization, molecular weight (MW), glycosylation and sialidase activity. Immune sera collected from BALB/c mice immunized with these recombinant viruses were assayed for binding and functional activities of anti-NA antibodies. Recombinant NA proteins were found localized in cytoplasm and cytoplasmic membrane of the infected cells. H1N1pdm NA protein had MW at about 75 kDa while it was 55 kDa for H5N1 NA protein. Hyperglycosylation was more pronounced in H1N1pdm NA compared to H5N1 NA according to N-glycosidase F treatment. Three dimensional structures also predicted that H1N1 NA globular head contained 4 and that of H5N1 contained 2 potential glycosylation sites. H5N1 NA protein had higher sialidase activity than H1N1pdm NA protein as measured by both MUNANA-based assay and fetuin-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). Plaque reduction assay demonstrated that anti-NA antibody could reduce number of plaques and plaque size through inhibiting virus release, not virus entry. Assay for neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibody by ELLA showed specific and cross reactivity between H5N1 NA and H1N1pdm NA protein derived from reverse genetic viruses or wild type viruses. In contrast, replication-inhibition assay in MDCK cells showed that anti-H1N1 NA antibody moderately inhibited viruses with homologous NA gene only, while anti-H5N1 NA antibody modestly inhibited the replication of viruses containing homologous NA gene and NA gene derived from H1N1pdm virus. Anti-H1N1 NA antibody showed higher titers of inhibiting virus replication than anti-H5N1 NA antibody, which are consistent with the results on reduction in plaque numbers and sizes as well as in inhibiting NA enzymatic activity. No assay showed cross

  19. Biological and Protective Properties of Immune Sera Directed to the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Halbherr, Stefan J.; Ludersdorfer, Thomas H.; Ricklin, Meret; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Summerfield, Artur

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope of influenza A viruses contains two large antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Conventional influenza virus vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies that are predominantly directed to the HA globular head, a domain that is subject to extensive antigenic drift. Antibodies directed to NA are induced at much lower levels, probably as a consequence of the immunodominance of the HA antigen. Although antibodies to NA may affect virus release by inhibiting the sialidase function of the glycoprotein, the antigen has been largely neglected in past vaccine design. In this study, we characterized the protective properties of monospecific immune sera that were generated by vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles encoding NA. These immune sera inhibited hemagglutination in an NA subtype-specific and HA subtype-independent manner and interfered with infection of MDCK cells. In addition, they inhibited the sialidase activities of various influenza viruses of the same and even different NA subtypes. With this, the anti-NA immune sera inhibited the spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus and HA/NA-pseudotyped viruses in MDCK cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When chickens were immunized with NA recombinant replicon particles and subsequently infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus, inflammatory serum markers were significantly reduced and virus shedding was limited or eliminated. These findings suggest that NA antibodies can inhibit virus dissemination by interfering with both virus attachment and egress. Our results underline the potential of high-quality NA antibodies for controlling influenza virus replication and place emphasis on NA as a vaccine antigen. IMPORTANCE The neuraminidase of influenza A viruses is a sialidase that acts as a receptor-destroying enzyme facilitating the release of progeny virus from infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that monospecific anti-NA immune sera inhibited not

  20. Development of neuraminidase detection using gold nanoparticles boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wahyuni, Wulan T; Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Saepudin, Endang; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2016-03-15

    Gold nanoparticles-modified boron-doped diamond (AuNPs-BDD) electrodes, which were prepared with a self-assembly deposition of AuNPs at amine-terminated boron-doped diamond, were examined for voltammetric detection of neuraminidase (NA). The detection method was performed based on the difference of electrochemical responses of zanamivir at gold surface before and after the reaction with NA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 5.5). A linear calibration curve for zanamivir in 0.1 M PBS in the absence of NA was achieved in the concentration range of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-5) M (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated limit of detection (LOD) of 2.29 × 10(-6) M. Furthermore, using its reaction with 1.00 × 10(-5) M zanamivir, a linear calibration curve of NA can be obtained in the concentration range of 0-12 mU (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated LOD of 0.12 mU. High reproducibility was shown with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.14% (n = 30). These performances could be maintained when the detection was performed in mucin matrix. Comparison performed using gold-modified BDD (Au-BDD) electrodes suggested that the good performance of the detection method is due to the stability of the gold particles position at the BDD surface. PMID:26717895

  1. Role of Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase in the function of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Galen, J E; Ketley, J M; Fasano, A; Richardson, S H; Wasserman, S S; Kaper, J B

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NANase) is hypothesized to act synergistically with cholera toxin (CT) and increase the severity of a secretory response by increasing the binding and penetration of CT to enterocytes. To test this hypothesis, the NANase gene (nanH) from V. cholerae Ogawa 395 was first cloned and sequenced. Isogenic wild-type and NANase- V. cholerae 395 strains were then constructed by using suicide vector-mediated mutagenesis. The influence of NANase on CT binding and penetration was examined in vitro by using culture filtrates from these isogenic strains. Fluorescence due to binding of fluorescein-conjugated CT to C57BL/6 and C3H mouse fibroblasts exposed to NANase+ filtrates increased five- and eightfold, respectively, relative to that with NANase- filtrates. In addition, NANase+ filtrates increased the short-circuit current measured in Ussing chambers 65% relative to that with NANase- filtrates, although this difference decreased as production of CT increased. The role of NANase in V. cholerae pathogenesis was examined in vivo by intragastric inoculation of the isogenic strains into CD1 suckling mice. No difference in fluid accumulation ratios was seen at doses of 10(4) to 10(8) CFU, but NANase+ strains produced 18% higher fluid accumulation ratios at 10(9) CFU than NANase- strains when inoculated into nonfasted suckling mice. It is concluded that NANase plays a subtle but significant role in the binding and uptake of CT by susceptible cells under defined conditions. Images PMID:1730470

  2. Triplet entropy analysis of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase sequences measures influenza virus phylodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Günther J L; Takeda, Agnes A S; Andrighetti, Tahila; Sartor, Ivaine T S; Echeverrigaray, Sergio L; de Avila E Silva, Scheila; Dos Santos, Laurita; Rybarczyk-Filho, José L

    2013-10-10

    The influenza virus has been a challenge to science due to its ability to withstand new environmental conditions. Taking into account the development of virus sequence databases, computational approaches can be helpful to understand virus behavior over time. Furthermore, they can suggest new directions to deal with influenza. This work presents triplet entropy analysis as a potential phylodynamic tool to quantify nucleotide organization of viral sequences. The application of this measure to segments of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1 and H3N2 virus subtypes has shown some variability effects along timeline, inferring about virus evolution. Sequences were divided by year and compared for virus subtype (H1N1 and H3N2). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison between groups. Results show that differentiation in entropy precedes differentiation in GC content for both groups. Considering the HA fragment, both triplet entropy as well as GC concentration show intersection in 2009, year of the recent pandemic. Some conclusions about possible flu evolutionary lines were drawn. PMID:23850726

  3. Structural Characterization of the 1918 Influenza H1N1 Neuraminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Zhu, X.; Dwek, R.A.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) plays a crucial role in facilitating the spread of newly synthesized virus in the host and is an important target for controlling disease progression. The NA crystal structure from the 1918 'Spanish flu' (A/Brevig Mission/1/18 H1N1) and that of its complex with zanamivir (Relenza) at 1.65-{angstrom} and 1.45-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively, corroborated the successful expression of correctly folded NA tetramers in a baculovirus expression system. An additional cavity adjacent to the substrate-binding site is observed in N1, compared to N2 and N9 NAs, including H5N1. This cavity arises from an open conformation of the 150 loop (Gly147 to Asp151) and appears to be conserved among group 1 NAs (N1, N4, N5, and N8). It closes upon zanamivir binding. Three calcium sites were identified, including a novel site that may be conserved in N1 and N4. Thus, these high-resolution structures, combined with our recombinant expression system, provide new opportunities to augment the limited arsenal of therapeutics against influenza.

  4. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells. PMID:26918060

  5. Variable ligand- and receptor-binding hot spots in key strains of influenza neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Votapka, Lane; Demir, Özlem; Swift, Robert V; Walker, Ross C; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A continues to be a major public health concern due to its ability to cause epidemic and pandemic disease outbreaks in humans. Computational investigations of structural dynamics of the major influenza glycoproteins, especially the neuraminidase (NA) enzyme, are able to provide key insights beyond what is currently accessible with standard experimental techniques. In particular, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the varying degrees of flexibility for such enzymes. Here we present an analysis of the relative flexibility of the ligand- and receptor-binding area of three key strains of influenza A: highly pathogenic H5N1, the 2009 pandemic H1N1, and a human N2 strain. Through computational solvent mapping, we investigate the various ligand- and receptor-binding “hot spots” that exist on the surface of NA which interacts with both sialic acid receptors on the host cells and antiviral drugs. This analysis suggests that the variable cavities found in the different strains and their corresponding capacities to bind ligand functional groups may play an important role in the ability of NA to form competent reaction encounter complexes with other species of interest, including antiviral drugs, sialic acid receptors on the host cell surface, and the hemagglutinin protein. Such considerations may be especially useful for the prediction of how such complexes form and with what binding capacity. PMID:22872804

  6. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  7. The serologic behaviour of neuraminidase-treated lymphoid cells: alloantigenicity and complement sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, P. K.; Gewurz, H.; Simmons, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (VCN) renders mouse lymphoid cells highly susceptible to the cytolytic effects of alloantibody and complement (C). This increased susceptibility to lysis is not due to unmasking of alloantigens since no increase in alloantibody-binding capacity of VCN-treated cells could be detected. However, VCN-treated cells can be lysed by normal rabbit serum, human serum, and guinea-pig serum even if specific antibody is not added to the incubation mixture. VCN, therefore, while not unmasking strong H-2 histocompatibility antigens, may be capable of unmasking other antigens with which heterologous sera can react. The increased susceptibility to immune cytolysis of VCN-treated cells appears to be related, at least partially, to its extreme susceptibility to C. Complement inactivation by heat totally abrogated the lytic effect, as did C inactivation by ammonium hydroxide, viscarin, and zymosan. In addition, activation of the autologous serum C within the fluid phase by cobra venom factor produced cytolysis only in VCN-treated cells. Thus, VCN renders nucleated cells highly susceptible to lysis by C. PMID:5042921

  8. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M; N Reinhold, Vernon

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and (3)H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. PMID:27012207

  9. Antigenic validation of recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Khulape, S A; Maity, H K; Pathak, D C; Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, S

    2015-09-01

    The outer membrane glycoprotein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is important for virus infection and subsequent immune response by host, and offers target for development of recombinant antigen-based immunoassays and subunit vaccines. In this study, the expression of HN protein of NDV is attempted in yeast expression system. Yeast offers eukaryotic environment for protein processing and posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, in addition to higher growth rate and easy genetic manipulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be better expression system for HN protein than Pichia pastoris as determined by codon usage analysis. The complete coding  sequence of HN gene was amplified with the histidine tag, cloned in pESC-URA under GAL10 promotor and transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant HN (rHN) protein was characterized by western blot, showing glycosylation heterogeneity as observed with other eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity column purification. The protein could be further used as subunit vaccine. PMID:26435147

  10. Optimization and comparative characterization of neuraminidase activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Klebsiella pneumoniae, Hep-2 cell, sheep kidney and rat liver lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaei, C; Ahmadi, M; Hosseini Jazani, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The properties of neuraminidase produced by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 during growth in a defined medium (BHI) was examined and compared with some neuraminidase features of K. pneumoniae in this investigation. Materials and Methods The enzyme was isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa which was used in a sensitive fluorometric assay by using 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl) α-D-N acetylneuraminic acid as substrate. Results Neuraminidase production in P. aeruginosa PAO1 paralleled bacterial growth in defined medium (BHI) and was maximal in the late logarithmic phase of growth but decreased during the stationary phase, probably owing to protease production or thermal instability. Highest production of P. aeruginosa PAO1 neuraminidase was in BHI culture media. The neuraminidase of P. aeruginosa PAO1 possessed an optimum temperature of activity at 56°C and the activity was maximal at pH 5. Heating the enzyme to 56°C for 45 min., in the presence of bovine serum albumin destroyed 33.1% of it's activity and addition of Ca+2, EDTA and NANA also decreased activity markedly. Conclusion The results revealed that the highest specific activity is for p. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:22347548

  11. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  12. Influenza A penetrates host mucus by cleaving sialic acids with neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) cleaves sialic acids (Sias) from glycans. Inhibiting NA with oseltamivir suppresses both viral infection, and viral release from cultured human airway epithelial cells. The role of NA in viral exit is well established: it releases budding virions by cleaving Sias from glycoconjugates on infected cells and progeny virions. The role of NA in viral entry remains unclear. Host respiratory epithelia secrete a mucus layer rich in heavily sialylated glycoproteins; these could inhibit viral entry by mimicking sialylated receptors on the cell surface. It has been suggested that NA allows influenza to penetrate the mucus by cleaving these sialylated decoys, but the exact mechanism is not yet established. Methods We tested IAV interaction with secreted mucus using frozen human trachea/bronchus tissue sections, and bead-bound purified human salivary mucins (HSM) and purified porcine submaxillary mucins (PSM). The protective effect of mucus was analyzed using MDCK cells coated with purified HSM and PSM with known Sia content. Oseltamivir was used to inhibit NA activity, and the fluorescent reporter substrate, 4MU-Neu5Ac, was used to quantify NA activity. Results IAV binds to the secreted mucus layer of frozen human trachea/bronchus tissues in a Sia dependent manner. HSM inhibition of IAV infection is Sia dose-dependent, but PSM cannot inhibit infection of underlying cells. HSM competitively inhibits NA cleavage of 4MU-Neu5Ac, reporter substrate. Human IAV effectively cleaves Sias from HSM but not from PSM, and binds to HSM but not to PSM. Conclusion IAV interacts with human mucus on frozen tissue sections and mucus-coated beads. Inhibition of IAV infection by sialylated human mucus is dose-dependent, and enhanced when NA is inhibited with oseltamivir. Thus NA cleaves sialylated decoys during initial stages of infection. Understanding IAV interactions with host mucins is a promising new avenue for drug development. PMID

  13. Computational study of interdependence between hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of pandemic 2009 H1N1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Influenza type A viruses are classified into subtypes based on their two surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The HA protein facilitates the viral binding and entering a host cell and the NA protein helps the release of viral progeny from the infected cell. The complementary roles of HA and NA entail their collaboration, which has important implications for viral replication and fitness. The HA protein from early strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 of swine origin preferentially binds to human type receptors with a weak binding to avian type receptors. This virus caused several human deaths in December 2013 in Texas, USA, which motivated us to investigate the changes of genetic features that might contribute to the surged virulence of the virus. Our time series analysis on the strains of this virus collected from 2009 to 2013 implied that the HA binding preference of this virus in USA, Europe, and Asia has been the characteristic of swine H1N1 virus since 2009. However, its characteristic of seasonal human H1N1 and its binding avidity for avian type receptors both were on steady rise and had a clear increase in 2013 with American strains having the sharpest surge. The first change could enhance the viral transmission and replication in humans and the second could increase its ability to cause infection deep in lungs, which might account for the recent human deaths in Texas. In light of HA and NA coadaptation and evolutionary interactions, we also explored the NA activity of this virus to reveal the functional balance between HA and NA during the course of virus evolution. Finally we identified amino acid substitutions in HA and NA of the virus that were critical for the observed evolution. PMID:25751873

  14. Tetherin Sensitivity of Influenza A Viruses Is Strain Specific: Role of Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Gnirß, Kerstin; Zmora, Pawel; Blazejewska, Paulina; Winkler, Michael; Lins, Anika; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gärtner, Sabine; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Wolff, Thorsten; Schindler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of the antiviral host cell factor tetherin is induced by interferon and can inhibit the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The Vpu protein of HIV-1 antagonizes the antiviral activity of tetherin, and tetherin antagonists with Vpu-like activity have been identified in other viruses. In contrast, it is incompletely understood whether tetherin inhibits influenza A virus (FLUAV) release and whether FLUAV encodes tetherin antagonists. Here, we show that release of several laboratory-adapted FLUAV strains and a seasonal FLUAV strain is inhibited by tetherin, while pandemic FLUAV A/Hamburg/4/2009 is resistant. Studies with a virus-like particle system and analysis of reassortant viruses provided evidence that the viral hemagglutinin (HA) is an important determinant of tetherin antagonism but requires the presence of its cognate neuraminidase (NA) to inhibit tetherin. Finally, tetherin antagonism by FLUAV was dependent on the virion context, since retrovirus release from tetherin-positive cells was not rescued, and correlated with an HA- and NA-dependent reduction in tetherin expression. In sum, our study identifies HA and NA proteins of certain pandemic FLUAV as tetherin antagonists, which has important implications for understanding FLUAV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (FLUAV) infection is responsible for substantial global morbidity and mortality, and understanding how the virus evades the immune defenses of the host may uncover novel targets for antiviral intervention. Tetherin is an antiviral effector molecule of the innate immune system which can contribute to control of viral invasion. However, it has been unclear whether FLUAV is inhibited by tetherin and whether these viruses encode tetherin-antagonizing proteins. Our observation that several pandemic FLUAV strains can counteract tetherin via their HA and NA proteins identifies these proteins as novel tetherin antagonists and indicates that HA

  15. A generic system for the expression and purification of soluble and stable influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peter M; Attwood, Rebecca M; Mohr, Peter G; Barrett, Susan A; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    The influenza surface glycoprotein neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the efficient spread of the virus. Antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir) that inhibit NA enzyme activity have been shown to be effective in the treatment of influenza infections. The recent 'swine flu' pandemic and world-wide emergence of Tamiflu-resistant seasonal human influenza A(H1N1) H(274)Y have highlighted the need for the ongoing development of new anti-virals, efficient production of vaccine proteins and novel diagnostic tools. Each of these goals could benefit from the production of large quantities of highly pure and stable NA. This publication describes a generic expression system for NAs in a baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) that is capable of expressing milligram amounts of recombinant NA. To construct NAs with increased stability, the natural influenza NA stalk was replaced by two different artificial tetramerization domains that drive the formation of catalytically active NA homotetramers: GCN4-pLI from yeast or the Tetrabrachion tetramerization domain from Staphylothermus marinus. Both recombinant NAs are secreted as FLAG-tagged proteins to allow for rapid and simple purification. The Tetrabrachion-based NA showed good solubility, increased stability and biochemical properties closer to the original viral NA than the GCN4-pLI based construct. The expressed quantities and high quality of the purified recombinant NA suggest that this expression system is capable of producing recombinant NA for a broad range of applications including high-throughput drug screening, protein crystallisation, or vaccine development. PMID:21326879

  16. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  17. In the Shadow of Hemagglutinin: A Growing Interest in Influenza Viral Neuraminidase and Its Role as a Vaccine Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of vaccine prophylaxis and antiviral therapeutics, the influenza virus continues to have a significant, annual impact on the morbidity and mortality of human beings, highlighting the continued need for research in the field. Current vaccine strategies predominantly focus on raising a humoral response against hemagglutinin (HA)—the more abundant, immunodominant glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus. In fact, anti-HA antibodies are often neutralizing, and are used routinely to assess vaccine immunogenicity. Neuraminidase (NA), the other major glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus, has historically served as the target for antiviral drug therapy and is much less studied in the context of humoral immunity. Yet, the quest to discern the exact importance of NA-based protection is decades old. Also, while antibodies against the NA glycoprotein fail to prevent infection of the influenza virus, anti-NA immunity has been shown to lessen the severity of disease, decrease viral lung titers in animal models, and reduce viral shedding. Growing evidence is intimating the possible gains of including the NA antigen in vaccine design, such as expanded strain coverage and increased overall immunogenicity of the vaccine. After giving a tour of general influenza virology, this review aims to discuss the influenza A virus neuraminidase while focusing on both the historical and present literature on the use of NA as a possible vaccine antigen. PMID:24960271

  18. Structure of the Ulster Strain Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Reveals Auto-Inhibitory Interactions Associated with Low Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Paterson, Reay G.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2012-09-06

    Paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) plays roles in viral entry and maturation, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activation of the F protein to drive membrane fusion, and enabling virion release during virus budding. HN can thereby directly influence virulence and in a subset of avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains, such as NDV Ulster, HN must be proteolytically activated to remove a C-terminal extension not found in other NDV HN proteins. Ulster HN is 616 amino acids long and the 45 amino acid C-terminal extension present in its precursor (HN0) form has to be cleaved to render HN biologically active. Here we show that Ulster HN contains an inter-subunit disulfide bond within the C-terminal extension at residue 596, which regulates HN activities and neuraminidase (NA) domain dimerization. We determined the crystal structure of the dimerized NA domain containing the C-terminal extension, which extends along the outside of the sialidase {beta}-propeller domain and inserts C-terminal residues into the NA domain active site. The C-terminal extension also engages a secondary sialic acid binding site present in NDV HN proteins, which is located at the NA domain dimer interface, that most likely blocks its attachment function. These results clarify how the Ulster HN C-terminal residues lead to an auto-inhibited state of HN, the requirement for proteolytic activation of HN{sub 0} and associated reduced virulence.

  19. Development of a Magnetic Electrochemical Bar Code Array for Point Mutation Detection in the H5N1 Neuraminidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Since its first official detection in the Guangdong province of China in 1996, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype (HPAI H5N1) has reportedly been the cause of outbreaks in birds in more than 60 countries, 24 of which were European. The main issue is still to develop effective antiviral drugs. In this case, single point mutation in the neuraminidase gene, which causes resistance to antiviral drug and is, therefore, subjected to many studies including ours, was observed. In this study, we developed magnetic electrochemical bar code array for detection of single point mutations (mismatches in up to four nucleotides) in H5N1 neuraminidase gene. Paramagnetic particles Dynabeads® with covalently bound oligo (dT)25 were used as a tool for isolation of complementary H5N1 chains (H5N1 Zhejin, China and Aichi). For detection of H5N1 chains, oligonucleotide chains of lengths of 12 (+5 adenine) or 28 (+5 adenine) bp labeled with quantum dots (CdS, ZnS and/or PbS) were used. Individual probes hybridized to target molecules specifically with efficiency higher than 60%. The obtained signals identified mutations present in the sequence. Suggested experimental procedure allows obtaining further information from the redox signals of nucleic acids. Moreover, the used biosensor exhibits sequence specificity and low limits of detection of subnanogram quantities of target nucleic acids. PMID:23860384

  20. Partial Antiviral Activities Detection of Chicken Mx Jointing with Neuraminidase Gene (NA) against Newcastle Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yani; Fu, Dezhi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Elsayed, Ahmed Kamel; Li, Bichun

    2013-01-01

    As an attempt to increase the resistance to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and so further reduction of its risk on the poultry industry. This work aimed to build the eukaryotic gene co-expression plasmid of neuraminidase (NA) gene and myxo-virus resistance (Mx) and detect the gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells, it is most important to investigate the influence of the recombinant plasmid on the chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) cells. cDNA fragment of NA and mutant Mx gene were derived from pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0-Mx plasmid via PCR, respectively, then NA and Mx cDNA fragment were inserted into the multiple cloning sites of pVITRO2 to generate the eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pVITRO2-Mx-NA. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease treatment and sequencing, and it was transfected into the mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells. The expression of genes in pVITRO2-Mx-NA were measured by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CEF cells then RT-PCR and the micro-cell inhibition tests were used to test the antiviral activity for NDV. Our results showed that co-expression vector pVITRO2-Mx-NA was constructed successfully; the expression of Mx and NA could be detected in both NIH-3T3 and CEF cells. The recombinant proteins of Mx and NA protect CEF cells from NDV infection until after 72 h of incubation but the individually mutagenic Mx protein or NA protein protects CEF cells from NDV infection till 48 h post-infection, and co-transfection group decreased significantly NDV infection compared with single-gene transfection group (P<0. 05), indicating that Mx-NA jointing contributed to delaying the infection of NDV in single-cell level and the co-transfection of the jointed genes was more powerful than single one due to their synergistic effects. PMID:23977111

  1. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following passage of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 t...

  2. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase genes of H9N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from commercial broiler chicken in Iran (2008 and 2009).

    PubMed

    Soltanialvar, Masoud; Shoushtari, Hamid; Bozorgmehrifard, Mohamadhasan; Charkhkar, Saeed; Akbarnejad, Farshad

    2012-03-01

    A total of 512 tissue samples collected from 30 farms located in various states of Iran during 2008-2009 as part of a program to monitor avian influenza viruses (AIVs) infection in Iran's poultry population. To determine the genetic relationship of Iranian viruses, neuraminidase (NA) genes from ten isolates of H9N2 viruses isolated from commercial chickens in Iran during 2008-2009 were amplified and sequenced. The viruses' neuraminidase gene was >90% similar to those of A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2) sublineage. The neuraminidase stalk regions in these Viruses had no deletion as compared to that of chicken/Beijing/1/94 sublineage (Beijing-like viruses) and the two human isolates A/HK/1073/99, A/HK/1074/99. Phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase (NA) gene showed that it shares a common ancestor A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 isolate which had contributed the internal genes of the H5N1 virus. The results of this study indicated that No (Beijing-like) virus and (Korean-like) virus were found in chickens in Iran, and the NA genes of H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in Iran during the past years were well conserved and the earlier Iranian isolates may be considered to represent such a progenitor. PMID:21744029

  3. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  4. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza.

    PubMed

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  5. Influence of a Novel Inhibitor (UM8190) of Prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) on Appetite and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, F. M.; Gadepalli, R.S.V.S.; Diano, S.; Cheng, Q.; Tabrizian, T.; Gailani, D.; Rimoldi, J.M.; Shariat-Madar, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical pharmacological characterization of a novel inhibitor (UM8190) of prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) was investigated. We synthesized and evaluated a library of proline-based analogs as prospective recombinant PRCP (rPRCP) inhibitors and inhibitors of PRCP-dependent prekallikrein (PK) activation on human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC). Among the newly synthesized compounds, UM8190 was further characterized in vivo using methods that encompassed a mouse carotid artery thrombosis model and animal model of food consumption. (S)-N-dodecyl-1-((S)-pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide [Compound 3 (UM8190)] was selected for further evaluation from the initial assessment of its PRCP inhibitory action (Ki= 43 µM) coupled with its ability to block PRCP-dependent PK activation on HPAEC (Ki= 34 µM). UM8190 demonstrated excellent selectivity against a panel of carboxypeptidases and serine proteases and blocked bradykinin (BK) generation and BK-induced permeability by 100%, suggesting that it may be useful in preventing the local production of large amounts of BK. Furthermore, UM8190 showed an anorexigenic effect when systemically administered to fasted mice, reducing food intake in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In a mouse carotid artery thrombosis model, it also demonstrated an antithrombotic effect. UM8190 is a selective PRCP inhibitor and it may represent a new anorexigenic, and antithrombotic drug, that works by inhibiting PRCP–mediated mechanisms. PMID:22664251

  6. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  7. Impact of the H275Y and I223V Mutations in the Neuraminidase of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus In Vitro and Evaluating Experimental Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Eric G.; Pinilla, Lady Tatiana; Holder, Benjamin P.; Abed, Yacine; Boivin, Guy; Beauchemin, Catherine A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza virus is naturally susceptible to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, but mutations in the NA protein can cause oseltamivir resistance. The H275Y and I223V amino acid substitutions in the NA of the H1N1pdm09 influenza strain have been separately observed in patients exhibiting oseltamivir-resistance. Here, we apply mathematical modelling techniques to compare the fitness of the wild-type H1N1pdm09 strain relative to each of these two mutants. We find that both the H275Y and I223V mutations in the H1N1pdm09 background significantly lengthen the duration of the eclipse phase (by 2.5 h and 3.6 h, respectively), consistent with these NA mutations delaying the release of viral progeny from newly infected cells. Cells infected by H1N1pdm09 virus carrying the I223V mutation display a disadvantageous, shorter infectious lifespan (17 h shorter) than those infected with the wild-type or MUT-H275Y strains. In terms of compensating traits, the H275Y mutation in the H1N1pdm09 background results in increased virus infectiousness, as we reported previously, whereas the I223V exhibits none, leaving it overall less fit than both its wild-type counterpart and the MUT-H275Y strain. Using computer simulated competition experiments, we determine that in the presence of oseltamivir at doses even below standard therapy, both the MUT-H275Y and MUT-I223V dominate their wild-type counterpart in all aspects, and the MUT-H275Y outcompetes the MUT-I223V. The H275Y mutation should therefore be more commonly observed than the I223V mutation in circulating H1N1pdm09 strains, assuming both mutations have a similar impact or no significant impact on between-host transmission. We also show that mathematical modelling offers a relatively inexpensive and reliable means to quantify inter-experimental variability and assess the reproducibility of results. PMID:25992792

  8. Large-scale FMO-MP3 calculations on the surface proteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuji; Yamashita, Katsumi; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Takematsu, Kazutomo; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Naoki; Okiyama, Yoshio; Tsuboi, Misako; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-06-01

    Two proteins on the influenza virus surface have been well known. One is hemagglutinin (HA) associated with the infection to cells. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were performed on a complex consisting of HA trimer and two Fab-fragments at the third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP3) level. The numbers of residues and 6-31G basis functions were 2351 and 201276, and thus a massively parallel-vector computer was utilized to accelerate the processing. This FMO-MP3 job was completed in 5.8 h with 1024 processors. Another protein is neuraminidase (NA) involved in the escape from infected cells. The FMO-MP3 calculation was also applied to analyze the interactions between oseltamivir and surrounding residues in pharmacophore.

  9. Influenza A virus nucleoprotein selectively decreases neuraminidase gene-segment packaging while enhancing viral fitness and transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Christopher B.; Ince, William L.; Wei, Jiajie; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) genome is divided into eight distinct RNA segments believed to be copackaged into virions with nearly perfect efficiency. Here, we describe a mutation in IAV nucleoprotein (NP) that enhances replication and transmission in guinea pigs while selectively reducing neuraminidase (NA) gene segment packaging into virions. We show that incomplete IAV particles lacking gene segments contribute to the propagation of the viral population through multiplicity reactivation under conditions of widespread coinfection, which we demonstrate commonly occurs in the upper respiratory tract of guinea pigs. NP also dramatically altered the functional balance of the viral glycoproteins on particles by selectively decreasing NA expression. Our findings reveal novel functions for NP in selective control of IAV gene packaging and balancing glycoprotein expression and suggest a role for incomplete gene packaging during host adaptation and transmission. PMID:25385602

  10. Structure determination of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase from a crystal with lattice-translocation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xueyong; Xu, Xiaojin; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-08-01

    The structure of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase was determined to 1.65 Å from crystals with a lattice-translocation defect using uncorrected, as well as corrected, diffraction data. Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 Å resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 Å, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  11. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Swanson, Kurt A.; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-10-02

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein plays multiple roles in viral entry and egress, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activating the fusion (F) protein to activate membrane fusion and viral entry, and cleaving sialic acid from carbohydrate chains. HN is an oligomeric integral membrane protein consisting of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, a stalk region, and an enzymatically active neuraminidase (NA) domain. Structures of the HN NA domains have been solved previously; however, the structure of the stalk region has remained elusive. The stalk region contains specificity determinants for F interactions and activation, underlying the requirement for homotypic F and HN interactions in viral entry. Mutations of the Newcastle disease virus HN stalk region have been shown to affect both F activation and NA activities, but a structural basis for understanding these dual affects on HN functions has been lacking. Here, we report the structure of the Newcastle disease virus HN ectodomain, revealing dimers of NA domain dimers flanking the N-terminal stalk domain. The stalk forms a parallel tetrameric coiled-coil bundle (4HB) that allows classification of extensive mutational data, providing insight into the functional roles of the stalk region. Mutations that affect both F activation and NA activities map predominantly to the 4HB hydrophobic core, whereas mutations that affect only F-protein activation map primarily to the 4HB surface. Two of four NA domains interact with the 4HB stalk, and residues at this interface in both the stalk and NA domain have been implicated in HN function.

  12. Comparison of serum hemagglutinin and neuraminidase inhibition antibodies after 2010-2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Laguio-Vila, Maryrose R; Thompson, Mark G; Reynolds, Sue; Spencer, Sarah M; Gaglani, Manjusha; Naleway, Allison; Ball, Sarah; Bozeman, Sam; Baker, Steven; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Levine, Min; Katz, Jackie; Fry, Alicia M; Treanor, John J

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Most inactivated influenza vaccines contain purified and standardized hemagglutinin (HA) and residual neuraminidase (NA) antigens. Vaccine-associated HA antibody responses (hemagglutination inhibition [HAI]) are well described, but less is known about the immune response to the NA. Methods.  Serum of 1349 healthcare personnel (HCP) electing or declining the 2010-2011 trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine ([IIV3], containing A/California/7/2009 p(H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/2008 strains) were tested for NA-inhibiting (NAI) antibody by a modified lectin-based assay using pseudotyped N1 and N2 influenza A viruses with an irrelevant (H5) HA. Neuraminidase-inhibiting and HAI antibody titers were evaluated approximately 30 days after vaccination and end-of-season for those with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed influenza infection. Results.  In 916 HCP (68%) receiving IIV3, a 2-fold increase in N1 and N2 NAI antibody occurred in 63.7% and 47.3%, respectively. Smaller responses occurred in HCP age >50 years and those without prior 2009-2010 IIV3 nor monovalent A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccinations. Forty-four PCR-confirmed influenza infections were observed, primarily affecting those with lower pre-exposure HAI and NAI antibodies. Higher pre-NAI titers correlated with shorter duration of illness for A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections. Conclusions.  Trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine is modestly immunogenic for N1 and N2 antigens in HCP. Vaccines eliciting robust NA immune responses may improve efficacy and reduce influenza-associated morbidity. PMID:25884004

  13. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  14. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: Further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K.; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A.; Fernandes, Miguel X.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for HIV protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (≥6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope Vout, is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the supplemental material. PMID:19703025

  15. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for human immunodeficiency virus protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (> or =6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope V(out), is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets, if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the 'Supporting Information'. PMID:19703025

  16. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  17. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  18. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  19. Hemagglutinin Stalk- and Neuraminidase-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Protect against Lethal H10N8 Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Chromikova, Veronika; Tan, Gene S.; Meade, Philip; Amanat, Fatima; Comella, Phillip; Hirsh, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Between November 2013 and February 2014, China reported three human cases of H10N8 influenza virus infection in the Jiangxi province, two of which were fatal. Using hybridoma technology, we isolated a panel of H10- and N8-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and further characterized the binding reactivity of these antibodies (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to a range of purified virus and recombinant protein substrates. The H10-directed MAbs displayed functional hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization activity, and the N8-directed antibodies displayed functional neuraminidase inhibition (NI) activity against H10N8. Surprisingly, the HI-reactive H10 antibodies, as well as a previously generated, group 2 hemagglutinin (HA) stalk-reactive antibody, demonstrated NI activity against H10N8 and an H10N7 strain; this phenomenon was absent when virus was treated with detergent, suggesting the anti-HA antibodies inhibited neuraminidase enzymatic activity through steric hindrance. We tested the prophylactic efficacy of one representative H10-reactive, N8-reactive, and group 2 HA stalk-reactive antibody in vivo using a BALB/c challenge model. All three antibodies were protective at a high dose (5 mg/kg). At a low dose (0.5 mg/kg), only the anti-N8 antibody prevented weight loss. Together, these data suggest that antibody targets other than the globular head domain of the HA may be efficacious in preventing influenza virus-induced morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE Avian H10N8 and H10N7 viruses have recently crossed the species barrier, causing morbidity and mortality in humans and other mammals. Although these reports are likely isolated incidents, it is possible that more cases may emerge in future winter seasons, similar to H7N9. Furthermore, regular transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans increases the risk of adaptive mutations and reassortment events, which may result in a novel virus with pandemic potential. Currently, no

  20. Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Balance Influences the Virulence Phenotype of a Recombinant H5N3 Influenza A Virus Possessing a Polybasic HA0 Cleavage Site

    PubMed Central

    Diederich, Sandra; Berhane, Yohannes; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Handel, Katherine; Cottam-Birt, Colleen; Ranadheera, Charlene; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although a polybasic HA0 cleavage site is considered the dominant virulence determinant for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 and H7 viruses, naturally occurring virus isolates possessing a polybasic HA0 cleavage site have been identified that are low pathogenic in chickens. In this study, we generated a reassortant H5N3 virus that possessed the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 HPAI A/swan/Germany/R65/2006 and the remaining gene segments from low pathogenic A/chicken/British Columbia/CN0006/2004 (H7N3). Despite possessing the HA0 cleavage site GERRRKKR/GLF, this rH5N3 virus exhibited a low pathogenic phenotype in chickens. Although rH5N3-inoculated birds replicated and shed virus and seroconverted, transmission to naive contacts did not occur. To determine whether this virus could evolve into a HPAI form, it underwent six serial passages in chickens. A progressive increase in virulence was observed with the virus from passage number six being highly transmissible. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the fixation of 12 nonsynonymous mutations involving all eight gene segments during passaging. One of these involved the catalytic site of the neuraminidase (NA; R293K) and is associated with decreased neuraminidase activity and resistance to oseltamivir. Although introducing the R293K mutation into the original low-pathogenicity rH5N3 increased its virulence, transmission to naive contact birds was inefficient, suggesting that one or more of the remaining changes that had accumulated in the passage number six virus also play an important role in transmissibility. Our findings show that the functional linkage and balance between HA and NA proteins contributes to expression of the HPAI phenotype. IMPORTANCE To date, the contribution that hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance can have on the expression of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus phenotype has not been thoroughly examined. Reassortment, which can result in new hemagglutinin-neuraminidase

  1. Arterial Stiffening in Western Diet-Fed Mice Is Associated with Increased Vascular Elastin, Transforming Growth Factor-β, and Plasma Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Christopher A.; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I.; Jia, Guanghong; Hill, Michael A.; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C.; Sowers, James R.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of excess fat and carbohydrate (Western diet, WD) is associated with alterations in the structural characteristics of blood vessels. This vascular remodeling contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease, particularly as it affects conduit and resistance arteries. Vascular remodeling is often associated with changes in the elastin-rich internal elastic lamina (IEL) and the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. In addition, obesity and type II diabetes have been associated with increased serum neuraminidase, an enzyme known to increase TGF-β cellular output. Therefore, we hypothesized that WD-feeding would induce structural modifications to the IEL of mesenteric resistance arteries in mice, and that these changes would be associated with increased levels of circulating neuraminidase and the up-regulation of elastin and TGF-β in the arterial wall. To test this hypothesis, a WD, high in fat and sugar, was used to induce obesity in mice, and the effect of this diet on the structure of mesenteric resistance arteries was investigated. 4-week old, Post-weaning mice were fed either a normal diet (ND) or WD for 16 weeks. Mechanically, arteries from WD-fed mice were stiffer and less distensible, with marginally increased wall stress for a given strain, and a significantly increased Young's modulus of elasticity. Structurally, the wall cross-sectional area and the number of fenestrae found in the internal elastic lamina (IEL) of mesenteric arteries from mice fed a WD were significantly smaller than those of arteries from the ND-fed mice. There was also a significant increase in the volume of elastin, but not collagen in arteries from the WD cohort. Plasma levels of neuraminidase and the amount of TGF-β in mesenteric arteries were elevated in mice fed a WD, while ex vivo, cultured vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to neuraminidase secreted greater amounts of tropoelastin and TGF-β than those exposed to vehicle. These data suggest that

  2. Prediction of mutation positions in H5N1 neuraminidases from influenza A virus by means of neural network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2010-03-01

    Quantification of mutation capacity within a protein could be a way to model the mutation relationship not only because history might not leave many cues on the causes for mutations but also the evolved protein might no longer be subject to previous mutation causes. Randomness should play a constant role in engineering mutations in proteins because randomness suggests the maximal probability of occurrence by which a protein would be constructed with the least time and energy to meet the speed of rapidly changing environments. Since 1999, we have developed three approaches for quantifying of randomness of protein by which each amino acid has three numeric values. In this study, we model our three random numeric values in each amino acid with occurrence and non-occurrence of mutation, which are classified as unity and zero, using a 3-6-1 feedforward backpropagation neural network to predict the mutation positions in H5N1 neuraminidases. The results show that the neural network can capture the mutation relationship as measured by prediction sensitivity, specificity, and total correct rate. With the help of translation probability between RNA codes and mutated amino acids, we predict the would-be-mutated amino acids at predicted mutation positions. PMID:20336836

  3. Paramyxovirus mediated cell fusion requires co-expression of both the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Heminway, B R; Yu, Y; Galinski, M S

    1994-01-01

    Syncytia formation in either CV-1 or HeLa T4+ cells required recombinant expression of both fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins from the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2), and simian virus 5 (SV5). In this system, recombinant T7 transcription vectors (pT7-5 or pGEM) containing F or HN, were transfected individually or in combination into cells previously infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase (vTF7-3). While both proteins were processed and expressed at the cell surface, syncytia formation occurred only when both glycoproteins were co-expressed. The function of HN in the fusion process could not be replaced using lectins or by co-expression of heterologous F and HN proteins. Further, cell fusion was not observed when experiments were performed using individually expressed F and HN proteins in adjacent cells. The data presented in this report support the notion that a specific interaction between both paramyxoviral glycoproteins is required for the formation of syncytia in tissue culture monolayers. PMID:8165862

  4. Long-Lasting Cross-Protection Against Influenza A by Neuraminidase and M2e-based immunization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schotsaert, Michael; Ysenbaert, Tine; Smet, Anouk; Schepens, Bert; Vanderschaeghe, Dieter; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Vogel, Thorsten U.; Callewaert, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that in the absence of neutralizing antibodies cross-reactive T cells provide protection against pandemic influenza viruses. Here, we compared protection and CD8+ T cell responses following challenge with H1N1 2009 pandemic and H3N2 viruses of mice that had been immunized with hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and the extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) fused to a virus-like particle (VLP). Mice were challenged a first time with a sublethal dose of H1N1 2009 pandemic virus and, four weeks later, challenged again with an H3N2 virus. Mice that had been vaccinated with HA, NA, NA + M2e-VLP and HA + NA + M2e-VLP were protected against homologous H1N1 virus challenge. Challenged NA and NA + M2e-VLP vaccinated mice mounted CD8+ T cell responses that correlated with protection against secondary H3N2 challenge. HA-vaccinated mice were fully protected against challenge with homologous H1N1 2009 virus, failed to mount cross-reactive CD8+ T cells and succumbed to the second challenge with heterologous H3N2 virus. In summary, NA- and M2e-based immunity can protect against challenge with (homologous) virus without compromising the induction of robust cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses upon exposure to virus. PMID:27072615

  5. Punctuated Evolution of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase (A/H1N1) under Opposing Migration and Vaccination Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus contains two highly variable envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The structure and properties of HA, which is responsible for binding the virus to the cell that is being infected, change significantly when the virus is transmitted from avian or swine species to humans. Here we focus first on the simpler problem of the much smaller human individual evolutionary amino acid mutational changes in NA, which cleaves sialic acid groups and is required for influenza virus replication. Our thermodynamic panorama shows that very small amino acid changes can be monitored very accurately across many historic (1945–2011) Uniprot and NCBI strains using hydropathicity scales to quantify the roughness of water film packages. Quantitative sequential analysis is most effective with the fractal differential hydropathicity scale based on protein self-organized criticality (SOC). Our analysis shows that large-scale vaccination programs have been responsible for a very large convergent reduction in common influenza severity in the last century. Hydropathic analysis is capable of interpreting and even predicting trends of functional changes in mutation prolific viruses directly from amino acid sequences alone. An engineered strain of NA1 is described which could well be significantly less virulent than current circulating strains. PMID:25143953

  6. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Shanks, G Dennis; Vincent, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigenic drift, but have been shown to induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with an antigenic variant of the same haemagglutinin (HA) subtype. This study investigated the role the immune response against HA, neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) may play in VAERD by reverse engineering vaccine and challenge viruses on a common backbone and using them in a series of vaccination/challenge trials. Mismatched HA between vaccine and challenge virus was necessary to induce VAERD. However, vaccines containing a matched NA abrogated the VAERD phenomenon induced by the HA mismatch and this was correlated with NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies. Divergence between the two circulating swine N2 lineages (92 % identity) resulted in a loss of NI cross-reactivity and also resulted in VAERD with the mismatched HA. The NP lineage selected for use in the WIV vaccine strains did not affect protection or pathology. Thus the combination of HA and NA in the vaccine virus strains played a substantial role in vaccine protection versus immunopathology, suggesting that vaccines that target the HA protein alone could be more prone to VAERD due to the absence of cross-protective NI antibodies. PMID:27031847

  7. What adaptive changes in hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are necessary for emergence of pandemic influenza virus from its avian precursor?

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Matrosovich, M N

    2015-07-01

    Wild ducks serve as the primary host for numerous and various influenza type A viruses. Occasionally, viruses from this reservoir can be transferred to other host species and cause outbreaks of influenza in fowl, swine, and horses, as well as result in novel human pandemics. Cellular tropism and range of susceptible host species are determined by interaction between virus and receptor molecules on cells. Here we discuss modern data regarding molecular features underlying interactions of influenza viruses with cellular receptors as well as a role for receptor specificity in interspecies transmission. By analyzing the earliest available pandemic influenza viruses (1918, 1957, 1968, 2009), we found that hemagglutinin reconfigured to recognize 2-6 sialic acid-containing receptors in the human upper airway tract together with altered enzymatic activity of neuraminidase necessary for maintaining functional balance with hemagglutinin are responsible for effective spread of influenza viruses in human populations. Resistance to low pH also contributes to this. Thus, a combination of such parameters makes it possible that influenza viruses give rise to novel pandemics. PMID:26542001

  8. A Novel I221L Substitution in Neuraminidase Confers High-Level Resistance to Oseltamivir in Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Escuret, Vanessa; Collins, Patrick J.; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Cattle, Nicholas; Ferraris, Olivier; Sabatier, Murielle; Frobert, Emilie; Caro, Valérie; Skehel, John J.; Gamblin, Steve; Valla, Frédéric; Valette, Martine; Ottmann, Michèle; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Lina, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Influenza B viruses with a novel I221L substitution in neuraminidase (NA) conferring high-level resistance to oseltamivir were isolated from an immunocompromised patient after prolonged oseltamivir treatment. Methods. Enzymatic characterization of the NAs (Km, Ki) and the in vitro fitness of viruses carrying wild-type or mutated (I221L) NA genes were evaluated. Proportions of wild-type and mutated NA genes were directly quantified in the patient samples. Structural characterizations by X-ray crystallography of a wild-type and I221L variant NA were performed. Results. The Km and Ki revealed that the I221L variant NA had approximately 84 and 51 times lower affinity for oseltamivir carboxylate and zanamivir, respectively, compared with wild-type NA. Viruses with a wild-type or I221L variant NA had similar growth kinetics in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and 5 passages in MDCK cells revealed no reversion of the I221L substitution. The crystal structure of the I221L NA and oseltamivir complex showed that the leucine side chain protrudes into the hydrophobic pocket of the active site that accommodates the pentyloxy substituent of oseltamivir. Conclusions. Enzyme kinetic and NA structural analyses provide an explanation for the high level of resistance to oseltamivir while retaining good fitness of viruses carrying I221L variant NA. PMID:24795482

  9. A monoclonal antibody targeting a highly conserved epitope in influenza B neuraminidase provides protection against drug resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Tracey M; Li, Changgui; Bucher, Doris J; Hashem, Anwar M; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wang, Junzhi; Farnsworth, Aaron; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Hurt, Aeron C; Li, Xuguang

    2013-11-01

    All influenza viral neuraminidases (NA) of both type A and B viruses have only one universally conserved sequence located between amino acids 222-230. A monoclonal antibody against this region has been previously reported to provide broad inhibition against all nine subtypes of influenza A NA; yet its inhibitory effect against influenza B viral NA remained unknown. Here, we report that the monoclonal antibody provides a broad inhibition against various strains of influenza B viruses of both Victoria and Yamagata genetic lineage. Moreover, the growth and NA enzymatic activity of two drug resistant influenza B strains (E117D and D197E) are also inhibited by the antibody even though these two mutations are conformationally proximal to the universal epitope. Collectively, these data suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral NA is exposed sufficiently to allow access by inhibitory antibody during the course of infection; it could represent a potential target for antiviral agents and vaccine-induced immune responses against diverse strains of type B influenza virus. PMID:24140051

  10. Disulfide bond formation is a determinant of glycosylation site usage in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGinnes, L W; Morrison, T G

    1997-01-01

    Determinants of glycosylation site usage were explored by using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus. The amino acid sequence of the HN protein, a type II glycoprotein, has six N-linked glycosylation addition sites, G1 to G6, two of which, G5 and G6, are not used for the addition of carbohydrate (L. McGinnes and T. Morrison, Virology 212:398-410, 1995). The sequence of this protein also has 13 cysteine residues in the ectodomain (C2 to C14). Mutation of either cysteine 13 or cysteine 14 resulted in the addition of another oligosaccharide chain to the protein. These cysteine residues flank the normally unused G6 glycosylation addition site, and mutation of the G6 site eliminated the extra glycosylation found in the cysteine mutants. These results suggested that failure to form an intramolecular disulfide bond resulted in the usage of a normally unused glycosylation site. This conclusion was confirmed by preventing cotranslational disulfide bond formation in cells by using dithiothreitol. Under these conditions, the wild-type protein acquired extra glycosylation, which was eliminated by mutation of the G6 site. These results suggest that localized folding events on the nascent chain, such as disulfide bond formation, which block access to the oligosaccharyl transferase are a determinant of glycosylation site usage. PMID:9060670

  11. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  12. Design of new inhibitors for H5N1 avian influenza using a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jo, Won Ho

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the treatment of H5N1 avian influenza. One of the most widely used antiviral agents is oseltamivir. However, it has been reported that oseltamivir is not as effective against the neuraminidase subtype N1 as it is against subtypes N2 and N9. In our research we addressed this problem by designing new inhibitors and these altered inhibitor's binding affinities were calculated. In this study, we introduced chemical groups to the existing oseltamivir, so to fit into the newly discovered cavity in the subtype N1. When the binding strengths of the oseltamivir and the newly designed inhibitors for N1 were calculated to examine the drug efficiency through a molecular dynamics simulation, then compared with each other, it was found that one of the designed molecules exhibited a strong binding affinity, with more than twice the binding strength than that of oseltamivir. Since the aforementioned designed inhibitor appears to have the possibility for oral activity according to the criteria of human oral bioavailability, we propose that the inhibitor is a promising antiviral drug for H5N1 avian influenza.

  13. An Innovative Pseudotypes-Based Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay for the Measurement of Functional Anti-Neuraminidase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Prevato, Marua; Cozzi, Roberta; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Taddei, Anna Rita; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Nandi, Avishek; Montomoli, Emanuele; Settembre, Ethan C.; Bertholet, Sylvie; Bonci, Alessandra; Legay, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies (Ab) to neuraminidase (NA) play a role in limiting influenza infection and might help reduce the disease impact. The most widely used serological assay to measure functional anti-NA immune responses is the Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay (ELLA) which relies on hemagglutinin (HA) mismatched virus reassortants, or detergent treated viruses as the NA source to overcome interference associated with steric hindrance of anti-HA Ab present in sera. The difficulty in producing and handling these reagents, which are not easily adapted for screening large numbers of samples, limits the routine analysis of functional anti-NA Ab in clinical trials. In this study, we produced influenza lentiviral pseudoparticles (PPs) containing only the NA antigen (NA-PPs) with a simple two-plasmid co-transfection system. NA-PPs were characterized and tested as an innovative source of NA in the NA inhibition (NI) assay. Both swine A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and avian A/turkey/Turkey/01/2005 (H5N1) N1s within NA-PPs retained their sialidase activity and were specifically inhibited by homologous and N1 subtype-specific, heterologous sheep sera. Moreover, A/California/07/2009 N1-PPs were a better source of NA compared to whole live and detergent treated H1N1 viruses in ELLA, likely due to lack of interference by anti-HA Ab, and absence of possible structural modifications caused by treatment with detergent. This innovative assay is safer and applicable to all NAs. Taken together, these results highlight the potential of NA-PPs-based NI assays to be developed as sensitive, flexible, easy to handle and scalable serological tests for routine NA immune response analysis. PMID:26267900

  14. Structure Determination of the 1918 H1N1 Neuraminidase From a Crystal With Lattice-Translocation Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.; Xu, X.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 {angstrom}, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  15. Rapid molecular subtyping by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the neuraminidase gene of avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, S R; Starick, E; Grund, C; Globig, A; Mettenleiter, T C; Beer, M; Harder, T

    2009-03-30

    Accurate identification of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of influenza A viruses is an integral part of monitoring programs targeting avian influenza viruses (AIV). Use of highly sensitive molecular screening methods such as pan influenza-specific real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) yields an increasing number of samples which are positive for AIV RNA but negative by virus isolation and, therefore, require molecular, instead of serological, subtyping. We developed specific RT-PCR assays for all known nine AIV NA subtypes. Validation using 43 reference isolates from different animal species revealed good performance characteristics regarding sensitivity and specificity. On basis of serial tenfold dilution series of reference isolates a benchmark value of C(t) 32 in an M gene-specific rRT-PCR became evident below which all nine NA subtypes were readily detectable by the subtype-specific RT-PCRs. For subtypes N1, N2, N4 and N6 detection was extended to dilutions with C(t) values of up to 35. Diagnostic applicability of the whole set of conventional NA-specific RT-PCRs was evaluated by analysis of 119 different diagnostic samples from wild birds which proved to be positive for AIV by M gene-specific rRT-PCR. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was confirmed by sequencing NA amplicons from 41 field isolates generated from this set and by NA inhibition assays. A universal molecular HA/NA subtyping algorithm for rRT-PCR positive avian influenza virus monitoring samples is proposed which may complement classical serological subtyping of influenza A virus isolates. PMID:19028027

  16. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type.

    PubMed

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Kitikoon, Pravina; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-07-19

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and respiratory specimens of pigs vaccinated with intramuscular whole-inactivated virus (WIV), intranasal live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), and intranasal wild type (WT) IAV. NI titers were also analyzed in sera from an investigation of piglet vaccination in the presence of passive maternally-derived antibodies. Test antigens contained genetically divergent swine-lineage NA genes homologous or heterologous to the vaccines with mismatched hemagglutinin genes (HA). Naïve piglets responded to WIV and LAIV vaccines and WT infection with strong homologous serum NI titers. Cross-reactivity to heterologous NAs depended on the degree of genetic divergence between the NA genes. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens of LAIV and WT-immunized groups also had significant NI titers against the homologous antigen whereas the WIV group did not. Piglets of vaccinated sows received high levels of passive NI antibody, but their NI responses to homologous LAIV vaccination were impeded. These data demonstrate the utility of the enzyme-linked lectin assay for efficient NI antibody titration of serum as well as respiratory tract secretions. Swine IAV vaccines that induce robust NI responses are likely to provide broader protection against the diverse and rapidly evolving IAV strains that circulate in pig populations. Mucosal antibodies to NA may be one of the protective immune mechanisms induced by LAIV vaccines. PMID:27325350

  17. Deliberate reduction of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase expression of influenza virus leads to an ultraprotective live vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Skiena, Steven; Futcher, Bruce; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard

    2013-06-01

    A long-held dogma posits that strong presentation to the immune system of the dominant influenza virus glycoprotein antigens neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) is paramount for inducing protective immunity against influenza virus infection. We have deliberately violated this dogma by constructing a recombinant influenza virus strain of A/PR8/34 (H1N1) in which expression of NA and HA genes was suppressed. We down-regulated NA and HA expression by recoding the respective genes with suboptimal codon pair bias, thereby introducing hundreds of nucleotide changes while preserving their codon use and protein sequence. The variants PR8-NA(Min), PR8-HA(Min), and PR8-(NA+HA)(Min) (Min, minimal expression) were used to assess the contribution of reduced glycoprotein expression to growth in tissue culture and pathogenesis in BALB/c mice. All three variants proliferated in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to nearly the degree as WT PR8. In mice, however, they expressed explicit attenuation phenotypes, as revealed by their LD50 values: PR8, 32 plaque-forming units (PFU); HA(Min), 1.7 × 10(3) PFU; NA(Min), 2.4 × 10(5) PFU; (NA+HA)(Min), ≥3.16 × 10(6) PFU. Remarkably, (NA+HA)(Min) was attenuated >100,000-fold, with NA(Min) the major contributor to attenuation. In vaccinated mice (NA+HA)(Min) was highly effective in providing long-lasting protective immunity against lethal WT challenge at a median protective dose (PD50) of 2.4 PFU. Moreover, at a PD50 of only 147 or 237, (NA+HA)(Min) conferred protection against heterologous lethal challenges with two mouse-adapted H3N2 viruses. We conclude that the suppression of HA and NA is a unique strategy in live vaccine development. PMID:23690603

  18. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  19. Newcastle disease virus chimeras expressing the Hemagglutinin- Neuraminidase protein of mesogenic strain exhibits an enhanced anti-hepatoma efficacy.

    PubMed

    He, Jinjiao; Pan, Ziye; Tian, Guiyou; Liu, Xin; Liu, Yunye; Guo, Xiaochen; An, Ying; Song, Liying; Wu, Hongsong; Cao, Hongwei; Yu, Dan; Che, Ruixiang; Xu, Pengfei; Rasoul, Lubna M; Li, Deshan; Yin, Jiechao

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an intrinsically tumor-specific virus, many researchers have reported that lentogenic NDV is a safe and effective agent for human cancer therapy. It had been demonstrated that the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site is a major factor in the pathogenicity and anti-tumor efficacy of rNDV. However, the role of Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) gene that contributes to virulence and anti-tumor efficacy remains undefined. To assess the role of HN gene in virus pathogenicity and anti-tumor efficacy, a reverse genetic system was developed using the lentogenic NDV Clone30 strain to provide backbone for gene exchange. Chimeric virus (rClone30-Anh(HN)) created by exchange of the HN gene of lentogenic strain Clone30 with HN gene of mesogenic strain produce no significant changes in virus pathogenicity as assessed by conducting the mean death time (MDT) and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) assays. In vitro, infection with chimeras could induce the formation of syncytium relative significantly in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, chimeras was shown to induce the cell apoptosis via MTT and Annexin V-PI assays, reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and increase the mRNA transcription level of caspase 3. In vivo, ICR mice carrying tumor of hepatoma H22 cells were treated via intratumoral injection of chimeric virus. The treatment of chimera shows an obvious suppression in tumor volume. These results suggest that it could be an ideal approach to enhance the antitumor ability of Newcastle disease virus and highlighted the potential therapeutic application of rClone30-Anh(HN) as a viral vector to deliver foreign genes for treatment of cancers. PMID:27164362

  20. Active influenza virus neuraminidase is expressed in monkey cells from cDNA cloned in simian virus 40 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1983-01-01

    We have replaced the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) with a cloned cDNA copy of the neuraminidase (NA; EC 3.2.1.18) gene of the WSN (H1N1) strain of human influenza virus. When the SV40-NA recombinant virus was complemented in a lytic infection of monkey cells with a helper virus containing an early region deletion mutant, influenza NA was expressed and readily detected by immunofluorescence as well as by immunoprecipitation of in vivo labeled proteins with monoclonal antibodies against NA. In addition, the expressed NA exhibited enzymatic activity by cleaving the sialic acid residue from alpha-2,3-sialyllactitol. The expressed protein was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface, and it possessed the same molecular weight as the NA of WSN virus grown in monkey cells. Because the structure of NA is quite different from that of other integral membrane proteins and includes an anchoring region at the NH2 terminus consisting of hydrophobic amino acids, we also constructed deletion mutants of NA in this region. Replacement of DNA coding for the first 10 NH2-terminal amino acids with SV40 and linker sequences had no apparent effect on NA expression, glycosylation, transport to the cell surface, or enzymatic activity. However, further deletion of NA DNA encoding the first 26 amino acids abolished NA expression. These data suggest that the hydrophobic NH2-terminal region is multifunctional and is important in biosynthesis and translocation of NA across the membrane as well as in anchoring the protein. Images PMID:6306656

  1. Antibody epitopes on the neuraminidase of a recent H3N2 influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98).

    PubMed

    Gulati, Upma; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Venkatramani, Lalitha; Gulati, Shelly; Stray, Stephen J; Lee, Janis T; Laver, W Graeme; Bochkarev, Alexey; Zlotnick, Adam; Air, Gillian M

    2002-12-01

    We have characterized monoclonal antibodies raised against the neuraminidase (NA) of a Sydney-like influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98, H3N2) in a reassortant virus A/NWS/33(HA)-A/Mem/31/98(NA) (H1N2) and nine escape mutants selected by these monoclonal antibodies. Five of the antibodies use the same heavy chain VDJ genes and may not be independent. Another antibody, Mem5, uses the same V(H) and J genes with a different D gene and different isotype. Sequence changes in escape mutants selected by these antibodies occur in two loops of the NA, at amino acid 198, 199, 220, or 221. These amino acids are located on the opposite side of the NA monomer to the major epitopes found in N9 and early N2 NAs. Escape mutants with a change at 198 have reduced NA activity compared to the wild-type virus. Asp198 points toward the substrate binding pocket, and we had previously found that a site-directed mutation of this amino acid resulted in a loss of enzyme activity (M. R. Lentz, R. G. Webster, and G. M. Air, Biochemistry 26:5351-5358, 1987). Mutations at residue 199, 220, or 221 did not alter the NA activity significantly compared to that of wild-type NA. A 3.5-A structure of Mem5 Fab complexed with the Mem/98 NA shows that the Mem5 antibody binds at the sites of escape mutation selected by the other antibodies. PMID:12414967

  2. Deliberate reduction of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase expression of influenza virus leads to an ultraprotective live vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Skiena, Steven; Futcher, Bruce; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard

    2013-01-01

    A long-held dogma posits that strong presentation to the immune system of the dominant influenza virus glycoprotein antigens neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) is paramount for inducing protective immunity against influenza virus infection. We have deliberately violated this dogma by constructing a recombinant influenza virus strain of A/PR8/34 (H1N1) in which expression of NA and HA genes was suppressed. We down-regulated NA and HA expression by recoding the respective genes with suboptimal codon pair bias, thereby introducing hundreds of nucleotide changes while preserving their codon use and protein sequence. The variants PR8-NAMin, PR8-HAMin, and PR8-(NA+HA)Min (Min, minimal expression) were used to assess the contribution of reduced glycoprotein expression to growth in tissue culture and pathogenesis in BALB/c mice. All three variants proliferated in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells to nearly the degree as WT PR8. In mice, however, they expressed explicit attenuation phenotypes, as revealed by their LD50 values: PR8, 32 plaque-forming units (PFU); HAMin, 1.7 × 103 PFU; NAMin, 2.4 × 105 PFU; (NA+HA)Min, ≥3.16 × 106 PFU. Remarkably, (NA+HA)Min was attenuated >100,000-fold, with NAMin the major contributor to attenuation. In vaccinated mice (NA+HA)Min was highly effective in providing long-lasting protective immunity against lethal WT challenge at a median protective dose (PD50) of 2.4 PFU. Moreover, at a PD50 of only 147 or 237, (NA+HA)Min conferred protection against heterologous lethal challenges with two mouse-adapted H3N2 viruses. We conclude that the suppression of HA and NA is a unique strategy in live vaccine development. PMID:23690603

  3. Vaccination with Adjuvanted Recombinant Neuraminidase Induces Broad Heterologous, but Not Heterosubtypic, Cross-Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Xu, Haoming; Tan, Gene S.; Hirsh, Ariana; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to assess the cross-protective potential of the influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) as a vaccine antigen, different subtypes of recombinant NA were expressed in a baculovirus system and used to vaccinate mice prior to lethal challenge with homologous, heterologous, or heterosubtypic viruses. Mice immunized with NA of subtype N2 were completely protected from morbidity and mortality in a homologous challenge and displayed significantly reduced viral lung titers. Heterologous challenge with a drifted strain resulted in morbidity but no mortality. Similar results were obtained for challenge experiments with N1 NA. Mice immunized with influenza B virus NA (from B/Yamagata/16/88) displayed no morbidity when sublethally infected with the homologous strain and, importantly, were completely protected from morbidity and mortality when lethally challenged with the prototype Victoria lineage strain or a more recent Victoria lineage isolate. Upon analyzing the NA content in 4 different inactivated-virus vaccine formulations from the 2013-2014 season via Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantification, we found that the amount of NA does indeed vary across vaccine brands. We also measured hemagglutinin (HA) and NA endpoint titers in pre- and postvaccination human serum samples from individuals who received a trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine from the 2004-2005 season; the induction of NA titers was statistically less pronounced than the induction of HA titers. The demonstrated homologous and heterologous protective capacity of recombinant NA suggests that supplementing vaccine formulations with a standard amount of NA may offer increased protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:25759506

  4. Influenza-induced tachypnea is prevented in immune cotton rats, but cannot be treated with an anti-inflammatory steroid or a neuraminidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Maryna C; Prince, Gregory A; Ottolini, Martin G

    2004-05-01

    Influenza viruses are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during winter months. Increased respiratory rate (tachypnea) is a sign of increasing lower respiratory disease during influenza infection and is frequently observed in hospitalized patients. We investigated this clinical sign in influenza virus-infected cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) and the efficacy of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapy in reducing symptomatic disease. Cotton rats infected intranasally with A/Wuhan/359/95 (H3N2) had increased respiratory rates from 1 to 4 days postinfection that correlated with the dose of virus used to inoculate the animal but not the amount of virus recovered from the lung. In addition, evaluation of sequential lung tissue pathology revealed that extensive epithelial cell destruction of small airways correlated with tachypnea. Increased respiratory rate was not observed in immune animals, supporting results that demonstrated a requirement for exposure to, and infection by, large amounts of live virus for induction of tachypnea. A variety of therapeutic approaches proved ineffective in reducing tachypnea, including anti-inflammatory therapy with systemic triamcinolone acetonide, bronchodilatory therapy with levalbuterol, or antiviral therapy with zanamivir. These results, together with the pathologic observations, suggest that early disruption of the lower respiratory tract epithelium is a major component of the pathophysiology of influenza infection. Therapeutic approaches need to be tailored to clear airway obstruction and restore an intact epithelium. PMID:15110527

  5. Impacts of papain and neuraminidase enzyme treatment on electrohydrodynamics and IgG-mediated agglutination of type A red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hyono, Atsushi; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Mazda, Toshio; Takata, Youichi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2009-09-15

    The stability of native and enzyme-treated human red blood cells of type A (Rh D positive) against agglutination is investigated under conditions where it is mediated by immunoglobuline G (IgG) anti-D antibody binding. The propensity of cells to agglutinate is related to their interphasic (electrokinetic) properties. These properties significantly depend on the concentration of proteolytic papain enzyme and protease-free neuraminidase enzyme that the cells are exposed to. The analysis is based on the interpretation of electrophoretic data of cells by means of the numerical theory for the electrokinetics of soft (bio)particles. A significant reduction of the hydrodynamic permeability of the external soft glycoprotein layer of the cells is reported under the action of papain. This reflects a significant decrease in soft surface layer thickness and a loss in cell surface integrity/rigidity, as confirmed by nanomechanical AFM analysis. Neuraminidase action leads to an important decrease in the interphase charge density by removing sialic acids from the cell soft surface layer. This is accompanied by hydrodynamic softness modulations less significant than those observed for papain-treated cells. On the basis of these electrohydrodynamic characteristics, the overall interaction potential profiles between two native cells and two enzyme-treated cells are derived as a function of the soft surface layer thickness in the Debye-Hückel limit that is valid for cell suspensions under physiological conditions (approximately 0.16 M). The thermodynamic computation of cell suspension stability against IgG-mediated agglutination then reveals that a decrease in the cell surface layer thickness is more favorable than a decrease in interphase charge density for inducing agglutination. This is experimentally confirmed by agglutination data collected for papain- and neuraminidase-treated cells. PMID:19735140

  6. Using Common Spatial Distributions of Atoms to Relate Functionally Divergent Influenza Virus N10 and N11 Protein Structures to Functionally Characterized Neuraminidase Structures, Toxin Cell Entry Domains, and Non-Influenza Virus Cell Entry Domains

    PubMed Central

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  7. Using common spatial distributions of atoms to relate functionally divergent influenza virus N10 and N11 protein structures to functionally characterized neuraminidase structures, toxin cell entry domains, and non-influenza virus cell entry domains.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  8. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westgeest, Kim; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Spronken, Monique I.J.; Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Eichelberger, Maryna; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used to characterize the antigenic properties of NA, these methods are cumbersome and not easily amendable to rapid screening. An additional difficulty of the NI assay is the interference by hemagglutinin (HA)-specific antibodies. To prevent interference of HA-specific antibodies, most NI assays are performed with recombinant viruses containing a mismatched HA. However, generation of these viruses is time consuming and unsuitable for large-scale surveillance. The feasibility of using the recently developed enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to evaluate the antigenic relatedness of NA of wild type A(H3N2) viruses was assessed. Rather than using recombinant viruses, wild type A(H3N2) viruses were used as antigen with ferret sera elicited against recombinant viruses with a mismatched HA. In this study, details of the critical steps that are needed to modify and optimize the NI ELLA in a format that is reproducible, highly sensitive, and useful for influenza virus surveillance to monitor antigenic drift of NA are provided. PMID:25712563

  9. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  10. Neuraminidase H275Y and hemagglutinin D222G mutations in a fatal case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, Aaron; Wotton, Jason; Lees, Christine; Boxrud, David; Uyeki, Timothy; Lynfield, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: DeVries et al. (2012) Neuraminidase H275Y and hemagglutinin D222G mutations in a fatal case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e85–e88. Oseltamivir‐resistant 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infections associated with neuraminidase (NA) H275Y have been identified sporadically. Strains possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) D222G mutation have been detected in small numbers of fatal 2009 H1N1 cases. We report the first clinical description of 2009 H1N1 virus infection with both NA‐H275Y and HA‐D222G mutations detected by pyrosequencing of bronchioalveolar lavage fluid obtained on symptom day 19. The 59‐year‐old immunosuppressed patient had multiple conditions conferring higher risk of prolonged viral replication and severe illness and died on symptom day 34. Further investigations are needed to determine the significance of infection with strains possessing NA‐H275Y and HA‐D222G. PMID:22243670

  11. [Evaluation of the anti-neuraminidase antibodies in clinical trials of the live influenza vaccine of the A(H5N2) subtype].

    PubMed

    Smolonogina, T A; Desheva, Iu A; Rekstin, A R; Mironov, A N; Rudenko, L G

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibodies among volunteers during the phase I and phase II of the clinical trials of a monovalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) A/17/duck/ Potsdam/86/92(H5N2). The reassortant influenza virus RN2/57-human A(H7N2) containing neuraminidase (NA) from the A/Leningrad/134/17/57(H2N2) was used in NI test. It was shown that two doses of the monovalent LAIV A(H5N2) led to a statistically significant increase in the NI antibodies to vaccine strain NA. More than twofold increase in antibodies was obtained among 19.5-33.3% of vaccinated. The microneutralization test and NI assay results coincidence in the same pairs of sera of the vaccinated volunteers was 73.2%, suggesting thus a statistically significant interdependence between the values of increase in antibodies revealed in both tests (p = 0.04). PMID:24772644

  12. Catalytic mechanism and novel receptor binding sites of human parainfluenza virus type 3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (hPIV3 HN).

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Pilling, Pat; Barrett, Susan; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV3) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) has opposing functions of binding sialic acid receptors and cleaving them, facilitating virus release. The crystal structure of hPIV3 HN complexed with the substrate analogue difluorosialic acid (DFSA) revealed that catalysis by HN involves the formation of a covalently linked sialosyl-enzyme intermediate which was trapped along with a transition-state analogue resembling an oxocarbenium ion. This mechanism of enzyme catalysis was also confirmed in the crystal structure of the influenza N9 neuraminidase complexed with DFSA. Additionally, novel secondary receptor binding sites were identified in the hPIV3 HN-DFSA complex including one near the catalytic cavity which upon binding DFSA imposes subtle changes and may help the HN balance the opposing functions. Multiple receptor binding sites may increase avidity to facilitate cell binding and fusion promotion. The secondary receptor binding sites in the paramyxoviruses are so far unique to each virus type. PMID:26364554

  13. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  14. Detection of neuraminidase stalk motifs associated with enhanced N1 subtype influenza A virulence via Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, JooYoung; Martin, Sharon J H; Tripp, Ralph A; Tompkins, S Mark; Dluhy, Richard A

    2015-11-21

    Oligonucleotides corresponding to neuraminidase (NA) stalk motifs that have been associated with enhanced influenza virulence have been identified using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). 5'-Thiolated ssDNA oligonucleotides were immobilized onto a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) coated Au nanoparticles (AuNP). Three synthetic RNA sequences corresponding to specific amino acid deletions in the influenza NA stalk region were attached to the CTAB-modified AuNPs. Two of these sequences were specific to sequences with amino acid deletions associated with increased virulence, and one was a low virulence sequence with no amino acid deletions. Hybridization of synthetic matched and mismatched DNA-RNA complexes were detected based on the intrinsic SERS spectra. In addition, this platform was used to analyze RNA sequences isolated from laboratory grown influenza viruses having the NA stalk motif associated with enhanced virulence, including A/WSN/33/H1N1, A/Anhui/1/2005/H5N, and A/Vietnam/1203/2004/H5N1 strains. Multivariate feature selection methods were employed to determine the specific wavenumbers in the Raman spectra that contributed the most information for class discrimination. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test identified 884 and 1196 wavenumbers as being highly significant in the high and low virulence spectra, respectively (p < 0.01). A post-hoc Tukey Honestly Significance Difference (HSD) test identified the wavenumbers that played a major role in differentiating the DNA-RNA hybrid classes. An estimate of the spectral variability, based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test, found the major source of variation to be predominately between the different classes, and not within the classes, thus confirming that the spectra reflected real class differences and not sampling artifacts. The multivariate classification methods partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machine discriminant analysis (SVM-DA) were able to

  15. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase containing virus-like particles produced in HEK-293 suspension culture: An effective influenza vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Gilbert, Renald; Simoneau, Melanie; Caron, Antoine; Chahal, Parminder; Chen, Wangxue; Ansorge, Sven; Li, Xuguang; Henry, Olivier; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) constitute a promising alternative as influenza vaccine. They are non-replicative particles that mimic the morphology of native viruses which make them more immunogenic than classical subunit vaccines. In this study, we propose HEK-293 cells in suspension culture in serum-free medium as an efficient platform to produce large quantities of VLPs. For this purpose, a stable cell line expressing the main influenza viral antigens hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) (subtype H1N1) under the regulation of a cumate inducible promoter was developed (293HA-NA cells). The production of VLPs was evaluated by transient transfection of plasmids encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag or M1 influenza matrix protein. To facilitate the monitoring of VLPs production, Gag was fused to the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The transient transfection of the gag containing plasmid in 293HA-NA cells increased the release of HA and NA seven times more than its counterpart transfected with the M1 encoding plasmid. Consequently, the production of HA-NA containing VLPs using Gag as scaffold was evaluated in a 3-L controlled stirred tank bioreactor. The VLPs secreted in the culture medium were recovered by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion and ultrafiltered by tangential flow filtration. Transmission electron micrographs of final sample revealed the presence of particles with the average typical size (150-200nm) and morphology of HIV-1 immature particles. The concentration of the influenza glycoproteins on the Gag-VLPs was estimated by single radial immunodiffusion and hemagglutination assay for HA and by Dot-Blot for HA and NA. More significantly, intranasal immunization of mice with influenza Gag-VLPs induced strong antigen-specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses and provided full protection against a lethal intranasal challenge with the homologous virus strain. These data suggest that, with further optimization and characterization

  16. Expression, purification and characterization of low-glycosylation influenza neuraminidase in α-1,6-mannosyltransferase defective Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Li; Chang, Shao-Hong; Gong, Xin; Wu, Jun; Liu, Bo

    2012-02-01

    Influenza A viruses expose two major surface glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Although N-glycosylation is essential for many glycoproteins, the glycoproteins expressed in yeast are sometimes hyper-glycosylated, which maybe a primary hindrance to the exploitation of therapeutic glycoprotein production because glycoproteins decorated with yeast-specific glycans are immunogenic and show poor pharmacokinetic properties in humans. To elucidate the NA with different glycosylation in interaction with immunogenicity, here we reported the heterologous expression of influenza NA glycoprotein derived from influenza virus A/newCaledonia/20/99(H1N1) in wide-type Pichia pastoris, α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (och1)-defective P. pastoris and Escherichia coli. We also assessed the immunogenicity of hyper-glycosylated NA expressed in the wide-type, low-glycosylated NA expressed in och1-defective P. pastoris strain and non-glycosylated NA produced in E. coli. Recombinant NA was expressed in wide-type P. pastoris as a 59-97 above kDa glycoprotein, 52-57 kDa in the och1 defective strain, and as a 45 kDa non-glycoprotein in E. coli. The antibody titers of Balb/c mice were tested after the mice were immunized three times with 0.2, 1, or 3 μg purified recombinant NA. Our results demonstrated that after the second immunization, the antibody titer elicited with 1 μg low-glycosylated NA was 1:5,500, while it was 1:10 and 1:13 when elicited by 1 μg hyper-glycosylated and non-glycosylated NA. In the 0.2 μg dose groups, a high antibody titer (1:4,900) was only found after third immunization by low-glycosylated NA, respectively. These results suggest that low-glycosylation in och1-defective P. pastoris enhances the immunogenicity of recombinant NA and elicits similar antibody titers with less antigen when compared with hyper- and non-glycosylated NA. Thus, och1-defective P. pastoris may be a better yeast expression system for production of glycoproteins to research

  17. Impact of Potential Permissive Neuraminidase Mutations on Viral Fitness of the H275Y Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus In Vitro, in Mice and in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Bouhy, Xavier; Rhéaume, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) mutations conferring resistance to NA inhibitors (NAIs) generally compromise the fitness of influenza viruses. The only NAI-resistant virus that widely spread in the population, the A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) strain, contained permissive mutations that restored the detrimental effect caused by the H275Y change. Computational analysis predicted other permissive NA mutations for A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Here, we investigated the effect of T289M and N369K mutations on the viral fitness of the A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y variant. Recombinant wild-type (WT) A(H1N1)pdm09 and the H275Y, H275Y/T289M, H275Y/N369K, and H275Y/V241I/N369K (a natural variant) NA mutants were generated by reverse genetics. Replication kinetics were performed by using ST6GalI-MDCK cells. Virulence was assessed in C57BL/6 mice, and contact transmission was evaluated in ferrets. The H275Y mutation significantly reduced viral titers during the first 12 to 36 h postinfection (p.i.) in vitro. Nevertheless, the WT and H275Y viruses induced comparable mortality rates, weight loss, and lung titers in mice. The T289M mutation eliminated the detrimental effect caused by the H275Y change in vitro while causing greater weight loss and mortality in mice, with significantly higher lung viral titers on days 3 and 6 p.i. than with the H275Y mutant. In index ferrets, the WT, H275Y, H275Y/T289M, and H275Y/V241I/N369K recombinants induced comparable fever, weight loss, and nasal wash viral titers. All tested viruses were transmitted at comparable rates in contact ferrets, with the H275Y/V241I/N369K recombinant demonstrating higher nasal wash viral titers than the H275Y mutant. Permissive mutations may enhance the fitness of A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y viruses in vitro and in vivo. The emergence of such variants should be carefully monitored. PMID:24257597

  18. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  19. Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    von Itzstein, Mark; Thomson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter. PMID:19048199

  20. Drug Repurposing Identifies Inhibitors of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ju; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Zheng, Jie J

    2016-03-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, oseltamivir, is a widely used anti-influenza drug. However, oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y NA mutation spontaneously emerged as a result of natural genetic drift and drug treatment. Because H275Y and other potential mutations may generate a future pandemic influenza strain that is oseltamivir-resistant, alternative therapy options are needed. Herein, we show that a structure-based computational method can be used to identify existing drugs that inhibit resistant viruses, thereby providing a first line of pharmaceutical defense against this possible scenario. We identified two drugs, nalidixic acid and dorzolamide, that potently inhibit the NA activity of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses with the H275Y NA mutation at very low concentrations, but have no effect on wild-type H1N1 NA even at a much higher concentration, suggesting that the oseltamivir-resistance mutation itself caused susceptibility to these drugs. PMID:26833677

  1. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure. PMID:27051336

  2. Functional Properties and Genetic Relatedness of the Fusion and Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Proteins of a Mumps Virus-Like Bat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Nadine; Hoffmann, Markus; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Corman, Victor Max; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steven; He, Biao; Örvell, Claes; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A bat virus with high phylogenetic relatedness to human mumps virus (MuV) was identified recently at the nucleic acid level. We analyzed the functional activities of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion (F) proteins of the bat virus (batMuV) and compared them to the respective proteins of a human isolate. Transfected cells expressing the F and HN proteins of batMuV were recognized by antibodies directed against these proteins of human MuV, indicating that both viruses are serologically related. Fusion, hemadsorption, and neuraminidase activities were demonstrated for batMuV, and either bat-derived protein could substitute for its human MuV counterpart in inducing syncytium formation when coexpressed in different mammalian cell lines, including chiropteran cells. Cells expressing batMuV glycoproteins were shown to have lower neuraminidase activity. The syncytia were smaller, and they were present in lower numbers than those observed after coexpression of the corresponding glycoproteins of a clinical isolate of MuV (hMuV). The phenotypic differences in the neuraminidase and fusion activity between the glycoproteins of batMuV and hMuV are explained by differences in the expression level of the HN and F proteins of the two viruses. In the case of the F protein, analysis of chimeric proteins revealed that the signal peptide of the bat MuV fusion protein is responsible for the lower surface expression. These results indicate that the surface glycoproteins of batMuV are serologically and functionally related to those of hMuV, raising the possibility of bats as a reservoir for interspecies transmission. IMPORTANCE The recently described MuV-like bat virus is unique among other recently identified human-like bat-associated viruses because of its high sequence homology (approximately 90% in most genes) to its human counterpart. Although it is not known if humans can be infected by batMuV, the antigenic relatedness between the bat and human forms of

  3. Expression at the cell surface of biologically active fusion and hemagglutinin/neuraminidase proteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1985-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the mRNAs for the fusion protein (F) and the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase protein (HN) of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 have been inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The F and HN proteins synthesized in recombinant infected cells are indistinguishable in terms of electrophoretic mobility and glycosylation from the proteins synthesized in simian virus 5-infected cells. In addition, the expressed F and HN proteins have been shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane in a biologically active form by indirect live cell immunofluorescence, the F-mediated formation of syncytia, and the ability of HN to cause the hemadsorption of erythrocytes to the infected cell surface. Images PMID:3865176

  4. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus strain with an H274Y mutation in neuraminidase persists without drug pressure in infected mallards.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Holmberg, Fredrik; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Tolf, Conny; Waldenström, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-04-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and emerging human IAVs often contain gene segments from avian viruses. The active drug metabolite of oseltamivir (oseltamivir carboxylate [OC]), stockpiled as Tamiflu for influenza pandemic preparedness, is not removed by conventional sewage treatment and has been detected in river water. There, it may exert evolutionary pressure on avian IAV in waterfowl, resulting in the development of resistant viral variants. A resistant avian IAV can circulate among wild birds only if resistance does not restrict viral fitness and if the resistant virus can persist without continuous drug pressure. In this in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) study, we tested whether an OC-resistant avian IAV (H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA-H274Y) could retain resistance while drug pressure was gradually removed. Successively infected mallards were exposed to decreasing levels of OC, and fecal samples were analyzed for the neuraminidase sequence and phenotypic resistance. No reversion to wild-type virus was observed during the experiment, which included 17 days of viral transmission among 10 ducks exposed to OC concentrations below resistance induction levels. We conclude that resistance in avian IAV that is induced by exposure of the natural host to OC can persist in the absence of the drug. Thus, there is a risk that human-pathogenic IAVs that evolve from IAVs circulating among wild birds may contain resistance mutations. An oseltamivir-resistant pandemic IAV would pose a substantial public health threat. Therefore, our observations underscore the need for prudent oseltamivir use, upgraded sewage treatment, and surveillance for resistant IAVs in wild birds. PMID:25616792

  5. Neuraminidase produces a decrease of adherence of slime-forming Staphylococcus aureus to gelatin-impregnated polyester fiber graft fabric: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sacar, Mustafa; Onem, Gokhan; Baltalarli, Ahmet; Sacar, Suzan; Turgut, Huseyin; Goksin, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Vefa; Sakarya, Serhan

    2007-01-01

    Because slime-forming microorganisms are the major causative agents of graft infections, we aimed to investigate bacterial adherence in slime-forming and nonslime-forming Staphylococcus aureus and to determine the role of neuraminidase (NANase) on adherence to gelatin-impregnated polyester fiber graft fabric. An in vitro model was developed to quantitatively measure bacterial adherence to the surface of the graft. The grafts were divided into two groups - those colonized with slime-forming S. aureus and those colonized with nonslime-forming S. aureus. The grafts were put into sterile tubes and human plasma was instilled and incubated at 37 degrees C to perform fibrin deposition on the grafts. After 48 h of incubation, grafts were drained and inoculated with slime-forming or nonslime-forming S. aureus in triptic soy broth in the presence or absence of NANase. Following 36 h of incubation at 36 degrees C, grafts were vortexed and cultured to perform a colony count. Bacterial counts were expressed as total colony-forming units per square centimeter of graft. Slime-forming S. aureus had greater affinity with the graft compared with nonslime-forming S. aureus (P < 0.05). The adherence of slime-forming S. aureus was impaired by NANase treatment (P < 0.001) but NANase treatment of nonslime-forming S. aureus did not change the adherence to the graft (P > 0.05). These results show that slime plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular graft infection. Adherence of slime-forming S. aureus can be decreased by NANase treatment. This may have implications for the development of neuraminidase-embedded vascular grafts to diminish biomaterial-related infections. PMID:17846717

  6. In situ molecular identification of the Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Neuraminidase in patients with severe and fatal infections during a pandemic in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In April 2009, public health surveillance detected an increased number of influenza-like illnesses in Mexico City’s hospitals. The etiological agent was subsequently determined to be a spread of a worldwide novel influenza A (H1N1) triple reassortant. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that molecular detection of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strains is possible in archival material such as paraffin-embedded lung samples. Methods In order to detect A (H1N1) virus sequences in archived biological samples, eight paraffin-embedded lung samples from patients who died of pneumonia and respiratory failure were tested for influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase (NA) RNA using in situ RT-PCR. Results We detected NA transcripts in 100% of the previously diagnosed A (H1N1)-positive samples as a cytoplasmic signal. No expression was detected by in situ RT-PCR in two Influenza-like Illness A (H1N1)-negative patients using standard protocols nor in a non-related cervical cell line. In situ relative transcription levels correlated with those obtained when in vitro RT-PCR assays were performed. Partial sequences of the NA gene from A (H1N1)-positive patients were obtained by the in situ RT-PCR-sequencing method. Sequence analysis showed 98% similarity with influenza viruses reported previously in other places. Conclusions We have successfully amplified specific influenza A (H1N1) NA sequences using stored clinical material; results suggest that this strategy could be useful when clinical RNA samples are quantity limited, or when poor quality is obtained. Here, we provide a very sensitive method that specifically detects the neuraminidase viral RNA in lung samples from patients who died from pneumonia caused by Influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Mexico City. PMID:23327529

  7. Comparability of neuraminidase inhibition antibody titers measured by enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) for the analysis of influenza vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Maryna C; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Yonghong; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline; Wagner, Ralf; Thompson, Catherine I; Höschler, Katja; Laurie, Karen; Bai, Tian; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Wood, John

    2016-01-20

    Neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibody titers can be used to evaluate the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza vaccines and have provided evidence of serologic cross-reactivity between seasonal and pandemic H1N1 viruses. The traditional thiobarbituric acid assay is impractical for large serologic analyses, and therefore many laboratories use an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to determine serum NI antibody titers. The comparability of ELLA NI antibody titers when measured in different laboratories was unknown. Here we report a study conducted through the Consortium for the Standardisation of Influenza SeroEpidemiology (CONSISE) to evaluate the variability of the ELLA. NI antibody titers of a set of 12 samples were measured against both N1 and N2 neuraminidase antigens in 3 independent assays by each of 23 laboratories. For a sample repeated in the same assay, ≥96% of N1 and N2 assays had less than a 4-fold difference in titer. Comparison of the titers measured in assays conducted on 3 different days in the same laboratory showed that a four-fold difference in titer was uncommon. Titers of the same sera measured in different laboratories spanned 3 to 6 two-fold dilutions (i.e., 8-64 fold difference in titer), with an average percent geometric coefficient of variation (%GCV) of 112 and 82% against N1 and N2 antigens, respectively. The difference in titer as indicated by fold range and %GCV was improved by normalizing the NI titers to a standard that was included in each assay. This study identified background signal and the amount of antigen in the assay as critical factors that influence titer, providing important information toward development of a consensus ELLA protocol. PMID:26707221

  8. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds' inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  9. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds’ inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  10. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526