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Sample records for proline-based neuraminidase inhibitor

  1. Neuraminidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Pharmaceutical companies have been developing drugs that can inhibit the function of neuraminidase hoping to create an effective weapon against the flu. Researchers from the pharmaceutical industry and from the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography have grown crystals of neuraminidase in space. These improved, space-grown crystals have provided information that have helped design drugs which form a stronger interaction with the enzyme. These drugs inhibit neuraminidase by attaching themselves to the enzyme. Since the drugs are less likely to detach from the enzyme, they are more effective, require smaller dosages, and have fewer side effects. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  2. Influenza virus neuraminidase: structure, antibodies, and inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the 3-dimensional structure of the influenza virus neuraminidase in 1983 has served as a platform for understanding interactions between antibodies and protein antigens, for investigating antigenic variation in influenza viruses, and for devising new inhibitors of the enzyme. That work is reviewed here, together with more recent developments that have resulted in one of the inhibitors entering clinical trials as an anti-influenza virus drug. PMID:7849585

  3. Novel Potent Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease Inhibitors Derived from Proline-Based Macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Arasappan, Ashok; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Yang, Weiying; Parekh, Tejal N.; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Yao, Nanhua; Madison, Vincent; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease is essential for viral replication. It has been a target of choice for intensive drug discovery research. On the basis of an active pentapeptide inhibitor, 1, we envisioned that macrocyclization from the P2 proline to P3 capping could enhance binding to the backbone Ala156 residue and the S4 pocket. Thus, a number of P2 proline-based macrocyclic {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitors were prepared and investigated in an HCV NS3 serine protease continuous assay (K*{sub i}). The biological activity varied substantially depending on factors such as the ring size, number of amino acid residues, number of methyl substituents, type of heteroatom in the linker, P3 residue, and configuration at the proline C-4 center. The pentapeptide inhibitors were very potent, with the C-terminal acids and amides being the most active ones (24, K*{sub i} = 8 nM). The tetrapeptides and tripeptides were less potent. Sixteen- and seventeen-membered macrocyclic compounds were equally potent, while fifteen-membered analogues were slightly less active. gem-Dimethyl substituents at the linker improved the potency of all inhibitors (the best compound was 45, K*{sub i} = 6 nM). The combination of tert-leucine at P3 and dimethyl substituents at the linker in compound 47 realized a selectivity of 307 against human neutrophil elastase. Compound 45 had an IC{sub 50} of 130 nM in a cellular replicon assay, while IC{sub 50} for 24 was 400 nM. Several compounds had excellent subcutaneous AUC and bioavailability in rats. Although tripeptide compound 40 was 97% orally bioavailable, larger pentapeptides generally had low oral bioavailability. The X-ray crystal structure of compounds 24 and 45 bound to the protease demonstrated the close interaction of the macrocycle with the Ala156 methyl group and S4 pocket. The strategy of macrocyclization has been proved to be successful in improving potency (>20-fold greater than that of 1) and in structural depeptization.

  4. Peramivir Phosphonate Derivatives as Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Cheng; Fang, Jim-Min; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Wang, Shi-Yun; Huang, Wen-I; Tseng, Yin-Chen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-06-01

    Peramivir is a potent neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor for treatment of influenza infection by intravenous administration. By replacing the carboxylate group in peramivir with a phosphonate group, phosphono-peramivir (6a), the dehydration and deoxy derivatives (7a and 8a) as well as their corresponding monoalkyl esters are prepared from a pivotal intermediate epoxide 12. Among these phosphonate compounds, the dehydration derivative 7a that has a relatively rigid cyclopentene core structure exhibits the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.3-4.1 nM) against several NAs of wild-type human and avian influenza viruses (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, and H7N9), although the phosphonate congener 6a is unexpectedly less active than peramivir. The inferior binding affinity of 6a is attributable to the deviated orientations of its phosphonic acid and 3-pentyl groups in the NA active site as inferred from the NMR, X-ray diffraction, and molecular modeling analyses. Compound 7a is active to the oseltamivir-resistant H275Y strains of H1N1 and H5N1 viruses (IC50 = 73-86 nM). The phosphonate monoalkyl esters (6b, 6c, 7b, 7c, 8b, and 8c) are better anti-influenza agents (EC50 = 19-89 nM) than their corresponding phosphonic acids (EC50 = 50-343 nM) in protection of cells from the viral infection. The phosphonate monoalkyl esters are stable in buffer solutions (pH 2.0-7.4) and rabbit serum; furthermore, the alkyl group is possibly tuned to attain the desired pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:27167096

  5. Neuraminidase Inhibitors from the Fruiting Body of Phellinus igniarius

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Jeong, Kyeong-Woon; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    During our ongoing investigation of neuraminidase inhibitors from medicinal fungi, we found that the fruiting bodies of Phellinus igniarius exhibited significant inhibitory activity against neuraminidase from recombinant H3N2 influenza viruses. Two active compounds were isolated from the methanolic extract of P. igniarius through solvent partitioning and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The active compounds were identified as phelligridins E and G on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and electrospray ionization mass measurements. These compounds inhibited neuraminidases from recombinant rvH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza viruses, with IC50 values in the range of 0.7~8.1 µM. PMID:27433123

  6. Proline-Based Macrocyclic Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus: Stereoselective Synthesis and Biological Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Prongay, Andrew; Pichardo, John; Madison, Vincent; Buevich, Alexei; Chan, Tze-Ming

    2008-06-30

    Macrocyclization through a Mitsunobu reaction was used to synthesize a 17-membered macrocycle. The bicyclic acetal core was prepared completely diastereoselectively. The macrocyclic peptidomimetic surrogate of the P2-P3 dipeptide moiety was designed to function as a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 serine protease inhibitor, and the pentapeptide {alpha}-ketoamides derived from the macrocycle were shown to be potent HCV inhibitors.

  7. Exploring the chemical space of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    The fight against the emergence of mutant influenza strains has led to the screening of an increasing number of compounds for inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase. This study explores the chemical space of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), which provides an opportunity to obtain further molecular insights regarding the underlying basis of their bioactivity. In particular, a large set of 347 and 175 NAIs against influenza A and B, respectively, was compiled from the literature. Molecular and quantum chemical descriptors were obtained from low-energy conformational structures geometrically optimized at the PM6 level. The bioactivities of NAIs were classified as active or inactive according to their half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) value in which IC50 < 1µM and ≥ 10µM were defined as active and inactive compounds, respectively. Interpretable decision rules were derived from a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model established using a set of substructure descriptors via decision tree analysis. Univariate analysis, feature importance analysis from decision tree modeling and molecular scaffold analysis were performed on both data sets for discriminating important structural features amongst active and inactive NAIs. Good predictive performance was achieved as deduced from accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient values in excess of 81% and 0.58, respectively, for both influenza A and B NAIs. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed to investigate the binding modes and their moiety preferences of active NAIs against both influenza A and B neuraminidases. Moreover, novel NAIs with robust binding fitness towards influenza A and B neuraminidase were generated via combinatorial library enumeration and their binding fitness was on par or better than FDA-approved drugs. The results from this study are anticipated to be beneficial for guiding the rational drug design of novel NAIs for treating influenza infections. PMID

  8. Exploring the chemical space of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    The fight against the emergence of mutant influenza strains has led to the screening of an increasing number of compounds for inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase. This study explores the chemical space of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), which provides an opportunity to obtain further molecular insights regarding the underlying basis of their bioactivity. In particular, a large set of 347 and 175 NAIs against influenza A and B, respectively, was compiled from the literature. Molecular and quantum chemical descriptors were obtained from low-energy conformational structures geometrically optimized at the PM6 level. The bioactivities of NAIs were classified as active or inactive according to their half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) value in which IC50 < 1µM and ≥ 10µM were defined as active and inactive compounds, respectively. Interpretable decision rules were derived from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model established using a set of substructure descriptors via decision tree analysis. Univariate analysis, feature importance analysis from decision tree modeling and molecular scaffold analysis were performed on both data sets for discriminating important structural features amongst active and inactive NAIs. Good predictive performance was achieved as deduced from accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient values in excess of 81% and 0.58, respectively, for both influenza A and B NAIs. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed to investigate the binding modes and their moiety preferences of active NAIs against both influenza A and B neuraminidases. Moreover, novel NAIs with robust binding fitness towards influenza A and B neuraminidase were generated via combinatorial library enumeration and their binding fitness was on par or better than FDA-approved drugs. The results from this study are anticipated to be beneficial for guiding the rational drug design of novel NAIs for treating influenza infections. PMID

  9. Using Support Vector Machine (SVM) for Classification of Selectivity of H1N1 Neuraminidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Kong, Yue; Zhang, Mengdi; Yan, Aixia; Liu, Zhenming

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of the neuraminidase is one of the most promising strategies for preventing influenza virus spreading. 479 neuraminidase inhibitors are collected for dataset 1 and 208 neuraminidase inhibitors for A/P/8/34 are collected for dataset 2. Using support vector machine (SVM), four computational models were built to predict whether a compound is an active or weakly active inhibitor of neuraminidase. Each compound is represented by MASSC fingerprints and ADRIANA.Code descriptors. The predication accuracies for the test sets of all the models are over 78 %. Model 2B, which is the best model, obtains a prediction accuracy and a Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 89.71 % and 0.81 on test set, respectively. The molecular polarizability, molecular shape, molecular size and hydrogen bonding are related to the activities of neuraminidase inhibitors. The models can be obtained from the authors. PMID:27491921

  10. Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex from human placenta with a photoreactive neuraminidase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Louie, A.; Potier, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex in human placenta was carried out using the radioactive photoprobe, 9-S-(4-azido-3,5-3H-2-nitrophenyl)-5-acetamido-2,6 anhydro-2,3,5,9- tetradeoxy-9- thio-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-enonic acid. Two intensely labeled bands at 61 and 46 kD were detected with autoradiography. Labeling of the 46 kD protein was blocked with the inclusion of the surfactant Triton X-100 in the photolysis mixture, indicating a nonspecific, hydrophobic interaction. The 61 kD protein was protected from labeling only when the neuraminidase inhibitor 2,3 dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (1 mM) was present during photolysis. These results suggest that the neuraminidase activity resides among the proteins in the 61 kD molecular weight range comigrating with the lysosomal beta-galactosidase, under denaturing conditions.

  11. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  12. RWJ-270201 (BCX-1812): a novel neuraminidase inhibitor for influenza.

    PubMed Central

    Young, D; Fowler, C; Bush, K

    2001-01-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is important in the pathogenesis of infection and, thus, is an attractive target for agents used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. This article describes preclinical and early clinical data related to RWJ-270201 (BCX-1812), a novel, orally active NA inhibitor that was rationally designed for having potent and selective activity against influenza A and B viruses. RWJ-270201 is a unique NA inhibitor with a cyclopentane ring structure and high selectivity for the influenza NA. RWJ-270201 has efficacy comparable to or better than earlier NA inhibitors against a wide range of influenza A and B isolates, including recently emerged and avian strains, both in vitro and in a lethal murine model of influenza. Based on the high selectivity and efficacy of RWJ-270201 against both type A and B influenza strains in preclinical studies as well as murine pharmacodynamic studies supporting the potential for once-daily administration, clinical trials were initiated in order to determine the tolerability and antiviral activity of RWJ-270201 in humans. To date, clinical studies have indicated that RWJ-270201 is well tolerated and has antiviral activity in human experimental influenza models when administered orally once daily. PMID:11779391

  13. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza B virus infection: efficacy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Baranovich, Tatiana; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology and epidemiology of influenza B viruses are far less studied than for influenza A viruses, and one of these aspects is effectiveness and resistance to the clinically available antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Acute respiratory infections are one of the leading causes of death in children and adults, and influenza is among the few respiratory infections that can be prevented and treated by vaccination and antiviral treatment. Recent data has suggested that influenza B virus infections are of specific concern to pediatric patients because of the increased risk of severe disease. Treatment of influenza B is a challenging task for the following reasons: NAIs (e.g., oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the only FDA-approved class of antivirals available for treatment;the data suggest that oseltamivir is less effective than zanamivir in pediatric patients;zanamivir is not prescribed to patients younger than 7;influenza B viruses are less susceptible than influenza A viruses to NAIs in vitro;although the level of resistance to NAIs is low, the number of different molecular markers of resistance is higher than for influenza A viruses, and they are not well defined;the relationship between levels of NAI phenotypic resistance and known molecular markers, frequency of emergence, transmissibility, and fitness of NAI-resistant variants are not well established. This review presents current knowledge of the effectiveness of NAIs for influenza B virus and antiviral resistance in clinical, surveillance, and experimental studies. PMID:24013000

  14. A Rigid Bicyclic Platform for the Generation of Conformationally Locked Neuraminidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rapid mutation of the influenza virus through genetic mixing raises the prospect of new strains that are both highly transmissible and highly lethal, and which have the ability to evade both immunization strategies (through mutation of hemagglutinin) and current therapies (through mutation of neuraminidase). Inspired by a need for next-generation therapeutics, a synthetic strategy for a new class of rigid, bicyclic inhibitors of influenza neuraminidase is reported. PMID:23181823

  15. A novel influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitor AV5027.

    PubMed

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Ivanenkov, Yan A; Mitkin, Oleg D; Yamanushkin, Pavel M; Bichko, Vadim V; Leneva, Irina A; Borisova, Olga V

    2013-10-24

    A medium-sized focused library of novel Oseltamivir structural analogues with promising antiviral activity was successfully synthesized using a combinatorial approach. The synthesized compounds were then thoroughly evaluated in neuraminidase- and cell-based assays. As a result, (3R,4R,5S)-4-(2,2-difluoroacetylamino)-5-amino-3-(1-ethyl-propoxy)-cyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid (AV5027) was identified as novel Hit-compound with picomolar potency. QSAR analysis was carried out based on the obtained biological data. Computational modeling was performed using a 3D-molecular docking approach and classical regression analysis. The developed integral model demonstrated a sufficient prediction accuracy and tolerance to evaluate compounds based on their potential activity against neuraminidase (NA) at least within the scaffold. Several compounds from the series can be reasonably regarded as promising anti-influenza drug-candidates. PMID:24513312

  16. Pyrrolidinobenzoic Acid Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase: the Hydrophobic Side Chain Influences Type A Subtype Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwu; Silamkoti, Arundutt; Kolavi, Gundurao; Mou, Liyuan; Gulati, Shelly; Air, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) plays a critical role in the life cycle of influenza virus and is a target for new therapeutic agents. A series of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors with the pyrrolidinobenzoic acid scaffold containing lipophilic side chains at the C3 position have been synthesized and evaluated for influenza neuraminidase inhibitory activity. The size and geometry of the C3 side chains have been modified in order to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results indicated that size and geometry of the C3-side chain are important for selectivity of inhibition against N1 vs N2 NA, important type A influenza variants that infect man, including the highly lethal avian influenza. PMID:22677529

  17. Pyrrolidinobenzoic acid inhibitors of influenza virus neuraminidase: the hydrophobic side chain influences type A subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanwu; Silamkoti, Arundutt; Kolavi, Gundurao; Mou, Liyuan; Gulati, Shelly; Air, Gillian M; Brouillette, Wayne J

    2012-07-15

    Neuraminidase (NA) plays a critical role in the life cycle of influenza virus and is a target for new therapeutic agents. A series of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors with the pyrrolidinobenzoic acid scaffold containing lipophilic side chains at the C3 position have been synthesized and evaluated for influenza neuraminidase inhibitory activity. The size and geometry of the C3 side chains have been modified in order to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results indicated that size and geometry of the C3-side chain are important for selectivity of inhibition against N1 versus N2 NA, important type A influenza variants that infect man, including the highly lethal avian influenza. PMID:22677529

  18. Neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 - A promising drug for treating influenza virus: Steered molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Binh Khanh; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We study binding affinity of R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958 to neuraminidase of pathogenic influenza viruses by molecular dynamics simulations. {yields} It is shown that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. {yields} We predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus. {yields} The high correlation between theoretical and experimental data implies that SMD is a very promising tool for drug design. -- Abstract: Two neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, are important drug treatments for influenza. Oseltamivir-resistant mutants of the influenza virus A/H1N1 and A/H5N1 have emerged, necessitating the development of new long-acting antiviral agents. One such agent is a new neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958. An atomic level understanding of the nature of this antiviral agents binding is still missing. We address this gap in our knowledge by applying steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to different subtypes of seasonal and highly pathogenic influenza viruses. We show that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. Based on results obtained by SMD and the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method, we predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus as its binding affinity does not vary much across these systems. The high correlation level between theoretically determined rupture forces and experimental data on binding energies for the large number of systems studied here implies that SMD is a promising tool for drug design.

  19. Reduced susceptibility to all neuraminidase inhibitors of influenza H1N1 viruses with haemagglutinin mutations and mutations in non-conserved residues of the neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L.; Williams, Janelle; Barrett, Susan; Jachno, Kim; McDonald, Mandy; Mohr, Peter G.; Saito, Takehiko; Tashiro, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We characterized human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Hokkaido/15/02, which has haemagglutinin and neuraminidase mutations that reduce drug susceptibility to oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir. Methods One wild-type and three mutant viruses were isolated by plaque purification. Viruses were tested in MUNANA-based enzyme assays, cell culture and receptor binding assays. Results Two viruses had a neuraminidase Y155H mutation that reduced susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay to all inhibitors by 30-fold to >100-fold. The Y155H mutation reduced plaque size and affected the stability, Km and pH activity profile of the enzyme. In contrast to previous mutants, this neuraminidase demonstrated a slower rate of inhibitor binding in the IC50 kinetics assay. One virus had both the Y155H mutation and a haemagglutinin D225G mutation that rescued the small-plaque phenotype of the Y155H virus and affected receptor binding and drug susceptibility in cell culture and binding assays. We also isolated a third mutant virus, with both neuraminidase V114I and haemagglutinin D225N mutations, which affected susceptibility in the enzyme inhibition assay and receptor binding, respectively, but to lesser extents than the Y155H and D225G mutations. Conclusions Neither Y155 nor V114 is conserved across neuraminidase subtypes. Furthermore, Y155 is not conserved even among avian and swine N1 viruses. Structurally, both residues reside far from the neuraminidase active site. D225 forms part of the receptor binding site of the haemagglutinin. We believe this is the first demonstration of a specific haemagglutinin mutation correlating with reduced drug susceptibility in plaque assays in both Madin Darby Canine Kidney and SIAT cells. PMID:23759505

  20. Structural basis for a class of nanomolar influenza A neuraminidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Philip S.; Mohan, Sankar; Russell, Rupert J. M.; Bance, Nicole; Niikura, Masahiro; Pinto, B. Mario

    2013-10-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the virus life cycle. The rise of resistance mutations against current antiviral therapies has increased the need for the development of novel inhibitors. Recent efforts have targeted a cavity adjacent to the catalytic site (the 150-cavity) in addition to the primary catalytic subsite in order to increase specificity and reduce the likelihood of resistance. This study details structural and in vitro analyses of a class of inhibitors that bind uniquely in both subsites. Crystal structures of three inhibitors show occupation of the 150-cavity in two distinct and novel binding modes. We believe these are the first nanomolar inhibitors of NA to be characterized in this way. Furthermore, we show that one inhibitor, binding within the catalytic site, offers reduced susceptibility to known resistance mutations via increased flexibility of a pendant pentyloxy group and the ability to pivot about a strong hydrogen-bonding network.

  1. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, Pv Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  2. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, PV Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  3. Characterization of Human Influenza Virus Variants Selected In Vitro in the Presence of the Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chun Y.; Escarpe, Paul A.; Sidwell, Robert W.; Williams, Matthew A.; Lew, Willard; Wu, Huiwei; Kim, Choung U.; Mendel, Dirk B.

    1998-01-01

    An oral prodrug of GS 4071, a potent and selective inhibitor of influenza neuraminidases, is currently under clinical development for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections in humans. To investigate the potential development of resistance during the clinical use of this compound, variants of the human influenza A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) virus with reduced susceptibility to the neuraminidase inhibitor GS 4071 were selected in vitro by passaging the virus in MDCK cells in the presence of inhibitor. After eight passages, variants containing two amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (A28T in HA1 and R124M in HA2) but no changes in the neuraminidase were isolated. These variants exhibited a 10-fold reduction in susceptibility to GS 4071 and zanamivir (GG167) in an in vitro plaque reduction assay. After 12 passages, a second variant containing these hemagglutinin mutations and a Lys substitution for the conserved Arg292 of the neuraminidase was isolated. The mutant neuraminidase enzyme exhibited high-level (30,000-fold) resistance to GS 4071, but only moderate (30-fold) resistance to zanamivir and 4-amino-Neu5Ac2en, the amino analog of zanamivir. The mutant enzyme had weaker affinity for the fluorogenic substrate 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid and lower enzymatic activity compared to the wild-type enzyme. The viral variant containing the mutant neuraminidase did not replicate as well as the wild-type virus in culture and was 10,000-fold less infectious than the wild-type virus in a mouse model. These results suggest that although the R292K neuraminidase mutation confers high-level resistance to GS 4071 in vitro, its effect on viral virulence is likely to render this mutation of limited clinical significance. PMID:9835519

  4. Aurintricarboxylic Acid Is a Potent Inhibitor of Influenza A and B Virus Neuraminidases

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Brown, Earl G.; Van Domselaar, Gary; He, Runtao; Li, Xuguang

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses cause serious infections that can be prevented or treated using vaccines or antiviral agents, respectively. While vaccines are effective, they have a number of limitations, and influenza strains resistant to currently available anti-influenza drugs are increasingly isolated. This necessitates the exploration of novel anti-influenza therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the potential of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), a potent inhibitor of nucleic acid processing enzymes, to protect Madin-Darby canine kidney cells from influenza infection. We found, by neutral red assay, that ATA was protective, and by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively, confirmed that ATA reduced viral replication and release. Furthermore, while pre-treating cells with ATA failed to inhibit viral replication, pre-incubation of virus with ATA effectively reduced viral titers, suggesting that ATA may elicit its inhibitory effects by directly interacting with the virus. Electron microscopy revealed that ATA induced viral aggregation at the cell surface, prompting us to determine if ATA could inhibit neuraminidase. ATA was found to compromise the activities of virus-derived and recombinant neuraminidase. Moreover, an oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 strain with H274Y was also found to be sensitive to ATA. Finally, we observed additive protective value when infected cells were simultaneously treated with ATA and amantadine hydrochloride, an anti-influenza drug that inhibits M2-ion channels of influenza A virus. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these data suggest that ATA is a potent anti-influenza agent by directly inhibiting the neuraminidase and could be a more effective antiviral compound when used in combination with amantadine hydrochloride. PMID:20020057

  5. A Novel Potent and Highly Specific Inhibitor against Influenza Viral N1-N9 Neuraminidases: Insight into Neuraminidase-Inhibitor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Magesh, Sadagopan; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Sakai, Miho; Ishitsubo, Erika; Hori, Takanori; Moriya, Setsuko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Miyagi, Taeko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kiso, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-05-26

    People throughout the world continue to be at risk for death from influenza A virus, which is always creating a new variant. Here we present a new effective and specific anti-influenza viral neuraminidase (viNA) inhibitor, 9-cyclopropylcarbonylamino-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (cPro-GUN). Like zanamivir, it is highly effective against N1-N9 avian and N1-N2 human viNAs, including H274Y oseltamivir-resistant N1 viNA, due to its C-6 portion still being anchored in the active site, different from the disruption of oseltamivir's C-6 anchoring by H274Y mutation. Unlike zanamivir, no sialidase inhibitory activity has been observed for cPro-GUN against huNeu1-huNeu4 enzymes. Broad efficacy of cPro-GUN against avian and human influenza viruses in cell cultures comparable to its sialidase inhibitory activities makes cPro-GUN ideal for further development for safe therapeutic or prophylactic use against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27095056

  6. Susceptibility of influenza viruses circulating in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tolah, Ahmed M.; Azhar, Esam I.; Hashem, Anwar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the sensitivity of circulating influenza viruses in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs); mainly, zanamivir and oseltamivir. Methods: Respiratory samples were collected from patients presenting with respiratory symptoms to King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) between September 2013 and October 2014. All samples were tested prospectively by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza A and B viruses. Positive samples were then inoculated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and isolated viruses were examined for their sensitivity to NAIs using fluorescent neuraminidase inhibition assay. Results: Out of 406 tested samples, 25 samples (6.2%) were positive for influenza A/pdmH1N1 virus, one sample (0.25%) was positive for influenza A/H3N2 virus, and 7 samples (1.7%) were positive for influenza B Yamagata-like virus. Screening of isolated influenza A and B viruses (9 out of 33) for their sensitivity to NAIs showed no significant resistance to available NAIs. Conclusion: Our results show that circulating influenza viruses in Jeddah are still sensitive to NAIs. PMID:27052292

  7. Structure-guided design of a novel class of benzyl-sulfonate inhibitors for influenza virus neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Platis, Dimitris; Smith, Brian J.; Huyton, Trevor; Labrou, Nikolaos E.

    2006-01-01

    Influenza NA (neuraminidase) is an antiviral target of high pharmaceutical interest because of its essential role in cleaving sialic acid residues from cell surface glycoproteins and facilitating release of virions from infected cells. The present paper describes the use of structural information in the progressive design from a lead binding ion (a sulfate) to a potent submicromolor inhibitor (Ki 0.13 μM). Structural information derived from the X-ray structure of an NA complexed with several sulfate ions, in combination with results derived from affinity labelling and molecular modelling studies, was used to guide design of potent sulfonic acid-based inhibitors. These inhibitors are structural fragments of the polysulfonate triazine dye Cibacron Blue 3GA and represent novel lead scaffolds for designing non-carbohydrate inhibitors for influenza neuraminidases. PMID:16776653

  8. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  9. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. PMID:27344026

  10. Efficacy of the New Neuraminidase Inhibitor CS-8958 against H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kiso, Maki; Kubo, Shuku; Ozawa, Makoto; Le, Quynh Mai; Nidom, Chairul A.; Yamashita, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Currently, two neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, which must be administrated twice daily for 5 days for maximum therapeutic effect, are licensed for the treatment of influenza. However, oseltamivir-resistant mutants of seasonal H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses have emerged. Therefore, alternative antiviral agents are needed. Recently, a new neuraminidase inhibitor, R-125489, and its prodrug, CS-8958, have been developed. CS-8958 functions as a long-acting NA inhibitor in vivo (mice) and is efficacious against seasonal influenza strains following a single intranasal dose. Here, we tested the efficacy of this compound against H5N1 influenza viruses, which have spread across several continents and caused epidemics with high morbidity and mortality. We demonstrated that R-125489 interferes with the NA activity of H5N1 viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant and different clade strains. A single dose of CS-8958 (1,500 µg/kg) given to mice 2 h post-infection with H5N1 influenza viruses produced a higher survival rate than did continuous five-day administration of oseltamivir (50 mg/kg twice daily). Virus titers in lungs and brain were substantially lower in infected mice treated with a single dose of CS-8958 than in those treated with the five-day course of oseltamivir. CS-8958 was also highly efficacious against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus and oseltamivir-resistant variants. A single dose of CS-8958 given seven days prior to virus infection also protected mice against H5N1 virus lethal infection. To evaluate the improved efficacy of CS-8958 over oseltamivir, the binding stability of R-125489 to various subtypes of influenza virus was assessed and compared with that of other NA inhibitors. We found that R-125489 bound to NA more tightly than did any other NA inhibitor tested. Our results indicate that CS-8958 is highly effective for the treatment and prophylaxis of infection with H5N1 influenza viruses

  11. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Adam; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Correia, Vanessa; Besselaar, Terry; Drager-Dayal, Renu; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Gubareva, Larisa; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Lackenby, Angie; Lo, Janice; Odagiri, Takato; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Wong, Sun; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Emergence of influenza viruses with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) is sporadic, often follows exposure to NAIs, but occasionally occurs in the absence of NAI pressure. The emergence and global spread in 2007/2008 of A(H1N1) influenza viruses showing clinical resistance to oseltamivir due to neuraminidase (NA) H275Y substitution, in the absence of drug pressure, warrants continued vigilance and monitoring for similar viruses. Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 11,387 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres (NIC) between May 2012 and May 2013 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. The data were evaluated using normalized IC50 fold-changes rather than raw IC50 data. Nearly 90% of the 11,387 viruses were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Only 0.2% (n=27) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, usually oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=39) showed reduced inhibition (RI). NA sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3661), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=18), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=3) or NA R292K (n=1) and B/Victoria-lineage with NA H273Y (n=2); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Overall, approximately 99% of circulating viruses tested during the 2012-2013 period were sensitive to all four NAIs. Consequently, these drugs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections. PMID:25043638

  12. QSAR modeling and molecular interaction analysis of natural compounds as potent neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Mei, Hu

    2016-04-26

    Different QSAR models of 40 natural compounds as neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are developed to comprehend chemical-biological interactions and predict activities against neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens. Based on the constitutional, topological and conformational descriptors, R(2) and Q(2) values of the obtained SRA model are 0.931 and 0.856. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the constructed HQSAR and almond models are 0.903 and 0.767, 0.904 and 0.511, respectively. Based on the pharmacophore alignment, R(2) and Q(2) values of the optimal CoMSIA model are 0.936 and 0.654. Moreover, Rtest(2) and Qext(2) of values of SRA, HQSAR, almond and CoMSIA models are 0.611 and 0.565, 0.753 and 0.750, 0.612 and 0.582, 0.582 and 0.571, respectively. So, QSAR models have good predictive capability. They can be further used to evaluate and screen new compounds. Moreover, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic factors have high contributions to activities. To understand molecular interactions between natural compounds and NA from Clostridium perfringens, molecular docking is investigated. The docking results elucidate that Arg266, Asp291, Asp328, Tyr485, Glu493, Arg555, Arg615 and Tyr655 are especially the key residues in the active site of 2bf6. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatics are key factors, which impact the interactions between NIs and NA. So, the influential factors of interactions between NIs and NA in the docking results are in agreement with the QSAR results. PMID:27008437

  13. Characterization of Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Korean Papaver rhoeas Bee Pollen Contributing to Anti-Influenza Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Ji-Yul; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Choi, Hwa Jung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2016-04-01

    The active constituents of Korean Papaver rhoeas bee pollen conferring neuraminidase inhibitory activities (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1) were investigated. Six flavonoids and one alkaloid were isolated and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data. These included kaempferol-3-sophoroside (1), kaempferol-3-neohesperidoside (2), kaempferol-3-sambubioside (3), kaempferol-3-glucoside (4), quercetin-3-sophoroside (5), luteolin (6), and chelianthifoline (7). All compounds showed neuraminidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 151.1 µM. The most potent neuraminidase inhibitor was luteolin, which was the dominant content in the ethyl acetate fraction. All tested compounds displayed noncompetitive inhibition of H3N2 neuraminidase. Furthermore, compounds 1-7 all reduced the severity of virally induced cytopathic effects as determined by the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell-based assay showing antiviral activity with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 33.4 µM (zanamivir: 58.3 µM). The active compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the total amount of compounds 1-7 made up about 0.592 g/100 g bee pollen, contributing a rich resource of a natural antiviral product. PMID:26848705

  14. Synergistic Effect of Nitazoxanide with Neuraminidase Inhibitors against Influenza A Viruses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Belardo, Giuseppe; Cenciarelli, Orlando; La Frazia, Simone; Rossignol, Jean Francois

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant influenza A virus (IAV) strains represents a serious threat to global human health and underscores the need for novel approaches to anti-influenza chemotherapy. Combination therapy with drugs affecting different IAV targets represents an attractive option for influenza treatment. We have previously shown that the thiazolide anti-infective nitazoxanide (NTZ) inhibits H1N1 IAV replication by selectively blocking viral hemagglutinin maturation. Herein we investigate the anti-influenza activity of NTZ against a wide range of human and avian IAVs (H1N1, H3N2, H5N9, H7N1), including amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant strains, in vitro. We also investigate whether therapy with NTZ in combination with the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir exerts synergistic, additive, or antagonistic antiviral effects against influenza viruses. NTZ was effective against all IAVs tested, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 0.9 to 3.2 μM, and selectivity indexes (SIs) ranging from >50 to >160, depending on the strain and the multiplicity of infection (MOI). Combination therapy studies were performed in cell culture-based assays using A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1), A/WSN/1933 (H1N1), or avian A/chicken/Italy/9097/1997 (H5N9) IAVs; dose-effect analysis and synergism/antagonism quantification were performed using isobologram analysis according to the Chou-Talalay method. Combination index (CI) analysis indicated that NTZ and oseltamivir combination treatment was synergistic against A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) and A/WSN/1933 (H1N1) IAVs, with CI values ranging between 0.39 and 0.63, independently of the MOI used. Similar results were obtained when NTZ was administered in combination with zanamivir (CI = 0.3 to 0.48). NTZ-oseltamivir combination treatment was synergistic also against the avian A/chicken/Italy/9097/1997 (H5N9) IAV (CI = 0.18 to 0.31). Taken together, the results suggest that regimens that combine

  15. Peramivir: A Novel Intravenous Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Acute Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alame, Malak M.; Massaad, Elie; Zaraket, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Peramivir is a novel cyclopentane neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza virus. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients 18 years and older. For several months prior to approval, the drug was made clinically available under Emergency Use authorization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Peramivir is highly effective against human influenza A and B isolates as well as emerging influenza virus strains with pandemic potential. Clinical trials demonstrated that the drug is well-tolerated in adult and pediatric populations. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and similar in frequency to patients receiving placebo. Common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders and decreased neutrophil counts but are self-limiting. Peramivir is administered as a single-dose via the intravenous route providing a valuable therapeutic alternative for critically ill patients or those unable to tolerate other administration routes. Successful clinical trials and post-marketing data in pediatric populations in Japan support the safety and efficacy of peramivir in this population where administration of other antivirals might not be feasible. PMID:27065996

  16. Peramivir: A Novel Intravenous Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Acute Influenza Infections.

    PubMed

    Alame, Malak M; Massaad, Elie; Zaraket, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Peramivir is a novel cyclopentane neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza virus. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients 18 years and older. For several months prior to approval, the drug was made clinically available under Emergency Use authorization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Peramivir is highly effective against human influenza A and B isolates as well as emerging influenza virus strains with pandemic potential. Clinical trials demonstrated that the drug is well-tolerated in adult and pediatric populations. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and similar in frequency to patients receiving placebo. Common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders and decreased neutrophil counts but are self-limiting. Peramivir is administered as a single-dose via the intravenous route providing a valuable therapeutic alternative for critically ill patients or those unable to tolerate other administration routes. Successful clinical trials and post-marketing data in pediatric populations in Japan support the safety and efficacy of peramivir in this population where administration of other antivirals might not be feasible. PMID:27065996

  17. The accuracy and timeliness of neuraminidase inhibitor dispensing data for predicting laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    PubMed

    Papenburg, J; Charland, K M; DE Serres, G; Buckeridge, D L

    2016-06-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitor (NI) dispensing has emerged as a possible automated data source for influenza surveillance. We aimed to evaluate its timeliness, correlation, and predictive accuracy in relation to influenza activity in Quebec, Canada, 2010-2013. Our secondary objective was to use the same metrics to compare NI dispensing to visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) in emergency departments (EDs). Provincial weekly counts of positive influenza laboratory tests were used as a reference measure for the level of influenza circulation. We applied ARIMA models to account for serial correlation. We computed cross-correlations to measure the strengths of association and lead-lag relationships between NI dispensing, ILI ED visits, and our reference indicator. Finally, using an ARIMA model, we evaluated the ability of NI dispensing and ILI ED visits to predict laboratory-confirmed influenza. NI dispensing was significantly correlated (R = 0·68) with influenza activity with no lag. The maximal correlation of ILI ED visits was not as strong (R = 0·50). Both NI dispensing and ILI ED visits were significant predictors of laboratory-confirmed influenza in a multivariable model; predictive potential was greatest when NI counts were lagged to precede laboratory surveillance by 2 weeks. We conclude that NI dispensing data provides timely and valuable information for influenza surveillance. PMID:26611607

  18. Prescribing of neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza in UK primary care since the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Hardelid, P; Rait, G; Gilbert, R; Petersen, I

    2016-03-01

    We determined prescribing rates of neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) for influenza in UK primary care since 2009 in relation to national prescribing guidelines. All NI prescriptions issued during the influenza seasons between October 2010 and May 2013 were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large UK primary-care database. We calculated NI prescribing rates per 100,000 person-weeks (pw) by age group, sex, deprivation level, influenza season and presence of chronic conditions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and used negative binomial regression models to determine the independent association between these variables and NI prescribing. NI prescribing was rare. The prescribing rate was 1·7/100,000 pw (95% CI 1·7-1·8) during influenza-active periods, and 0·1/100,000 (95% CI 0·1-0·1) during non-active periods. Prescribing rates were highest in 25- to 44-year-olds in 2010/2011 and in persons aged ⩾85 years in 2011/2012 and 2012/2013. Individuals with chronic conditions had significantly higher prescribing rates than persons without (rate ratio 2·62, 95% CI 2·27-3·03). GPs are more likely to prescribe NIs to high-risk individuals and during influenza active periods, as per national guidelines. We could not assess the proportion of patients with influenza-like illness who were prescribed an NI. PMID:26364671

  19. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Besselaar, Terry G; Daniels, Rod S; Ermetal, Burcu; Fry, Alicia; Gubareva, Larisa; Huang, Weijuan; Lackenby, Angie; Lee, Raphael T C; Lo, Janice; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Nguyen, Ha T; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Tilmanis, Danielle; Wang, Dayan; Zhang, Wenqing; Meijer, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 13,312 viruses collected by WHO recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2014 and May 2015 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. Ninety-four per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 0.5% (n = 68) of viruses showed either highly reduced inhibition (HRI) or reduced inhibition (RI) (n = 56) against at least one of the four NAIs. Of the twelve viruses with HRI, six were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, three were A(H3N2) viruses and three were B/Yamagata-lineage viruses. The overall frequency of viruses with RI or HRI by the NAIs was lower than that observed in 2013-14 (1.9%), but similar to the 2012-13 period (0.6%). Based on the current analysis, the NAIs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections. PMID:27265623

  20. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Meijer, Adam; Lackenby, Angie; Gubareva, Larisa; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Besselaar, Terry; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Huang, Weijuan; Lo, Janice; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Wang, Dayan; Mak, Gannon C; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C; Tashiro, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 10,641 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2013 and May 2014 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. In addition, neuraminidase (NA) sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3206), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Ninety-five per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 2% (n=172) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, commonly oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=32) showed reduced inhibition (RI). Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=169), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=1), B/Victoria-lineage with NA E117G (n=1) and B/Yamagata-lineage with NA H273Y (n=1); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Although approximately 98% of circulating viruses tested during the 2013-2014 period were sensitive to all four NAIs, a large community cluster of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with the NA H275Y substitution from patients with no previous exposure to antivirals was detected in Hokkaido, Japan. Significant numbers of A(H1N1)pdm09 NA H275Y viruses were also detected in China and the United States: phylogenetic analyses showed that the Chinese viruses were similar to those from Japan, while the United States viruses clustered separately from those of the Hokkaido outbreak, indicative of multiple resistance-emergence events. Consequently, global surveillance of influenza antiviral susceptibility should be continued from a public health perspective. PMID:25721488

  1. Identification of GS 4104 as an Orally Bioavailable Prodrug of the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixing; Escarpe, Paul A.; Eisenberg, Eugene J.; Cundy, Kenneth C.; Sweet, Clive; Jakeman, Kenneth J.; Merson, James; Lew, Willard; Williams, Matt; Zhang, Lijun; Kim, Choung U.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Chen, Ming S.; Mendel, Dirk B.

    1998-01-01

    GS 4071 is a potent carbocyclic transition-state analog inhibitor of influenza virus neuraminidase with activity against both influenza A and B viruses in vitro. GS 4116, the guanidino analog of GS 4071, is a 10-fold more potent inhibitor of influenza virus replication in tissue culture than GS 4071. In this study we determined the oral bioavailabilities of GS 4071, GS 4116, and their respective ethyl ester prodrugs in rats. Both parent compounds and the prodrug of the guanidino analog exhibited poor oral bioavailability (2 to 4%) and low peak concentrations in plasma (Cmaxs; Cmax <0.06 μg/ml). In contrast, GS 4104, the ethyl ester prodrug of GS 4071, exhibited good oral bioavailability (35%) as GS 4071 and high Cmaxs of GS 4071 (Cmax = 0.47 μg/ml) which are 150 times the concentration necessary to inhibit influenza virus neuraminidase activity by 90%. The bioavailability of GS 4104 as GS 4071 was also determined in mice (30%), ferrets (11%), and dogs (73%). The plasma of all four species exhibited high, sustained concentrations of GS 4071 such that at 12 h postdosing the concentrations of GS 4071 in plasma exceeded those necessary to inhibit influenza virus neuraminidase activity by 90%. These results demonstrate that GS 4104 is an orally bioavailable prodrug of GS 4071 in animals and that it has the potential to be an oral agent for the prevention and treatment of influenza A and B virus infections in humans. PMID:9517946

  2. In silico modification of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza A virus subtype H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Rachmania, Rizky Archintya; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research focused on the modification of the functional groups of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor against influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Interactions of three of the best ligands were evaluated in the hydrated state using molecular dynamics simulation at two different temperatures. The docking result showed that AD3BF2D ligand (N-[(1S,6R)-5-amino-5-{[(2R,3S,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]oxy}-4-formylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]acetamide-3-(1-ethylpropoxy)-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate) had better binding energy values than standard oseltamivir. AD3BF2D had several interactions, including hydrogen bonds, with the residues in the catalytic site of neuraminidase as identified by molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that AD3BF2D ligand can be used as a good candidate for neuraminidase inhibitor to cope with influenza A virus subtype H1N1. PMID:25859271

  3. Long-acting Neuraminidase Inhibitor Laninamivir Octanoate as Post-exposure Prophylaxis for Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Seizaburo; Watanabe, Akira; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Uemori, Mitsutoshi; Awamura, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate, a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, has been proven to be effective in the treatment of influenza but not for post-exposure prophylaxis. Methods. We conducted a double-blind, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine if a single administration of laninamivir octanoate 40 mg was superior to placebo for post-exposure prophylaxis. Eligible participants who had cohabited with an influenza patient within 48 hours of symptom onset were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to 1 of 3 groups: 40 mg of laninamivir octanoate single administration (LO-40SD), 20 mg of laninamivir octanoate once daily for 2 days (LO-20TD), or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of participants who developed clinical influenza (defined as influenza virus positive, an axillary temperature >37.5°C, and at least 2 symptoms) over a 10-day period. Results. A total of 803 participants were enrolled, with 801 included in the primary analysis. The proportions of participants with clinical influenza were 4.5% (12/267), 4.5% (13/269), and 12.1% (32/265) in the LO-40SD, LO-20TD, and placebo groups, respectively. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate 40 mg significantly reduced the development of influenza compared with placebo (P = .001). The relative risk reductions compared with the placebo group were 62.8% and 63.1% for the LO-40SD and LO-20TD groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events in the LO-40SD group was similar to that of the LO-20TD and placebo groups. Conclusions. A single administration of laninamivir octanoate was effective and well tolerated as post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the development of influenza. Clinical Trials Registration. JapicCTI-142679. PMID:27118785

  4. Increasing oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors: a prodrug transporter approach applied to oseltamivir analogue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Varghese Gupta, Sheeba; Dahan, Arik; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-02-01

    showed that the l-valyl prodrug (P(app) = 1.7 × 10(-6) cm/s) has the potential to be rapidly transported across the epithelial cell apical membrane. Significantly, only the parent drug (GOCarb) appeared in the basolateral compartment, indicating complete activation (hydrolysis) during transport. Intestinal rat jejunal permeability studies showed that l-valyl and l-isoleucyl prodrugs are highly permeable compared to the orally well absorbed metoprolol, while the parent drug had essentially zero permeability in the jejunum, consistent with its known poor low absorption. Prodrugs were rapidly converted to parent in cell homogenates, suggesting their ability to be activated endogenously in the epithelial cell, consistent with the transport studies. Additionally, l-valyl prodrug was found to be a substrate for valacyclovirase (K(m) = 2.37 mM), suggesting a potential cell activation mechanism. Finally we determined the oral bioavailability of our most promising candidate, GOC-l-Val, in mice to be 23% under fed conditions and 48% under fasted conditions. In conclusion, GOC-l-Val prodrug was found to be a very promising antiviral agent for oral delivery. These findings indicate that the carrier-mediated prodrug approach is an excellent strategy for improving oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors. These promising results demonstrate that the oral peptide transporter-mediated prodrug strategy has enormous promise for improving the oral mucosal cell membrane permeability of polar, poorly absorbed antiviral agents and treating influenza via the oral route of administration. PMID:23244438

  5. Oral Administration of a Prodrug of the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071 Protects Mice and Ferrets against Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Dirk B.; Tai, Chun Y.; Escarpe, Paul A.; Li, Weixing; Sidwell, Robert W.; Huffman, John H.; Sweet, Clive; Jakeman, Kenneth J.; Merson, James; Lacy, Steven A.; Lew, Willard; Williams, Matthew A.; Zhang, Lijun; Chen, Ming S.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Kim, Choung U.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently described GS 4071, a carbocyclic transition-state analog inhibitor of the influenza virus neuraminidase, which has potent inhibitory activity comparable to that of 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (GG167; zanamivir) when tested against influenza A virus replication and neuraminidase activity in vitro. We now report that GS 4071 is active against several strains of influenza A and B viruses in vitro and that oral GS 4104, an ethyl ester prodrug which is converted to GS 4071 in vivo, is active in the mouse and ferret models of influenza virus infection. Oral administration of 10 mg of GS 4104 per kg of body weight per day caused a 100-fold reduction in lung homogenate viral titers and enhanced survival in mice infected with influenza A or B viruses. In ferrets, a 25-mg/kg dose of GS 4104 given twice daily reduced peak viral titers in nasal washings and eliminated constitutional responses to influenza virus infection including fever, increased nasal signs (sneezing, nasal discharge, mouth breathing), and decreased activity. Consistent with our demonstration that the parent compound is highly specific for influenza virus neuraminidases, no significant drug-related toxicity was observed after the administration of oral dosages of GS 4104 of up to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days in nonclinical toxicology studies with rats. These results indicate that GS 4104 is a novel, orally active antiviral agent with the potential to be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. PMID:9517945

  6. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza: a systematic review and meta-analysis of regulatory and mortality data.

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Carl J; Onakpoya, Igho; Jones, Mark A; Doshi, Peter; Del Mar, Chris B; Hama, Rokuro; Thompson, Matthew J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Mahtani, Kamal R; Nunan, David; Howick, Jeremy; Jefferson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. OBJECTIVES To (1) describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports (CSRs) of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments; and (2) determine the effect of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®), Roche) treatment on mortality in patients with 2009A/H1N1 influenza. METHODS We searched trial registries, electronic databases and corresponded with regulators and sponsors to identify randomised trials of NIs. We requested full CSRs and accessed regulators' comments. We included only those trials for which we had CSRs. To examine the effects of oseltamivir on 2009A/H1N1 influenza mortality, we requested individual patient data (IPD) from corresponding authors of all included observational studies. RESULTS Effect of oseltamivir and zanamivir (Relenza®, GlaxoSmithKline) in the prevention and treatment of influenza: Oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 16.8 hours [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4 to 25.1 hours]. Zanamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 0.60 days (95% CI 0.39 to 0.81 days). Oseltamivir reduced unverified pneumonia in adult treatment [risk difference (RD) 1.00%, 95% CI 0.22% to 1.49%]; similar findings were observed with zanamivir prophylaxis in adults (RD 0.32%, 95% CI 0.09% to 0.41%). Oseltamivir treatment of adults increased the risk of nausea (RD 3.66%, 95% CI 0.90% to 7.39%) and vomiting (RD 4.56%, 95% CI 2.39% to 7.58%). In the treatment of children, oseltamivir induced vomiting (RD 5.34%, 95% CI 1.75% to 10.29%). Both oseltamivir and zanamivir prophylaxis reduced the risk of symptomatic influenza in individuals (oseltamivir RD 3.05%, 95% CI 1.83% to 3.88%; zanamivir RD 1.98%, 95% CI 0.98% to

  7. Different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate: a potent influenza neuraminidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianzhi; Xu, Wenfang

    2008-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is the only orally active anti-influenza drug that potently inhibit neuraminidase. The recent emergence of avian flu, especially the H5N1 type, makes the situation of Tamiflu supply and demand increasingly serious. Further optimization of the current commercial approach and exploration of new synthetic routes are urgent. Here, different synthetic strategies of oseltamivir phosphate are reviewed, including discovery and improved synthetic route from (-)-quinic acid or (-)-shikimic acid, new asymmetric synthesis via catalytic desymmetrization of a meso-aziridine (CDMA), Diels-Alder Reaction and from other available materials. PMID:19075659

  8. QSAR study of flavonoids and biflavonoids as influenza H1N1 virus neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Andrew G; Pomilio, Alicia B

    2010-05-01

    We performed a predictive analysis based on Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) of a very important property of flavonoids which is the inhibition (IC50) of influenza H1N1 virus neuraminidase. The best linear model constructed from 20 molecular structures incorporated four molecular descriptors, selected from more than a thousand geometrical, topological, quantum-mechanical and electronic types of descriptors. The obtained model suggests that the activity depends on the electric charges, masses and polarizabilities of the atoms present in the molecule as well as its conformation. The model showed good predictive ability established by the theoretical and external test set validations. PMID:20116898

  9. The structures of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 neuraminidase and its complexes with three inhibitors at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Crennell, S J; Garman, E F; Philippon, C; Vasella, A; Laver, W G; Vimr, E R; Taylor, G L

    1996-06-01

    The structure of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 neuraminidase (STNA) is reported here to a resolution of 1.6 angstroms together with the structures of three complexes of STNA with different inhibitors. The first is 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en or DANA), the second and third are phosphonate derivatives of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (NANA) which have phosphonate groups at the C2 position equatorial (ePANA) and axial (aPANA) to the plane of the sugar ring. The complex structures are at resolutions of 1.6 angstroms, 1.6 angstroms and 1.9 angstroms, respectively. These analyses show the STNA active site to be topologically inflexible and the interactions to be dominated by the arginine triad, with the pyranose rings of the inhibitors undergoing distortion to occupy the space available. Solvent structure differs only around the third phosphonate oxygen, which attracts a potassium ion. The STNA structure is topologically identical to the previously reported influenza virus neuraminidase structures, although very different in detail; the root-mean-square (r.m.s) deviation for 210 C alpha positions considered equivalent is 2.28 angstroms (out of a total of 390 residues in influenza and 381 in STNA). The active site residues are more highly conserved, in that both the viral and bacterial structures contain an arginine triad, a hydrophobic pocket, a tyrosine and glutamic acid residue at the base of the site and a potential proton-donating aspartic acid. However, differences in binding to O4 and to the glycerol side-chain may reflect the different kinetics employed by the two enzymes. PMID:8656428

  10. In-silico structural analysis of the influenza A subtype H7N9 neuraminidase and molecular docking with different neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eweas, Ahmad F; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2015-06-01

    Human infection with H7 influenza subtypes usually resulted in mild disease with a rare mortalities, however, human infection with the avian low pathogenic H7N9 influenza virus resulted in about 38.6 % human fatality. Due to the new cross-species barrier of this virus subtype, there is an urgent need to better understand the susceptibility to commercially available antivirals and their relation to the structural changes of the viral neuraminidase. Neuraminidases derived from 2013 H7N9, H5N1 and H1N1 were subjected to a structural analysis of their catalytic and framework binding sites. The modeling structure of selected neuraminidases from H7N9 and influenza A subtypes were solved and the docking studies with oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir and peramivir were conducted. The active site residues that are responsible for both binding and cleavage of the terminally linked sialic acid receptors were found conserved. Docking studies with oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir and peramivir revealed that the laninamivir and peramivir showed superior energy binding activities in comparison to the commonly used oseltamivir and zanamivir. The results presented in the current study provide data that are useful for the future treatment of different influenza A subtypes including the recently emerged H7N9. PMID:26436118

  11. Discovery of Influenza A virus neuraminidase inhibitors using support vector machine and Naïve Bayesian models.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenwen; Fang, Jiansong; Li, Chao; Pang, Xiaocong; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) is a critical enzyme in the life cycle of influenza virus, which is known as a successful paradigm in the design of anti-influenza agents. However, to date there are no classification models for the virtual screening of NA inhibitors. In this work, we built support vector machine and Naïve Bayesian models of NA inhibitors and non-inhibitors, with different ratios of active-to-inactive compounds in the training set and different molecular descriptors. Four models with sensitivity or Matthews correlation coefficients greater than 0.9 were chosen to predict the NA inhibitory activities of 15,600 compounds in our in-house database. We combined the results of four optimal models and selected 60 representative compounds to assess their NA inhibitory profiles in vitro. Nine NA inhibitors were identified, five of which were oseltamivir derivatives with large C-5 substituents exhibiting potent inhibition against H1N1 NA with [Formula: see text] values in the range of 12.9-185.0 nM, and against H3N2 NA with [Formula: see text] values between 18.9 and 366.1 nM. The other four active compounds belonged to novel scaffolds, with [Formula: see text] values ranging 39.5-63.8 [Formula: see text]M against H1N1 NA and 44.5-114.1 [Formula: see text]M against H3N2 NA. This is the first time that classification models of NA inhibitors and non-inhibitors are built and their prediction results validated experimentally using in vitro assays. PMID:26689205

  12. Neuraminidase Ribbon Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Ribbons is a program developed at UAB used worldwide to graphically depict complicated protein structures in a simplified format. The program uses sophisticated computer systems to understand the implications of protein structures. The Influenza virus remains a major causative agent for a large number of deaths among the elderly and young children and huge economic losses due to illness. Finding a cure will have a general impact both on the basic research of viral pathologists of fast evolving infectious agents and clinical treatment of influenza virus infection. The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  13. In Vitro Characterization of A-315675, a Highly Potent Inhibitor of A and B Strain Influenza Virus Neuraminidases and Influenza Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kati, Warren M.; Montgomery, Debra; Carrick, Robert; Gubareva, Larisa; Maring, Clarence; McDaniel, Keith; Steffy, Kevin; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Hayden, Frederick; Kempf, Dale; Kohlbrenner, William

    2002-01-01

    A-315675 is a novel, pyrrolidine-based compound that was evaluated in this study for its ability to inhibit A and B strain influenza virus neuraminidases in enzyme assays and influenza virus replication in cell culture. A-315675 effectively inhibited influenza A N1, N2, and N9 and B strain neuraminidases with inhibitor constant (Ki) values between 0.024 and 0.31 nM. These values were comparable to or lower than the Ki values measured for oseltamivir carboxylate (GS4071), zanamivir, and BCX-1812, except for the N1 enzymes that were found to be the most sensitive to BCX-1812. The time-dependent inhibition of neuraminidase catalytic activity observed with A-315675 is likely due to its very low rate of dissociation from the active site of neuraminidase. The half times for dissociation of A-315675 from B/Memphis/3/89 and A/Tokyo/3/67 (H3N2) influenza virus neuraminidases of 10 to 12 h are significantly slower than the half times measured for oseltamivir carboxylate (33 to 60 min). A-315675 inhibited the replication of several laboratory strains of influenza virus in cell culture with potencies that were comparable or superior to those for oseltamivir carboxylate and BCX-1812, except for the A/H1N1 viruses that were found to be two- to fourfold more susceptible to BCX-1812. A-315675 and oseltamivir carboxylate exhibited comparable potencies against a panel of A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza virus clinical isolates, but A-315675 was found to be significantly more potent than oseltamivir carboxylate against the B strain isolates. The favorable in vitro results relative to other clinically effective agents provide strong support for the further investigation of A-315675 as a potential therapy for influenza virus infections. PMID:11897583

  14. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Richter, Martina; Kirchmair, Johannes; Grienke, Ulrike; Rollinger, Judith M.; Krumbholz, Andi; Saluz, Hans P.; Pfister, Wolfgang; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA) suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs) will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178) and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB) were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption. PMID:27047471

  15. A randomized, controlled trial comparing traditional herbal medicine and neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment of seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Shigeki; Kashiwagi, Kenichiro; Ajisaka, Kazuhiko; Masui, Shinta; Takeoka, Hiroaki; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2012-08-01

    The herbal medicine, maoto, has been traditionally prescribed to patients with influenza in Japan. To better understand the efficacy of maoto for the treatment of influenza, a randomized trial was conducted for comparison with oseltamivir or zanamivir. Adult patients with influenza symptoms, including fever, positive for quick diagnostic kit for influenza within 48 h of fever onset were assessed for enrollment. The data of 28 patients randomly assigned to maoto (n = 10), oseltamivir (n = 8), or zanamivir (n = 10) were analyzed for the duration of fever (>37.5°C) and total symptom score from symptom cards recorded by the patient. Viral isolation and serum cytokine measurements were also done on days 1, 3, and 5. Maoto granules, a commercial medical dosage form, are made from four plants: Ephedra Herb, Apricot Kernel, Cinnamon Bark, and Glycyrrhiza Root. Median durations of fever of patients assigned maoto, oseltamivir, or zanamivir were 29, 46, or 27 h, respectively, significantly different for maoto and oseltamivir. No significant between-group differences were found in total symptom score among three groups. Viral persistent rates and serum cytokine levels (IFN-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α) during the study period showed no differences among three groups. The administration of oral maoto granules to healthy adults with seasonal influenza was well tolerated and associated with equivalent clinical and virological efficacy to neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:22350323

  16. [Analysis of decrease in sensitivity in influenza A (H5N1) avian and human strains to neuraminidase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Reina, J

    2008-03-01

    The options for efficient control of avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses include specific vaccination and antiviral prophylaxis and treatment. However, because H5N1 viruses undergo continuous antigen mutations, the production of a matched vaccine strain is currently not possible. Thus, during the early pandemic period, specific control measures would rely solely on antiviral drugs. Now only neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) (zanamivir and oseltamivir) are considered for prophylaxis and therapy in patients with H5N1 infection. The sensitivies of H5N1 strains to the NIs fell into 3 groups. The clade I viruses isolated before 2004 were as sensitive to NIs than reference strains (first group). But the clade I viruses isolated from 2004 were 6 to 7-fold less sensitivity to NIs (second group). The clade II strains isolated from 2005 to 2007 demonstrated a 15 to 30 fold decrease in sensitivity to oseltamivir compared with clade I viruses (third group). The specific decrease in sensitivity to oseltamivir of both Cambodian and Indonesian clade 2 influenza H5N1 isolates is disturbing, especially because they maintain their pathogenicity and transmissibility in birds and are clearly pathogenic in humans. No altered sensitivity to zanamivir has been detected. Zanamivir may also play an important role in pandemic stockpiles. Because the clade 2 virus is now spread through parts of Europe and Africa, continued global collaboration and phenotypic testing of NIs sensitivity are critical for a future pandemic. PMID:18443931

  17. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Richter, Martina; Kirchmair, Johannes; Grienke, Ulrike; Rollinger, Judith M; Krumbholz, Andi; Saluz, Hans P; Pfister, Wolfgang; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA) suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs) will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178) and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB) were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption. PMID:27047471

  18. Crystal structure of a new benzoic acid inhibitor of influenza neuraminidase bound with a new tilt induced by overpacking subsite C6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza neuraminidase (NA) is an important target for antiviral inhibitors since its active site is highly conserved such that inhibitors can be cross-reactive against multiple types and subtypes of influenza. Here, we discuss the crystal structure of neuraminidase subtype N9 complexed with a new benzoic acid based inhibitor (2) that was designed to add contacts by overpacking one side of the active site pocket. Inhibitor 2 uses benzoic acid to mimic the pyranose ring, a bis-(hydroxymethyl)-substituted 2-pyrrolidinone ring in place of the N-acetyl group of the sialic acid, and a branched aliphatic structure to fill the sialic acid C6 subsite. Results Inhibitor 2 {4-[2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-5-oxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-3-[(dipropylamino)methyl)]benzoic acid} was soaked into crystals of neuraminidase of A/tern/Australia/G70c/75 (N9), and the structure refined with 1.55 Å X-ray data. The benzene ring of the inhibitor tilted 8.9° compared to the previous compound (1), and the number of contacts, including hydrogen bonds, increased. However, the IC50 for compound 2 remained in the low micromolar range, likely because one propyl group was disordered. In this high-resolution structure of NA isolated from virus grown in chicken eggs, we found electron density for additional sugar units on the N-linked glycans compared to previous neuraminidase structures. In particular, seven mannoses and two N-acetylglucosamines are visible in the glycan attached to Asn200. This long, branched high-mannose glycan makes significant contacts with the neighboring subunit. Conclusions We designed inhibitor 2 with an extended substituent at C4-corresponding to C6 of sialic acid-to increase the contact surface in the C6-subsite and to force the benzene ring to tilt to maximize these interactions while retaining the interactions of the carboxylate and the pyrolidinone substituents. The crystal structure at 1.55 Å showed that we partially succeeded in that the ring in 2 is tilted

  19. Effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors in preventing hospitalization during the H1N1 influenza pandemic in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Fawziah; Chong, Mei; Henry, Bonnie; Patrick, David M.; Kendall, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In British Columbia (BC), Canada, neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) were publicly funded during the 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic for treatment of high-risk patients and/or anyone with moderate-to-severe illness. We assessed antiviral effectiveness (AVE) against hospitalization in that context. Methods A population-based cohort study was conducted using linked administrative data. The cohort included all individuals living in BC during the study period (1 September to 31 December 2009) with a diagnostic code consistent with influenza or pandemic H1N1. The main study period pertained to the second-wave A(H1N1)pdm09 circulation (1 October to 31 December 2009), with sensitivity analyses around the more specific pandemic peak (18 October to 7 November). Exposure was defined by same-day NI prescription. The main outcome was all-cause hospitalization within 14 days of the outpatient influenza diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models assessed AVE with 1 : 1 propensity-score matching and covariate adjustment. Results After matching, there were 304/58 061 NI-exposed and 345/58 061 unexposed patients hospitalized during the main study period. The very young [<6 months (35.0; 95% CI 16.7–73.4)], the old [65–79 years (13.7; 95% CI 10.1–18.6)] and the very old [≥80 years (38.7; 95% CI 26.6–56.5)] had the highest hospitalization rate per 1000 patients overall. Fully adjusted AVE against all-cause hospitalization during the main study period was 16% (95% CI 2%–28%), similar to the pandemic peak (15%; 95% CI −4%–30%). Conclusions The use of NIs was associated with modest protection against hospitalization during the 2009 pandemic, but appeared underutilized in affected age groups with the highest hospitalization risk. PMID:24346762

  20. Long-Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitor Laninamivir Octanoate (CS-8958) versus Oseltamivir as Treatment for Children with Influenza Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Norio; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, laninamivir octanoate, with oseltamivir. Eligible patients were children 9 years of age and under who had febrile influenza symptoms of no more than 36-h duration. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: a group given 40 mg laninamivir (40-mg group), a group given 20 mg laninamivir (20-mg group), and an oseltamivir group. Laninamivir octanoate was administered as a single inhalation. Oseltamivir (2 mg/kg of body weight) was administered orally twice daily for 5 days. The primary end point was the time to alleviation of influenza illness. The primary analysis included 184 patients (61, 61, and 62 in the 40-mg group, 20-mg group, and oseltamivir group, respectively). Laninamivir octanoate markedly reduced the median time to illness alleviation in comparison with oseltamivir in patients infected with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus, and the reductions were 60.9 h for the 40-mg group and 66.2 h for the 20-mg group. On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the times to alleviation of illness between the laninamivir groups and oseltamivir group for patients with influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Laninamivir octanoate was well tolerated. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal events. Laninamivir octanoate was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Further study will be needed to confirm clinical efficacy against influenza A (H3N2) or B virus infection. Its ease of administration is noteworthy, because a single inhalation is required during the course of illness. PMID:20368393

  1. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  2. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of influenza A viral neuraminidase candidate inhibitors based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Pinto, B Mario; Bernardi, Anna; Bennet, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    This manuscript describes a novel class of derivatives based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold, proposed as mimics of sialic acid in a distorted boat conformation that is on the catalytic pathway of neuraminidases (sialidases). A general synthetic route for these constrained-ring molecules was developed using a photochemical reaction followed by a Johnson-Corey-Chaykovsky cyclopropanation. Functionalization with the goal of occupying the 150-cavity was also exploited. Inhibition assays demonstrated low micromolar inhibition against both group-1 (H5N1) and group-2 (H9N2) influenza neuraminidase subtypes, indicating good affinity for the alpha and beta sialic acid mimics and 150-cavity-targeted derivatives. These results provide a validation of a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold as a mimic of a distorted sialic acid bound in the neuraminidase active site during catalysis. PMID:27305457

  4. In vitro neuraminidase inhibitory concentration (IC50) of four neuraminidase inhibitors against clinical isolates of the influenza viruses circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2014-2015 Japanese influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kawai, Naoki; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2016-09-01

    To assess the extent of viral resistance to the four neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), we measured their 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for influenza virus isolates from the 2014-2015 influenza season for comparison with those circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2013-2014 influenza seasons. Viral isolation was done with specimens obtained prior to treatment, and the type and subtype of influenza was determined by RT-PCR using type- and subtype-specific primers. The IC50 was determined by a neuraminidase inhibition assay using a fluorescent substrate. IC50 was measured for 200 influenza A(H3N2) and 19 influenza B in the 2014-2015 season, and no virus with highly reduced sensitivity to the four NAIs was detected. The ratios of the geometric means of the A(H3N2) IC50s of 2014-2015 to those of the 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 seasons ranged from 0.72 to 1.05, 0.82 to 1.22, 0.69 to 1.00, and 0.70 to 1.03, respectively. The ratios of the geometric mean of the B IC50s to the previous four seasons ranged from 0.59 to 1.28, 0.66 to 1.34, 0.84 to 1.21, and 1.06 to 1.47, respectively. There was no trend in the change of the IC50s for A(H3N2) or B. Significant differences were found in some seasons, but the differences in the IC50s were all less than two fold. These results show change in the geometric mean IC50 by season but with no trend, which indicates that the influence of viral mutation on the effectiveness of these NAIs was minute for A(H3N2) and B over the past five seasons. PMID:27346379

  5. Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009–2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Roderick J.; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E.; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Penn, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. Methods Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR) = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply). While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase). Conclusion While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. PMID:22984431

  6. Influenza A viruses of swine circulating in the United States during 2009-2014 are susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors but show lineage-dependent resistance to adamantanes.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Bahl, Justin; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Culhane, Marie; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Darnell, Daniel; Kaplan, Bryan S; Lowe, James F; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-05-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility is one of the evaluation criteria of pandemic potential posed by an influenza virus. Influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) can play an important role in generating novel variants, yet limited information is available on the drug resistance profiles of IAV-S circulating in the U.S. Phenotypic analysis of the IAV-S isolated in the U.S. (2009-2011) (n=105) revealed normal inhibition by the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir. Screening NA sequences from IAV-S collected in the U.S. (1930-2014) showed 0.03% (1/3396) sequences with clinically relevant H274Y-NA substitution. Phenotypic analysis of IAV-S isolated in the U.S. (2009-2011) confirmed amantadine resistance caused by the S31N-M2 and revealed an intermediate level of resistance caused by the I27T-M2. The majority (96.7%, 589/609) of IAV-S with the I27T-M2 in the influenza database were isolated from pigs in the U.S. The frequency of amantadine-resistant markers among IAV-S in the U.S. was high (71%), and their distribution was M-lineage dependent. All IAV-S of the Eurasian avian M lineage were amantadine-resistant and possessed either a single S31N-M2 substitution (78%, 585/747) or its combination with the V27A-M2 (22%, 162/747). The I27T-M2 substitution accounted for 43% (429/993) of amantadine resistance in classic swine M lineage. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both S31N-M2 and I27T-M2 emerged stochastically but appeared to be fixed in the U.S. IAV-S population. This study defines a drug-susceptibility profile, identifies the frequency of drug-resistant markers, and establishes a phylogenetic approach for continued antiviral-susceptibility monitoring of IAV-S in the U.S. PMID:25701593

  7. Competitive Fitness of Influenza B Viruses Possessing E119A and H274Y Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance-Associated Substitutions in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Burnham, Andrew J; Vogel, Peter; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only antiviral drugs recommended for influenza treatment and prophylaxis. Although NAI-resistant influenza B viruses that could pose a threat to public health have been reported in the field, their fitness is poorly understood. We evaluated in ferrets the pathogenicity and relative fitness of reverse genetics (rg)-generated influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998-like viruses containing E119A or H274Y NA substitutions (N2 numbering). Ferrets inoculated with NAI-susceptible rg-wild-type (rg-WT) or NAI-resistant (rg-E119A or rg-H274Y) viruses developed mild infections. Growth of rg-E119A virus in the nasal cavities was delayed, but the high titers at 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) were comparable to those of the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses (3.6-4.1 log10TCID50/mL). No virus persisted beyond 5 dpi and replication did not extend to the trachea or lungs. Positive virus antigen-staining of the nasal turbinate epithelium was intermittent with the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses; whereas antigen-staining for the rg-E119A virus was more diffuse. Virus populations in ferrets coinoculated with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses (1:1 mixture) remained heterogeneous at 5 dpi but were predominantly rg-WT (>70%). Although the E119A substitution was associated with delayed replication in ferrets, the H274Y substitution did not measurably affect viral growth properties. These data suggest that rg-H274Y has undiminished fitness in single virus inoculations, but neither rg-E119A nor rg-H274Y gained a fitness advantage over rg-WT in direct competition experiments without antiviral drug pressure. Taken together, our data suggest the following order of relative fitness in a ferret animal model: rg-WT > rg-H274Y > rg-E119A. PMID:27466813

  8. Competitive Fitness of Influenza B Viruses Possessing E119A and H274Y Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance–Associated Substitutions in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Burnham, Andrew J.; Vogel, Peter; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only antiviral drugs recommended for influenza treatment and prophylaxis. Although NAI-resistant influenza B viruses that could pose a threat to public health have been reported in the field, their fitness is poorly understood. We evaluated in ferrets the pathogenicity and relative fitness of reverse genetics (rg)–generated influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998-like viruses containing E119A or H274Y NA substitutions (N2 numbering). Ferrets inoculated with NAI-susceptible rg–wild-type (rg-WT) or NAI-resistant (rg-E119A or rg-H274Y) viruses developed mild infections. Growth of rg-E119A virus in the nasal cavities was delayed, but the high titers at 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) were comparable to those of the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses (3.6–4.1 log10TCID50/mL). No virus persisted beyond 5 dpi and replication did not extend to the trachea or lungs. Positive virus antigen-staining of the nasal turbinate epithelium was intermittent with the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses; whereas antigen-staining for the rg-E119A virus was more diffuse. Virus populations in ferrets coinoculated with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses (1:1 mixture) remained heterogeneous at 5 dpi but were predominantly rg-WT (>70%). Although the E119A substitution was associated with delayed replication in ferrets, the H274Y substitution did not measurably affect viral growth properties. These data suggest that rg-H274Y has undiminished fitness in single virus inoculations, but neither rg-E119A nor rg-H274Y gained a fitness advantage over rg-WT in direct competition experiments without antiviral drug pressure. Taken together, our data suggest the following order of relative fitness in a ferret animal model: rg-WT > rg-H274Y > rg-E119A. PMID:27466813

  9. Neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility profile of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dapat, Clyde; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Two new influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), peramivir and laninamivir, were approved in 2010 which resulted to four NAIs that were used during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan. This study aims to monitor the susceptibility of influenza virus isolates in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan to the four NAIs using the fluorescence-based 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) method. Outliers were identified using box-and-whisker plot analysis and full NA gene sequencing was performed to determine the mutations that are associated with reduction of susceptibility to NAIs. A total of 117 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 59 A(H3N2), and 18 type B viruses were tested before NAI treatment and eight A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1 type B viruses were examined from patients after NAI treatment in the two seasons. NA inhibition assay showed type A influenza viruses were more susceptible to NAIs than type B viruses. The peramivir and laninamivir IC₅₀ values of both type A and B viruses were significantly lower than the oseltamivir and zanamivir IC₅₀ values. Among influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, the prevalence of H274Y viruses increased from 0% in the 2009-2010 season to 3% in the 2010-2011 season. These H274Y viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and peramivir with 200-300 fold increase in IC₅₀ values but remained sensitive to zanamivir and laninamivir. Other mutations in NA, such as I222T and M241I were identified among the outliers. Among influenza A(H3N2) viruses, two outliers were identified with D151G and T148I mutations, which exhibited a reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir, respectively. Among type B viruses, no outliers were identified to the four NAIs. For paired samples that were collected before and after drug treatment, three (3/11; 27.3%) H274Y viruses were identified among A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses after oseltamivir treatment but no outliers were found in the laninamivir-treatment group (n=3). Despite widespread use of

  10. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  11. Proline-based Phosphoramidite Reagents for the Reductive Ligation of S-Nitrosothiols

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Ming

    2015-01-01

    S-Nitrosothiols have many biological implications but are rarely used in organic synthesis. In this work we report the development of proline-based phosphoramidite substrates that can effectively convert S-nitrosothiols to proline-based sulfenamides through a reductive ligation process. A unique property of this method is that the phosphine oxide moiety on the ligation products can be readily removed under acidic conditions. In conjugation with the facile preparation of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) from the corresponding thiols (RSH), this method provides a new way to prepare proline-based sulfenamides from simple thiol starting materials. PMID:26758493

  12. Toll-like receptor 9 ligand D-type oligodeoxynucleotide D35 as a broad inhibitor for influenza A virus replication that is associated with suppression of neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Nagase, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Shigefumi

    2016-05-01

    The most effective drugs available to treat influenza are neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, which provide important additional measures for the control of influenza virus infections. However, since the emergence of NA inhibitor-resistant viruses may compromise the clinical utility of this class of anti-influenza agents, it is very important to develop new anti-influenza agents which target a different region in NA responsible for its sensitivity from that for NA inhibitors and could be used to treat NA inhibitors-resistant isolates. The oligodeoxynucleotide D35, multimerized and aggregated, suppressed replication of influenza A viruses except A/WSN/33 (WSN). The suppressive viral replication by D35 depended on G-terad and multimer formation. The range of the suppressive viral replication at the late stage, including virus assembly and release from infected cells, was much larger than that at the initial stage, viral attachment and entry. D35 suppressed NA activity of influenza A viruses. Furthermore, replacing the NA gene of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8), in which viral replication was inhibited by D35 at the late stage, with the NA gene from WSN, in which viral replication was not inhibited, eliminated the D35-dependent suppression. D35 showed an additive anti-influenza effect with oseltamivir. It was also effective in vivo. These results suggest that the influenza virus NA mainly contributes to the D35-suppressible virus release from infected cells at the late stage. In addition, because administration of D35 into the virus-infected mice suppressed viral replication and weight loss, clinical application of D35 could be considered. PMID:26923882

  13. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations. PMID:25592264

  14. Kinetic, thermodynamic and structural analysis of tamiphosphor binding to neuraminidase of H1N1 (2009) pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Albiñana, Carlos Berenguer; Machara, Aleš; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Pachl, Petr; Konvalinka, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Influenza virus causes severe respiratory infections that are responsible for up to half a million deaths worldwide each year. Two inhibitors targeting viral neuraminidase have been approved to date (oseltamivir, zanamivir). However, the rapid development of antiviral drug resistance and the efficient transmission of resistant viruses among humans represent serious threats to public health. The approved influenza neuraminidase inhibitors have (oxa)cyclohexene scaffolds designed to mimic the oxonium transition state during enzymatic cleavage of sialic acid. Their active forms contain a carboxylate that interacts with three arginine residues in the enzyme active site. Recently, the phosphonate group was successfully used as an isostere of the carboxylate in oseltamivir, and the resulting compound, tamiphosphor, was identified as a highly active neuraminidase inhibitor. However, the structure of the complex of this promising inhibitor with neuraminidase has not yet been reported. Here, we analyzed the interaction of a set of oseltamivir and tamiphosphor derivatives with neuraminidase from the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus. We thermodynamically characterized the binding of oseltamivir carboxylate or tamiphosphor to the neuraminidase catalytic domain by protein microcalorimetry, and we determined crystal structure of the catalytic domain in complex with tamiphosphor at 1.8 Å resolution. This structural information should aid rational design of the next generation of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27236066

  15. Neuraminidase Resistant Sialosides for the Detection of Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Yang, Yang; Iyer, Suri S

    2016-06-15

    We report the synthesis of influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) resistant sialosides that include different glycoside linkages (C-, S-, and triazole). These unnatural sialosides were printed onto glass slides to generate a small focused microarray. We evaluated the binding affinity of multiple lectins and compared the stability of these sialosides with O-linked sialosides toward influenza virus neuraminidase and intact virus. We demonstrated the ability of these molecules to capture eight different strains of influenza virus at ambient temperature without the addition of NA inhibitors. The glycans capture extremely low, clinically relevant concentrations of viruses and each strain gives rise to a specific "fingerprint" binding pattern, which could potentially be used in rapid diagnostic tests. PMID:27139196

  16. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  17. A virtual screening approach for identifying plants with anti H5N1 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Nur Kusaira Khairul; Durrant, Jacob D; Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Zalaludin, Ayunni Salihah; Purwitasari, Neny; Mohamed, Nornisah; Rahim, Aisyah Saad Abdul; Lam, Chan Kit; Normi, Yahaya M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Amaro, Rommie E; Wahab, Habibah A

    2015-02-23

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  18. Glycan specificity of neuraminidases determined in microarray format.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Diaz, Jason P; Luebke, Kevin J; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-06-16

    Neuraminidases hydrolytically remove sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Neuraminidases are produced by both humans and their pathogens, and function in normal physiology and in pathological events. Identification of neuraminidase substrates is needed to reveal their mechanism of action, but high-throughput methods to determine glycan specificity of neuraminidases are limited. Here we use two glycan labeling reactions to monitor neuraminidase activity toward glycan substrates. While both periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL) can be used to monitor neuraminidase activity toward glycans in microtiter plates, only GAL accurately measured neuraminidase activity toward glycans displayed on a commercial glass slide microarray. Using GAL, we confirm known linkage specificities of three pneumococcal neuraminidases and obtain new information about underlying glycan specificity. PMID:27131125

  19. Trypsin inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Trixi; Simic, Oliver; Skaanderup, Philip R; Namoto, Kenji; Berst, Frederic; Ehrhardt, Claus; Schiering, Nikolaus; Mueller, Irene; Woelcke, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Proline-based trypsin inhibitors occupying the S1-S2-S1' region were identified by an HTS screening campaign. It was discovered that truncation of the P1' moiety and appropriate extension into the S4 region led to highly potent trypsin inhibitors with excellent selectivity against related serine proteases and a favorable hERG profile. PMID:27476144

  20. Influenza neuraminidase as a vaccine antigen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase protein of influenza viruses is a surface glycoprotein that has enzymatic activity to remove sialic acid, the viral receptor, from both viral and host proteins. The removal of sialic acid from viral proteins plays a key role in the release of the virus from the cell by preventing ...

  1. Combining Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics to Predict the Binding Modes of Flavonoid Derivatives with the Neuraminidase of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Control of flavonoid derivatives inhibitors release through the inhibition of neuraminidase has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of H1N1 influenza disease. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation techniques to optimize the 2009 H1N1 influenza neuraminidase X-ray crystal structure. Molecular docking of the compounds revealed the possible binding mode. Our molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solvated interaction energies technique was applied to predict the docking models of the inhibitors in the binding pocket of the H1N1 influenza neuraminidase. In the simulations, the correlation of the predicted and experimental binding free energies of all 20 flavonoid derivatives inhibitors is satisfactory, as indicated by R2 = 0.75. PMID:22605992

  2. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  3. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc) is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc) were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media. PMID:22963456

  4. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Antibody Escape Promotes Neuraminidase Antigenic Variation and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.; Das, Suman R.; Gibbs, James S.; Bailey, Adam L.; Schmidt, Loren M.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature. PMID:21364978

  5. [Purification of neuraminidase from influenza virus on an immunosorbent].

    PubMed

    Iakubov, L A; Savich, I M; Beklemishev, A B

    1984-10-01

    A procedure for isolation of neuraminidase from influenza virus using the nonionic detergent Triton x-100 was developed. To achieve further purification, the protein mixture was passed through a Sepharose column packed with immobilized antibodies against hemagglutinin. The neuraminidase preparation thus obtained fully retained its enzymatic and antigenic properties and during electrophoretic separation under denaturating conditions gave one protein band. PMID:6440594

  6. Clinical effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors--oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, and peramivir--for treatment of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 infection: an observational study in the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Reiko; Sato, Isamu; Kawashima, Takashi; Dapat, Clyde; Dapat, Isolde Caperig; Kondo, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Saito, Kousuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    The clinical effectiveness of the newly released neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) laninamivir and peramivir has not been sufficiently evaluated in influenza-infected patients in clinical and practical settings. In this study, we analyzed the clinical data of 211 patients infected with influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (A(H3N2)) and 45 patients infected with influenza A virus subtype H1N1pdm (A(H1N1)pdm09) who received the NAIs oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, or peramivir during the 2010-2011 influenza season. The duration of fever from the first dose of the NAI to fever alleviation to <37.5 °C was evaluated as an indicator of the clinical effectiveness of the NAIs in the influenza-infected patients. For the A(H3N2)-infected patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed the peramivir treatment group had the fastest time of fever alleviation to <37.5 °C (median 17.0 h, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 7.2-26.8 h) of the four treatment groups. No significant difference was found in the time to fever alleviation among the other antivirals, oseltamivir, zanamivir, and laninamivir. Results of multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional-hazards model (hazard ratio 3.321) adjusted for the factors age, sex, body weight, vaccination status, time from onset to the clinic visit, and body temperature showed significantly faster fever alleviation in the peramivir treatment group compared with the oseltamivir treatment group. For the A(H1N1)pdm09-infected patients, only the oseltamivir and zanamivir treatment groups were compared, and no significant difference in time to alleviation of fever was observed between the two groups. Based on a cycling probe real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, none of the A(H1N1)pdm09 strains in this study had the H275Y mutation conferring oseltamivir resistance. Further evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of the newly released NAIs for influenza-infected patients, including those infected with A(H1N1)pdm09, is needed. PMID:22644080

  7. Promiscuous catalysis of asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes to β-nitrostyrene by the proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yufeng; Geertsema, Edzard M; Tepper, Pieter G; Zandvoort, Ellen; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-21

    Exploiting catalytic promiscuity: The proline-based enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) promiscuously catalyzes asymmetric Michael-type additions of linear aldehydes--ranging from acetaldehyde to octanal--to trans-β-nitrostyrene in aqueous solvent. The presence of 1.4 mol% of 4-OT effected formation of the anticipated γ-nitroaldehydes in fair to good yields with dr values of up to 93:7 and ee values of up to 81 %. PMID:23303727

  8. A membrane-associated neuraminidase in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Udezulu, I A; Leitch, G J

    1987-01-01

    Trophozoites of the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica HM-1:IMSS possess a surface neuraminidase capable of liberating N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) from N-acetylneuramin-lactose (alpha 2----3 or alpha 2----6) or mucin in their medium. The neuraminidase was found to be membrane associated, with more than 50% of the yield being recovered in the plasma membrane fraction. The neuraminidase specific activity of the plasma membrane fraction was six times that of internal membrane fraction enzyme. The optimum pH and temperature for this enzyme were 6.7 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Neuraminidase activity was inhibited by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, and the optimum Ca2+ concentration was 2 mM. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin D (30 micrograms/ml) inhibited motility and neuraminidase activity of intact Entamoeba trophozoites. The cytochalasin D-induced loss of surface neuraminidase activity was explained in part by a redistribution of enzyme with a loss of plasma membrane enzyme and an increase in intracellular membrane enzyme. A qualitatively similar cytochalasin D effect was observed with two other membrane-associated enzymes, calcium-regulated ATPase and acid phosphatase. Membrane-associated enzyme was minimally affected by Triton X-100 and saponin. An N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, optimum pH, 7.4, was found in trophozoite homogenate supernatant fractions. NANA and NANA-containing compounds stimulated trophozoite-directed motility. This motility stimulation by NANA-containing compounds did not apparently require prior release of free NANA by the trophozoite surface neuraminidase. Entamoeba neuraminidase is one of a series of enzymes that may modify the mucus blanket and target cell surface and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. PMID:2878886

  9. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  10. Neuraminidase of Influenza A Virus Binds Lysosome-Associated Membrane Proteins Directly and Induces Lysosome Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiangwu; Yan, Yiwu; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ning; Sheng, Miaomiao; Zhang, Lifang; Li, Xiao; Liang, Zhu; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Kangtai; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yanxu; Zou, Zhen; Du, Jianchao; Zhong, Ying; Zhou, Huandi; Yang, Peng; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Li, Dangsheng; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a recycling center, lysosomes are filled with numerous acid hydrolase enzymes that break down waste materials and invading pathogens. Recently, lysosomal cell death has been defined as “lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of lysosome contents into cytosol.” Here, we show that the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 influenza A virus markedly deglycosylates and degrades lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs; the most abundant membrane proteins of lysosome), which induces lysosomal rupture, and finally leads to cell death of alveolar epithelial carcinoma A549 cells and human tracheal epithelial cells. The NA inhibitors peramivir and zanamivir could effectively block the deglycosylation of LAMPs, inhibit the virus cell entry, and prevent cell death induced by the H5N1 influenza virus. The NA of seasonal H1N1 virus, however, does not share these characteristics. Our findings not only reveal a novel role of NA in the early stage of the H5N1 influenza virus life cycle but also elucidate the molecular mechanism of lysosomal rupture crucial for influenza virus induced cell death. IMPORTANCE The integrity of lysosomes is vital for maintaining cell homeostasis, cellular defense and clearance of invading pathogens. This study shows that the H5N1 influenza virus could induce lysosomal rupture through deglycosylating lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) mediated by the neuraminidase activity of NA protein. NA inhibitors such as peramivir and zanamivir could inhibit the deglycosylation of LAMPs and protect lysosomes, which also further interferes with the H5N1 influenza virus infection at early stage of life cycle. This work is significant because it presents new concepts for NA's function, as well as for influenza inhibitors' mechanism of action, and could partially explain the high mortality and high viral load after H5N1 virus infection in human beings and why NA inhibitors have more potent therapeutic effects for lethal avian

  11. Photodegradation and inhibition of drug-resistant influenza virus neuraminidase using anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Shuho; Takahashi, Daisuke; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-02-11

    The anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids designed effectively degraded not only non-drug-resistant neuraminidase but also drug-resistant neuraminidase, which is an important target of anti-influenza therapy. Degradation was achieved using long-wavelength UV radiation in the absence of any additives and under neutral conditions. Moreover, the hybrids efficiently inhibited neuraminidase activities upon photo-irradiation. PMID:23282898

  12. Neuraminidase-Dependent Degradation of Polysialic Acid Is Required for the Lamination of Newly Generated Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Mari; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Tanii, Takashi; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal granule cells (GCs) are generated throughout the lifetime and are properly incorporated into the innermost region of the granule cell layer (GCL). Hypotheses for the well-regulated lamination of newly generated GCs suggest that polysialic acid (PSA) is present on the GC surface to modulate GC-to-GC interactions, regulating the process of GC migration; however, direct evidence of this involvement is lacking. We show that PSA facilitates the migration of newly generated GCs and that the activity of N-acetyl-α-neuraminidase 1 (NEU1, sialidase 1) cleaves PSA from immature GCs, terminating their migration in the innermost GCL. Developing a migration assay of immature GCs in vitro, we found that the pharmacological depletion of PSA prevents the migration of GCs, whereas the inhibition of PSA degradation with a neuraminidase inhibitor accelerates this migration. We found that NEU1 is highly expressed in immature GCs. The knockdown of NEU1 in newly generated GCs in vivo increased PSA presence on these cells, and attenuated the proper termination of GC migration in the innermost GCL. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel mechanism that underlies the proper lamination of newly generated GCs through the modulation of PSA presence by neuronal NEU1. PMID:26731280

  13. Selective binding of antiinfluenza drugs and their analogues to 'open' and 'closed' conformations of H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Zhang, John Z H

    2010-10-14

    It was suggested that the open conformation of the 150-loop of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase is intrinsically lower in energy than the closed conformation and that oseltamivir (tamiflu) favors binding to the closed conformation through a relatively slow conformational change [Russell, R. J. Nature 2006, 443, 45-49]. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the binding mechanism of five ligands to H5N1 neuraminidase (H5N1 NA) with the 150-loop in both open and closed conformations through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and MM/PBSA free energy calculation. Our result shows that the electrostatic interactions between polar groups on the 150-loop and the charged groups of the ligands play a key role on the binding selectivity. In particular, ligands having a small positively charged group favor binding to the closed conformation of H5N1 NA, while those having a large positively charged group generally prefer binding to the open conformation. Our analysis suggests that it may be possible to design new inhibitors with large basic groups that are selective for the open conformation and thereby have stronger binding affinity to H5N1 neuraminidase. PMID:20860351

  14. A sialic acid-derived phosphonate analog inhibits different strains of influenza virus neuraminidase with different efficiencies.

    PubMed

    White, C L; Janakiraman, M N; Laver, W G; Philippon, C; Vasella, A; Air, G M; Luo, M

    1995-02-01

    A phosphonate analog of N-acetyl neuraminic acid (PANA) has been designed as a potential neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor and synthesized as both the alpha (ePANA) and beta (aPANA) anomers. Inhibition of type A (N2) and type B NA activity by ePANA was approximately a 100-fold better than by sialic acid, but inhibition of type A (N9) NA was only ten-fold better than by sialic acid. The aPANA compound was not a strong inhibitor for any of the NA strains tested. The crystal structures at 2.4 A resolution of ePANA complexed to type A (N2) NA, type A (N9) NA and type B NA and aPANA complexed to type A (N2) NA showed that neither of the PANA compounds distorted the NA active site upon binding. No significant differences in the NA-ePANA complex structures were found to explain the anomalous inhibition of N9 neuraminidase by ePANA. We put forward the hypothesis that an increase in the ePANA inhibition compared to that caused by sialic acid is due to (1) a stronger electrostatic interaction between the inhibitor phosphonyl group and the active site arginine pocket and (2) a lower distortion energy requirement for binding of ePANA. PMID:7844831

  15. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus Carrying a Q136K Mutation in the Neuraminidase Gene Is Resistant to Zanamivir but Exhibits Reduced Fitness in the Guinea Pig Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Michael M.; Ohnemus, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of influenza A viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors can arise through mutations in the neuraminidase (NA) gene. We show here that a Q136K mutation in the NA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus confers a high degree of resistance to zanamivir. Resistance is accompanied by reduced numbers of NA molecules in viral particles and reduced intrinsic enzymatic activity of mutant NA. Interestingly, the Q136K mutation strongly impairs viral fitness in the guinea pig transmission model. PMID:23192869

  16. A Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase mutation that diminished hemagglutination and neuraminidase activity did not change infectivity and pathogenecity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, requires recognition and attachment of the virions to host cell receptors containing sialic acid residues. Recognition of sialic acid-containing proteins is mediated by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of...

  17. A single amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus results in increased fusion and decreased neuraminidase activities without changes in virus pathotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) attachment to the host cell is mediated by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a multifunctional protein that has receptor recognition, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activities. The process that correlates receptor binding and fusion triggering is poorly understo...

  18. Neuroinflammation Induced by Intracerebroventricular Injection of Microbial Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María D.; Grondona, Jesús M.; Gómez-Roldán, María del Carmen; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Alvarez, Martina; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe the facts that took place in the rat brain after a single injection of the enzyme neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle. After injection, it diffused through the cerebrospinal fluid of the ipsilateral ventricle and the third ventricle, and about 400 μm into the periventricular brain parenchyma. The expression of ICAM1 in the endothelial cells of the periventricular vessels, IBA1 in microglia, and GFAP in astrocytes notably increased in the regions reached by the injected neuraminidase. The subependymal microglia and the ventricular macrophages begun to express IL1β and some appeared to cross the ependymal layer. After about 4 h of the injection, leukocytes migrated from large venules of the affected choroid plexus, the meninges and the local subependyma, and infiltrated the brain. The invading cells arrived orderly: first neutrophils, then macrophage-monocytes, and last CD8α-positive T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Leukocytes in the ventricles and the perivascular zones penetrated the brain parenchyma passing through the ependyma and the glia limitans. Thus, it is likely that a great part of the damage produced by microorganism invading the brain may be due to their neuraminidase content. PMID:25853134

  19. Understanding the cross-resistance of oseltamivir to H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A neuraminidase mutations using multidimensional computational analyses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashona; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2015-01-01

    This study embarks on a comprehensive description of the conformational contributions to resistance of neuraminidase (N1) in H1N1 and H5N1 to oseltamivir, using comparative multiple molecular dynamic simulations. The available data with regard to elucidation of the mechanism of resistance as a result of mutations in H1N1 and H5N1 neuraminidases is not well established. Enhanced post-dynamic analysis, such as principal component analysis, solvent accessible surface area, free binding energy calculations, and radius of gyration were performed to gain a precise insight into the binding mode and origin of resistance of oseltamivir in H1N1 and H5N1 mutants. Three significant features reflecting resistance in the presence of mutations H274Y and I222K, of the protein complexed with the inhibitor are: reduced flexibility of the α-carbon backbone; an improved ΔEele of ~15 (kcal/mol) for H1N1 coupled with an increase in ΔGsol (~13 kcal/mol) from wild-type to mutation; a low binding affinity in comparison with the wild-type of ~2 (kcal/mol) and ~7 (kcal/mol) with respect to each mutation for the H5N1 systems; and reduced hydrophobicity of the overall surface structure due to an impaired hydrogen bonding network. We believe the results of this study will ultimately provide a useful insight into the structural landscape of neuraminidase-associated binding of oseltamivir. Furthermore, the results can be used in the design and development of potent inhibitors of neuraminidases. PMID:26257512

  20. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA) is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity. PMID:26267136

  1. Structure prediction and analysis of neuraminidase sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M

    2016-07-01

    Analyzing protein structure has become an integral aspect of understanding systems of biochemical import. The laboratory experiment endeavors to introduce protein folding to ascertain structures of proteins for which the structure is unavailable, as well as to critically evaluate the quality of the prediction obtained. The model system used is the highly mutable influenza virus protein neuraminidase, which is the key target in the development of therapeutics. In light of recent pandemics, understanding how mutations confer drug resistance, which translates at the molecular level to understanding how different sequence variants differ, constitutes an area of great interest because of the ramifications in public health. This lab targets upper level undergraduate biochemistry students, and aims to introduce tools to be used to explore protein folding and protein visualization in the context of the neuraminidase case study. Students proceed to critically evaluate the folded models by comparison with crystallographic structures. When validity is established, they fold a neuraminidase sequence for which a structure is not available. Through structural alignment and visual inspection of the 150 loop, students gain molecular insight into two possible conformations of the protein, which are actively being studied. Folding the third chosen sequence mimics a true research environment in allowing students to generate a structure from a sequence for which a structure was not previously available, and to assess whether their particular variant has an open or closed loop. From this vantage, they are then challenged to speculate about the connection between loop conformation and drug susceptibility. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):361-376, 2016. PMID:26900942

  2. In silico study on multidrug resistance conferred by I223R/H275Y double mutant neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hua; Wei, Kun; Bao, Jiguang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-11-01

    It was recently reported that an I223R/H275Y double mutant of neuraminidase (NA) creates a multidrug-resistant form of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus. However, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms is still lacking. We conducted a systematic in silico study to explore the structural basis underlying this multidrug resistance. By molecular docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we compared various biochemical and biophysical properties of the wild type, the I223R single mutant and the I223R/H275Y double mutant NA with two inhibitors, zanamivir (ZMR) and oseltamivir (G39). The binding free energy of oseltamivir with all types of NA was substantially lower than its zanamivir counterpart. On the other hand, the binding free energy of each inhibitor with wild type NA was generally higher than that with mutant NAs. MD simulation outcomes exemplify distinct patterns for oseltamivir and zanamivir with all types of NA. In particular, the stronger resistance of the double mutant NA relative to the wild and single mutant types can be ascribed to the overall looser but locally more compact structure of the former. Specifically, as a whole the double mutant NA adapts to the larger gyration radius and greater distance between charged atom groups, which is contrary to the pattern in the local binding site region. The enhanced resistance of all types of NA to oseltamivir rather than zanamivir might be accounted for similarly. We expect these findings to provide significant insights into improving inhibitors for the multidrug-resistant neuraminidase of H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:24056678

  3. Antiviral Susceptibility of Avian and Swine Influenza Virus of the N1 Neuraminidase Subtype▿

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Terri D.; Krauss, Scott; DuBois, Rebecca M.; Negovetich, Nicholas J.; Stallknecht, David E.; Senne, Dennis A.; Gramer, Marie R.; Swafford, Seth; DeLiberto, Tom; Govorkova, Elena A.; Webster, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses of the N1 neuraminidase (NA) subtype affecting both animals and humans caused the 2009 pandemic. Anti-influenza virus NA inhibitors are crucial early in a pandemic, when specific influenza vaccines are unavailable. Thus, it is urgent to confirm the antiviral susceptibility of the avian viruses, a potential source of a pandemic virus. We evaluated the NA inhibitor susceptibilities of viruses of the N1 subtype isolated from wild waterbirds, swine, and humans. Most avian viruses were highly or moderately susceptible to oseltamivir (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], <5.1 to 50 nM). Of 91 avian isolates, 7 (7.7%) had reduced susceptibility (IC50, >50 nM) but were sensitive to the NA inhibitors zanamivir and peramivir. Oseltamivir susceptibility ranged more widely among the waterbird viruses (IC50, 0.5 to 154.43 nM) than among swine and human viruses (IC50, 0.33 to 2.56 nM). Swine viruses were sensitive to oseltamivir, compared to human seasonal H1N1 isolated before 2007 (mean IC50, 1.4 nM). Avian viruses from 2007 to 2008 were sensitive to oseltamivir, in contrast to the emergence of resistant H1N1 in humans. Susceptibility remained high to moderate over time among influenza viruses. Sequence analysis of the outliers did not detect molecular markers of drug-resistance (e.g., H275Y NA mutation [N1 numbering]) but revealed mutations outside the NA active site. In particular, V267I, N307D, and V321I residue changes were found, and structural analyses suggest that these mutations distort hydrophobic pockets and affect residues in the NA active site. We determined that natural oseltamivir resistance among swine and wild waterbirds is rare. Minor naturally occurring variants in NA can affect antiviral susceptibility. PMID:20660186

  4. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a neuraminidase gene from Arcanobacterium pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Jost, B H; Songer, J G; Billington, S J

    2001-07-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes is an opportunistic pathogen, associated with suppurative infections in domestic animals. In addition to pyolysin, a pore-forming, cholesterol-binding toxin, A. pyogenes expresses a number of putative virulence factors, including several proteases and neuraminidase activity. A 3,009-bp gene, nanH, was cloned and sequenced and conferred neuraminidase activity on an Escherichia coli host strain. The predicted 107-kDa NanH protein displayed similarity to a number of bacterial neuraminidases and contained the RIP/RLP motif and five copies of the Asp box motif found in all bacterial neuraminidases. Recombinant His-tagged NanH was found to have pH and temperature optima of 5.5 to 6.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Insertional deletion of the nanH gene resulted in the reduction, but not absence, of neuraminidase activity, indicating the presence of a second neuraminidase gene in A. pyogenes. NanH was localized to the A. pyogenes cell wall. A. pyogenes adhered to HeLa, CHO, and MDBK cells in a washing-resistant manner. However, the nanH mutant was not defective for adherence to epithelial cells. The role of NanH in host epithelial cell adherence may be masked by the presence of a second neuraminidase in A. pyogenes. PMID:11401983

  5. Structural Studies of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Tetramer in Complex with Its Receptor, Sialyllactose

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Thompson, Thomas B.; Wurzburg, Beth A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) functions in virus attachment to cells, cleavage of sialic acid from oligosaccharides, and stimulating membrane fusion during virus entry into cells. The structural basis for these diverse functions remains to be fully understood. We report the crystal structures of the parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) HN and its complexes with sialic acid, the inhibitor DANA, and the receptor sialyllactose. SV5 HN shares common structural features with HN of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and human parainfluenza 3 (HPIV3), but unlike the previously determined HN structures, the SV5 HN forms a tetramer in solution, which is thought to be the physiological oligomer. The sialyllactose complex reveals intact receptor within the active site, but no major conformational changes in the protein. The SV5 HN structures do not support previously proposed models for HN action in membrane fusion and suggest alternative mechanisms by which HN may promote virus entry into cells.

  6. Neuraminidase inhibitory activities of quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids from Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Young Bae; Lee, Woo Song; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes food poisoning. The neuraminidase (NA) protein of C. perfringens plays a pivotal role in bacterial proliferation and is considered a novel antibacterial drug target. Based on screens for novel NA inhibitors, a 95% EtOH extract of Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome showed NA inhibitory activity (68% at 30 μg/ml), which resulted in the isolation of 10 isoquinoline alkaloids; namely, palmatine (1), berberine (2), coptisine (3), pseudodehydrocorydaline (4), jatrorrhizine (5), dehydrocorybulbine (6), pseudocoptisine (7), glaucine (8), corydaline (9) and tetrahydrocoptisine (10). Interestingly, seven quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids 1-7 (IC50 = 12.8 ± 1.5 to 65.2 ± 4.5 μM) showed stronger NA inhibitory activity than the tertiary alkaloids 8-10. In addition, highly active compounds 1 and 2 showed reversible non-competitive behavior based on a kinetic study. Molecular docking simulations using the Autodock 4.2 software increased our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of these compounds. In addition, we demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 suppressed bacterial growth. PMID:25277281

  7. A mutant influenza virus that uses an N1 neuraminidase as the receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Kathryn A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2013-12-01

    In the vast majority of influenza A viruses characterized to date, hemagglutinin (HA) is the receptor-binding and fusion protein, whereas neuraminidase (NA) is a receptor-cleaving protein that facilitates viral release but is expendable for entry. However, the NAs of some recent human H3N2 isolates have acquired receptor-binding activity via the mutation D151G, although these isolates also appear to retain the ability to bind receptors via HA. We report here the laboratory generation of a mutation (G147R) that enables an N1 NA to completely co-opt the receptor-binding function normally performed by HA. Viruses with this mutant NA grow to high titers even in the presence of extensive mutations to conserved residues in HA's receptor-binding pocket. When the receptor-binding NA is paired with this binding-deficient HA, viral infectivity and red blood cell agglutination are blocked by NA inhibitors. Furthermore, virus-like particles expressing only the receptor-binding NA agglutinate red blood cells in an NA-dependent manner. Although the G147R NA receptor-binding mutant virus that we characterize is a laboratory creation, this same mutation is found in several natural clusters of H1N1 and H5N1 viruses. Our results demonstrate that, at least in tissue culture, influenza virus receptor-binding activity can be entirely shifted from HA to NA. PMID:24027333

  8. Biophysical measurement of the balance of influenza a hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities.

    PubMed

    Benton, Donald J; Martin, Stephen R; Wharton, Stephen A; McCauley, John W

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of influenza A viruses with the cell surface is controlled by the surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). These two glycoproteins have opposing activities: HA is responsible for binding the host receptor (sialic acid) to allow infection, and NA is responsible for cleaving the receptor to facilitate virus release. Several studies have demonstrated that compatible levels of HA and NA activity are required for a virus to replicate efficiently. This is consequently of great interest for determining virus transmissibility. The concurrent role of these two proteins in receptor binding has never been directly measured. We demonstrate a novel biophysical approach based on bio-layer interferometry to measure the balance of the activities of these two proteins in real time. This technique measures virus binding to and release from a surface coated with either the human-like receptor analog α2,6-linked sialic acid or the avian-like receptor analog α2,3-linked sialic acid in both the presence and absence of NA inhibitors. Bio-layer interferometry measurements were also carried out to determine the effect of altering HA receptor affinity and NA stalk length on receptor binding. PMID:25586179

  9. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase Substrates Identified through Comparative Proteomics Enabled by Chemoselective Labeling.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-04-20

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) are enzymes that hydrolytically remove sialic acid from sialylated proteins and lipids. Neuraminidases are encoded by a range of human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Many pathogen neuraminidases are virulence factors, indicating that desialylation of host glycoconjugates can be a critical step in infection. Specifically, desialylation of host cell surface glycoproteins can enable these molecules to function as pathogen receptors or can alter signaling through the plasma membrane. Despite these critical effects, no unbiased approaches exist to identify glycoprotein substrates of neuraminidases. Here, we combine previously reported glycoproteomics methods with quantitative proteomics analysis to identify glycoproteins whose sialylation changes in response to neuraminidase treatment. The two glycoproteomics methods-periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL)-rely on chemoselective labeling of sialylated and nonsialylated glycoproteins, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of the combined approaches by identifying substrates of two pneumococcal neuraminidases in a human cell line that models the blood-brain barrier. The methods deliver complementary lists of neuraminidase substrates, with GAL identifying a larger number of substrates than PAL (77 versus 17). Putative neuraminidase substrates were confirmed by other methods, establishing the validity of the approach. Among the identified substrates were host glycoproteins known to function in bacteria adherence and infection. Functional assays suggest that multiple desialylated cell surface glycoproteins may act together as pneumococcus receptors. Overall, this method will provide a powerful approach to identify glycoproteins that are desialylated by both purified neuraminidases and intact pathogens. PMID:26954852

  10. Immunity Against Parainfluenza-3 Virus in Cattle: Anti-Neuraminidase Activity in Serum and Nasal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Morein, B.; Höglund, S.; Bergman, R.

    1973-01-01

    The antigenicity of two parainfluenza=3 virus strains, a “neuraminidasestrong” and a “neuraminidase-weak,” was compared. For both strains the amount of hemagglutinin units was equal. The antibody responses to neuraminidase and hemagglutinin were measured on samples of serum and nasal secretion and were found to be similar, irrespective of the strain used for immunization. Anti-neuraminidase activity was demonstrated in the gel phase of nasal secretion of immunized cattle. Immunglobulin A was found attached to the peplomers of inhibited virus by immuno-electron microscopy. Images PMID:4355138

  11. Interface dynamics explain assembly dependency of influenza neuraminidase catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    von Grafenstein, Susanne; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Kirchmair, Johannes; Fuchs, Julian E.; Huber, Roland G.; Schmidtke, Michaela; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Rollinger, Judith M.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (iNA) is a homotetrameric surface protein of the influenza virus and an established target for antiviral drugs. In contrast to neuraminidases (NAs) of other biological systems (non-iNAs), enzymatic activity of iNA is only observed in a quaternary assembly and iNA needs the tetramerization to mediate enzymatic activity. Obviously, differences on a molecular level between iNA and non-iNAs are responsible for this intriguing observation. Comparison between protein structures and multiple sequence alignment allow the identification of differences in amino acid composition in crucial regions of the enzyme, such as next to the conserved D151 and the 150-loop. These differences in amino acid sequence and protein tetramerization are likely to alter the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate differences in the molecular flexibility of monomers, dimers, and tetramers of iNAs of subtype N1 (avian 2004, pandemic 1918 and pandemic 2009 iNA) and as comparison the non-iNA monomer from Clostridium perfringens. We show that conformational transitions of iNA are crucially influenced by its assembly state. The protein–protein interface induces a complex hydrogen-bonding network between the 110-helix and the 150-loop, which consequently stabilizes the structural arrangement of the binding site. Therefore, we claim that these altered dynamics are responsible for the dependence of iNA’s catalytic activity on the tetrameric assembly. Only the tetramerization-induced balance between stabilization and altered local flexibility in the binding site provides the appropriate arrangement of key residues for iNA’s catalytic activity. PMID:24279589

  12. Purification and properties of rabbit spermatozoal acrosomal neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, P N; Abou-Issa, H

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of rabbit spermatozoa with 50mM-MgCl2 removes the plasma and the outer acrosomal membranes. Subsequent treatment with the detergents Hyamine 2389 and Triton X-100 solubilizes spermatozoal neuraminidase bound to the inner acrosomal membrane. The enzyme was further purified by DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-150 and Bio-Gel P-300 column chromato. The enzyme showed a single major band, with the possibility of some minor contaminants, on disc-gel electrophoresis. It had a specific activity of 0.37 micronmal of sialic acid released/min per mg with purified boar Cowper's-gland mucin as the substrate. The enzyme had marked specificity for 2 leads to 6'-linked sialic acid in glycoproteins. The Km of spermatozoal neuraminidase was 1.72 X 10(-6)M with Cowper's-gland mucin, 1.17 X 10(-5)M with fetuin and 8.8 X 10(-4)M with sialyl-lactose as a substrates. The Vmax. was 0.112 micronmol/min per mg with the Cowper's-gland mucin, 0.071 micronmol/min per mg with fetuin and 0.033 micronmol/min per mg with sialyl-lactose as substrate. The enzyme hydrolysed sheep submaxillary-gland mucin as readily as the Cowper's-gland mucin. The optimum of enzyme activity was at pH 5.0 on the Cowper's-gland mucin and at pH4.3 on sialyl-lactose. The enzyme activity was unaffected by 20mM-Na+ and-K+, but was inhibited by 20mM-Ca2+,-Mn2+,-Co2+ and -Cu2+. The enzyme was unstable in dilute solutions, but could be stored indefinitely freeze-dried at --20 degrees C. Images PLATE 1 PMID:66917

  13. Novel binding patterns between ganoderic acids and neuraminidase: Insights from docking, molecular dynamics and MM/PBSA studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-04-01

    Recently, ganoderic acids (GAs) give rise to the attractive candidates of novel neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. However, there is still no evident conclusion about their binding patterns. To this end, docking, molecular dynamics and MM/PBSA methods were combined to study the binding profiles of GAs with the N1 protein and familiar H274Y and N294S mutations (A/Vietnam/1203/04 stain). It was found that the binding affinities of ganoderic acid DM and Z (ΔGbind, -16.83 and -10.99 kcal mol(-1)) are comparable to that of current commercial drug oseltamivir (-23.62 kcal mol(-1)). Electrostatic interaction is the main driving force, and should be one important factor to evaluate the binding quality and rational design of NA inhibitors. The 150-loop residues Asp151 and Arg152 played an important role in the binding processes. Further analysis revealed that ganoderic acid DM is a potential source of anti-influenza ingredient, with novel binding pattern and advantage over oseltamivir. It had steric hindrance on the 150 cavity of N1 protein, and exerted activities across the H274Y and N294S mutations. This work also pointed out how to effectively design dual-site NA inhibitors and reinforce their affinities. These findings should prove valuable for the in-depth understanding of interactions between NA and GAs, and warrant the experimental aspects to design novel anti-influenza drugs. PMID:26905206

  14. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage. PMID:27255748

  15. Elastin Peptides Signaling Relies on Neuraminidase-1-Dependent Lactosylceramide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Rusciani, Anthony; Duca, Laurent; Sartelet, Hervé; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Bobichon, Hélène; Ploton, Dominique; Le Naour, Richard; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The sialidase activity of neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1) is responsible for ERK 1/2 pathway activation following binding of elastin peptide on the elastin receptor complex. In this work, we demonstrate that the receptor and lipid rafts colocalize at the plasma membrane. We also show that the disruption of these microdomains as well as their depletion in glycolipids blocks the receptor signaling. Following elastin peptide treatment, the cellular GM3 level decreases while lactosylceramide (LacCer) content increases consistently with a GM3/LacCer conversion. The use of lactose or Neu-1 siRNA blocks this process suggesting that the elastin receptor complex is responsible for this lipid conversion. Flow cytometry analysis confirms this elastin peptide-driven LacCer generation. Further, the use of a monoclonal anti-GM3 blocking antibody shows that GM3 is required for signaling. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that Neu-1-dependent GM3/LacCer conversion is the key event leading to signaling by the elastin receptor complex. As a consequence, we propose that LacCer is an early messenger for this receptor. PMID:21103358

  16. On the agglutinogens of red cells developed with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Takahashi, K

    1976-10-01

    It has been known that the agglutinability of human red cells is changed or enhanced by treatments with proteolytic enzymes or neuraminidase. In this paper, the serological properties of agglutinogens developed by proteolytic enzymes (bromelin, ficin, papain, trypsin and pronase) and neuraminidase are investigated by using antisera to trypsin- and neuraminidase-treated red cells. The adsorptions of the antiserum to trypsinized red cells with the cells treated with each of the proteolytic enzymes showed that the agglutinogens uncovered by bromelin, ficin and papain were different from those by pronase and trypsin. It was demonstrated that pronase was the most effective enzyme to uncover the agglutinogen located on deeper site of red cell membrane. This was confirmed by the agglutination with the test cells treated twice with two kinds of the enzymes. The reactions of the antiserum to neuraminidase-treated red cells treated with six kinds of the enzymes indicated that the agglutinogens developed by neuraminidase resembled those by bromelin, ficin and papain more than those by trypsin and pronase. PMID:982434

  17. Distribution of Neuraminidase among Food-poisoning Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Schekter, Marcia A.; Cherry, William B.

    1967-01-01

    A survey was made to determine the distribution of the enzyme neuraminidase among 76 strains of Clostridium perfringens. Representative strains from each toxigenic type (A to F) and atypical C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strains of both American and English (Hobbs types) origin were tested. Both the American food-poisoning and nonfood-poisoning associated cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative strains. Furthermore, American strains which could not be differentiated from the original Hobbs cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative representatives. In contrast, the English (Hobbs) strains uniformly failed to produce an active intracellular or extracellular neuraminidase. No enzyme activity was detected in these strains when cultures were grown in different growth media, when grown in the presence of substrate (neuraminlactose), or upon extended incubation of enzyme preparations with substrate. With the exception of a type F strain, representative strains of the other toxigenic types (A to F) produced neuraminidase; 85% of the typical type A strains contained the enzyme. PMID:4292823

  18. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the Micromonospora viridifaciens neuraminidase gene in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurada, K; Ohta, T; Hasegawa, M

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned the Micromonospora viridifaciens neuraminidase (EC 3.2.1.18) gene (nedA) in Streptomyces lividans. This was accomplished by using the vector pIJ702 and BglII-BclI libraries of M. viridifaciens chromosomal inserts created in S. lividans. The libraries were screened for the expression of neuraminidase by monitoring the cleavage of the fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-alpha-D-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid. Positive clones (BG6, BG7, BC4, and BC8) contained the identical 2-kb BclI-BglII fragment and expressed neuraminidase efficiently and constitutively using its own promoter in the heterologous host. From the nucleotide sequence analysis, an open reading frame of 1,941 bp which encodes a polypeptide with an M(r) of 68,840 was detected. The deduced amino acid sequence has five Asp boxes, -Ser-X-Asp-X-Gly-X-Thr-Trp, showing great similarity to other bacterial and viral neuraminidases. We have also identified the catalytic domain by using truncated proteins produced in S. lividans. Images PMID:1400240

  19. The discovery of (2R,4R)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N- (2-fluoro-4-(2-oxopyridin-1(2H)-yl)phenyl)-4-methoxypyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamide (PD 0348292), an orally efficacious factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Bigge, Christopher F; Bryant, John W; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Chi, Liguo; Cody, Wayne L; Dahring, Tawny; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Haarer, Staci; Heemstra, Ron; Janiczek, Nancy; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; McClanahan, Thomas; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaisheli; Schaum, Robert; Van Huis, Chad A; Welch, Kathleen M; Zhang, Erli; Leadley, Robert J; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-08-01

    Herein, we report the discovery of novel, proline-based factor Xa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. Through the additional incorporation of 1-(4-amino-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-pyridin-2-one 22, as a P4 pharmacophore, we discovered compound 7 (PD 0348292). This compound is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious FXa inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders. PMID:17683371

  20. Biochemical characterisation of the neuraminidase pool of the human gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Mao M; Kulinich, Anna; Yao, Hong L; Ma, Hong Y; Martínez, Juana E R; Duan, Xu C; Chen, Huan; Cai, Zhi P; Flitsch, Sabine L; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2015-10-13

    Since the isolation and identification of Akkermansia muciniphila one decade ago, much attention has been drawn to this gut bacterium due to its role in obesity and type 2 diabetes. This report describes the discovery and biochemical characterisation of all four putative neuraminidases annotated in the A. muciniphila genome. Recombinantly expressed candidate genes, which were designated Am0705, Am0707, Am1757 and Am2085, were shown to cover complementary pH ranges between 4.0 and 9.5. Temperature optima of the enzymes lay between 37 and 42 °C. All four enzymes were strongly inhibited by Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), and loss of activity after the addition of EDTA suggests that all neuraminidases, with the exception of Am0707, require divalent metal ions for their catalytic function. Chemoenzymatically synthesised α2,3- and α2,6-linked indoyl-sialosides were utilised to determine the regioselectivity and substrate promiscuity of the neuraminidases towards C5-modifications of sialic acids with N-acetyl-, N-glycolyl-, N-propionyl-, or hydroxyl-groups. The combination of simple purification procedures and good activities of some of the characterised neuraminidases makes them potentially interesting as tools in bioanalytical or industrial applications. PMID:26340137

  1. Microcapsules functionalized with neuraminidase can enter vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weizhi; Wang, Xiaocong; Bai, Ke; Lin, Miao; Sukhorukov, Gleb; Wang, Wen

    2014-12-01

    Microcapsules made of polyelectrolyte multilayers exhibit no or low toxicity, appropriate mechanical stability, variable controllable degradation and can incorporate remote release mechanisms triggered by various stimuli, making them well suited for targeted drug delivery to live cells. This study investigates interactions between microcapsules made of synthetic (i.e. polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt/polyallylamine hydrochloride) or natural (i.e. dextran sulfate/poly-L-arginine) polyelectrolyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells with particular focus on the effect of the glycocalyx layer on the intake of microcapsules by endothelial cells. Neuraminidase cleaves N-acetyl neuraminic acid residues of glycoproteins and targets the sialic acid component of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Three-dimensional confocal images reveal that microcapsules, functionalized with neuraminidase, can be internalized by endothelial cells. Capsules without neuraminidase are blocked by the glycocalyx layer. Uptake of the microcapsules is most significant in the first 2 h. Following their internalization by endothelial cells, biodegradable DS/PArg capsules rupture by day 5; however, there is no obvious change in the shape and integrity of PSS/PAH capsules within the period of observation. Results from the study support our hypothesis that the glycocalyx functions as an endothelial barrier to cross-membrane movement of microcapsules. Neuraminidase-loaded microcapsules can enter endothelial cells by localized cleavage of glycocalyx components with minimum disruption of the glycocalyx layer and therefore have high potential to act as drug delivery vehicles to reach tissues beyond the endothelial barrier of blood vessels. PMID:25339691

  2. A SOE-PCR method of introducing multiple mutations into Mycoplasma gallisepticum neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Hongjun; Yu, Shengqing; Qiu, Xusheng; Song, Cuiping; Chen, Danqing; Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Fanqing; He, Suibin; Shen, Xinyue; Hu, Meirong; Ding, Chan

    2013-08-01

    A modified splicing with overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR) was generated to introduce 21 TGA to TGG at Mycoplasma gallisepticum MGA_0329 gene. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed and retained neuraminidase activities, indicating that SOE-PCR is a rapid and highly efficient method of introducing multiple mutations into large M. gallisepticum genes. PMID:23707236

  3. Structural characterization of a protective epitope spanning A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus neuraminidase monomers

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Yang, Hua; Shore, David A.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Jin; Jiang, Lianlian; Carney, Paul J.; Villanueva, Julie; Stevens, James; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2015-01-01

    A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza A viruses predominated in the 2013–2014 USA influenza season, and although most of these viruses remain sensitive to Food and Drug Administration-approved neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, alternative therapies are needed. Here we show that monoclonal antibody CD6, selected for binding to the NA of the prototypic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, A/California/07/2009, protects mice against lethal virus challenge. The crystal structure of NA in complex with CD6 Fab reveals a unique epitope, where the heavy-chain complementarity determining regions (HCDRs) 1 and 2 bind one NA monomer, the light-chain CDR2 binds the neighbouring monomer, whereas HCDR3 interacts with both monomers. This 30-amino-acid epitope spans the lateral face of an NA dimer and is conserved among circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. These results suggest that the large, lateral CD6 epitope may be an effective target of antibodies selected for development as therapeutic agents against circulating H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:25668439

  4. The 340-cavity in neuraminidase provides new opportunities for influenza drug development: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Han, Nanyu; Mu, Yuguang; Miao, Huabiao; Yang, Yunjuan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Ding, Junmei; Xu, Bo; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-01-29

    Influenza neuraminidase (NA) is a pivotal target for viral infection control. However, the accumulating of mutations compromise the efficacy of NA inhibitors. Thus, it is critical to design new drugs targeted to different motifs of NA. Recently, a new motif called 340-cavity was discovered in NA subtypes close to the calcium binding site. The presence of calcium is known to influence NA activity and thermostability. Therefore, the 340-cavity is a putative ligand-binding site for affecting the normal function of NA. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of different NA subtypes to explore the mechanism of 340-loop formation. Ligand-binding site prediction and fragment library screening were also carried out to provide evidence for the 340-cavity as a druggable pocket. We found that residues G342 and P/R344 in the 340-loop determine the size of the 340-cavity, and the calcium ion plays an important role in maintaining the conformation of the 340-loop through contacts with G345 and Q347. In addition, the 340-cavity is predicted to be a ligand-binding site by metaPocket, and a sequence analysis method is proposed to predict the existence of the 340-cavity. Our study shows that the 340-cavity is not an occasional or atypical domain in NA subtypes, and it has potential to function as a new hotspot for influenza drug binding. PMID:26768362

  5. Binding mechanism of H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase with ligands and its implication for drug design.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Li, Lin; Wang, Jing-Fang; Cheng, Feng; Wei, Dong-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-05-01

    To simulate new strategies for designing effective drugs against bird flu, we have carried out extensive studies by using various computer-aided drug design tools. Molecule AG7088 was first docked to the active site of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase (PBD code: 2HTY). The results thus obtained were compared with those by docking zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to the same receptor, respectively. It has been found that the compound AG7088 has better binding energy than zanamivir and oseltamivir. Thus, it was adopted as a template to perform the similarity search of 392,698 druggable compounds in order to find the leading candidates for the next step of modeling studies. Nine analogs of AG7088 were singled out through a series of docking studies. Finally, the molecular dynamics simulation technique was utilized to investigate into the binding interactions between the H5N1 receptor and the nine analogs, with a focus on the binding pocket, intermolecular surfaces and hydrogen bonds. This study may be used as a guide for mutagenesis studies for designing new inhibitors against H5N1. PMID:19442214

  6. The role of antigenically different virus neuraminidases as structures implicated in receptor-binding processes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, M V; Luiz, M O; Cabral, M C; Couceiro, J N

    1995-06-01

    Influenza A viruses exhibit segmented nucleic acid coding for eight different proteins, two of them as glycoproteins exposed on their lipoprotein envelopes, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Hemagglutinin exhibits receptor-binding activity while neuraminidase develops sialidase cleavage activity which acts on cell receptors. Influenza A strains responsible for human, avian, equine and porcine respiratory infections all over the world present antigenically different hemagglutinin (H1 to H14) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) structures on their surface. The objective of the present investigation was to study the role of N2, N8, and N9, antigenically diverse neuraminidase structures of human (N2) and animal (N8 and N9) influenza viruses, in the receptor-binding process. Receptor-binding activity of N2 and N8 was analyzed by crossed tests using H3N2 and H3N8 antisera and the hemagglutination inhibition test as a model. Hemagglutinating activity of antigenically different N2 and N8 structures was demonstrable and was inhibited by homologous antisera (N2-H3N2, N8-H3N8) but not by heterologous antisera (N2-H3N8,N8-H3N2). This previously demonstrated N9 hemagglutinating activity was analyzed for receptor-binding specificity using hemagglutination tests and NeuAc alpha2,3Gal and NeuAc alpha2,6Gal derivatized erythrocytes. This highly purified N9 strain was obtained from a virus strain isolated from terns by Dr. Peter Colman (CSIRO Division of Biomolecular Engineering, Parkville, Victoria, Australia). It exhibited receptor-binding specificity for NeuAc alpha2,3Gal sequences, a property similar to that observed in hemagglutinins from avian strains. These results indicate the importance of antigenically different neuraminidase structures as alternative agents for developing receptor-binding activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8547843

  7. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable “hotspots” on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  8. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Influenza Neuraminidase Suggest a Mechanism for the Increased Virulence of Stalk-Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Jacob D; Bush, Robin M; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-08-25

    Deletions in the stalk of the influenza neuraminidase (NA) surface protein are associated with increased virulence, but the mechanisms responsible for this enhanced virulence are unclear. Here we use microsecond molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of stalk deletion on enzymatic activity, contrasting NA proteins from the A/swine/Shandong/N1/2009 strain both with and without a stalk deletion. By modeling and simulating neuraminidase apo glycoproteins embedded in complex-mixture lipid bilayers, we show that the geometry and dynamics of the neuraminidase enzymatic pocket may differ depending on stalk length, with possible repercussions on the binding of the endogenous sialylated-oligosaccharide receptors. We also use these simulations to predict previously unrecognized druggable "hotspots" on the neuraminidase surface that may prove useful for future efforts aimed at structure-based drug design. PMID:27141956

  9. Production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa neuraminidase is increased under hyperosmolar conditions and is regulated by genes involved in alginate expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, G; Kays, M; Saiman, L; Prince, A

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex process attributed to specific characteristics of both the host and the infecting organism. In this study, the properties of the PAO1 neuraminidase were examined to determine its potential role in facilitating Pseudomonas colonization of the respiratory epithelium. The PAO1 neuraminidase was 1000-fold more active than the Clostridium perfringens enzyme in releasing sialic acid from respiratory epithelial cells. This effect correlated with increased adherence of PAO1 to epithelial cells after exposure to PAO1 neuraminidase and was consistent with in vitro studies demonstrating Pseudomonas adherence to asialoganglioside receptors. The regulation of the neuraminidase gene nanA was examined in Pseudomonas and as cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. In hyperosmolar conditions neuraminidase expression was increased by 50% (P less than 0.0004), an effect which was OmpR dependent in E. coli. In Pseudomonas the osmotic regulation of neuraminidase production was dependent upon algR1 and algR2, genes involved in the transcriptional activation of algD, which is responsible for the mucoid phenotype of Pseudomonas and pathognomonic for chronic infection in CF. Under the hyperosmolar conditions postulated to exist in the CF lung, nanA is likely to be expressed to facilitate the initial adherence of Pseudomonas to the respiratory tract. Images PMID:1601994

  10. Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza Neuraminidases via Generalized Born Molecular Dynamics and End-Point Free Energy Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Rommie E; Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Xu, Dong; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The comparative dynamics and inhibitor binding free energies of group-1 and group-2 pathogenic influenza A subtype neuraminidase (NA) enzymes are of fundamental biological interest and relevant to structure-based drug design studies for antiviral compounds. In this work, we present seven generalized Born molecular dynamics simulations of avian (N1)- and human (N9)-type NAs in order to probe the comparative flexibility of the two subtypes, both with and without the inhibitor oseltamivir bound. The enhanced sampling obtained through the implicit solvent treatment suggests several provocative insights into the dynamics of the two subtypes, including that the group-2 enzymes may exhibit similar motion in the 430-binding site regions but different 150-loop motion. End-point free energy calculations elucidate the contributions to inhibitor binding free energies and suggest that entropic considerations cannot be neglected when comparing across the subtypes. We anticipate the findings presented here will have broad implications for the development of novel antiviral compounds against both seasonal and pandemic influenza strains.

  11. Antiviral activity of baicalin against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus in cell culture and in mice and its inhibition of neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Dou, Jie; Teng, Zaijin; Yu, Jie; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Na; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Changlin

    2014-12-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a Chinese herbal decoction, has been used for the treatment of the common cold, fever and influenza virus infections. In previous studies, we found that oral administration of baicalein resulted in the inhibition of influenza A virus replication in vivo, which was linked to baicalin in serum. However, the effective dose and underlying mechanisms of the efficacy of baicalin against influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the antiviral effects of baicalin in influenza-virus-infected MDCK cells and mice were examined. The neuraminidase inhibition assay was performed to investigate the mechanism of action of baicalin. In vitro results showed that baicalin exhibited a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 43.3 μg/ml against the influenza A/FM1/1/47 (H1N1) virus and 104.9 μg/ml against the influenza A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) virus. When added to MDCK cell cultures after inoculation with influenza virus, baicalin demonstrated obvious antiviral activity that increased in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that baicalin affected virus budding. Baicalin had clear inhibitory effects against neuraminidases, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 52.3 μg/ml against the influenza A/FM1/1/47 (H1N1) virus and 85.8 μg/ml against the influenza A/Beijing/32/92 (H3N2) virus. In vivo studies showed that an intravenous injection of baicalin effectively reduced the death rate, prolonged the mean day to death (MDD) and improved the lung parameters of mice infected with influenza A virus. These results demonstrate that baicalin acts as a neuraminidase inhibitor, with clear inhibitory activities that are effective against different strains of influenza A virus in both cell culture and a mouse model, and that baicalin has potential utility in the management of influenza virus infections. PMID:25078390

  12. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Ping; Leser, George P.; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high {alpha}-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  13. Abrogation of Neuraminidase Reduces Biofilm Formation, Capsule Biosynthesis, and Virulence of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Kurniyati; Hu, Bo; Bian, Jiang; Sun, Jianlan; Zhang, Weiyan; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yaping

    2012-01-01

    The oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key etiological agent of human periodontitis, a prevalent chronic disease that affects up to 80% of the adult population worldwide. P. gingivalis exhibits neuraminidase activity. However, the enzyme responsible for this activity, its biochemical features, and its role in the physiology and virulence of P. gingivalis remain elusive. In this report, we found that P. gingivalis encodes a neuraminidase, PG0352 (SiaPg). Transcriptional analysis showed that PG0352 is monocistronic and is regulated by a sigma70-like promoter. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that SiaPg is an exo-α-neuraminidase that cleaves glycosidic-linked sialic acids. Cryoelectron microscopy and tomography analyses revealed that the PG0352 deletion mutant (ΔPG352) failed to produce an intact capsule layer. Compared to the wild type, in vitro studies showed that ΔPG352 formed less biofilm and was less resistant to killing by the host complement. In vivo studies showed that while the wild type caused a spreading type of infection that affected multiple organs and all infected mice were killed, ΔPG352 only caused localized infection and all animals survived. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SiaPg is an important virulence factor that contributes to the biofilm formation, capsule biosynthesis, and pathogenicity of P. gingivalis, and it can potentially serve as a new target for developing therapeutic agents against P. gingivalis infection. PMID:22025518

  14. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  15. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  16. Single-Domain Antibodies Targeting Neuraminidase Protect against an H5N1 Influenza Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Francisco Miguel; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; De Baets, Sarah; Smet, Anouk; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Descamps, Francis J.; Fiers, Walter; Muyldermans, Serge

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is an interesting target of small-molecule antiviral drugs. We isolated a set of H5N1 NA-specific single-domain antibodies (N1-VHHm) and evaluated their in vitro and in vivo antiviral potential. Two of them inhibited the NA activity and in vitro replication of clade 1 and 2 H5N1 viruses. We then generated bivalent derivatives of N1-VHHm by two methods. First, we made N1-VHHb by genetically joining two N1-VHHm moieties with a flexible linker. Second, bivalent N1-VHH-Fc proteins were obtained by genetic fusion of the N1-VHHm moiety with the crystallizable region of mouse IgG2a (Fc). The in vitro antiviral potency against H5N1 of both bivalent N1-VHHb formats was 30- to 240-fold higher than that of their monovalent counterparts, with 50% inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, single-dose prophylactic treatment with bivalent N1-VHHb or N1-VHH-Fc protected BALB/c mice against a lethal challenge with H5N1 virus, including an oseltamivir-resistant H5N1 variant. Surprisingly, an N1-VHH-Fc fusion without in vitro NA-inhibitory or antiviral activity also protected mice against an H5N1 challenge. Virus escape selection experiments indicated that one amino acid residue close to the catalytic site is required for N1-VHHm binding. We conclude that single-domain antibodies directed against influenza virus NA protect against H5N1 virus infection, and when engineered with a conventional Fc domain, they can do so in the absence of detectable NA-inhibitory activity. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses are a zoonotic threat. Outbreaks of avian influenza caused by these viruses occur in many parts of the world and are associated with tremendous economic loss, and these viruses can cause very severe disease in humans. In such cases, small-molecule inhibitors of the viral NA are among the few treatment options for patients. However, treatment with such drugs often results in the emergence of resistant viruses

  17. Epistatic interactions between neuraminidase mutations facilitated the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Susu; Govorkova, Elena A.; Bahl, Justin; Zaraket, Hassan; Baranovich, Tatiana; Seiler, Patrick; Prevost, Kristi; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y neuraminidase mutation predominated worldwide during the 2007–2009 seasons. While several neuraminidase substitutions were found to be necessary to counteract the adverse effects of H275Y, the order and impact of evolutionary events involved remain elusive. Here, we reconstruct H1N1 neuraminidase phylogeny during 1999–2009, estimate the timing and order of crucial amino acid changes, and evaluate their impact on the biological outcome of the H275Y mutation. Of the twelve neuraminidase substitutions that occurred during 1999–2009, five (chronologically, V234M, R222Q, K329E, D344N, H275Y, and D354G) are necessary for maintaining full neuraminidase function in the presence of the H275Y mutation by altering protein accumulation or enzyme affinity/activity. The sequential emergence and cumulative effects of these mutations clearly illustrate a role for epistasis in shaping the emergence and subsequent evolution of a drug-resistant virus population, which can be useful in understanding emergence of novel viral phenotypes of influenza. PMID:25297528

  18. Isolation of a biologically active soluble form of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Sendai virus.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Laver, W G; Murti, K G; Portner, A

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in establishing the three-dimensional structure of the Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), we have isolated and characterized a potentially crystallizable form of the molecule. The sequence of HN, a surface glycoprotein, predicts a protein with an uncharged hydrophobic region near the amino terminus which is responsible for anchorage in the viral envelope. To avoid rosette formation (aggregation), which would preclude crystallization, this hydrophobic tail was removed from a membrane-free form of HN by proteolytic digestion. This digestion resulted in a single product with a molecular weight of about 10,000 less than native HN. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of cleaved HN (C-HN) indicated a single cleavage site at amino acid residue 131, resulting in a product consisting of the carboxyl-terminal 444 amino acids of HN. Functional analyses revealed that C-HN retained full neuraminidase activity and was able to bind erythrocytes, indicating that the N-terminal 131 residues were not necessary for these biological activities. Furthermore, this cleavage product retained the antigenic structure of intact HN, since monoclonal antibodies still bound to C-HN in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western (immuno-) blot analysis. Viewed by electron microscopy, the dimeric and tetrameric forms of intact HN form rosettes while C-HN maintains the oligomeric structure but no longer aggregates. Furthermore, the electron micrographs revealed a C-HN tetramer strikingly similar to the influenza virus neuraminidase in both size and gross structural features. Images PMID:2846877

  19. Immunobiological properties of influenza A (H7N9) hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Changsom, Don; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Masamae, Wanibtisam; Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses harboring the complete hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) genes from the influenza A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus were constructed (rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses). The HA and NA proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of thymidine-kinase-negative (TK(-)) cells infected with these recombinant viruses. Only one form of the HA protein was expressed in infected TK(-) cells, with a molecular weight (MW) of 75 kDa, but three forms were found when the culture medium was supplemented with trypsin (MWs of 75, 50 and 27 kDa), which was similar to what was found in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with reverse genetic (rg) influenza viruses carrying HA genes of H7N9 virus origin. One form of hyperglycosylated NA protein with a MW of 75 kDa was produced in rVac-N9-NA-virus-infected TK(-) or MDCK cells. The MW decreased to 55 kDa after deglycosylation. The hyperglycosylated recombinant NA protein demonstrated sialidase activity in a fetuin-based neuraminidase assay. The rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses elicited significantly higher anti-HA and anti-NA antibody titers in BALB/c mice that were immunized once than in ICR mice. The anti-HA and anti-NA antibodies showed activity against homosubtypic HA or NA, but not against heterosubtypic HA or NA, as determined by hemagglutination-inhibition and microneutralization assays for anti-HA antibodies and neuraminidase-inhibition and replication-inhibition assays for anti-NA antibodies. Taken together, our data demonstrated immunobiological properties of recombinant HA and NA proteins that might be useful for vaccine development. PMID:27406044

  20. Thermal Inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus I. Coupled Inactivation Rates of Hemagglutinating and Neuraminidase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, John S.; Haywood, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal stability of Newcastle disease virus has been characterized in terms of the rate constants for inactivation of hemagglutinating activity (HA), neuraminidase activity (NA), and infectivity. Inactivation of HA results in the concomitant loss of NA. Infectivity, however, is much more thermolabile. Disintegration of the virus particle is not responsible for the identical rate constants for inactivation of HA and NA, nor is their parallel inactivation uncoupled in envelope fragments produced by pretreating the virus with phospholipase-C. The data indicate that a common envelope factor(s) can influence the thermal stability of both activities. PMID:4734647

  1. Flavonol dimers from callus cultures of Dysosma versipellis and their in vitro neuraminidase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ridao; Duan, Ruigang; Wei, Yannan; Zou, Jianhua; Li, Junwei; Liu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Ying; Li, Qiuhong; Dai, Jungui

    2015-12-01

    A chemical investigation of callus cultures of Dysosma versipellis led to the isolation of five new flavonol dimers, dysoverines A-E (1-5), together with 12 known compounds (6-17). The structures of new compounds were determined by the extensive spectroscopic data analyses. The biosynthetic pathway of the new compounds was proposed to involve O-methylation, prenylation, and Diels-Alder cycloaddition, which successively occurred in cultured plant cells. Compounds 1-17 exhibited in vitro neuraminidase inhibitory activities with the IC50 values of 31.0-93.9μM. PMID:26481138

  2. Truncation and Sequence Shuffling of Segment 6 Generate Replication-Competent Neuraminidase-Negative Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, Donata; Röhrs, Susanne; Höper, Dirk; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bogs, Jessica; Stech, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses are highly genetically variable and escape from immunogenic pressure by antigenic changes in their surface proteins, referred to as “antigenic drift” and “antigenic shift.” To assess the potential genetic plasticity under strong selection pressure, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 was passaged 50 times in embryonated chicken eggs in the presence of a neutralizing, polyclonal chicken serum. The resulting mutant acquired major alterations in the neuraminidase (NA)-encoding segment. Extensive deletions and rearrangements were detected, in contrast to only 12 amino acid substitutions within all other segments. Interestingly, this new neuraminidase segment resulted from complex sequence shuffling and insertion of a short fragment originating from the PA segment. Characterization of that novel variant revealed a loss of the neuraminidase protein and enzymatic activity, but its replication efficiency remained comparable to that of the wild type. Using reverse genetics, a recombinant virus consisting of the wild-type backbone and the shortened NA segment could be generated; however, generation of this recombinant virus required the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. Two independent repetitions starting with egg passage 30 in the presence of alternative chicken-derived immune sera selected mutants with similar but different large deletions within the NA segment without any neuraminidase activity, indicating a general mechanism. In chicken, these virus variants were avirulent, even though the HPAIV polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site was still present. Overall, the variants reported here are the first HPAIV H5N1 strains without a functional neuraminidase shown to grow efficiently without any helper factor. These novel HPAIV variants may facilitate future studies shedding light on the role of neuraminidase in virus replication and pathogenicity. PMID:24109212

  3. Changes in the Length of the Neuraminidase Stalk Region Impact H7N9 Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haixia; Chen, Quanjiao; Wu, Yan; Fu, Lifeng; Quan, Chuansong; Wong, Gary; Liu, Jun; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The neuraminidase stalk of the newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus possesses a 5-amino-acid deletion. This study focuses on characterizing the biological functions of H7N9 with varied neuraminidase stalk lengths. Results indicate that the 5-amino-acid deletion had no impact on virus infectivity or replication in vitro or in vivo compared to that of a virus with a full-length stalk, but enhanced virulence in mice was observed for H7N9 encoding a 19- to 20-amino-acid deletion, suggesting that N9 stalk length impacts virulence in mammals, as N1 stalk length does. PMID:26656694

  4. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors.

  5. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27125351

  6. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  7. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and re...

  8. Theoretical studies on the susceptibility of oseltamivir against variants of 2009 A/H1N1 influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Youyong; Zhang, Liling; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-10-22

    The outbreak and high speed global spread of the new strain of influenza A/H1N1 virus in 2009 posed a serious threat to global health. It is more likely that drug-resistant influenza strains will arise after the extensive use of anti-influenza drugs. Consequently, the identification of the potential resistant sites for drugs in advance and the understanding of the corresponding molecular mechanisms that cause drug resistance are quite important in the design of new drug candidates with better potency to combat drug resistance. Here, we performed molecular simulations to evaluate the potency of oseltamivir to combat drug resistance caused by the mutations in 2009 A/H1N1 neuraminidase (NA). We examined three representative drug-resistant mutations in NA, consisting of H274Y, N294S, and Y252H. First, a theoretical structure of A/H1N1 NA in complex with oseltamivir was constructed using homology modeling. Then, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition were used to characterize the binding of oseltamivir with the wild type (WT) and three mutated NAs. Our predictions show that N294S and H274Y, two popular drug-resistant mutations in different variants of NA, still cause significant resistance to oseltamivir. However, the Y252H mutation does not impair the interactions between oseltamivir and A/H1N1 NA. An examination of individual energy components shows that the loss of polar interactions is the key source for the resistance of the studied mutations to oseltamivir. Moreover, free energy decomposition analysis and structural analysis reveal that the N294S or H274Y mutation triggers the large-scale conformational changes of the binding pocket and then impairs the affinity of oseltamivir. We expect that our results will be useful for the rational design of NA inhibitors with high potency against drug-resistant A/H1N1 mutants. PMID:22998323

  9. Oseltamivir Resistance in Influenza A(H6N2) Caused by an R292K Substitution in Neuraminidase Is Not Maintained in Mallards without Drug Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Mårdnäs, Andreas; Söderström, Hanna; Fedorova, Ganna; Löwenthal, Max; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild waterfowl is the natural reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV); hosted viruses are very variable and provide a source for genetic segments which can reassort with poultry or mammalian adapted IAVs to generate novel species crossing viruses. Additionally, wild waterfowl act as a reservoir for highly pathogenic IAVs. Exposure of wild birds to the antiviral drug oseltamivir may occur in the environment as its active metabolite can be released from sewage treatment plants to river water. Resistance to oseltamivir, or to other neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), in IAVs of wild waterfowl has not been extensively studied. Aim and Methods In a previous in vivo Mallard experiment, an influenza A(H6N2) virus developed oseltamivir resistance by the R292K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA), when the birds were exposed to oseltamivir. In this study we tested if the resistance could be maintained in Mallards without drug exposure. Three variants of resistant H6N2/R292K virus were each propagated during 17 days in five successive pairs of naïve Mallards, while oseltamivir exposure was decreased and removed. Daily fecal samples were analyzed for viral presence, genotype and phenotype. Results and Conclusion Within three days without drug exposure no resistant viruses could be detected by NA sequencing, which was confirmed by functional NAI sensitivity testing. We conclude that this resistant N2 virus could not compete in fitness with wild type subpopulations without oseltamivir drug pressure, and thus has no potential to circulate among wild birds. The results of this study contrast to previous observations of drug induced resistance in an avian H1N1 virus, which was maintained also without drug exposure in Mallards. Experimental observations on persistence of NAI resistance in avian IAVs resemble NAI resistance seen in human IAVs, in which resistant N2 subtypes do not circulate, while N1 subtypes with permissive mutations can circulate without drug pressure. We

  10. Hemagglutination and the closest distance of approach of normal, neuraminidase- and papain-treated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J; Absolom, D R

    1984-01-01

    By means of potential energy versus distance diagrams, derived from electrophoretic and surface tension data, the minimum distances of approach of normal (NOR) and of neuraminidase-treated (NEU) and papain-treated (PAP) human erythrocytes could be determined. The minimum distances between the actual cell membranes of two opposing red cells are: 184 A (NOR), 111 A (NEU), and 113 A (PAP), which agrees well with the fact that anti-D (Rho) antibodies of the IgG-class (which have a maximum distance of approximately 120 A between the two antibody-active sites) can hemagglutinate NEU and PAP cells, but are incapable of hemagglutinating normal D (Rho)-positive erythrocytes. PMID:6431697

  11. Localization of a new neutralizing epitope on the mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Fischer, S; Sedlmeier, R; Valassina, M; Valensin, P E; Donati, M; Neubert, W J

    2001-04-01

    Four protein fragments which span the entire hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein (HN) of mumps virus were expressed in HeLa cells and cell extracts were tested for their capability to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. Fragment HN3 (aa 213-372) was able to induce the production of hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing antibodies. When a subfragment of HN3, the synthetic peptide NSTLGVKSAREF (aa 329-340 of HN) was used for immunization, hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing antibodies against mumps wild type virus but not against the Urabe Am9 vaccine virus were raised. The peptide could, therefore, contain a new epitope, which may be critical for protective host humoral immune response. PMID:11226581

  12. ZstatFlu-II test: a chemiluminescent neuraminidase assay for influenza viral diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Pence, Lisa M; Appleman, James R; Shimasaki, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    The ZstatFlu-II test is a highly sensitive, specific, rapid, point-of-care chemiluminescent diagnostic test for influenza infection. Influenza viral neuraminidase-specific substrate, spiroadamantyl-1,2-dioxetane-4,7-dimethoxy-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, is at the core of the ZstatFlu-II Test. The enzymatic reaction was carried out at 25 degrees C and neutral pH, representing the optimum assay conditions for influenza types A and B viral neuraminidases. The results were outputted on a Polaroid trade mark High Speed Detector Film. Positive results appeared as a '+'-shaped white film image; negative results produced no image. The 'glow' kinetics, facilitated by a unique combination of light enhancers, also 'tuned' the wavelength of emission to match the spectral properties of the film. The substrate hydrolysed non-enzymatically at acid pH or at temperatures above 25 degrees C. In order to minimize false positives, the ZstatFlu-II Test was formatted with 0.3-0.4 K(m) substrate and freezing the test kit until use. The pH optimization of the ZstatFlu-II test is discussed with reference to model compounds of sialyl-glycosides. A nucleophilic attack or an electrostatic stabilization of a developing carbonium ion under the influence of the adjacent carboxyl group was probably responsible for non-enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate. Intramolecular general acid catalysis is proposed as a mechanism for the lability of the O-glycosidic linkage of the substrate. PMID:12701088

  13. Effects of pronase and neuraminidase treatment on a myelin-associated glycoprotein in developing brain.

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, R H

    1976-01-01

    Rats (14 days old) were injected with [14c]fucose and young adult rats with [3H]fucose in order to label the myelin-associated glycoproteins. As previously reported, the major [14C]fucose-labelled glycoprotein in the immature myelin had a higher apparent molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels that the [3H]fucose-labelled glycoprotein in mature myelin. This predominant doubly labelled glycoprotein component was partially purified by preparative gel electrophoresis and converted to glycopeptides by extensive Pronase digestion. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 separated the glycopeptides into several clases, which were designted A,B, C AND D, from high to low molecular weight. The 14C-labelled glycopeptides from immature myeline were enriched in the highest-molecular-weight class A relative to the 3H-labelled glycopeptides from mature myelin. Neuraminidase treatment of the glycoprotein before Pronase digestion greatly decreased the proportion of glycopeptides fractionating in the higher-molecular-weight classes and largely eliminated the developmental differences that were apparent by gel filtration. However, neuraminidase treatment did not decrease the magnitude of the developmental difference revealed by electrophoresing the intact glycoprotein on sodium dodecyl sulphate gels, although it did decrease the apparent molecular weight of the glycoprotein from both the 15-day-old and adult rats by an amount comparable in magnitude to that developmental difference. The results from gel filtration of glycopeptides indicate that there is a higher content of large molecular weight, sialic acid-rich oligosaccharide units in the glycoprotein of immature myelin. However, the higher apparent molecular weight for the glycoprotein from 15-day-old rats on sodium dodcyl sulphate gels is not due primarily to its higher sialic acid content. PMID:942396

  14. Cross-Reactive Neuraminidase-Inhibiting Antibodies Elicited by Immunization with Recombinant Neuraminidase Proteins of H5N1 and Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Chia-Ying; Tsou, Yung-Ta; Jan, Jia-Tsrong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuraminidase (NA), an influenza virus envelope glycoprotein, removes sialic acid from receptors for virus release from infected cells. For this study, we used a baculovirus-insect cell expression system to construct and purify recombinant NA (rNA) proteins of H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) and pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) (A/Texas/05/2009) influenza viruses. BALB/c mice immunized with these proteins had high titers of NA-specific IgG and NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies against H5N1, pH1N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. H5N1 rNA immunization resulted in higher quantities of NA-specific antibody-secreting B cells against H5N1 and heterologous pH1N1 viruses in the spleen. H5N1 rNA and pH1N1 rNA immunizations both provided complete protection against homologous virus challenges, with H5N1 rNA immunization providing better protection against pH1N1 virus challenges. Cross-reactive NI antibodies were further dissected via pH1N1 rNA protein immunizations with I149V (NA with a change of Ile to Val at position 149), N344Y, and I365T/S366N NA mutations. The I365T/S366N mutation of pH1N1 rNA enhanced cross-reactive NI antibodies against H5N1, H3N2, and H7N9 viruses. It is our hope that these findings provide useful information for the development of an NA-based universal influenza vaccine. IMPORTANCE Neuraminidase (NA) is an influenza virus enzymatic protein that cleaves sialic acid linkages on infected cell surfaces, thus facilitating viral release and contributing to viral transmission and mucus infection. In currently available inactivated or live, attenuated influenza vaccines based on the antigenic content of hemagglutinin proteins, vaccine efficacy can be contributed partly through NA-elicited immune responses. We investigated the NA immunity of different recombinant NA (rNA) proteins associated with pH1N1 and H5N1 viruses. Our results indicate that H5N1 rNA immunization induced more potent cross-protective immunity than pH1N1 rNA immunization, and three mutated residues, I149V

  15. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  16. Influenza A(H7N9) virus acquires resistance-related neuraminidase I222T substitution when infected mallards are exposed to low levels of oseltamivir in water.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  17. Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Acquires Resistance-Related Neuraminidase I222T Substitution When Infected Mallards Are Exposed to Low Levels of Oseltamivir in Water

    PubMed Central

    Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  18. Influenza Neuraminidase Subtype N1: Immunobiological Properties and Functional Assays for Specific Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Changsom, Don; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Siridechadilok, Bunpote; Prasertsopon, Jarunee; Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Masamae, Wanibtisam; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2016-01-01

    Influenza neuraminidase (NA) proteins expressed in TK− cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus carrying NA gene of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus or 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus were characterized for their biological properties, i.e., cell localization, molecular weight (MW), glycosylation and sialidase activity. Immune sera collected from BALB/c mice immunized with these recombinant viruses were assayed for binding and functional activities of anti-NA antibodies. Recombinant NA proteins were found localized in cytoplasm and cytoplasmic membrane of the infected cells. H1N1pdm NA protein had MW at about 75 kDa while it was 55 kDa for H5N1 NA protein. Hyperglycosylation was more pronounced in H1N1pdm NA compared to H5N1 NA according to N-glycosidase F treatment. Three dimensional structures also predicted that H1N1 NA globular head contained 4 and that of H5N1 contained 2 potential glycosylation sites. H5N1 NA protein had higher sialidase activity than H1N1pdm NA protein as measured by both MUNANA-based assay and fetuin-based enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). Plaque reduction assay demonstrated that anti-NA antibody could reduce number of plaques and plaque size through inhibiting virus release, not virus entry. Assay for neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibody by ELLA showed specific and cross reactivity between H5N1 NA and H1N1pdm NA protein derived from reverse genetic viruses or wild type viruses. In contrast, replication-inhibition assay in MDCK cells showed that anti-H1N1 NA antibody moderately inhibited viruses with homologous NA gene only, while anti-H5N1 NA antibody modestly inhibited the replication of viruses containing homologous NA gene and NA gene derived from H1N1pdm virus. Anti-H1N1 NA antibody showed higher titers of inhibiting virus replication than anti-H5N1 NA antibody, which are consistent with the results on reduction in plaque numbers and sizes as well as in inhibiting NA enzymatic activity. No assay showed cross

  19. Biological and Protective Properties of Immune Sera Directed to the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Halbherr, Stefan J.; Ludersdorfer, Thomas H.; Ricklin, Meret; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Summerfield, Artur

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope of influenza A viruses contains two large antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Conventional influenza virus vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies that are predominantly directed to the HA globular head, a domain that is subject to extensive antigenic drift. Antibodies directed to NA are induced at much lower levels, probably as a consequence of the immunodominance of the HA antigen. Although antibodies to NA may affect virus release by inhibiting the sialidase function of the glycoprotein, the antigen has been largely neglected in past vaccine design. In this study, we characterized the protective properties of monospecific immune sera that were generated by vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles encoding NA. These immune sera inhibited hemagglutination in an NA subtype-specific and HA subtype-independent manner and interfered with infection of MDCK cells. In addition, they inhibited the sialidase activities of various influenza viruses of the same and even different NA subtypes. With this, the anti-NA immune sera inhibited the spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus and HA/NA-pseudotyped viruses in MDCK cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When chickens were immunized with NA recombinant replicon particles and subsequently infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza virus, inflammatory serum markers were significantly reduced and virus shedding was limited or eliminated. These findings suggest that NA antibodies can inhibit virus dissemination by interfering with both virus attachment and egress. Our results underline the potential of high-quality NA antibodies for controlling influenza virus replication and place emphasis on NA as a vaccine antigen. IMPORTANCE The neuraminidase of influenza A viruses is a sialidase that acts as a receptor-destroying enzyme facilitating the release of progeny virus from infected cells. Here, we demonstrate that monospecific anti-NA immune sera inhibited not

  20. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells. PMID:26918060

  1. Role of Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase in the function of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Galen, J E; Ketley, J M; Fasano, A; Richardson, S H; Wasserman, S S; Kaper, J B

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NANase) is hypothesized to act synergistically with cholera toxin (CT) and increase the severity of a secretory response by increasing the binding and penetration of CT to enterocytes. To test this hypothesis, the NANase gene (nanH) from V. cholerae Ogawa 395 was first cloned and sequenced. Isogenic wild-type and NANase- V. cholerae 395 strains were then constructed by using suicide vector-mediated mutagenesis. The influence of NANase on CT binding and penetration was examined in vitro by using culture filtrates from these isogenic strains. Fluorescence due to binding of fluorescein-conjugated CT to C57BL/6 and C3H mouse fibroblasts exposed to NANase+ filtrates increased five- and eightfold, respectively, relative to that with NANase- filtrates. In addition, NANase+ filtrates increased the short-circuit current measured in Ussing chambers 65% relative to that with NANase- filtrates, although this difference decreased as production of CT increased. The role of NANase in V. cholerae pathogenesis was examined in vivo by intragastric inoculation of the isogenic strains into CD1 suckling mice. No difference in fluid accumulation ratios was seen at doses of 10(4) to 10(8) CFU, but NANase+ strains produced 18% higher fluid accumulation ratios at 10(9) CFU than NANase- strains when inoculated into nonfasted suckling mice. It is concluded that NANase plays a subtle but significant role in the binding and uptake of CT by susceptible cells under defined conditions. Images PMID:1730470

  2. Triplet entropy analysis of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase sequences measures influenza virus phylodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Günther J L; Takeda, Agnes A S; Andrighetti, Tahila; Sartor, Ivaine T S; Echeverrigaray, Sergio L; de Avila E Silva, Scheila; Dos Santos, Laurita; Rybarczyk-Filho, José L

    2013-10-10

    The influenza virus has been a challenge to science due to its ability to withstand new environmental conditions. Taking into account the development of virus sequence databases, computational approaches can be helpful to understand virus behavior over time. Furthermore, they can suggest new directions to deal with influenza. This work presents triplet entropy analysis as a potential phylodynamic tool to quantify nucleotide organization of viral sequences. The application of this measure to segments of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1 and H3N2 virus subtypes has shown some variability effects along timeline, inferring about virus evolution. Sequences were divided by year and compared for virus subtype (H1N1 and H3N2). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison between groups. Results show that differentiation in entropy precedes differentiation in GC content for both groups. Considering the HA fragment, both triplet entropy as well as GC concentration show intersection in 2009, year of the recent pandemic. Some conclusions about possible flu evolutionary lines were drawn. PMID:23850726

  3. Structural Characterization of the 1918 Influenza H1N1 Neuraminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Zhu, X.; Dwek, R.A.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) plays a crucial role in facilitating the spread of newly synthesized virus in the host and is an important target for controlling disease progression. The NA crystal structure from the 1918 'Spanish flu' (A/Brevig Mission/1/18 H1N1) and that of its complex with zanamivir (Relenza) at 1.65-{angstrom} and 1.45-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively, corroborated the successful expression of correctly folded NA tetramers in a baculovirus expression system. An additional cavity adjacent to the substrate-binding site is observed in N1, compared to N2 and N9 NAs, including H5N1. This cavity arises from an open conformation of the 150 loop (Gly147 to Asp151) and appears to be conserved among group 1 NAs (N1, N4, N5, and N8). It closes upon zanamivir binding. Three calcium sites were identified, including a novel site that may be conserved in N1 and N4. Thus, these high-resolution structures, combined with our recombinant expression system, provide new opportunities to augment the limited arsenal of therapeutics against influenza.

  4. The serologic behaviour of neuraminidase-treated lymphoid cells: alloantigenicity and complement sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, P. K.; Gewurz, H.; Simmons, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (VCN) renders mouse lymphoid cells highly susceptible to the cytolytic effects of alloantibody and complement (C). This increased susceptibility to lysis is not due to unmasking of alloantigens since no increase in alloantibody-binding capacity of VCN-treated cells could be detected. However, VCN-treated cells can be lysed by normal rabbit serum, human serum, and guinea-pig serum even if specific antibody is not added to the incubation mixture. VCN, therefore, while not unmasking strong H-2 histocompatibility antigens, may be capable of unmasking other antigens with which heterologous sera can react. The increased susceptibility to immune cytolysis of VCN-treated cells appears to be related, at least partially, to its extreme susceptibility to C. Complement inactivation by heat totally abrogated the lytic effect, as did C inactivation by ammonium hydroxide, viscarin, and zymosan. In addition, activation of the autologous serum C within the fluid phase by cobra venom factor produced cytolysis only in VCN-treated cells. Thus, VCN renders nucleated cells highly susceptible to lysis by C. PMID:5042921

  5. Variable ligand- and receptor-binding hot spots in key strains of influenza neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Votapka, Lane; Demir, Özlem; Swift, Robert V; Walker, Ross C; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A continues to be a major public health concern due to its ability to cause epidemic and pandemic disease outbreaks in humans. Computational investigations of structural dynamics of the major influenza glycoproteins, especially the neuraminidase (NA) enzyme, are able to provide key insights beyond what is currently accessible with standard experimental techniques. In particular, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the varying degrees of flexibility for such enzymes. Here we present an analysis of the relative flexibility of the ligand- and receptor-binding area of three key strains of influenza A: highly pathogenic H5N1, the 2009 pandemic H1N1, and a human N2 strain. Through computational solvent mapping, we investigate the various ligand- and receptor-binding “hot spots” that exist on the surface of NA which interacts with both sialic acid receptors on the host cells and antiviral drugs. This analysis suggests that the variable cavities found in the different strains and their corresponding capacities to bind ligand functional groups may play an important role in the ability of NA to form competent reaction encounter complexes with other species of interest, including antiviral drugs, sialic acid receptors on the host cell surface, and the hemagglutinin protein. Such considerations may be especially useful for the prediction of how such complexes form and with what binding capacity. PMID:22872804

  6. Development of neuraminidase detection using gold nanoparticles boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wahyuni, Wulan T; Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Saepudin, Endang; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2016-03-15

    Gold nanoparticles-modified boron-doped diamond (AuNPs-BDD) electrodes, which were prepared with a self-assembly deposition of AuNPs at amine-terminated boron-doped diamond, were examined for voltammetric detection of neuraminidase (NA). The detection method was performed based on the difference of electrochemical responses of zanamivir at gold surface before and after the reaction with NA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 5.5). A linear calibration curve for zanamivir in 0.1 M PBS in the absence of NA was achieved in the concentration range of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-5) M (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated limit of detection (LOD) of 2.29 × 10(-6) M. Furthermore, using its reaction with 1.00 × 10(-5) M zanamivir, a linear calibration curve of NA can be obtained in the concentration range of 0-12 mU (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated LOD of 0.12 mU. High reproducibility was shown with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.14% (n = 30). These performances could be maintained when the detection was performed in mucin matrix. Comparison performed using gold-modified BDD (Au-BDD) electrodes suggested that the good performance of the detection method is due to the stability of the gold particles position at the BDD surface. PMID:26717895

  7. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M; N Reinhold, Vernon

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and (3)H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. PMID:27012207

  8. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  9. Antigenic validation of recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Khulape, S A; Maity, H K; Pathak, D C; Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, S

    2015-09-01

    The outer membrane glycoprotein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is important for virus infection and subsequent immune response by host, and offers target for development of recombinant antigen-based immunoassays and subunit vaccines. In this study, the expression of HN protein of NDV is attempted in yeast expression system. Yeast offers eukaryotic environment for protein processing and posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, in addition to higher growth rate and easy genetic manipulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be better expression system for HN protein than Pichia pastoris as determined by codon usage analysis. The complete coding  sequence of HN gene was amplified with the histidine tag, cloned in pESC-URA under GAL10 promotor and transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant HN (rHN) protein was characterized by western blot, showing glycosylation heterogeneity as observed with other eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity column purification. The protein could be further used as subunit vaccine. PMID:26435147

  10. Optimization and comparative characterization of neuraminidase activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Klebsiella pneumoniae, Hep-2 cell, sheep kidney and rat liver lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaei, C; Ahmadi, M; Hosseini Jazani, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The properties of neuraminidase produced by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 during growth in a defined medium (BHI) was examined and compared with some neuraminidase features of K. pneumoniae in this investigation. Materials and Methods The enzyme was isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa which was used in a sensitive fluorometric assay by using 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl) α-D-N acetylneuraminic acid as substrate. Results Neuraminidase production in P. aeruginosa PAO1 paralleled bacterial growth in defined medium (BHI) and was maximal in the late logarithmic phase of growth but decreased during the stationary phase, probably owing to protease production or thermal instability. Highest production of P. aeruginosa PAO1 neuraminidase was in BHI culture media. The neuraminidase of P. aeruginosa PAO1 possessed an optimum temperature of activity at 56°C and the activity was maximal at pH 5. Heating the enzyme to 56°C for 45 min., in the presence of bovine serum albumin destroyed 33.1% of it's activity and addition of Ca+2, EDTA and NANA also decreased activity markedly. Conclusion The results revealed that the highest specific activity is for p. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:22347548

  11. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  12. Influenza A penetrates host mucus by cleaving sialic acids with neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) cleaves sialic acids (Sias) from glycans. Inhibiting NA with oseltamivir suppresses both viral infection, and viral release from cultured human airway epithelial cells. The role of NA in viral exit is well established: it releases budding virions by cleaving Sias from glycoconjugates on infected cells and progeny virions. The role of NA in viral entry remains unclear. Host respiratory epithelia secrete a mucus layer rich in heavily sialylated glycoproteins; these could inhibit viral entry by mimicking sialylated receptors on the cell surface. It has been suggested that NA allows influenza to penetrate the mucus by cleaving these sialylated decoys, but the exact mechanism is not yet established. Methods We tested IAV interaction with secreted mucus using frozen human trachea/bronchus tissue sections, and bead-bound purified human salivary mucins (HSM) and purified porcine submaxillary mucins (PSM). The protective effect of mucus was analyzed using MDCK cells coated with purified HSM and PSM with known Sia content. Oseltamivir was used to inhibit NA activity, and the fluorescent reporter substrate, 4MU-Neu5Ac, was used to quantify NA activity. Results IAV binds to the secreted mucus layer of frozen human trachea/bronchus tissues in a Sia dependent manner. HSM inhibition of IAV infection is Sia dose-dependent, but PSM cannot inhibit infection of underlying cells. HSM competitively inhibits NA cleavage of 4MU-Neu5Ac, reporter substrate. Human IAV effectively cleaves Sias from HSM but not from PSM, and binds to HSM but not to PSM. Conclusion IAV interacts with human mucus on frozen tissue sections and mucus-coated beads. Inhibition of IAV infection by sialylated human mucus is dose-dependent, and enhanced when NA is inhibited with oseltamivir. Thus NA cleaves sialylated decoys during initial stages of infection. Understanding IAV interactions with host mucins is a promising new avenue for drug development. PMID

  13. Computational study of interdependence between hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of pandemic 2009 H1N1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Influenza type A viruses are classified into subtypes based on their two surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The HA protein facilitates the viral binding and entering a host cell and the NA protein helps the release of viral progeny from the infected cell. The complementary roles of HA and NA entail their collaboration, which has important implications for viral replication and fitness. The HA protein from early strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 of swine origin preferentially binds to human type receptors with a weak binding to avian type receptors. This virus caused several human deaths in December 2013 in Texas, USA, which motivated us to investigate the changes of genetic features that might contribute to the surged virulence of the virus. Our time series analysis on the strains of this virus collected from 2009 to 2013 implied that the HA binding preference of this virus in USA, Europe, and Asia has been the characteristic of swine H1N1 virus since 2009. However, its characteristic of seasonal human H1N1 and its binding avidity for avian type receptors both were on steady rise and had a clear increase in 2013 with American strains having the sharpest surge. The first change could enhance the viral transmission and replication in humans and the second could increase its ability to cause infection deep in lungs, which might account for the recent human deaths in Texas. In light of HA and NA coadaptation and evolutionary interactions, we also explored the NA activity of this virus to reveal the functional balance between HA and NA during the course of virus evolution. Finally we identified amino acid substitutions in HA and NA of the virus that were critical for the observed evolution. PMID:25751873

  14. Tetherin Sensitivity of Influenza A Viruses Is Strain Specific: Role of Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Gnirß, Kerstin; Zmora, Pawel; Blazejewska, Paulina; Winkler, Michael; Lins, Anika; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gärtner, Sabine; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Wolff, Thorsten; Schindler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of the antiviral host cell factor tetherin is induced by interferon and can inhibit the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The Vpu protein of HIV-1 antagonizes the antiviral activity of tetherin, and tetherin antagonists with Vpu-like activity have been identified in other viruses. In contrast, it is incompletely understood whether tetherin inhibits influenza A virus (FLUAV) release and whether FLUAV encodes tetherin antagonists. Here, we show that release of several laboratory-adapted FLUAV strains and a seasonal FLUAV strain is inhibited by tetherin, while pandemic FLUAV A/Hamburg/4/2009 is resistant. Studies with a virus-like particle system and analysis of reassortant viruses provided evidence that the viral hemagglutinin (HA) is an important determinant of tetherin antagonism but requires the presence of its cognate neuraminidase (NA) to inhibit tetherin. Finally, tetherin antagonism by FLUAV was dependent on the virion context, since retrovirus release from tetherin-positive cells was not rescued, and correlated with an HA- and NA-dependent reduction in tetherin expression. In sum, our study identifies HA and NA proteins of certain pandemic FLUAV as tetherin antagonists, which has important implications for understanding FLUAV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (FLUAV) infection is responsible for substantial global morbidity and mortality, and understanding how the virus evades the immune defenses of the host may uncover novel targets for antiviral intervention. Tetherin is an antiviral effector molecule of the innate immune system which can contribute to control of viral invasion. However, it has been unclear whether FLUAV is inhibited by tetherin and whether these viruses encode tetherin-antagonizing proteins. Our observation that several pandemic FLUAV strains can counteract tetherin via their HA and NA proteins identifies these proteins as novel tetherin antagonists and indicates that HA

  15. A generic system for the expression and purification of soluble and stable influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peter M; Attwood, Rebecca M; Mohr, Peter G; Barrett, Susan A; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    The influenza surface glycoprotein neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the efficient spread of the virus. Antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir) that inhibit NA enzyme activity have been shown to be effective in the treatment of influenza infections. The recent 'swine flu' pandemic and world-wide emergence of Tamiflu-resistant seasonal human influenza A(H1N1) H(274)Y have highlighted the need for the ongoing development of new anti-virals, efficient production of vaccine proteins and novel diagnostic tools. Each of these goals could benefit from the production of large quantities of highly pure and stable NA. This publication describes a generic expression system for NAs in a baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) that is capable of expressing milligram amounts of recombinant NA. To construct NAs with increased stability, the natural influenza NA stalk was replaced by two different artificial tetramerization domains that drive the formation of catalytically active NA homotetramers: GCN4-pLI from yeast or the Tetrabrachion tetramerization domain from Staphylothermus marinus. Both recombinant NAs are secreted as FLAG-tagged proteins to allow for rapid and simple purification. The Tetrabrachion-based NA showed good solubility, increased stability and biochemical properties closer to the original viral NA than the GCN4-pLI based construct. The expressed quantities and high quality of the purified recombinant NA suggest that this expression system is capable of producing recombinant NA for a broad range of applications including high-throughput drug screening, protein crystallisation, or vaccine development. PMID:21326879

  16. In the Shadow of Hemagglutinin: A Growing Interest in Influenza Viral Neuraminidase and Its Role as a Vaccine Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of vaccine prophylaxis and antiviral therapeutics, the influenza virus continues to have a significant, annual impact on the morbidity and mortality of human beings, highlighting the continued need for research in the field. Current vaccine strategies predominantly focus on raising a humoral response against hemagglutinin (HA)—the more abundant, immunodominant glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus. In fact, anti-HA antibodies are often neutralizing, and are used routinely to assess vaccine immunogenicity. Neuraminidase (NA), the other major glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus, has historically served as the target for antiviral drug therapy and is much less studied in the context of humoral immunity. Yet, the quest to discern the exact importance of NA-based protection is decades old. Also, while antibodies against the NA glycoprotein fail to prevent infection of the influenza virus, anti-NA immunity has been shown to lessen the severity of disease, decrease viral lung titers in animal models, and reduce viral shedding. Growing evidence is intimating the possible gains of including the NA antigen in vaccine design, such as expanded strain coverage and increased overall immunogenicity of the vaccine. After giving a tour of general influenza virology, this review aims to discuss the influenza A virus neuraminidase while focusing on both the historical and present literature on the use of NA as a possible vaccine antigen. PMID:24960271

  17. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  18. Structure of the Ulster Strain Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Reveals Auto-Inhibitory Interactions Associated with Low Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Paterson, Reay G.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2012-09-06

    Paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) plays roles in viral entry and maturation, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activation of the F protein to drive membrane fusion, and enabling virion release during virus budding. HN can thereby directly influence virulence and in a subset of avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains, such as NDV Ulster, HN must be proteolytically activated to remove a C-terminal extension not found in other NDV HN proteins. Ulster HN is 616 amino acids long and the 45 amino acid C-terminal extension present in its precursor (HN0) form has to be cleaved to render HN biologically active. Here we show that Ulster HN contains an inter-subunit disulfide bond within the C-terminal extension at residue 596, which regulates HN activities and neuraminidase (NA) domain dimerization. We determined the crystal structure of the dimerized NA domain containing the C-terminal extension, which extends along the outside of the sialidase {beta}-propeller domain and inserts C-terminal residues into the NA domain active site. The C-terminal extension also engages a secondary sialic acid binding site present in NDV HN proteins, which is located at the NA domain dimer interface, that most likely blocks its attachment function. These results clarify how the Ulster HN C-terminal residues lead to an auto-inhibited state of HN, the requirement for proteolytic activation of HN{sub 0} and associated reduced virulence.

  19. Development of a Magnetic Electrochemical Bar Code Array for Point Mutation Detection in the H5N1 Neuraminidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Since its first official detection in the Guangdong province of China in 1996, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype (HPAI H5N1) has reportedly been the cause of outbreaks in birds in more than 60 countries, 24 of which were European. The main issue is still to develop effective antiviral drugs. In this case, single point mutation in the neuraminidase gene, which causes resistance to antiviral drug and is, therefore, subjected to many studies including ours, was observed. In this study, we developed magnetic electrochemical bar code array for detection of single point mutations (mismatches in up to four nucleotides) in H5N1 neuraminidase gene. Paramagnetic particles Dynabeads® with covalently bound oligo (dT)25 were used as a tool for isolation of complementary H5N1 chains (H5N1 Zhejin, China and Aichi). For detection of H5N1 chains, oligonucleotide chains of lengths of 12 (+5 adenine) or 28 (+5 adenine) bp labeled with quantum dots (CdS, ZnS and/or PbS) were used. Individual probes hybridized to target molecules specifically with efficiency higher than 60%. The obtained signals identified mutations present in the sequence. Suggested experimental procedure allows obtaining further information from the redox signals of nucleic acids. Moreover, the used biosensor exhibits sequence specificity and low limits of detection of subnanogram quantities of target nucleic acids. PMID:23860384

  20. Partial Antiviral Activities Detection of Chicken Mx Jointing with Neuraminidase Gene (NA) against Newcastle Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yani; Fu, Dezhi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Elsayed, Ahmed Kamel; Li, Bichun

    2013-01-01

    As an attempt to increase the resistance to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and so further reduction of its risk on the poultry industry. This work aimed to build the eukaryotic gene co-expression plasmid of neuraminidase (NA) gene and myxo-virus resistance (Mx) and detect the gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells, it is most important to investigate the influence of the recombinant plasmid on the chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) cells. cDNA fragment of NA and mutant Mx gene were derived from pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0-Mx plasmid via PCR, respectively, then NA and Mx cDNA fragment were inserted into the multiple cloning sites of pVITRO2 to generate the eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pVITRO2-Mx-NA. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease treatment and sequencing, and it was transfected into the mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells. The expression of genes in pVITRO2-Mx-NA were measured by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CEF cells then RT-PCR and the micro-cell inhibition tests were used to test the antiviral activity for NDV. Our results showed that co-expression vector pVITRO2-Mx-NA was constructed successfully; the expression of Mx and NA could be detected in both NIH-3T3 and CEF cells. The recombinant proteins of Mx and NA protect CEF cells from NDV infection until after 72 h of incubation but the individually mutagenic Mx protein or NA protein protects CEF cells from NDV infection till 48 h post-infection, and co-transfection group decreased significantly NDV infection compared with single-gene transfection group (P<0. 05), indicating that Mx-NA jointing contributed to delaying the infection of NDV in single-cell level and the co-transfection of the jointed genes was more powerful than single one due to their synergistic effects. PMID:23977111

  1. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase genes of H9N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from commercial broiler chicken in Iran (2008 and 2009).

    PubMed

    Soltanialvar, Masoud; Shoushtari, Hamid; Bozorgmehrifard, Mohamadhasan; Charkhkar, Saeed; Akbarnejad, Farshad

    2012-03-01

    A total of 512 tissue samples collected from 30 farms located in various states of Iran during 2008-2009 as part of a program to monitor avian influenza viruses (AIVs) infection in Iran's poultry population. To determine the genetic relationship of Iranian viruses, neuraminidase (NA) genes from ten isolates of H9N2 viruses isolated from commercial chickens in Iran during 2008-2009 were amplified and sequenced. The viruses' neuraminidase gene was >90% similar to those of A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2) sublineage. The neuraminidase stalk regions in these Viruses had no deletion as compared to that of chicken/Beijing/1/94 sublineage (Beijing-like viruses) and the two human isolates A/HK/1073/99, A/HK/1074/99. Phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase (NA) gene showed that it shares a common ancestor A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 isolate which had contributed the internal genes of the H5N1 virus. The results of this study indicated that No (Beijing-like) virus and (Korean-like) virus were found in chickens in Iran, and the NA genes of H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in Iran during the past years were well conserved and the earlier Iranian isolates may be considered to represent such a progenitor. PMID:21744029

  2. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following passage of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 t...

  3. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  4. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza.

    PubMed

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  5. Influence of a Novel Inhibitor (UM8190) of Prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) on Appetite and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, F. M.; Gadepalli, R.S.V.S.; Diano, S.; Cheng, Q.; Tabrizian, T.; Gailani, D.; Rimoldi, J.M.; Shariat-Madar, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical pharmacological characterization of a novel inhibitor (UM8190) of prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) was investigated. We synthesized and evaluated a library of proline-based analogs as prospective recombinant PRCP (rPRCP) inhibitors and inhibitors of PRCP-dependent prekallikrein (PK) activation on human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC). Among the newly synthesized compounds, UM8190 was further characterized in vivo using methods that encompassed a mouse carotid artery thrombosis model and animal model of food consumption. (S)-N-dodecyl-1-((S)-pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide [Compound 3 (UM8190)] was selected for further evaluation from the initial assessment of its PRCP inhibitory action (Ki= 43 µM) coupled with its ability to block PRCP-dependent PK activation on HPAEC (Ki= 34 µM). UM8190 demonstrated excellent selectivity against a panel of carboxypeptidases and serine proteases and blocked bradykinin (BK) generation and BK-induced permeability by 100%, suggesting that it may be useful in preventing the local production of large amounts of BK. Furthermore, UM8190 showed an anorexigenic effect when systemically administered to fasted mice, reducing food intake in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In a mouse carotid artery thrombosis model, it also demonstrated an antithrombotic effect. UM8190 is a selective PRCP inhibitor and it may represent a new anorexigenic, and antithrombotic drug, that works by inhibiting PRCP–mediated mechanisms. PMID:22664251

  6. Impact of the H275Y and I223V Mutations in the Neuraminidase of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus In Vitro and Evaluating Experimental Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Eric G.; Pinilla, Lady Tatiana; Holder, Benjamin P.; Abed, Yacine; Boivin, Guy; Beauchemin, Catherine A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza virus is naturally susceptible to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, but mutations in the NA protein can cause oseltamivir resistance. The H275Y and I223V amino acid substitutions in the NA of the H1N1pdm09 influenza strain have been separately observed in patients exhibiting oseltamivir-resistance. Here, we apply mathematical modelling techniques to compare the fitness of the wild-type H1N1pdm09 strain relative to each of these two mutants. We find that both the H275Y and I223V mutations in the H1N1pdm09 background significantly lengthen the duration of the eclipse phase (by 2.5 h and 3.6 h, respectively), consistent with these NA mutations delaying the release of viral progeny from newly infected cells. Cells infected by H1N1pdm09 virus carrying the I223V mutation display a disadvantageous, shorter infectious lifespan (17 h shorter) than those infected with the wild-type or MUT-H275Y strains. In terms of compensating traits, the H275Y mutation in the H1N1pdm09 background results in increased virus infectiousness, as we reported previously, whereas the I223V exhibits none, leaving it overall less fit than both its wild-type counterpart and the MUT-H275Y strain. Using computer simulated competition experiments, we determine that in the presence of oseltamivir at doses even below standard therapy, both the MUT-H275Y and MUT-I223V dominate their wild-type counterpart in all aspects, and the MUT-H275Y outcompetes the MUT-I223V. The H275Y mutation should therefore be more commonly observed than the I223V mutation in circulating H1N1pdm09 strains, assuming both mutations have a similar impact or no significant impact on between-host transmission. We also show that mathematical modelling offers a relatively inexpensive and reliable means to quantify inter-experimental variability and assess the reproducibility of results. PMID:25992792

  7. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  8. Influenza A virus nucleoprotein selectively decreases neuraminidase gene-segment packaging while enhancing viral fitness and transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Christopher B.; Ince, William L.; Wei, Jiajie; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) genome is divided into eight distinct RNA segments believed to be copackaged into virions with nearly perfect efficiency. Here, we describe a mutation in IAV nucleoprotein (NP) that enhances replication and transmission in guinea pigs while selectively reducing neuraminidase (NA) gene segment packaging into virions. We show that incomplete IAV particles lacking gene segments contribute to the propagation of the viral population through multiplicity reactivation under conditions of widespread coinfection, which we demonstrate commonly occurs in the upper respiratory tract of guinea pigs. NP also dramatically altered the functional balance of the viral glycoproteins on particles by selectively decreasing NA expression. Our findings reveal novel functions for NP in selective control of IAV gene packaging and balancing glycoprotein expression and suggest a role for incomplete gene packaging during host adaptation and transmission. PMID:25385602

  9. Large-scale FMO-MP3 calculations on the surface proteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuji; Yamashita, Katsumi; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Takematsu, Kazutomo; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Naoki; Okiyama, Yoshio; Tsuboi, Misako; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-06-01

    Two proteins on the influenza virus surface have been well known. One is hemagglutinin (HA) associated with the infection to cells. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were performed on a complex consisting of HA trimer and two Fab-fragments at the third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP3) level. The numbers of residues and 6-31G basis functions were 2351 and 201276, and thus a massively parallel-vector computer was utilized to accelerate the processing. This FMO-MP3 job was completed in 5.8 h with 1024 processors. Another protein is neuraminidase (NA) involved in the escape from infected cells. The FMO-MP3 calculation was also applied to analyze the interactions between oseltamivir and surrounding residues in pharmacophore.

  10. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Swanson, Kurt A.; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-10-02

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein plays multiple roles in viral entry and egress, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activating the fusion (F) protein to activate membrane fusion and viral entry, and cleaving sialic acid from carbohydrate chains. HN is an oligomeric integral membrane protein consisting of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, a stalk region, and an enzymatically active neuraminidase (NA) domain. Structures of the HN NA domains have been solved previously; however, the structure of the stalk region has remained elusive. The stalk region contains specificity determinants for F interactions and activation, underlying the requirement for homotypic F and HN interactions in viral entry. Mutations of the Newcastle disease virus HN stalk region have been shown to affect both F activation and NA activities, but a structural basis for understanding these dual affects on HN functions has been lacking. Here, we report the structure of the Newcastle disease virus HN ectodomain, revealing dimers of NA domain dimers flanking the N-terminal stalk domain. The stalk forms a parallel tetrameric coiled-coil bundle (4HB) that allows classification of extensive mutational data, providing insight into the functional roles of the stalk region. Mutations that affect both F activation and NA activities map predominantly to the 4HB hydrophobic core, whereas mutations that affect only F-protein activation map primarily to the 4HB surface. Two of four NA domains interact with the 4HB stalk, and residues at this interface in both the stalk and NA domain have been implicated in HN function.

  11. Structure determination of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase from a crystal with lattice-translocation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xueyong; Xu, Xiaojin; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-08-01

    The structure of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase was determined to 1.65 Å from crystals with a lattice-translocation defect using uncorrected, as well as corrected, diffraction data. Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 Å resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 Å, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  12. Comparison of serum hemagglutinin and neuraminidase inhibition antibodies after 2010-2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Laguio-Vila, Maryrose R; Thompson, Mark G; Reynolds, Sue; Spencer, Sarah M; Gaglani, Manjusha; Naleway, Allison; Ball, Sarah; Bozeman, Sam; Baker, Steven; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Levine, Min; Katz, Jackie; Fry, Alicia M; Treanor, John J

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Most inactivated influenza vaccines contain purified and standardized hemagglutinin (HA) and residual neuraminidase (NA) antigens. Vaccine-associated HA antibody responses (hemagglutination inhibition [HAI]) are well described, but less is known about the immune response to the NA. Methods.  Serum of 1349 healthcare personnel (HCP) electing or declining the 2010-2011 trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine ([IIV3], containing A/California/7/2009 p(H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/2008 strains) were tested for NA-inhibiting (NAI) antibody by a modified lectin-based assay using pseudotyped N1 and N2 influenza A viruses with an irrelevant (H5) HA. Neuraminidase-inhibiting and HAI antibody titers were evaluated approximately 30 days after vaccination and end-of-season for those with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed influenza infection. Results.  In 916 HCP (68%) receiving IIV3, a 2-fold increase in N1 and N2 NAI antibody occurred in 63.7% and 47.3%, respectively. Smaller responses occurred in HCP age >50 years and those without prior 2009-2010 IIV3 nor monovalent A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccinations. Forty-four PCR-confirmed influenza infections were observed, primarily affecting those with lower pre-exposure HAI and NAI antibodies. Higher pre-NAI titers correlated with shorter duration of illness for A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections. Conclusions.  Trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine is modestly immunogenic for N1 and N2 antigens in HCP. Vaccines eliciting robust NA immune responses may improve efficacy and reduce influenza-associated morbidity. PMID:25884004

  13. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  14. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: Further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K.; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A.; Fernandes, Miguel X.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for HIV protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (≥6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope Vout, is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the supplemental material. PMID:19703025

  15. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for human immunodeficiency virus protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (> or =6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope V(out), is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets, if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the 'Supporting Information'. PMID:19703025

  16. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  17. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  18. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  19. Hemagglutinin Stalk- and Neuraminidase-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Protect against Lethal H10N8 Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Chromikova, Veronika; Tan, Gene S.; Meade, Philip; Amanat, Fatima; Comella, Phillip; Hirsh, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Between November 2013 and February 2014, China reported three human cases of H10N8 influenza virus infection in the Jiangxi province, two of which were fatal. Using hybridoma technology, we isolated a panel of H10- and N8-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and further characterized the binding reactivity of these antibodies (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to a range of purified virus and recombinant protein substrates. The H10-directed MAbs displayed functional hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization activity, and the N8-directed antibodies displayed functional neuraminidase inhibition (NI) activity against H10N8. Surprisingly, the HI-reactive H10 antibodies, as well as a previously generated, group 2 hemagglutinin (HA) stalk-reactive antibody, demonstrated NI activity against H10N8 and an H10N7 strain; this phenomenon was absent when virus was treated with detergent, suggesting the anti-HA antibodies inhibited neuraminidase enzymatic activity through steric hindrance. We tested the prophylactic efficacy of one representative H10-reactive, N8-reactive, and group 2 HA stalk-reactive antibody in vivo using a BALB/c challenge model. All three antibodies were protective at a high dose (5 mg/kg). At a low dose (0.5 mg/kg), only the anti-N8 antibody prevented weight loss. Together, these data suggest that antibody targets other than the globular head domain of the HA may be efficacious in preventing influenza virus-induced morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE Avian H10N8 and H10N7 viruses have recently crossed the species barrier, causing morbidity and mortality in humans and other mammals. Although these reports are likely isolated incidents, it is possible that more cases may emerge in future winter seasons, similar to H7N9. Furthermore, regular transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans increases the risk of adaptive mutations and reassortment events, which may result in a novel virus with pandemic potential. Currently, no

  20. Arterial Stiffening in Western Diet-Fed Mice Is Associated with Increased Vascular Elastin, Transforming Growth Factor-β, and Plasma Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Christopher A.; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I.; Jia, Guanghong; Hill, Michael A.; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C.; Sowers, James R.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of excess fat and carbohydrate (Western diet, WD) is associated with alterations in the structural characteristics of blood vessels. This vascular remodeling contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease, particularly as it affects conduit and resistance arteries. Vascular remodeling is often associated with changes in the elastin-rich internal elastic lamina (IEL) and the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. In addition, obesity and type II diabetes have been associated with increased serum neuraminidase, an enzyme known to increase TGF-β cellular output. Therefore, we hypothesized that WD-feeding would induce structural modifications to the IEL of mesenteric resistance arteries in mice, and that these changes would be associated with increased levels of circulating neuraminidase and the up-regulation of elastin and TGF-β in the arterial wall. To test this hypothesis, a WD, high in fat and sugar, was used to induce obesity in mice, and the effect of this diet on the structure of mesenteric resistance arteries was investigated. 4-week old, Post-weaning mice were fed either a normal diet (ND) or WD for 16 weeks. Mechanically, arteries from WD-fed mice were stiffer and less distensible, with marginally increased wall stress for a given strain, and a significantly increased Young's modulus of elasticity. Structurally, the wall cross-sectional area and the number of fenestrae found in the internal elastic lamina (IEL) of mesenteric arteries from mice fed a WD were significantly smaller than those of arteries from the ND-fed mice. There was also a significant increase in the volume of elastin, but not collagen in arteries from the WD cohort. Plasma levels of neuraminidase and the amount of TGF-β in mesenteric arteries were elevated in mice fed a WD, while ex vivo, cultured vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to neuraminidase secreted greater amounts of tropoelastin and TGF-β than those exposed to vehicle. These data suggest that

  1. Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Balance Influences the Virulence Phenotype of a Recombinant H5N3 Influenza A Virus Possessing a Polybasic HA0 Cleavage Site

    PubMed Central

    Diederich, Sandra; Berhane, Yohannes; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Handel, Katherine; Cottam-Birt, Colleen; Ranadheera, Charlene; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although a polybasic HA0 cleavage site is considered the dominant virulence determinant for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 and H7 viruses, naturally occurring virus isolates possessing a polybasic HA0 cleavage site have been identified that are low pathogenic in chickens. In this study, we generated a reassortant H5N3 virus that possessed the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 HPAI A/swan/Germany/R65/2006 and the remaining gene segments from low pathogenic A/chicken/British Columbia/CN0006/2004 (H7N3). Despite possessing the HA0 cleavage site GERRRKKR/GLF, this rH5N3 virus exhibited a low pathogenic phenotype in chickens. Although rH5N3-inoculated birds replicated and shed virus and seroconverted, transmission to naive contacts did not occur. To determine whether this virus could evolve into a HPAI form, it underwent six serial passages in chickens. A progressive increase in virulence was observed with the virus from passage number six being highly transmissible. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the fixation of 12 nonsynonymous mutations involving all eight gene segments during passaging. One of these involved the catalytic site of the neuraminidase (NA; R293K) and is associated with decreased neuraminidase activity and resistance to oseltamivir. Although introducing the R293K mutation into the original low-pathogenicity rH5N3 increased its virulence, transmission to naive contact birds was inefficient, suggesting that one or more of the remaining changes that had accumulated in the passage number six virus also play an important role in transmissibility. Our findings show that the functional linkage and balance between HA and NA proteins contributes to expression of the HPAI phenotype. IMPORTANCE To date, the contribution that hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance can have on the expression of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus phenotype has not been thoroughly examined. Reassortment, which can result in new hemagglutinin-neuraminidase

  2. Punctuated Evolution of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase (A/H1N1) under Opposing Migration and Vaccination Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus contains two highly variable envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The structure and properties of HA, which is responsible for binding the virus to the cell that is being infected, change significantly when the virus is transmitted from avian or swine species to humans. Here we focus first on the simpler problem of the much smaller human individual evolutionary amino acid mutational changes in NA, which cleaves sialic acid groups and is required for influenza virus replication. Our thermodynamic panorama shows that very small amino acid changes can be monitored very accurately across many historic (1945–2011) Uniprot and NCBI strains using hydropathicity scales to quantify the roughness of water film packages. Quantitative sequential analysis is most effective with the fractal differential hydropathicity scale based on protein self-organized criticality (SOC). Our analysis shows that large-scale vaccination programs have been responsible for a very large convergent reduction in common influenza severity in the last century. Hydropathic analysis is capable of interpreting and even predicting trends of functional changes in mutation prolific viruses directly from amino acid sequences alone. An engineered strain of NA1 is described which could well be significantly less virulent than current circulating strains. PMID:25143953

  3. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Shanks, G Dennis; Vincent, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigenic drift, but have been shown to induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with an antigenic variant of the same haemagglutinin (HA) subtype. This study investigated the role the immune response against HA, neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) may play in VAERD by reverse engineering vaccine and challenge viruses on a common backbone and using them in a series of vaccination/challenge trials. Mismatched HA between vaccine and challenge virus was necessary to induce VAERD. However, vaccines containing a matched NA abrogated the VAERD phenomenon induced by the HA mismatch and this was correlated with NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies. Divergence between the two circulating swine N2 lineages (92 % identity) resulted in a loss of NI cross-reactivity and also resulted in VAERD with the mismatched HA. The NP lineage selected for use in the WIV vaccine strains did not affect protection or pathology. Thus the combination of HA and NA in the vaccine virus strains played a substantial role in vaccine protection versus immunopathology, suggesting that vaccines that target the HA protein alone could be more prone to VAERD due to the absence of cross-protective NI antibodies. PMID:27031847

  4. Paramyxovirus mediated cell fusion requires co-expression of both the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Heminway, B R; Yu, Y; Galinski, M S

    1994-01-01

    Syncytia formation in either CV-1 or HeLa T4+ cells required recombinant expression of both fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins from the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2), and simian virus 5 (SV5). In this system, recombinant T7 transcription vectors (pT7-5 or pGEM) containing F or HN, were transfected individually or in combination into cells previously infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase (vTF7-3). While both proteins were processed and expressed at the cell surface, syncytia formation occurred only when both glycoproteins were co-expressed. The function of HN in the fusion process could not be replaced using lectins or by co-expression of heterologous F and HN proteins. Further, cell fusion was not observed when experiments were performed using individually expressed F and HN proteins in adjacent cells. The data presented in this report support the notion that a specific interaction between both paramyxoviral glycoproteins is required for the formation of syncytia in tissue culture monolayers. PMID:8165862

  5. Long-Lasting Cross-Protection Against Influenza A by Neuraminidase and M2e-based immunization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schotsaert, Michael; Ysenbaert, Tine; Smet, Anouk; Schepens, Bert; Vanderschaeghe, Dieter; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Vogel, Thorsten U.; Callewaert, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that in the absence of neutralizing antibodies cross-reactive T cells provide protection against pandemic influenza viruses. Here, we compared protection and CD8+ T cell responses following challenge with H1N1 2009 pandemic and H3N2 viruses of mice that had been immunized with hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and the extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) fused to a virus-like particle (VLP). Mice were challenged a first time with a sublethal dose of H1N1 2009 pandemic virus and, four weeks later, challenged again with an H3N2 virus. Mice that had been vaccinated with HA, NA, NA + M2e-VLP and HA + NA + M2e-VLP were protected against homologous H1N1 virus challenge. Challenged NA and NA + M2e-VLP vaccinated mice mounted CD8+ T cell responses that correlated with protection against secondary H3N2 challenge. HA-vaccinated mice were fully protected against challenge with homologous H1N1 2009 virus, failed to mount cross-reactive CD8+ T cells and succumbed to the second challenge with heterologous H3N2 virus. In summary, NA- and M2e-based immunity can protect against challenge with (homologous) virus without compromising the induction of robust cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses upon exposure to virus. PMID:27072615

  6. Disulfide bond formation is a determinant of glycosylation site usage in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGinnes, L W; Morrison, T G

    1997-01-01

    Determinants of glycosylation site usage were explored by using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus. The amino acid sequence of the HN protein, a type II glycoprotein, has six N-linked glycosylation addition sites, G1 to G6, two of which, G5 and G6, are not used for the addition of carbohydrate (L. McGinnes and T. Morrison, Virology 212:398-410, 1995). The sequence of this protein also has 13 cysteine residues in the ectodomain (C2 to C14). Mutation of either cysteine 13 or cysteine 14 resulted in the addition of another oligosaccharide chain to the protein. These cysteine residues flank the normally unused G6 glycosylation addition site, and mutation of the G6 site eliminated the extra glycosylation found in the cysteine mutants. These results suggested that failure to form an intramolecular disulfide bond resulted in the usage of a normally unused glycosylation site. This conclusion was confirmed by preventing cotranslational disulfide bond formation in cells by using dithiothreitol. Under these conditions, the wild-type protein acquired extra glycosylation, which was eliminated by mutation of the G6 site. These results suggest that localized folding events on the nascent chain, such as disulfide bond formation, which block access to the oligosaccharyl transferase are a determinant of glycosylation site usage. PMID:9060670

  7. A Novel I221L Substitution in Neuraminidase Confers High-Level Resistance to Oseltamivir in Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Escuret, Vanessa; Collins, Patrick J.; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Cattle, Nicholas; Ferraris, Olivier; Sabatier, Murielle; Frobert, Emilie; Caro, Valérie; Skehel, John J.; Gamblin, Steve; Valla, Frédéric; Valette, Martine; Ottmann, Michèle; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Lina, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Influenza B viruses with a novel I221L substitution in neuraminidase (NA) conferring high-level resistance to oseltamivir were isolated from an immunocompromised patient after prolonged oseltamivir treatment. Methods. Enzymatic characterization of the NAs (Km, Ki) and the in vitro fitness of viruses carrying wild-type or mutated (I221L) NA genes were evaluated. Proportions of wild-type and mutated NA genes were directly quantified in the patient samples. Structural characterizations by X-ray crystallography of a wild-type and I221L variant NA were performed. Results. The Km and Ki revealed that the I221L variant NA had approximately 84 and 51 times lower affinity for oseltamivir carboxylate and zanamivir, respectively, compared with wild-type NA. Viruses with a wild-type or I221L variant NA had similar growth kinetics in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and 5 passages in MDCK cells revealed no reversion of the I221L substitution. The crystal structure of the I221L NA and oseltamivir complex showed that the leucine side chain protrudes into the hydrophobic pocket of the active site that accommodates the pentyloxy substituent of oseltamivir. Conclusions. Enzyme kinetic and NA structural analyses provide an explanation for the high level of resistance to oseltamivir while retaining good fitness of viruses carrying I221L variant NA. PMID:24795482

  8. What adaptive changes in hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are necessary for emergence of pandemic influenza virus from its avian precursor?

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Matrosovich, M N

    2015-07-01

    Wild ducks serve as the primary host for numerous and various influenza type A viruses. Occasionally, viruses from this reservoir can be transferred to other host species and cause outbreaks of influenza in fowl, swine, and horses, as well as result in novel human pandemics. Cellular tropism and range of susceptible host species are determined by interaction between virus and receptor molecules on cells. Here we discuss modern data regarding molecular features underlying interactions of influenza viruses with cellular receptors as well as a role for receptor specificity in interspecies transmission. By analyzing the earliest available pandemic influenza viruses (1918, 1957, 1968, 2009), we found that hemagglutinin reconfigured to recognize 2-6 sialic acid-containing receptors in the human upper airway tract together with altered enzymatic activity of neuraminidase necessary for maintaining functional balance with hemagglutinin are responsible for effective spread of influenza viruses in human populations. Resistance to low pH also contributes to this. Thus, a combination of such parameters makes it possible that influenza viruses give rise to novel pandemics. PMID:26542001

  9. Prediction of mutation positions in H5N1 neuraminidases from influenza A virus by means of neural network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2010-03-01

    Quantification of mutation capacity within a protein could be a way to model the mutation relationship not only because history might not leave many cues on the causes for mutations but also the evolved protein might no longer be subject to previous mutation causes. Randomness should play a constant role in engineering mutations in proteins because randomness suggests the maximal probability of occurrence by which a protein would be constructed with the least time and energy to meet the speed of rapidly changing environments. Since 1999, we have developed three approaches for quantifying of randomness of protein by which each amino acid has three numeric values. In this study, we model our three random numeric values in each amino acid with occurrence and non-occurrence of mutation, which are classified as unity and zero, using a 3-6-1 feedforward backpropagation neural network to predict the mutation positions in H5N1 neuraminidases. The results show that the neural network can capture the mutation relationship as measured by prediction sensitivity, specificity, and total correct rate. With the help of translation probability between RNA codes and mutated amino acids, we predict the would-be-mutated amino acids at predicted mutation positions. PMID:20336836

  10. A monoclonal antibody targeting a highly conserved epitope in influenza B neuraminidase provides protection against drug resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Tracey M; Li, Changgui; Bucher, Doris J; Hashem, Anwar M; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wang, Junzhi; Farnsworth, Aaron; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Hurt, Aeron C; Li, Xuguang

    2013-11-01

    All influenza viral neuraminidases (NA) of both type A and B viruses have only one universally conserved sequence located between amino acids 222-230. A monoclonal antibody against this region has been previously reported to provide broad inhibition against all nine subtypes of influenza A NA; yet its inhibitory effect against influenza B viral NA remained unknown. Here, we report that the monoclonal antibody provides a broad inhibition against various strains of influenza B viruses of both Victoria and Yamagata genetic lineage. Moreover, the growth and NA enzymatic activity of two drug resistant influenza B strains (E117D and D197E) are also inhibited by the antibody even though these two mutations are conformationally proximal to the universal epitope. Collectively, these data suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral NA is exposed sufficiently to allow access by inhibitory antibody during the course of infection; it could represent a potential target for antiviral agents and vaccine-induced immune responses against diverse strains of type B influenza virus. PMID:24140051

  11. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  12. Design of new inhibitors for H5N1 avian influenza using a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jo, Won Ho

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the treatment of H5N1 avian influenza. One of the most widely used antiviral agents is oseltamivir. However, it has been reported that oseltamivir is not as effective against the neuraminidase subtype N1 as it is against subtypes N2 and N9. In our research we addressed this problem by designing new inhibitors and these altered inhibitor's binding affinities were calculated. In this study, we introduced chemical groups to the existing oseltamivir, so to fit into the newly discovered cavity in the subtype N1. When the binding strengths of the oseltamivir and the newly designed inhibitors for N1 were calculated to examine the drug efficiency through a molecular dynamics simulation, then compared with each other, it was found that one of the designed molecules exhibited a strong binding affinity, with more than twice the binding strength than that of oseltamivir. Since the aforementioned designed inhibitor appears to have the possibility for oral activity according to the criteria of human oral bioavailability, we propose that the inhibitor is a promising antiviral drug for H5N1 avian influenza.

  13. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  14. Newcastle disease virus chimeras expressing the Hemagglutinin- Neuraminidase protein of mesogenic strain exhibits an enhanced anti-hepatoma efficacy.

    PubMed

    He, Jinjiao; Pan, Ziye; Tian, Guiyou; Liu, Xin; Liu, Yunye; Guo, Xiaochen; An, Ying; Song, Liying; Wu, Hongsong; Cao, Hongwei; Yu, Dan; Che, Ruixiang; Xu, Pengfei; Rasoul, Lubna M; Li, Deshan; Yin, Jiechao

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an intrinsically tumor-specific virus, many researchers have reported that lentogenic NDV is a safe and effective agent for human cancer therapy. It had been demonstrated that the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site is a major factor in the pathogenicity and anti-tumor efficacy of rNDV. However, the role of Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) gene that contributes to virulence and anti-tumor efficacy remains undefined. To assess the role of HN gene in virus pathogenicity and anti-tumor efficacy, a reverse genetic system was developed using the lentogenic NDV Clone30 strain to provide backbone for gene exchange. Chimeric virus (rClone30-Anh(HN)) created by exchange of the HN gene of lentogenic strain Clone30 with HN gene of mesogenic strain produce no significant changes in virus pathogenicity as assessed by conducting the mean death time (MDT) and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) assays. In vitro, infection with chimeras could induce the formation of syncytium relative significantly in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, chimeras was shown to induce the cell apoptosis via MTT and Annexin V-PI assays, reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and increase the mRNA transcription level of caspase 3. In vivo, ICR mice carrying tumor of hepatoma H22 cells were treated via intratumoral injection of chimeric virus. The treatment of chimera shows an obvious suppression in tumor volume. These results suggest that it could be an ideal approach to enhance the antitumor ability of Newcastle disease virus and highlighted the potential therapeutic application of rClone30-Anh(HN) as a viral vector to deliver foreign genes for treatment of cancers. PMID:27164362

  15. Active influenza virus neuraminidase is expressed in monkey cells from cDNA cloned in simian virus 40 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1983-01-01

    We have replaced the late genes of simian virus 40 (SV40) with a cloned cDNA copy of the neuraminidase (NA; EC 3.2.1.18) gene of the WSN (H1N1) strain of human influenza virus. When the SV40-NA recombinant virus was complemented in a lytic infection of monkey cells with a helper virus containing an early region deletion mutant, influenza NA was expressed and readily detected by immunofluorescence as well as by immunoprecipitation of in vivo labeled proteins with monoclonal antibodies against NA. In addition, the expressed NA exhibited enzymatic activity by cleaving the sialic acid residue from alpha-2,3-sialyllactitol. The expressed protein was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface, and it possessed the same molecular weight as the NA of WSN virus grown in monkey cells. Because the structure of NA is quite different from that of other integral membrane proteins and includes an anchoring region at the NH2 terminus consisting of hydrophobic amino acids, we also constructed deletion mutants of NA in this region. Replacement of DNA coding for the first 10 NH2-terminal amino acids with SV40 and linker sequences had no apparent effect on NA expression, glycosylation, transport to the cell surface, or enzymatic activity. However, further deletion of NA DNA encoding the first 26 amino acids abolished NA expression. These data suggest that the hydrophobic NH2-terminal region is multifunctional and is important in biosynthesis and translocation of NA across the membrane as well as in anchoring the protein. Images PMID:6306656

  16. Antibody epitopes on the neuraminidase of a recent H3N2 influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98).

    PubMed

    Gulati, Upma; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Venkatramani, Lalitha; Gulati, Shelly; Stray, Stephen J; Lee, Janis T; Laver, W Graeme; Bochkarev, Alexey; Zlotnick, Adam; Air, Gillian M

    2002-12-01

    We have characterized monoclonal antibodies raised against the neuraminidase (NA) of a Sydney-like influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98, H3N2) in a reassortant virus A/NWS/33(HA)-A/Mem/31/98(NA) (H1N2) and nine escape mutants selected by these monoclonal antibodies. Five of the antibodies use the same heavy chain VDJ genes and may not be independent. Another antibody, Mem5, uses the same V(H) and J genes with a different D gene and different isotype. Sequence changes in escape mutants selected by these antibodies occur in two loops of the NA, at amino acid 198, 199, 220, or 221. These amino acids are located on the opposite side of the NA monomer to the major epitopes found in N9 and early N2 NAs. Escape mutants with a change at 198 have reduced NA activity compared to the wild-type virus. Asp198 points toward the substrate binding pocket, and we had previously found that a site-directed mutation of this amino acid resulted in a loss of enzyme activity (M. R. Lentz, R. G. Webster, and G. M. Air, Biochemistry 26:5351-5358, 1987). Mutations at residue 199, 220, or 221 did not alter the NA activity significantly compared to that of wild-type NA. A 3.5-A structure of Mem5 Fab complexed with the Mem/98 NA shows that the Mem5 antibody binds at the sites of escape mutation selected by the other antibodies. PMID:12414967

  17. Structure Determination of the 1918 H1N1 Neuraminidase From a Crystal With Lattice-Translocation Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.; Xu, X.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 {angstrom}, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  18. Rapid molecular subtyping by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the neuraminidase gene of avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, S R; Starick, E; Grund, C; Globig, A; Mettenleiter, T C; Beer, M; Harder, T

    2009-03-30

    Accurate identification of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of influenza A viruses is an integral part of monitoring programs targeting avian influenza viruses (AIV). Use of highly sensitive molecular screening methods such as pan influenza-specific real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) yields an increasing number of samples which are positive for AIV RNA but negative by virus isolation and, therefore, require molecular, instead of serological, subtyping. We developed specific RT-PCR assays for all known nine AIV NA subtypes. Validation using 43 reference isolates from different animal species revealed good performance characteristics regarding sensitivity and specificity. On basis of serial tenfold dilution series of reference isolates a benchmark value of C(t) 32 in an M gene-specific rRT-PCR became evident below which all nine NA subtypes were readily detectable by the subtype-specific RT-PCRs. For subtypes N1, N2, N4 and N6 detection was extended to dilutions with C(t) values of up to 35. Diagnostic applicability of the whole set of conventional NA-specific RT-PCRs was evaluated by analysis of 119 different diagnostic samples from wild birds which proved to be positive for AIV by M gene-specific rRT-PCR. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was confirmed by sequencing NA amplicons from 41 field isolates generated from this set and by NA inhibition assays. A universal molecular HA/NA subtyping algorithm for rRT-PCR positive avian influenza virus monitoring samples is proposed which may complement classical serological subtyping of influenza A virus isolates. PMID:19028027

  19. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type.

    PubMed

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Kitikoon, Pravina; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-07-19

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and respiratory specimens of pigs vaccinated with intramuscular whole-inactivated virus (WIV), intranasal live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), and intranasal wild type (WT) IAV. NI titers were also analyzed in sera from an investigation of piglet vaccination in the presence of passive maternally-derived antibodies. Test antigens contained genetically divergent swine-lineage NA genes homologous or heterologous to the vaccines with mismatched hemagglutinin genes (HA). Naïve piglets responded to WIV and LAIV vaccines and WT infection with strong homologous serum NI titers. Cross-reactivity to heterologous NAs depended on the degree of genetic divergence between the NA genes. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens of LAIV and WT-immunized groups also had significant NI titers against the homologous antigen whereas the WIV group did not. Piglets of vaccinated sows received high levels of passive NI antibody, but their NI responses to homologous LAIV vaccination were impeded. These data demonstrate the utility of the enzyme-linked lectin assay for efficient NI antibody titration of serum as well as respiratory tract secretions. Swine IAV vaccines that induce robust NI responses are likely to provide broader protection against the diverse and rapidly evolving IAV strains that circulate in pig populations. Mucosal antibodies to NA may be one of the protective immune mechanisms induced by LAIV vaccines. PMID:27325350

  20. Deliberate reduction of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase expression of influenza virus leads to an ultraprotective live vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Skiena, Steven; Futcher, Bruce; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard

    2013-06-01

    A long-held dogma posits that strong presentation to the immune system of the dominant influenza virus glycoprotein antigens neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) is paramount for inducing protective immunity against influenza virus infection. We have deliberately violated this dogma by constructing a recombinant influenza virus strain of A/PR8/34 (H1N1) in which expression of NA and HA genes was suppressed. We down-regulated NA and HA expression by recoding the respective genes with suboptimal codon pair bias, thereby introducing hundreds of nucleotide changes while preserving their codon use and protein sequence. The variants PR8-NA(Min), PR8-HA(Min), and PR8-(NA+HA)(Min) (Min, minimal expression) were used to assess the contribution of reduced glycoprotein expression to growth in tissue culture and pathogenesis in BALB/c mice. All three variants proliferated in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to nearly the degree as WT PR8. In mice, however, they expressed explicit attenuation phenotypes, as revealed by their LD50 values: PR8, 32 plaque-forming units (PFU); HA(Min), 1.7 × 10(3) PFU; NA(Min), 2.4 × 10(5) PFU; (NA+HA)(Min), ≥3.16 × 10(6) PFU. Remarkably, (NA+HA)(Min) was attenuated >100,000-fold, with NA(Min) the major contributor to attenuation. In vaccinated mice (NA+HA)(Min) was highly effective in providing long-lasting protective immunity against lethal WT challenge at a median protective dose (PD50) of 2.4 PFU. Moreover, at a PD50 of only 147 or 237, (NA+HA)(Min) conferred protection against heterologous lethal challenges with two mouse-adapted H3N2 viruses. We conclude that the suppression of HA and NA is a unique strategy in live vaccine development. PMID:23690603

  1. Deliberate reduction of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase expression of influenza virus leads to an ultraprotective live vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Skiena, Steven; Futcher, Bruce; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard

    2013-01-01

    A long-held dogma posits that strong presentation to the immune system of the dominant influenza virus glycoprotein antigens neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) is paramount for inducing protective immunity against influenza virus infection. We have deliberately violated this dogma by constructing a recombinant influenza virus strain of A/PR8/34 (H1N1) in which expression of NA and HA genes was suppressed. We down-regulated NA and HA expression by recoding the respective genes with suboptimal codon pair bias, thereby introducing hundreds of nucleotide changes while preserving their codon use and protein sequence. The variants PR8-NAMin, PR8-HAMin, and PR8-(NA+HA)Min (Min, minimal expression) were used to assess the contribution of reduced glycoprotein expression to growth in tissue culture and pathogenesis in BALB/c mice. All three variants proliferated in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells to nearly the degree as WT PR8. In mice, however, they expressed explicit attenuation phenotypes, as revealed by their LD50 values: PR8, 32 plaque-forming units (PFU); HAMin, 1.7 × 103 PFU; NAMin, 2.4 × 105 PFU; (NA+HA)Min, ≥3.16 × 106 PFU. Remarkably, (NA+HA)Min was attenuated >100,000-fold, with NAMin the major contributor to attenuation. In vaccinated mice (NA+HA)Min was highly effective in providing long-lasting protective immunity against lethal WT challenge at a median protective dose (PD50) of 2.4 PFU. Moreover, at a PD50 of only 147 or 237, (NA+HA)Min conferred protection against heterologous lethal challenges with two mouse-adapted H3N2 viruses. We conclude that the suppression of HA and NA is a unique strategy in live vaccine development. PMID:23690603

  2. Vaccination with Adjuvanted Recombinant Neuraminidase Induces Broad Heterologous, but Not Heterosubtypic, Cross-Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Xu, Haoming; Tan, Gene S.; Hirsh, Ariana; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to assess the cross-protective potential of the influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) as a vaccine antigen, different subtypes of recombinant NA were expressed in a baculovirus system and used to vaccinate mice prior to lethal challenge with homologous, heterologous, or heterosubtypic viruses. Mice immunized with NA of subtype N2 were completely protected from morbidity and mortality in a homologous challenge and displayed significantly reduced viral lung titers. Heterologous challenge with a drifted strain resulted in morbidity but no mortality. Similar results were obtained for challenge experiments with N1 NA. Mice immunized with influenza B virus NA (from B/Yamagata/16/88) displayed no morbidity when sublethally infected with the homologous strain and, importantly, were completely protected from morbidity and mortality when lethally challenged with the prototype Victoria lineage strain or a more recent Victoria lineage isolate. Upon analyzing the NA content in 4 different inactivated-virus vaccine formulations from the 2013-2014 season via Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantification, we found that the amount of NA does indeed vary across vaccine brands. We also measured hemagglutinin (HA) and NA endpoint titers in pre- and postvaccination human serum samples from individuals who received a trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine from the 2004-2005 season; the induction of NA titers was statistically less pronounced than the induction of HA titers. The demonstrated homologous and heterologous protective capacity of recombinant NA suggests that supplementing vaccine formulations with a standard amount of NA may offer increased protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:25759506

  3. An Innovative Pseudotypes-Based Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay for the Measurement of Functional Anti-Neuraminidase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Prevato, Marua; Cozzi, Roberta; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Taddei, Anna Rita; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Nandi, Avishek; Montomoli, Emanuele; Settembre, Ethan C.; Bertholet, Sylvie; Bonci, Alessandra; Legay, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies (Ab) to neuraminidase (NA) play a role in limiting influenza infection and might help reduce the disease impact. The most widely used serological assay to measure functional anti-NA immune responses is the Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay (ELLA) which relies on hemagglutinin (HA) mismatched virus reassortants, or detergent treated viruses as the NA source to overcome interference associated with steric hindrance of anti-HA Ab present in sera. The difficulty in producing and handling these reagents, which are not easily adapted for screening large numbers of samples, limits the routine analysis of functional anti-NA Ab in clinical trials. In this study, we produced influenza lentiviral pseudoparticles (PPs) containing only the NA antigen (NA-PPs) with a simple two-plasmid co-transfection system. NA-PPs were characterized and tested as an innovative source of NA in the NA inhibition (NI) assay. Both swine A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and avian A/turkey/Turkey/01/2005 (H5N1) N1s within NA-PPs retained their sialidase activity and were specifically inhibited by homologous and N1 subtype-specific, heterologous sheep sera. Moreover, A/California/07/2009 N1-PPs were a better source of NA compared to whole live and detergent treated H1N1 viruses in ELLA, likely due to lack of interference by anti-HA Ab, and absence of possible structural modifications caused by treatment with detergent. This innovative assay is safer and applicable to all NAs. Taken together, these results highlight the potential of NA-PPs-based NI assays to be developed as sensitive, flexible, easy to handle and scalable serological tests for routine NA immune response analysis. PMID:26267900

  4. Influenza-induced tachypnea is prevented in immune cotton rats, but cannot be treated with an anti-inflammatory steroid or a neuraminidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Maryna C; Prince, Gregory A; Ottolini, Martin G

    2004-05-01

    Influenza viruses are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during winter months. Increased respiratory rate (tachypnea) is a sign of increasing lower respiratory disease during influenza infection and is frequently observed in hospitalized patients. We investigated this clinical sign in influenza virus-infected cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) and the efficacy of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapy in reducing symptomatic disease. Cotton rats infected intranasally with A/Wuhan/359/95 (H3N2) had increased respiratory rates from 1 to 4 days postinfection that correlated with the dose of virus used to inoculate the animal but not the amount of virus recovered from the lung. In addition, evaluation of sequential lung tissue pathology revealed that extensive epithelial cell destruction of small airways correlated with tachypnea. Increased respiratory rate was not observed in immune animals, supporting results that demonstrated a requirement for exposure to, and infection by, large amounts of live virus for induction of tachypnea. A variety of therapeutic approaches proved ineffective in reducing tachypnea, including anti-inflammatory therapy with systemic triamcinolone acetonide, bronchodilatory therapy with levalbuterol, or antiviral therapy with zanamivir. These results, together with the pathologic observations, suggest that early disruption of the lower respiratory tract epithelium is a major component of the pathophysiology of influenza infection. Therapeutic approaches need to be tailored to clear airway obstruction and restore an intact epithelium. PMID:15110527

  5. Impacts of papain and neuraminidase enzyme treatment on electrohydrodynamics and IgG-mediated agglutination of type A red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hyono, Atsushi; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Mazda, Toshio; Takata, Youichi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2009-09-15

    The stability of native and enzyme-treated human red blood cells of type A (Rh D positive) against agglutination is investigated under conditions where it is mediated by immunoglobuline G (IgG) anti-D antibody binding. The propensity of cells to agglutinate is related to their interphasic (electrokinetic) properties. These properties significantly depend on the concentration of proteolytic papain enzyme and protease-free neuraminidase enzyme that the cells are exposed to. The analysis is based on the interpretation of electrophoretic data of cells by means of the numerical theory for the electrokinetics of soft (bio)particles. A significant reduction of the hydrodynamic permeability of the external soft glycoprotein layer of the cells is reported under the action of papain. This reflects a significant decrease in soft surface layer thickness and a loss in cell surface integrity/rigidity, as confirmed by nanomechanical AFM analysis. Neuraminidase action leads to an important decrease in the interphase charge density by removing sialic acids from the cell soft surface layer. This is accompanied by hydrodynamic softness modulations less significant than those observed for papain-treated cells. On the basis of these electrohydrodynamic characteristics, the overall interaction potential profiles between two native cells and two enzyme-treated cells are derived as a function of the soft surface layer thickness in the Debye-Hückel limit that is valid for cell suspensions under physiological conditions (approximately 0.16 M). The thermodynamic computation of cell suspension stability against IgG-mediated agglutination then reveals that a decrease in the cell surface layer thickness is more favorable than a decrease in interphase charge density for inducing agglutination. This is experimentally confirmed by agglutination data collected for papain- and neuraminidase-treated cells. PMID:19735140

  6. Using Common Spatial Distributions of Atoms to Relate Functionally Divergent Influenza Virus N10 and N11 Protein Structures to Functionally Characterized Neuraminidase Structures, Toxin Cell Entry Domains, and Non-Influenza Virus Cell Entry Domains

    PubMed Central

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  7. Using common spatial distributions of atoms to relate functionally divergent influenza virus N10 and N11 protein structures to functionally characterized neuraminidase structures, toxin cell entry domains, and non-influenza virus cell entry domains.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  8. Neuraminidase H275Y and hemagglutinin D222G mutations in a fatal case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, Aaron; Wotton, Jason; Lees, Christine; Boxrud, David; Uyeki, Timothy; Lynfield, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: DeVries et al. (2012) Neuraminidase H275Y and hemagglutinin D222G mutations in a fatal case of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e85–e88. Oseltamivir‐resistant 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infections associated with neuraminidase (NA) H275Y have been identified sporadically. Strains possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) D222G mutation have been detected in small numbers of fatal 2009 H1N1 cases. We report the first clinical description of 2009 H1N1 virus infection with both NA‐H275Y and HA‐D222G mutations detected by pyrosequencing of bronchioalveolar lavage fluid obtained on symptom day 19. The 59‐year‐old immunosuppressed patient had multiple conditions conferring higher risk of prolonged viral replication and severe illness and died on symptom day 34. Further investigations are needed to determine the significance of infection with strains possessing NA‐H275Y and HA‐D222G. PMID:22243670

  9. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westgeest, Kim; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Spronken, Monique I.J.; Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Eichelberger, Maryna; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used to characterize the antigenic properties of NA, these methods are cumbersome and not easily amendable to rapid screening. An additional difficulty of the NI assay is the interference by hemagglutinin (HA)-specific antibodies. To prevent interference of HA-specific antibodies, most NI assays are performed with recombinant viruses containing a mismatched HA. However, generation of these viruses is time consuming and unsuitable for large-scale surveillance. The feasibility of using the recently developed enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to evaluate the antigenic relatedness of NA of wild type A(H3N2) viruses was assessed. Rather than using recombinant viruses, wild type A(H3N2) viruses were used as antigen with ferret sera elicited against recombinant viruses with a mismatched HA. In this study, details of the critical steps that are needed to modify and optimize the NI ELLA in a format that is reproducible, highly sensitive, and useful for influenza virus surveillance to monitor antigenic drift of NA are provided. PMID:25712563

  10. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  11. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  12. [Evaluation of the anti-neuraminidase antibodies in clinical trials of the live influenza vaccine of the A(H5N2) subtype].

    PubMed

    Smolonogina, T A; Desheva, Iu A; Rekstin, A R; Mironov, A N; Rudenko, L G

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibodies among volunteers during the phase I and phase II of the clinical trials of a monovalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) A/17/duck/ Potsdam/86/92(H5N2). The reassortant influenza virus RN2/57-human A(H7N2) containing neuraminidase (NA) from the A/Leningrad/134/17/57(H2N2) was used in NI test. It was shown that two doses of the monovalent LAIV A(H5N2) led to a statistically significant increase in the NI antibodies to vaccine strain NA. More than twofold increase in antibodies was obtained among 19.5-33.3% of vaccinated. The microneutralization test and NI assay results coincidence in the same pairs of sera of the vaccinated volunteers was 73.2%, suggesting thus a statistically significant interdependence between the values of increase in antibodies revealed in both tests (p = 0.04). PMID:24772644

  13. Catalytic mechanism and novel receptor binding sites of human parainfluenza virus type 3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (hPIV3 HN).

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Pilling, Pat; Barrett, Susan; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV3) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) has opposing functions of binding sialic acid receptors and cleaving them, facilitating virus release. The crystal structure of hPIV3 HN complexed with the substrate analogue difluorosialic acid (DFSA) revealed that catalysis by HN involves the formation of a covalently linked sialosyl-enzyme intermediate which was trapped along with a transition-state analogue resembling an oxocarbenium ion. This mechanism of enzyme catalysis was also confirmed in the crystal structure of the influenza N9 neuraminidase complexed with DFSA. Additionally, novel secondary receptor binding sites were identified in the hPIV3 HN-DFSA complex including one near the catalytic cavity which upon binding DFSA imposes subtle changes and may help the HN balance the opposing functions. Multiple receptor binding sites may increase avidity to facilitate cell binding and fusion promotion. The secondary receptor binding sites in the paramyxoviruses are so far unique to each virus type. PMID:26364554

  14. Expression, purification and characterization of low-glycosylation influenza neuraminidase in α-1,6-mannosyltransferase defective Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Li; Chang, Shao-Hong; Gong, Xin; Wu, Jun; Liu, Bo

    2012-02-01

    Influenza A viruses expose two major surface glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Although N-glycosylation is essential for many glycoproteins, the glycoproteins expressed in yeast are sometimes hyper-glycosylated, which maybe a primary hindrance to the exploitation of therapeutic glycoprotein production because glycoproteins decorated with yeast-specific glycans are immunogenic and show poor pharmacokinetic properties in humans. To elucidate the NA with different glycosylation in interaction with immunogenicity, here we reported the heterologous expression of influenza NA glycoprotein derived from influenza virus A/newCaledonia/20/99(H1N1) in wide-type Pichia pastoris, α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (och1)-defective P. pastoris and Escherichia coli. We also assessed the immunogenicity of hyper-glycosylated NA expressed in the wide-type, low-glycosylated NA expressed in och1-defective P. pastoris strain and non-glycosylated NA produced in E. coli. Recombinant NA was expressed in wide-type P. pastoris as a 59-97 above kDa glycoprotein, 52-57 kDa in the och1 defective strain, and as a 45 kDa non-glycoprotein in E. coli. The antibody titers of Balb/c mice were tested after the mice were immunized three times with 0.2, 1, or 3 μg purified recombinant NA. Our results demonstrated that after the second immunization, the antibody titer elicited with 1 μg low-glycosylated NA was 1:5,500, while it was 1:10 and 1:13 when elicited by 1 μg hyper-glycosylated and non-glycosylated NA. In the 0.2 μg dose groups, a high antibody titer (1:4,900) was only found after third immunization by low-glycosylated NA, respectively. These results suggest that low-glycosylation in och1-defective P. pastoris enhances the immunogenicity of recombinant NA and elicits similar antibody titers with less antigen when compared with hyper- and non-glycosylated NA. Thus, och1-defective P. pastoris may be a better yeast expression system for production of glycoproteins to research

  15. Detection of neuraminidase stalk motifs associated with enhanced N1 subtype influenza A virulence via Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, JooYoung; Martin, Sharon J H; Tripp, Ralph A; Tompkins, S Mark; Dluhy, Richard A

    2015-11-21

    Oligonucleotides corresponding to neuraminidase (NA) stalk motifs that have been associated with enhanced influenza virulence have been identified using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). 5'-Thiolated ssDNA oligonucleotides were immobilized onto a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) coated Au nanoparticles (AuNP). Three synthetic RNA sequences corresponding to specific amino acid deletions in the influenza NA stalk region were attached to the CTAB-modified AuNPs. Two of these sequences were specific to sequences with amino acid deletions associated with increased virulence, and one was a low virulence sequence with no amino acid deletions. Hybridization of synthetic matched and mismatched DNA-RNA complexes were detected based on the intrinsic SERS spectra. In addition, this platform was used to analyze RNA sequences isolated from laboratory grown influenza viruses having the NA stalk motif associated with enhanced virulence, including A/WSN/33/H1N1, A/Anhui/1/2005/H5N, and A/Vietnam/1203/2004/H5N1 strains. Multivariate feature selection methods were employed to determine the specific wavenumbers in the Raman spectra that contributed the most information for class discrimination. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test identified 884 and 1196 wavenumbers as being highly significant in the high and low virulence spectra, respectively (p < 0.01). A post-hoc Tukey Honestly Significance Difference (HSD) test identified the wavenumbers that played a major role in differentiating the DNA-RNA hybrid classes. An estimate of the spectral variability, based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test, found the major source of variation to be predominately between the different classes, and not within the classes, thus confirming that the spectra reflected real class differences and not sampling artifacts. The multivariate classification methods partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machine discriminant analysis (SVM-DA) were able to

  16. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase containing virus-like particles produced in HEK-293 suspension culture: An effective influenza vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Gilbert, Renald; Simoneau, Melanie; Caron, Antoine; Chahal, Parminder; Chen, Wangxue; Ansorge, Sven; Li, Xuguang; Henry, Olivier; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) constitute a promising alternative as influenza vaccine. They are non-replicative particles that mimic the morphology of native viruses which make them more immunogenic than classical subunit vaccines. In this study, we propose HEK-293 cells in suspension culture in serum-free medium as an efficient platform to produce large quantities of VLPs. For this purpose, a stable cell line expressing the main influenza viral antigens hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) (subtype H1N1) under the regulation of a cumate inducible promoter was developed (293HA-NA cells). The production of VLPs was evaluated by transient transfection of plasmids encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag or M1 influenza matrix protein. To facilitate the monitoring of VLPs production, Gag was fused to the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The transient transfection of the gag containing plasmid in 293HA-NA cells increased the release of HA and NA seven times more than its counterpart transfected with the M1 encoding plasmid. Consequently, the production of HA-NA containing VLPs using Gag as scaffold was evaluated in a 3-L controlled stirred tank bioreactor. The VLPs secreted in the culture medium were recovered by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion and ultrafiltered by tangential flow filtration. Transmission electron micrographs of final sample revealed the presence of particles with the average typical size (150-200nm) and morphology of HIV-1 immature particles. The concentration of the influenza glycoproteins on the Gag-VLPs was estimated by single radial immunodiffusion and hemagglutination assay for HA and by Dot-Blot for HA and NA. More significantly, intranasal immunization of mice with influenza Gag-VLPs induced strong antigen-specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses and provided full protection against a lethal intranasal challenge with the homologous virus strain. These data suggest that, with further optimization and characterization

  17. Impact of Potential Permissive Neuraminidase Mutations on Viral Fitness of the H275Y Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus In Vitro, in Mice and in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Bouhy, Xavier; Rhéaume, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) mutations conferring resistance to NA inhibitors (NAIs) generally compromise the fitness of influenza viruses. The only NAI-resistant virus that widely spread in the population, the A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) strain, contained permissive mutations that restored the detrimental effect caused by the H275Y change. Computational analysis predicted other permissive NA mutations for A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Here, we investigated the effect of T289M and N369K mutations on the viral fitness of the A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y variant. Recombinant wild-type (WT) A(H1N1)pdm09 and the H275Y, H275Y/T289M, H275Y/N369K, and H275Y/V241I/N369K (a natural variant) NA mutants were generated by reverse genetics. Replication kinetics were performed by using ST6GalI-MDCK cells. Virulence was assessed in C57BL/6 mice, and contact transmission was evaluated in ferrets. The H275Y mutation significantly reduced viral titers during the first 12 to 36 h postinfection (p.i.) in vitro. Nevertheless, the WT and H275Y viruses induced comparable mortality rates, weight loss, and lung titers in mice. The T289M mutation eliminated the detrimental effect caused by the H275Y change in vitro while causing greater weight loss and mortality in mice, with significantly higher lung viral titers on days 3 and 6 p.i. than with the H275Y mutant. In index ferrets, the WT, H275Y, H275Y/T289M, and H275Y/V241I/N369K recombinants induced comparable fever, weight loss, and nasal wash viral titers. All tested viruses were transmitted at comparable rates in contact ferrets, with the H275Y/V241I/N369K recombinant demonstrating higher nasal wash viral titers than the H275Y mutant. Permissive mutations may enhance the fitness of A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y viruses in vitro and in vivo. The emergence of such variants should be carefully monitored. PMID:24257597

  18. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  19. Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    von Itzstein, Mark; Thomson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter. PMID:19048199

  20. Drug Repurposing Identifies Inhibitors of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ju; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Zheng, Jie J

    2016-03-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, oseltamivir, is a widely used anti-influenza drug. However, oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y NA mutation spontaneously emerged as a result of natural genetic drift and drug treatment. Because H275Y and other potential mutations may generate a future pandemic influenza strain that is oseltamivir-resistant, alternative therapy options are needed. Herein, we show that a structure-based computational method can be used to identify existing drugs that inhibit resistant viruses, thereby providing a first line of pharmaceutical defense against this possible scenario. We identified two drugs, nalidixic acid and dorzolamide, that potently inhibit the NA activity of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses with the H275Y NA mutation at very low concentrations, but have no effect on wild-type H1N1 NA even at a much higher concentration, suggesting that the oseltamivir-resistance mutation itself caused susceptibility to these drugs. PMID:26833677

  1. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure. PMID:27051336

  2. Functional Properties and Genetic Relatedness of the Fusion and Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Proteins of a Mumps Virus-Like Bat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Nadine; Hoffmann, Markus; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Corman, Victor Max; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steven; He, Biao; Örvell, Claes; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A bat virus with high phylogenetic relatedness to human mumps virus (MuV) was identified recently at the nucleic acid level. We analyzed the functional activities of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion (F) proteins of the bat virus (batMuV) and compared them to the respective proteins of a human isolate. Transfected cells expressing the F and HN proteins of batMuV were recognized by antibodies directed against these proteins of human MuV, indicating that both viruses are serologically related. Fusion, hemadsorption, and neuraminidase activities were demonstrated for batMuV, and either bat-derived protein could substitute for its human MuV counterpart in inducing syncytium formation when coexpressed in different mammalian cell lines, including chiropteran cells. Cells expressing batMuV glycoproteins were shown to have lower neuraminidase activity. The syncytia were smaller, and they were present in lower numbers than those observed after coexpression of the corresponding glycoproteins of a clinical isolate of MuV (hMuV). The phenotypic differences in the neuraminidase and fusion activity between the glycoproteins of batMuV and hMuV are explained by differences in the expression level of the HN and F proteins of the two viruses. In the case of the F protein, analysis of chimeric proteins revealed that the signal peptide of the bat MuV fusion protein is responsible for the lower surface expression. These results indicate that the surface glycoproteins of batMuV are serologically and functionally related to those of hMuV, raising the possibility of bats as a reservoir for interspecies transmission. IMPORTANCE The recently described MuV-like bat virus is unique among other recently identified human-like bat-associated viruses because of its high sequence homology (approximately 90% in most genes) to its human counterpart. Although it is not known if humans can be infected by batMuV, the antigenic relatedness between the bat and human forms of

  3. Expression at the cell surface of biologically active fusion and hemagglutinin/neuraminidase proteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1985-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the mRNAs for the fusion protein (F) and the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase protein (HN) of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 have been inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The F and HN proteins synthesized in recombinant infected cells are indistinguishable in terms of electrophoretic mobility and glycosylation from the proteins synthesized in simian virus 5-infected cells. In addition, the expressed F and HN proteins have been shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane in a biologically active form by indirect live cell immunofluorescence, the F-mediated formation of syncytia, and the ability of HN to cause the hemadsorption of erythrocytes to the infected cell surface. Images PMID:3865176

  4. Comparability of neuraminidase inhibition antibody titers measured by enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) for the analysis of influenza vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Maryna C; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Yonghong; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline; Wagner, Ralf; Thompson, Catherine I; Höschler, Katja; Laurie, Karen; Bai, Tian; Engelhardt, Othmar G; Wood, John

    2016-01-20

    Neuraminidase-inhibition (NI) antibody titers can be used to evaluate the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza vaccines and have provided evidence of serologic cross-reactivity between seasonal and pandemic H1N1 viruses. The traditional thiobarbituric acid assay is impractical for large serologic analyses, and therefore many laboratories use an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to determine serum NI antibody titers. The comparability of ELLA NI antibody titers when measured in different laboratories was unknown. Here we report a study conducted through the Consortium for the Standardisation of Influenza SeroEpidemiology (CONSISE) to evaluate the variability of the ELLA. NI antibody titers of a set of 12 samples were measured against both N1 and N2 neuraminidase antigens in 3 independent assays by each of 23 laboratories. For a sample repeated in the same assay, ≥96% of N1 and N2 assays had less than a 4-fold difference in titer. Comparison of the titers measured in assays conducted on 3 different days in the same laboratory showed that a four-fold difference in titer was uncommon. Titers of the same sera measured in different laboratories spanned 3 to 6 two-fold dilutions (i.e., 8-64 fold difference in titer), with an average percent geometric coefficient of variation (%GCV) of 112 and 82% against N1 and N2 antigens, respectively. The difference in titer as indicated by fold range and %GCV was improved by normalizing the NI titers to a standard that was included in each assay. This study identified background signal and the amount of antigen in the assay as critical factors that influence titer, providing important information toward development of a consensus ELLA protocol. PMID:26707221

  5. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) virus strain with an H274Y mutation in neuraminidase persists without drug pressure in infected mallards.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Holmberg, Fredrik; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Tolf, Conny; Waldenström, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-04-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and emerging human IAVs often contain gene segments from avian viruses. The active drug metabolite of oseltamivir (oseltamivir carboxylate [OC]), stockpiled as Tamiflu for influenza pandemic preparedness, is not removed by conventional sewage treatment and has been detected in river water. There, it may exert evolutionary pressure on avian IAV in waterfowl, resulting in the development of resistant viral variants. A resistant avian IAV can circulate among wild birds only if resistance does not restrict viral fitness and if the resistant virus can persist without continuous drug pressure. In this in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) study, we tested whether an OC-resistant avian IAV (H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA-H274Y) could retain resistance while drug pressure was gradually removed. Successively infected mallards were exposed to decreasing levels of OC, and fecal samples were analyzed for the neuraminidase sequence and phenotypic resistance. No reversion to wild-type virus was observed during the experiment, which included 17 days of viral transmission among 10 ducks exposed to OC concentrations below resistance induction levels. We conclude that resistance in avian IAV that is induced by exposure of the natural host to OC can persist in the absence of the drug. Thus, there is a risk that human-pathogenic IAVs that evolve from IAVs circulating among wild birds may contain resistance mutations. An oseltamivir-resistant pandemic IAV would pose a substantial public health threat. Therefore, our observations underscore the need for prudent oseltamivir use, upgraded sewage treatment, and surveillance for resistant IAVs in wild birds. PMID:25616792

  6. Neuraminidase produces a decrease of adherence of slime-forming Staphylococcus aureus to gelatin-impregnated polyester fiber graft fabric: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sacar, Mustafa; Onem, Gokhan; Baltalarli, Ahmet; Sacar, Suzan; Turgut, Huseyin; Goksin, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Vefa; Sakarya, Serhan

    2007-01-01

    Because slime-forming microorganisms are the major causative agents of graft infections, we aimed to investigate bacterial adherence in slime-forming and nonslime-forming Staphylococcus aureus and to determine the role of neuraminidase (NANase) on adherence to gelatin-impregnated polyester fiber graft fabric. An in vitro model was developed to quantitatively measure bacterial adherence to the surface of the graft. The grafts were divided into two groups - those colonized with slime-forming S. aureus and those colonized with nonslime-forming S. aureus. The grafts were put into sterile tubes and human plasma was instilled and incubated at 37 degrees C to perform fibrin deposition on the grafts. After 48 h of incubation, grafts were drained and inoculated with slime-forming or nonslime-forming S. aureus in triptic soy broth in the presence or absence of NANase. Following 36 h of incubation at 36 degrees C, grafts were vortexed and cultured to perform a colony count. Bacterial counts were expressed as total colony-forming units per square centimeter of graft. Slime-forming S. aureus had greater affinity with the graft compared with nonslime-forming S. aureus (P < 0.05). The adherence of slime-forming S. aureus was impaired by NANase treatment (P < 0.001) but NANase treatment of nonslime-forming S. aureus did not change the adherence to the graft (P > 0.05). These results show that slime plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular graft infection. Adherence of slime-forming S. aureus can be decreased by NANase treatment. This may have implications for the development of neuraminidase-embedded vascular grafts to diminish biomaterial-related infections. PMID:17846717

  7. In situ molecular identification of the Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Neuraminidase in patients with severe and fatal infections during a pandemic in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In April 2009, public health surveillance detected an increased number of influenza-like illnesses in Mexico City’s hospitals. The etiological agent was subsequently determined to be a spread of a worldwide novel influenza A (H1N1) triple reassortant. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that molecular detection of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strains is possible in archival material such as paraffin-embedded lung samples. Methods In order to detect A (H1N1) virus sequences in archived biological samples, eight paraffin-embedded lung samples from patients who died of pneumonia and respiratory failure were tested for influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase (NA) RNA using in situ RT-PCR. Results We detected NA transcripts in 100% of the previously diagnosed A (H1N1)-positive samples as a cytoplasmic signal. No expression was detected by in situ RT-PCR in two Influenza-like Illness A (H1N1)-negative patients using standard protocols nor in a non-related cervical cell line. In situ relative transcription levels correlated with those obtained when in vitro RT-PCR assays were performed. Partial sequences of the NA gene from A (H1N1)-positive patients were obtained by the in situ RT-PCR-sequencing method. Sequence analysis showed 98% similarity with influenza viruses reported previously in other places. Conclusions We have successfully amplified specific influenza A (H1N1) NA sequences using stored clinical material; results suggest that this strategy could be useful when clinical RNA samples are quantity limited, or when poor quality is obtained. Here, we provide a very sensitive method that specifically detects the neuraminidase viral RNA in lung samples from patients who died from pneumonia caused by Influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Mexico City. PMID:23327529

  8. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds' inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  9. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds’ inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  10. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  11. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  12. Screening of telomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kleideiter, Elke; Piotrowska, Kamilla; Klotz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Shortening of telomeres prevents cells from uncontrolled proliferation. Progressive telomere shortening occurs at each cell division until a critical telomeric length is reached. Telomerase expression is switched off after embryonic differentiation in most normal cells, but it is expressed in a very high percentage of tumors of different origin. Thus, telomerase is regarded as the best tumor marker and a promising novel molecular target for cancer treatment. Therefore, different strategies to inhibit telomerase have been developed. However, systematic screening of telomerase inhibitors has not been performed to compare their therapeutic potential. We propose a suitable strategy for estimation of the therapeutic potential of telomerase inhibitors, which is based on a systematic screening of different inhibitors in the same cell system. From the long list of compounds discussed in the literature, we have selected four telomerase inhibitors of different structure and mode of action: BRACO19 (G-quadruplex-interactive compound), BIBR1532 (non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor), 2'-O-methyl RNA, and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs; hTR antisense oligonucleotides). To determine minimal effective concentrations for telomerase inhibition, telomerase activity was measured using the cell-free telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. We also tested inhibitors in long-term cell-culture experiments by exposing A-549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentrations of inhibitors for a period of 99 days. Subsequently, telomerase activity of A-549 cells was investigated using the TRAP assay, and telomere length of samples was assessed by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blot analysis. PMID:18369824

  13. Amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase protein of an H9N2 avian influenza virus affect its airborne transmission in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Wei, Liangmeng; Yang, Yan; Wang, Bingxiao; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Gao, Lili; Cai, Yumei; Hou, Peiqiang; Yang, Huili; Wang, Airong; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jing; Chai, Tongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cases of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry are increasing throughout many Eurasian countries, and co-infections with other pathogens have resulted in high morbidity and mortality in poultry. Few studies have investigated the genetic factors of virus airborne transmission which determine the scope of this epidemic. In this study, we used specific-pathogen-free chickens housed in isolators to investigate the airborne transmissibility of five recombinant H9N2 AIV rescued by reverse genetic technology. The results show that airborne transmission of A/Chicken/Shandong/01/2008 (SD01) virus was related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene, and four amino acid mutations (D368E, S370L, E313K and G381D) within the head region of the SD01 NA, reduced virus replication in the respiratory tract of chickens, reduced virus NA activity, and resulted in a loss of airborne transmission ability in chickens. Similarly, reverse mutations of these four amino acids in the NA protein of r01/NASS virus, conferred an airborne transmission ability to the recombinant virus. We conclude that these four NA residues may be significant genetic markers for evaluating potential disease outbreak of H9N2 AIV, and propose that immediate attention should be paid to the airborne transmission of this virus. PMID:25928577

  14. An alpha2,6-sialyltransferase cloned from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 shows both sialyltransferase and neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Mine, Toshiki; Katayama, Sakurako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Tsunashima, Masako; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    We cloned, expressed, and characterized a novel beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119. The protein showed 56-96% identity to the marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases classified into glycosyltransferase family 80. The sialyltransferase activity of the N-terminal truncated form of the recombinant enzyme was 1477 U/L of Escherichia coli culture. The truncated recombinant enzyme was purified as a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis through 3 column chromatography steps. The enzyme had distinct activity compared with known marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases. Although alpha2,6-sialyltransferases cloned from marine bacteria, such as Photobacterium damselae strain JT0160, P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-145, and Photobacterium sp. strain JT-ISH-224, show only alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity, the recombinant enzyme cloned from P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 showed both alpha2,6-sialyltransferase and alpha2,6-linkage-specific neuraminidase activity. Our results provide important information toward a comprehensive understanding of the bacterial sialyltransferases belonging to the group 80 glycosyltransferase family in the CAZy database. PMID:19797322

  15. Production of an enzymatically active and immunogenic form of ectodomain of Porcine rubulavirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Cerriteño-Sánchez, José Luis; Santos-López, Gerardo; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma

    2016-04-10

    Blue-eye disease (BED) of swine is a viral disease endemic in Mexico. The etiological agent is a paramyxovirus classified as Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV-LPMV), which exhibits in its envelope the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein, the most immunogenic and a major target for vaccine development. We report in this study the obtaining of ectodomain of PoRV HN (eHN) through the Pichia pastoris expression system. The expression vector (pPICZαB-HN) was integrated by displacement into the yeast chromosome and resulted in a Mut(+) phenotype. Expressed eHN in the P. pastoris X33 strain was recovered from cell-free medium, featuring up to 67nmol/min/mg after 6 days of expression. eHN was recognized by the serum of infected pigs with strains currently circulating in the Mexican Bajio region. eHN induces antibodies in mice after 28 days of immunization with specific recognition in ELISA test. These antibodies were able to inhibit >80% replication by viral neutralization assays in cell culture. These studies show the obtaining of a protein with similar characteristics to the native HN and which may be a candidate to propose a vaccine or to use the antigen in a serologic diagnostic test. PMID:26940828

  16. Expression of a secreted version of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus: its evaluation as a diagnostic reagent.

    PubMed

    Zoth, Silvina Chimeno; Gómez, Evangelina; Carballeda, Juan Manuel; Carrillo, Elisa; Berinstein, Analía

    2011-05-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) constitutes, together with the fusion glycoprotein, the main surface antigen of this avian pathogen, which causes a highly contagious disease, relevant economically worldwide. The purpose of this work was to obtain the HN glycoprotein as a soluble antigen in culture supernatants of recombinant baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and to evaluate its application to the development of a recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (rELISA) for the analysis of chicken sera. A transfer vector for baculovirus containing the sequence of a melittin signal peptide was constructed and the sequence coding for HN protein without its own signal peptide was cloned. The recombinant protein was secreted and recovered easily from the culture medium of Sf9-infected cells. The recombinant protein was evaluated as antigen for ELISA coating the plates with the recovered HN using 79 positive and 142 negative samples. The Cohen kappa value resulted 0.91, indicating excellent agreement between the rELISA and the hemagglutinin inhibition tests. The rELISA was also compared with a commercial ELISA, finding high levels of agreement between both assays. The present results show that the cloning strategy developed yielded the HN protein free in the cell culture supernatant and that the recombinant protein retained its reactivity with anti-NDV HN antibodies in chicken sera. PMID:21908282

  17. Induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells by the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus Malaysian strain AF2240.

    PubMed

    Ghrici, Mohamed; El Zowalaty, Mohamed; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Ideris, Aini

    2013-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) exerts its naturally occurring oncolysis possibly through the induction of apoptosis. We hypothesized that the binding of the virus to the cell via the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein may be sufficient to not only induce apoptosis but to induce a higher apoptosis level than the parental NDV AF2240 virus. NDV AF2240 induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was analyzed and quantified. In addition, the complete HN gene of NDV strain AF2240 was amplified, sequenced and cloned into the pDisplay eukaryotic expression vector. HN gene expression was first detected at the cell surface membrane of the transfected MCF-7 cells. HN induction of apoptosis in transfected MCF-7 cells was analyzed and quantified. The expression of the HN gene alone was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells but it was a less potent apoptosis inducer compared to the parental NDV AF2240 strain. In conclusion, the NDV AF2240 strain is a more suitable antitumor candidate agent than its recombinant HN gene unless the latter is further improved by additional modifications. PMID:23807159

  18. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays. PMID:23820164

  19. The significance of naturally occurring neuraminidase quasispecies of H5N1 avian influenza virus on resistance to oseltamivir: a point of concern.

    PubMed

    Schaduangrat, Nalini; Phanich, Jiraphorn; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Ubol, Sukathida

    2016-06-01

    Viral adaptability and survival arise due to the presence of quasispecies populations that are able to escape the immune response or produce drug-resistant variants. However, the presence of H5N1 virus with natural mutations acquired without any drug selection pressure poses a great threat. Cloacal samples collected from the 2004-2005 epidemics in Thailand from Asian open-billed storks revealed one major and several minor quasispecies populations with mutations on the oseltamivir (OTV)-binding site of the neuraminidase gene (NA) without prior exposure to a drug. Therefore, this study investigated the binding between the NA-containing novel mutations and OTV drug using molecular dynamic simulations and plaque inhibition assay. The results revealed that the mutant populations, S236F mutant, S236F/C278Y mutant, A250V/V266A/P271H/G285S mutant and C278Y mutant, had a lower binding affinity with OTV as compared with the WT virus due to rearrangement of amino acid residues and increased flexibility in the 150-loop. This result was further emphasized through the IC50 values obtained for the major population and WT virus, 104.74 nM and 18.30 nM, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that H5N1 viruses isolated from wild birds have already acquired OTV-resistant point mutations without any exposure to a drug. PMID:26935590

  20. Conserved epitopes on the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of human and bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses: nucleotide sequence analysis of variants selected with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Coelingh, K J; Winter, C C; Murphy, B R; Rice, J M; Kimball, P C; Olmsted, R A; Collins, P L

    1986-01-01

    We have previously identified 11 epitopes located in two topologically nonoverlapping antigenic sites (A and B) and a third bridging site (C) on the human type 3 parainfluenza virus (PIV3) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which inhibit hemagglutination and virus infectivity (K. L. Coelingh, C. C. Winter, and B. R. Murphy, Virology 143:569-582, 1985). We have identified three additional antigenic sites (D, E, and F) on the HN molecule by competitive-binding assays of anti-HN MAbs which have no known biological activity. Epitopes in sites A, D, and F are conserved on the bovine PIV3 HN glycoprotein and also among a wide range of human isolates. The dideoxy method was used to identify nucleotide substitutions in the HN genes of antigenic variants selected with neutralizing MAbs representing epitopes in site A which are shared by human and bovine PIV3. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the variants were located in separate hydrophilic stretches of HN residues which are conserved in the primary structures of the HN proteins of both human and bovine PIV3 strains. Images PMID:2427750

  1. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant, Tetrameric and Enzymatically Active Influenza Neuraminidase for the Setup of an Enzyme-Linked Lectin-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prevato, Marua; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bonci, Alessandra; Uematsu, Yasushi; Anselmi, Giulia; Giusti, Fabiola; Bertholet, Sylvie; Legay, Francois; Telford, John Laird; Settembre, Ethan C.; Maione, Domenico; Cozzi, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Developing a universal influenza vaccine that induces broad spectrum and longer-term immunity has become an important potentially achievable target in influenza vaccine research and development. Hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are the two major influenza virus antigens. Although antibody responses against influenza virus are mainly directed toward HA, NA is reported to be more genetically stable; hence NA-based vaccines have the potential to be effective for longer time periods. NA-specific immunity has been shown to limit the spread of influenza virus, thus reducing disease symptoms and providing cross-protection against heterosubtypic viruses in mouse challenge experiments. The production of large quantities of highly pure and stable NA could be beneficial for the development of new antivirals, subunit-based vaccines, and novel diagnostic tools. In this study, recombinant NA (rNA) was produced in mammalian cells at high levels from both swine A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and avian A/turkey/Turkey/01/2005 (H5N1) influenza viruses. Biochemical, structural, and immunological characterizations revealed that the soluble rNAs produced are tetrameric, enzymatically active and immunogenic, and finally they represent good alternatives to conventionally used sources of NA in the Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay (ELLA). PMID:26280677

  2. Thio-ketosides of sialic acid containing aryl azides: potential photo-affinity probes for analysis of neuraminidases and sialic acid binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Lee, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    To date, only a single report describing the synthesis of thio-ketosides of sialic acid has appeared. In this procedure, the pseudo thiourea of acetoneuraminic acid methyl ester (NTU) was used to prepare the sodium thiolate salt. However, in their hands, the preparation of NTU was not straight-forward, and in subsequent reactions thio glycosides were not obtained. Therefore, they have developed an alternate route for introduction of the sulfhydryl group and have prepared novel thio-ketosides with aryl azides. The thio linkage is advantageous since it is not easily cleaved by neuraminidases and it allows incorporation of /sup 35/S as a convenient radioactive label. 2-deoxy-2-S-acetyl-4,7,8,9,- tetra-0-acetyl-N-acetyl neuraminic acid methyl ester was prepared (70% yield) from 2-chloro aceto- neuraminic acid methyl ester and potassium thioacetate in acetone at room temperature (RT) for 90 min. Selective hydrolysis of the thio acetate group was accomplished with equimolar sodium methoxide in DMF. After 10 min at RT, 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide was added and reaction continued for 60 min. Silicic acid purification, base hydrolysis, and gel filtration chromatography, gave 2'-deoxy-2'-(2-nitro-4-azido-thiophenyl)-..cap alpha..-D-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (35% yield). Other thio-arylazido ketosides were prepared similarly.

  3. Mucosal administration of raccoonpox virus expressing highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza neuraminidase is highly protective against H5N1 and seasonal influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Kamlangdee, Attapon; Osorio, Jorge E

    2015-09-22

    We previously generated recombinant poxviruses expressing influenza antigens and studied their efficacy as potential highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) vaccines in mice. While both modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expressing hemagglutinin (HA) provided strong protection when administered by parenteral routes, only RCN-neuraminidase (NA) showed promise as a mucosal vaccine. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of RCN-NA constructs by both intradermal (ID) and intranasal (IN) routes. Surprisingly, while RCN-NA completely protected mice when administered by the IN route, it failed to protect mice when administered by the ID route. After challenge, significantly less virus induced pathology was observed in the lungs of mice vaccinated with RCN-NA by the IN route as compared to the ID route. Furthermore, IN administration of RCN-NA elicited neutralizing antibodies detected in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. We also determined the role of cellular immune responses in protection elicited by RCN-NA by depleting CD4 and CD8 T cells prior to challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that antibodies against NA can block viral entry in addition to viral spread in vitro. These studies demonstrate the importance of mucosal administration of RCN viral vectors for eliciting protective immune responses against the NA antigen. PMID:26271828

  4. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV. PMID:26873815

  5. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  6. [STAT3 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Clinical efficacies of various molecular-targeted drugs have been recently demonstrated. Most of these drugs are kinase inhibitors. A most successful drug Glivec is an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl fusion kinase, derived from a well-known causative chromosome translocation of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). Although other kinase inhibitors have also proved to be useful in the therapy of malignant diseases including an ALK inhibitor for lung carcinomas, a general problem of kinase inhibitors is their lowspecificities. Therefore, the complication of these drugs must be overcome. Recently, trials to develop moleculartargeted therapy whose targets are molecules other than kinases have also been promising. Among molecular targets, STAT3 has attracted a great deal of researchers' attention because it is constitutively activated in most malignant tumors and plays important roles in carcinogenesis. This article summarizes the current situation and problems to be solved with STAT3 inhibitors as well as our recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of STAT3 activation. PMID:21368456

  7. Aromatase and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Lu, Q; Long, B

    1999-01-01

    Inhibitors of aromatase (estrogen synthetase) have been developed as treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. Both steroidal substrate analogs, type I inhibitors, which inactivate the enzyme and non-steroidal competitive reversible, type II inhibitors, are now available. 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), the first selective aromatase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce serum estrogen concentrations and cause complete and partial responses in approximately 25% of patients with hormone responsive disease who have relapsed from previous endocrine treatment. Letrozole (CGS 20, 269) and anastrozole (ZN 1033) have been recently approved for treatment. Both suppress serum estrogen levels to the limit of assay detection. Letrozole has been shown to be significantly superior to megace in overall response rates and time to treatment failure, whereas anastrozole was found to improve survival in comparison to megace. Both were better tolerated than the latter. The potential of aromatase within the breast as a significant source of estrogen mediating tumor proliferation and which might determine the outcome of inhibitor treatment was explored. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, aromatase and mRNAarom was detected mainly in the epithelial cells of the terminal ductal lobular units (TDLU) of the normal breast and also in breast tumor epithelial cells as well as some stromal cells. Increase in proliferation, measured by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and by PCNA immunostaining in response to testosterone was observed in histocultures of breast cancer samples. This effect could be inhibited by 4-OHA and implies that intratumoral aromatase has functional significance. An intratumoral aromatase model in the ovariectomized nude mouse was developed which simulated the hormone responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patient. This model also allows evaluation of the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens in tumors of estrogen receptor positive

  8. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  9. Protection of pigs against pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus infection by hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinants.

    PubMed

    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Influenza is an important respiratory disease of pigs, and may lead to novel human pathogens like the 2009 pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (SoIV). Therefore, improved influenza vaccines for pigs are required. Recently, we demonstrated that single intranasal immunization with a hemagglutinin (HA)-expressing pseudorabies virus recombinant of vaccine strain Bartha (PrV-Ba) protected pigs from H1N1 SoIV challenge (Klingbeil et al., 2014). Now we investigated enhancement of efficacy by prime-boost vaccination and/or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, a novel PrV-Ba recombinant expressing codon-optimized N1 neuraminidase (NA) was included. In vitro replication of this virus was only slightly affected compared to parental virus. Unlike HA, the abundantly expressed NA was efficiently incorporated into PrV particles. Immunization of pigs with the two PrV recombinants, either singly or in combination, induced B cell proliferation and the expected SoIV-specific antibodies, whose titers increased substantially after boost vaccination. After immunization of animals with either PrV recombinant H1N1 SoIV challenge virus replication was significantly reduced compared to PrV-Ba vaccinated or naïve controls. Protective efficacy of HA-expressing PrV was higher than of NA-expressing PrV, and not significantly enhanced by combination. Despite higher serum antibody titers obtained after intramuscular immunization, transmission of challenge virus to naïve contact animals was only prevented after intranasal prime-boost vaccination with HA-expressing PrV-Ba. PMID:25599604

  10. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  11. Therapeutic activity of intramuscular peramivir in mice infected with a recombinant influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus containing the H275Y neuraminidase mutation.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Boivin, Guy

    2012-08-01

    The therapeutic activity of intramuscular (IM) peramivir was evaluated in mice infected with a recombinant influenza A/WSN/33 virus containing the H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation known to confer oseltamivir resistance. Regimens consisted of single (90 mg/kg of body weight) or multiple (45 mg/kg daily for 5 days) IM peramivir doses that were initiated 24 h or 48 h postinfection (p.i.). An oral oseltamivir regimen (1 or 10 mg/kg daily for 5 days) was used for comparison. Untreated animals had a mortality rate of 75% and showed a mean weight loss of 16.9% on day 5 p.i. When started at 24 h p.i., both peramivir regimens prevented mortality and significantly reduced weight loss (P < 0.001) and lung viral titers (LVT) (P < 0.001). A high dose (10 mg/kg) of oseltamivir initiated at 24 h p.i. also prevented mortality and significantly decreased weight loss (P < 0.05) and LVT (P < 0.001) compared to the untreated group results. In contrast, a low dose (1 mg/kg) of oseltamivir did not show any benefits. When started at 48 h p.i., both peramivir regimens prevented mortality and significantly reduced weight loss (P < 0.01) and LVT (P < 0.001) whereas low-dose or high-dose oseltamivir regimens had no effect on mortality rates, body weight loss, and LVT. Our results show that single-dose and multiple-dose IM peramivir regimens retain clinical and virological activities against the A/H1N1 H275Y variant despite some reduction in susceptibility when assessed in vitro using enzymatic assays. IM peramivir could constitute an alternative for treatment of oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 infections, although additional studies are warranted to support such a recommendation. PMID:22664977

  12. Protection against avian influenza H9N2 virus challenge by immunization with hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing DNA in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Meizhen; Fang Fang; Chen Yan; Wang Hualin; Chen Quanjiao; Chang Haiyan; Wang Fuyan; Wang Hanzhong; Zhang Ran; Chen Ze . E-mail: chenze2005@263.net

    2006-05-19

    Avian influenza viruses of H9N2 subtype are widely spread in avian species. The viruses have recently been transmitted to mammalian species, including humans, accelerating the efforts to devise protective strategies against them. In this study, an avian influenza H9N2 virus strain (A/Chicken/Jiangsu/7/2002), isolated in Jiangsu Province, China, was used to infect BALB/c mice for adaptation. After five lung-to-lung passages, the virus was stably proliferated in a large quantity in the murine lung and caused the deaths of mice. In addition, we explored the protection induced by H9N2 virus hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-expressing DNAs in BALB/c mice. Female BALB/c mice aged 6-8 weeks were immunized once or twice at a 3-week interval with HA-DNA and NA-DNA by electroporation, respectively, each at a dose of 3, 10 or 30 {mu}g. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (40x LD{sub 5}) of influenza H9N2 virus four weeks after immunization once or one week after immunization twice. The protections of DNA vaccines were evaluated by the serum antibody titers, residual lung virus titers, and survival rates of the mice. The result showed that immunization once with not less than 10 {mu}g or twice with 3 {mu}g HA-DNA or NA-DNA provided effective protection against homologous avian influenza H9N2 virus.

  13. Anti-Tumor Effects of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase of Newcastle Disease Virus in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongyun; Sun, Lili; Li, Chang; Hu, Ningning; Sheng, Yuan; Chen, Zhifei; Li, Xiao; Chi, Baorong; Jin, Ningyi

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy has been an attractive drug platform for targeted therapy of cancer over the past few years. Viral vectors can be used to target and lyse cancer cells, but achieving good efficacy and specificity with this treatment approach is a major challenge. Here, we assessed the ability of a novel dual-specific anti-tumor oncolytic adenovirus, expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene from the Newcastle disease virus under the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter (Ad-hTERTp-E1a-HN), to inhibit esophageal cancer EC-109 cells in culture and to reduce tumor burden in xenografted BALB/c nude mice. In vitro, infection with Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN could inhibit the growth of EC-109 cells significantly and also protect normal human liver cell line L02 from growth suppression in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN also effectively and selectively decreased the sialic acid level on EC-109 cells, but not on L02 cells. Furthermore, Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN was shown to induce the apoptosis pathway via acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining (AO/EB staining), increase reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and release cytochrome c. In vivo, xenografted BALB/c nude mice were treated via intratumoral or intravenous injections of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN. Although both treatments showed an obvious suppression in tumor volume, only Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN delivered via intratumoral injection elicited a complete response to treatment. These results reinforced previous findings and highlighted the potential therapeutic application of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN for treatment of esophageal cancer in clinical trials. PMID:24553109

  14. Identification of Domains on the Fusion (F) Protein Trimer That Influence the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Specificity of the F Protein in Mediating Cell-Cell Fusion ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tsurudome, Masato; Ito, Morihiro; Nishio, Machiko; Nakahashi, Mito; Kawano, Mitsuo; Komada, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    For most paramyxoviruses, virus type-specific interaction between fusion (F) protein and attachment protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], hemagglutinin [H], or glycoprotein [G]) is a prerequisite for mediating virus-cell fusion and cell-cell fusion. Our previous cell-cell fusion assay using the chimeric F proteins of human parainfluenza virus 2 (HPIV2) and simian virus 41 (SV41) suggested that the middle region of the HPIV2 F protein contains the site(s) that determines its specificity for the HPIV2 HN protein. In the present study, we further investigated the sites of the F protein that could be critical for determining the HN protein specificity. By analyzing the reported structure of the F protein of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), we found that four major domains (M1, M2, M3, and M4) and five minor domains (A to E) in the middle region of the PIV5 F protein were exposed on the trimer surface. We then replaced these domains with the SV41 F counterparts individually or in combination and examined whether the resulting chimeras could mediate cell-cell fusion when coexpressed with the SV41 HN protein. The results showed that a chimera designated M(1+2), which harbored SV41 F-derived domains M1 and M2, mediated cell-cell fusion with the coexpressed SV41 HN protein, suggesting that these domains are involved in determining the HN protein specificity. Intriguingly, another chimera which harbored the SV41 F-derived domain B in addition to domains M1 and M2 showed increased specificity for the SV41 HN protein compared to that of M(1+2), although it was capable of mediating cell-cell fusion by itself. PMID:21270148

  15. Newcastle Disease Virus-Vectored Vaccines Expressing the Hemagglutinin or Neuraminidase Protein of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Protect against Virus Challenge in Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Nayak, Baibaswata; Yang, Lijuan; Finneyfrock, Brad W.; Cook, Anthony; Andersen, Hanne; Torres-Velez, Fernando; Murphy, Brian R.; Samal, Siba K.; Collins, Peter L.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) causes periodic outbreaks in humans, resulting in severe infections with a high (60%) incidence of mortality. The circulating strains have low human-to-human transmissibility; however, widespread concerns exist that enhanced transmission due to mutations could lead to a global pandemic. We previously engineered Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, as a vector to express the HPAIV hemagglutinin (HA) protein, and we showed that this vaccine (NDV/HA) induced a high level of HPAIV-specific mucosal and serum antibodies in primates when administered through the respiratory tract. Here we developed additional NDV-vectored vaccines expressing either HPAIV HA in which the polybasic cleavage site was replaced with that from a low-pathogenicity strain of influenza virus [HA(RV)], in order to address concerns of enhanced vector replication or genetic exchange, or HPAIV neuraminidase (NA). The three vaccine viruses [NDV/HA, NDV/HA(RV), and NDV/NA] were administered separately to groups of African green monkeys by the intranasal/intratracheal route. An additional group of animals received NDV/HA by aerosol administration. Each of the vaccine constructs was highly restricted for replication, with only low levels of virus shedding detected in respiratory secretions. All groups developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous strains of HPAIV and were protected against challenge with 2 × 107 PFU of homologous HPAIV. Thus, needle-free, highly attenuated NDV-vectored vaccines expressing either HPAIV HA, HA(RV), or NA have been developed and demonstrated to be individually immunogenic and protective in a primate model of HPAIV infection. The finding that HA(RV) was protective indicates that it would be preferred for inclusion in a vaccine. The study also identified NA as an independent protective HPAIV antigen in primates. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of aerosol

  16. The paramyxovirus simian virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein, but not the fusion glycoprotein, is internalized via coated pits and enters the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Leser, G P; Ector, K J; Lamb, R A

    1996-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) are expressed on the surface of virus-infected cells. Although the F protein was found to be expressed stably, the HN protein was internalized from the plasma membrane. HN protein lacks known internalization signals in its cytoplasmic domain that are common to many integral membrane proteins that are internalized via clathrin-coated pits. Thus, the cellular pathway of HN protein internalization was examined. Biochemical analysis indicated that HN was lost from the cell surface with a t1/2 of approximately 45-50 min and turned over with a t1/2 of approximately 2 h. Immunofluorescent analysis showed internalized SV5 HN in vesicle-like structures in a juxtanuclear pattern coincident with the localization of ovalbumin. In contrast the SV5 F glycoprotein and the HN glycoprotein of the highly related parainfluenza virus 3 (hPIV-3) were found only on the cell surface. Immunogold staining of HN on the surface of SV5-infected CV-1 cells and examination using electron microscopy, showed heavy surface labeling that gradually decreased with time. Concomitantly, gold particles were detected in the endosomal system and with increasing time, gold-labeled structures having the morphology of lysosomes were observed. On the plasma membrane approximately 5% of the gold-labeled HN was found in coated pits. The inhibition of the pinching-off of coated pits from the plasma membrane by cytosol acidification significantly reduced HN internalization. Internalized HN was co-localized with gold-conjugated transferrin, a marker for the early endosomal compartments, and with gold-conjugated bovine serum albumin, a marker for late endosomal compartments. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the HN glycoprotein is internalized via clathrin-coated pits and delivered to the endocytic pathway. Images PMID:8741847

  17. Neuraminidase-Inhibiting Antibody Is a Correlate of Cross-Protection against Lethal H5N1 Influenza Virus in Ferrets Immunized with Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lorena E.; Barr, Ian G.; Gilbertson, Brad; Lowther, Sue; Kachurin, Anatoly; Kachurina, Olga; Klippel, Jessica; Bodle, Jesse; Pearse, Martin; Middleton, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    In preparing for the threat of a pandemic of avian H5N1 influenza virus, we need to consider the significant delay (4 to 6 months) necessary to produce a strain-matched vaccine. As some degree of cross-reactivity between seasonal influenza vaccines and H5N1 virus has been reported, this was further explored in the ferret model to determine the targets of protective immunity. Ferrets were vaccinated with two intramuscular inoculations of trivalent inactivated split influenza vaccine or subcomponent vaccines, with and without adjuvant, and later challenged with a lethal dose of A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) influenza virus. We confirmed that vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine afforded partial protection against lethal H5N1 challenge and showed that use of either AlPO4 or Iscomatrix adjuvant with the vaccine resulted in complete protection against disease and death. The protection was due exclusively to the H1N1 vaccine component, and although the hemagglutinin contributed to protection, the dominant protective response was targeted toward the neuraminidase (NA) and correlated with sialic acid cleavage-inhibiting antibody titers. Purified heterologous NA formulated with Iscomatrix adjuvant was also protective. These results suggest that adjuvanted seasonal trivalent vaccine could be used as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality from H5N1 prior to the availability of a specific vaccine. The data also highlight that an inducer of cross-protective immunity is the NA, a protein whose levels are not normally monitored in vaccines and whose capacity to induce immunity in recipients is not normally assessed. PMID:23283953

  18. Independent-Trajectories Thermodynamic-Integration Free-Energy Changes for Biomolecular Systems: Determinants of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibition by Peramivir

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Free-energy changes are essential physicochemical quantities for understanding most biochemical processes. Yet, the application of accurate thermodynamic-integration (TI) computation to biological and macromolecular systems is limited by finite-sampling artifacts. In this paper, we employ independent-trajectories thermodynamic-integration (IT-TI) computation to estimate improved free-energy changes and their uncertainties for (bio)molecular systems. IT-TI aids sampling statistics of the thermodynamic macrostates for flexible associating partners by ensemble averaging of multiple, independent simulation trajectories. We study peramivir (PVR) inhibition of the H5N1 avian influenza virus neuraminidase flexible receptor (N1). Binding site loops 150 and 119 are highly mobile, as revealed by N1-PVR 20-ns molecular dynamics. Due to such heterogeneous sampling, standard TI binding free-energy estimates span a rather large free-energy range, from a 19% underestimation to a 29% overestimation of the experimental reference value (−62.2 ± 1.8 kJ mol−1). Remarkably, our IT-TI binding free-energy estimate (−61.1 ± 5.4 kJ mol−1) agrees with a 2% relative difference. In addition, IT-TI runs provide a statistics-based free-energy uncertainty for the process of interest. Using ∼800 ns of overall sampling, we investigate N1-PVR binding determinants by IT-TI alchemical modifications of PVR moieties. These results emphasize the dominant electrostatic contribution, particularly through the N1 E277−PVR guanidinium interaction. Future drug development may be also guided by properly tuning ligand flexibility and hydrophobicity. IT-TI will allow estimation of relative free energies for systems of increasing size, with improved reliability by employing large-scale distributed computing. PMID:19461872

  19. Molecular Basis for Broad Neuraminidase Immunity: Conserved Epitopes in Seasonal and Pandemic H1N1 as Well as H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Gao, Jin; Xu, Kemin; Chen, Hongjun; Couzens, Laura K.; Rivers, Katie H.; Easterbrook, Judy D.; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Lei; Rajabi, Mohsen; Ye, Jianqiang; Sultana, Ishrat; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiufan; Perez, Daniel R.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes, pose a serious threat to public health. Neuraminidase (NA)-related immunity contributes to protection against influenza virus infection. Antibodies to the N1 subtype provide protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 as well as H5N1 virus challenge. Since neither the strain-specific nor conserved epitopes of N1 have been identified, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that exhibit different reactivity spectra with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and used these MAbs to map N1 antigenic domains. We identified 12 amino acids essential for MAb binding to the NA of a recent seasonal H1N1 virus, A/Brisbane/59/2007. Of these, residues 248, 249, 250, 341, and 343 are recognized by strain-specific group A MAbs, while residues 273, 338, and 339 are within conserved epitope(s), which allows cross-reactive group B MAbs to bind the NAs of seasonal H1N1 and the 1918 and 2009 pandemic (09pdm) H1N1 as well as H5N1 viruses. A single dose of group B MAbs administered prophylactically fully protected mice against lethal challenge with seasonal and 09pdm H1N1 viruses and resulted in significant protection against the highly pathogenic wild-type H5N1 virus. Another three N1 residues (at positions 396, 397, and 456) are essential for binding of cross-reactive group E MAbs, which differ from group B MAbs in that they do not bind 09pdm H1N1 viruses. The identification of conserved N1 epitopes reveals the molecular basis for NA-mediated immunity between H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and demonstrates the potential for developing broadly protective NA-specific antibody treatments for influenza. PMID:23785204

  20. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  1. Screening and identification of inhibitors against influenza A virus from a US drug collection of 1280 drugs.

    PubMed

    An, Liwei; Liu, Rui; Tang, Wei; Wu, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xulin

    2014-09-01

    Infection with influenza A virus is still a global concern since it causes significant mortality, morbidity and economic loss. New burst pandemics and rapid emergence of drug-resistance strains in recent years call for novel antiviral therapies. One promising way to overcome this problem is searching new inhibitors among thousands of drugs approved in the clinic for the treatment of different diseases or approved to be safe by clinical trials. In the present work, a collection of 1280 compounds, most of which have been clinically used in human or animal, were screened for anti-influenza activity and 41 hits (SI>4.0) were obtained. Next the 18 hit compounds with SI >10.0 were tested for antiviral activity against 7 other influenza virus strains in canine-originated MDCK cells, 9 compounds exhibited broad antiviral spectrum. The antiviral effects of the 9 compounds were also confirmed in human-originated A549 cells and chicken-originated DF1 cells, by infectious virus yield reduction assay and indirect immunofluorescent assay. Results from the time of addition assay showed that the 9 candidates impaired different stages of influenza virus life cycle, indicating they are novel inhibitors with different mechanisms compared with the existing M2 ion-channel blockers or neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. Taken together, our findings provide 9 novel drug candidates for the treatment of influenza virus infection. Further mechanism of action study of these inhibitors may lead to the discovery of new anti-influenza targets and structure-activity relationship (SAR) study can be initiated to improve the efficacy of these new classes of influenza inhibitors. PMID:24971493

  2. Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. Purification by affinity chromatography, characterization and isolation of an active fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris, A D; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor (alpha CPI) was purified by a two-stage method: affinity chromatography on S-carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose, and high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography. The protein was obtained as a form of Mr about 64 000 and material of higher Mr (about 100 000). In sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with reduction, both forms showed a major component of Mr 64 000. An antiserum was raised against alpha CPI, and 'rocket' immunoassays showed the mean concentration in sera from 19 individuals to be 35.9 mg/dl. Both low-Mr and high-Mr forms of alpha CPI were confirmed to be sialoglycoproteins by the decrease in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with neuraminidase. alpha CPI was shown immunologically to be distinct from antithrombin III and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, two serine proteinase inhibitors from plasma with somewhat similar Mr values. alpha CPI was also distinct from cystatins A and B, the two intracellular low-Mr cysteine proteinase inhibitors from human liver. Complexes of alpha CPI with papain were detectable in immunoelectrophoresis, but dissociated to free enzyme and intact inhibitor in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The stoichiometry of binding of papain was close to 1:1 for both low-Mr and high-Mr forms. alpha CPI was found to be a tight-binding inhibitor of papain and human cathepsins H and L (Ki 34 pM, 1.1 nM and 62 pM respectively). By contrast, inhibition of cathepsin B was much weaker, Ki being about 35 microM. Dipeptidyl peptidase I also was weakly inhibited. Digestion of alpha CPI with bromelain gave rise to an inhibitory fragment of Mr about 22 000, which was isolated. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6548132

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  4. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  5. A Novel Endonuclease Inhibitor Exhibits Broad-Spectrum Anti-Influenza Virus Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Lerner, Christian; Kreis, Lukas; Gasser, Rodolfo; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Najera, Isabel; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-09-01

    Antiviral drugs are important in preventing and controlling influenza, particularly when vaccines are ineffective or unavailable. A single class of antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), is recommended for treating influenza. The limited therapeutic options and the potential risk of antiviral resistance are driving the search for additional small-molecule inhibitors that act on influenza virus proteins. The acid polymerase (PA) of influenza viruses is a promising target for new antivirals because of its essential role in initiating virus transcription. Here, we characterized a novel compound, RO-7, identified as a putative PA endonuclease inhibitor. RO-7 was effective when added before the cessation of genome replication, reduced polymerase activity in cell-free systems, and decreased relative amounts of viral mRNA and genomic RNA during influenza virus infection. RO-7 specifically inhibited the ability of the PA endonuclease domain to cleave a nucleic acid substrate. RO-7 also inhibited influenza A viruses (seasonal and 2009 pandemic H1N1 and seasonal H3N2) and B viruses (Yamagata and Victoria lineages), zoonotic viruses (H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2), and NAI-resistant variants in plaque reduction, yield reduction, and cell viability assays in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with nanomolar to submicromolar 50% effective concentrations (EC50s), low toxicity, and favorable selective indices. RO-7 also inhibited influenza virus replication in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Overall, RO-7 exhibits broad-spectrum activity against influenza A and B viruses in multiple in vitro assays, supporting its further characterization and development as a potential antiviral agent for treating influenza. PMID:27381402

  6. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  7. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  8. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  9. Serum amyloid P is a sialylated glycoprotein inhibitor of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Job, Emma R; Bottazzi, Barbara; Gilbertson, Brad; Edenborough, Kathryn M; Brown, Lorena E; Mantovani, Alberto; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    Members of the pentraxin family, including PTX3 and serum amyloid P component (SAP), have been reported to play a role in innate host defence against a range of microbial pathogens, yet little is known regarding their antiviral activities. In this study, we demonstrate that human SAP binds to human influenza A virus (IAV) strains and mediates a range of antiviral activities, including inhibition of IAV-induced hemagglutination (HA), neutralization of virus infectivity and inhibition of the enzymatic activity of the viral neuraminidase (NA). Characterization of the anti-IAV activity of SAP after periodate or bacterial sialidase treatment demonstrated that α(2,6)-linked sialic acid residues on the glycosidic moiety of SAP are critical for recognition by the HA of susceptible IAV strains. Other proteins of the innate immune system, namely human surfactant protein A and porcine surfactant protein D, have been reported to express sialylated glycans which facilitate inhibition of particular IAV strains, yet the specific viral determinants for recognition of these inhibitors have not been defined. Herein, we have selected virus mutants in the presence of human SAP and identified specific residues in the receptor-binding pocket of the viral HA which are critical for recognition and therefore susceptibility to the antiviral activities of SAP. Given the widespread expression of α(2,6)-linked sialic acid in the human respiratory tract, we propose that SAP may act as an effective receptor mimic to limit IAV infection of airway epithelial cells. PMID:23544079

  10. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of the neuraminidase gene of pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus circulating in the South American region.

    PubMed

    Comas, Victoria; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Soñora, Martin; Goñi, Natalia; Pereyra, Silvana; Ifran, Silvana; Moreno, Pilar; Cristina, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Molecular characterization of circulating influenza A viruses (IAV) in all regions of the world is essential to detect mutations potentially involved in increased virulence, anti-viral resistance and immune escape. In order to gain insight into these matters, a phylogenetic analysis of the neuraminidase (NA) gene of 146 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) influenza A virus strains isolated in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay from 2009 to 2013 was performed. Comparison of vaccine strain A/California/7/2009 included in the influenza vaccine recommended for the Southern hemisphere from 2010 through 2013 influenza seasons and strains isolated in South America revealed several amino acid substitutions. Mapping of these substitutions revealed that most of them are located at the surface of the protein and do not interfere with the active site. 3.4% of the strains enrolled in these studies carried the H275Y substitution that confers resistance to oseltamivir. Strains isolated in South America differ from vaccine in two predicted B-cell epitope regions present at positions 102-103 and 351-352 of the NA protein. Moreover, vaccine and strains isolated in Paraguay differ also in an epitope present at position 229. These differences among strains isolated in South America and vaccine strain suggests that these epitopes may not be present in strains isolated in this region. A potential new N-linked glycosylation site was observed in the NA protein of an H1N1pdm IAV strain isolated in Brazil. The results of these studies revealed several genetic and antigenic differences in the NA of H1N1pdm IAV among vaccine and strains circulating in South America. All these findings contribute to our understanding of the course of genetic and antigenic evolution of H1N1pdm IAV populations circulating in the South American region and, consequently, contribute to the study and selection of future and more appropriate vaccines and anti-viral drugs. PMID:25479596

  12. Comparable Fitness and Transmissibility between Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic 2009 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses with the H275Y Neuraminidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Diana D. Y.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Sia, Sin Fun; Chiu, Hsin-Ping; Cheung, Peter P. H.; Chan, Michael C. W.

    2012-01-01

    Limited antiviral compounds are available for the control of influenza, and the emergence of resistant variants would further narrow the options for defense. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir carboxylate, has been identified among the seasonal H1N1 and 2009 pandemic influenza viruses; however, those H275Y resistant variants demonstrated distinct epidemiological outcomes in humans. Specifically, dominance of the H275Y variant over the oseltamivir-sensitive viruses was only reported for a seasonal H1N1 variant during 2008-2009. Here, we systematically analyze the effect of the H275Y NA mutation on viral fitness and transmissibility of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses. The NA genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 A/California/04/09 (CA04), seasonal H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NewCal), and A/Brisbane/59/2007 (Brisbane) were individually introduced into the genetic background of CA04. The H275Y mutation led to reduced NA enzyme activity, an increased Km for 3′-sialylactose or 6′-sialylactose, and decreased infectivity in mucin-secreting human airway epithelial cells compared to the oseltamivir-sensitive wild-type counterparts. Attenuated pathogenicity in both RG-CA04NA-H275Y and RG-CA04 × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses was observed in ferrets compared to RG-CA04 virus, although the transmissibility was minimally affected. In parallel experiments using recombinant Brisbane viruses differing by hemagglutinin and NA, comparable direct contact and respiratory droplet transmissibilities were observed among RG-NewCalHA,NA, RG-NewCalHA,NA-H275Y, RG-BrisbaneHA,NA-H275Y, and RG-NewCalHA × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses. Our results demonstrate that, despite the H275Y mutation leading to a minor reduction in viral fitness, the transmission potentials of three different antigenic strains carrying this mutation were comparable in the naïve ferret model. PMID:22811535

  13. Estimating the fitness advantage conferred by permissive neuraminidase mutations in recent oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeff; Hooper, Kathryn A; Petrie, Stephen; Lee, Raphael; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Reh, Lucia; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Baas, Chantal; Xue, Lumin; Vitesnik, Sophie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; McVernon, Jodie; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; McCaw, James M; Bloom, Jesse D; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-04-01

    Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), the proportion of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR) has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA) H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1)pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide. PMID:24699865

  14. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action. Working to delay carbohydrate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, they control postprandial hyperglycaemia and provide unquestioned cardiovascular benefit. Specially suited for a traditional Pakistani carbohydrate-rich diet, AGIs have been termed the 'untapped diamonds' of diabetology. The use of these oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) that target pathophysiology in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, notably to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia will inevitably increase with time. This review describes the history of their development, mechanism of action, basic and clinical pharmacology, and suggests practical, evidence-based guidance for their optimal use. PMID:24864650

  15. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  16. PARP inhibitors and more.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  17. PARP inhibitors and more

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  18. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs. PMID:26168369

  19. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Toroian, Damon; Lim, Joo Eun

    2009-01-01

    One of our goals is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study revealed that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril, whereas molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization: that macromolecular inhibitors of apatite growth favor fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting crystal growth in the solution outside of the fibril. To test this mechanism, we developed a system in which crystal formation is driven by homogeneous nucleation at high calcium phosphate concentration and the only macromolecule in solution is fetuin, a 48-kDa inhibitor of apatite growth. Our experiments with this system demonstrated that fetuin determines the location of mineral growth; in the presence of fetuin mineral grows exclusively within the fibril, whereas in its absence mineral grows in solution outside the fibril. Additional experiments showed that fetuin is also able to localize calcification to the interior of synthetic matrices that have size exclusion characteristics similar to those of collagen and that it does so by selectively inhibiting mineral growth outside of these matrices. We termed this new calcification mechanism “mineralization by inhibitor exclusion,” the selective mineralization of a matrix using a macromolecular inhibitor of mineral growth that is excluded from that matrix. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the possible role of this mechanism in bone mineralization. PMID:19414589

  20. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  1. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  2. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  3. A new charge-tagged proline-based organocatalyst for mechanistic studies using electrospray mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Willms, J Alexander; Beel, Rita; Schmidt, Martin L; Mundt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary A new 4-hydroxy-L-proline derivative with a charged 1-ethylpyridinium-4-phenoxy substituent has been synthesized with the aim of facilitating mechanistic studies of proline-catalyzed reactions by ESI mass spectrometry. The charged residue ensures a strongly enhanced ESI response compared to neutral unmodified proline. The connection by a rigid linker fixes the position of the charge tag far away from the catalytic center in order to avoid unwanted interactions. The use of a charged catalyst leads to significantly enhanced ESI signal abundances for every catalyst-derived species which are the ones of highest interest present in a reacting solution. The new charged proline catalyst has been tested in the direct asymmetric inverse aldol reaction between aldehydes and diethyl ketomalonate. Two intermediates in accordance with the List–Houk mechanism for enamine catalysis have been detected and characterized by gas-phase fragmentation. In addition, their temporal evolution has been followed using a microreactor continuous-flow technique. PMID:25246962

  4. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  5. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  6. Repositioning of DHFR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lele, Arundhati Chandrashekhar; Mishra, Deepak Amarnath; Kamil, Tengku Karmila; Bhakta, Sanjib; Degani, Mariam Sohel

    2016-01-01

    Development of new drugs is a time-consuming, hugely expensive and an uncertain endeavor. The pharmaceutical industry is looking for cost-effective alternatives with reduced risks of drug failure. Validated target machinery along with established inhibitors indicates usefulness in drug design, discovery and further development. Folate metabolism, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, represents an essential druggable target for chemotherapy. Numerous enzymes in the cell replication cycle use folate either as a cofactor or as a substrate. DHFR, an enzyme of the folate biosynthesis pathway is an established chemotherapeutic target, initially explored for anti-cancer drug discovery. Diaminopteridines e.g. methotrexate and aminopterin, primarily used as anti-cancer agents, are folic acid analogues, first reported in late 1940's, used to produce temporary remission of acute leukaemia in children. However, due to the toxicity of these drugs, they could not be used for other therapeutic implications such as in the treatment of infectious diseases. Development of newer diaminopteridine derivatives has helped in repositioning their therapeutic usefulness. These analogues have now been proven as anti-parasitic, immuno-suppressants, anti-bacterial agents, to enlist a few therapeutic applications. Likewise, diaminopyrimidine, diaminoquinazoline and diaminodihydrotriazines are being explored for structural modifications by which they can be repurposed from their originally developed medicinal applicability and exploited for various other infectious disease conditions. In this review, we encompass the study of DHFR inhibitors potentially to be repurposed for different infectious disease case scenario and also highlight the novel anti-infective drug discovery benefits therein. PMID:26881719

  7. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  8. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  9. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  10. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  11. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  12. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  13. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  14. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  15. Aromatase inhibitors for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-12-01

    Some men with severely defective sperm production commonly have excess aromatase activity, reflected by low serum testosterone and relatively elevated estradiol levels. Aromatase inhibitors can increase endogenous testosterone production and serum testosterone levels. Treatment of infertile males with the aromatase inhibitors testolactone, anastrazole, and letrozole has been associated with increased sperm production and return of sperm to the ejaculate in men with non-obstructive azoospermia. Use of the aromatase inhibitors anastrazole (1 mg/day) and letrozole (2.5 mg/day) represent off-label use of these agents for impaired spermatogenesis in men with excess aromatase activity (abnormal testosterone/estradiol [T/E] ratios). Side effects have rarely been reported. Randomized controlled trials are needed to define the magnitude of benefit of aromatase inhibitor treatment for infertile men. PMID:23103016

  16. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  17. [Cancer therapy by PARP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases(PARP) synthesize the ADP-ribose polymers onto proteins and play a role in DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block the repair of single-strand breaks, which in turn gives rise to double-strand breaks during DNA replication. Thus, PARP inhibitors elicit synthetic lethality in cancer with BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations that hamper homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks. Olaparib, the first-in-class PARP inhibitor, was approved for treatment of BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer in Europe and the United States in 2014. Other PARP inhibitors under clinical trials include rucaparib, niraparib, veliparib, and the "PARP-trapping" BMN-673. BRCA1/2 sequencing is an FDA-approved companion diagnostics, which predicts the cancer vulnerability to PARP inhibition. Together, synthetic lethal PARP inhibition is a novel promising strategy for cancer intervention even in cases without prominent driver oncogenes. PMID:26281686

  18. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  19. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  20. Protection of chickens against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection by live vaccination with infectious laryngotracheitis virus recombinants expressing H5 hemagglutinin and N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sophia P; Veits, Jutta; Keil, Günther M; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2009-01-29

    Attenuated vaccine strains of the alphaherpesvirus causing infectious laryngotracheitis of chickens (ILTV, gallid herpesvirus 1) can be used for mass application. Previously, we showed that live virus vaccination with recombinant ILTV expressing hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) protected chickens against ILT and fowl plague caused by HPAIV carrying the corresponding hemagglutinin subtypes [Lüschow D, Werner O, Mettenleiter TC, Fuchs W. Protection of chickens from lethal avian influenza A virus infection by live-virus vaccination with infectious laryngotracheitis virus recombinants expressing the hemagglutinin (H5) gene. Vaccine 2001;19(30):4249-59; Veits J, Lüschow D, Kindermann K, Werner O, Teifke JP, Mettenleiter TC, et al. Deletion of the non-essential UL0 gene of infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) virus leads to attenuation in chickens, and UL0 mutants expressing influenza virus haemagglutinin (H7) protect against ILT and fowl plague. J Gen Virol 2003;84(12):3343-52]. However, protection against H5N1 HPAIV was not satisfactory. Therefore, a newly designed dUTPase-negative ILTV vector was used for rapid insertion of the H5-hemagglutinin, or N1-neuraminidase genes of a recent H5N1 HPAIV isolate. Compared to our previous constructs, protein expression was considerably enhanced by insertion of synthetic introns downstream of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter within the 5'-nontranslated region of the transgenes. Deletion of the viral dUTPase gene did not affect in vitro replication of the ILTV recombinants, but led to sufficient attenuation in vivo. After a single ocular immunization, all chickens developed H5- or N1-specific serum antibodies. Nevertheless, animals immunized with N1-ILTV died after subsequent H5N1 HPAIV challenge, although survival times were prolonged compared to non-vaccinated controls. In contrast, all chickens vaccinated with either H5-ILTV alone, or H5- and N1-ILTV simultaneously, survived

  1. Corrosion inhibitor selection for wet pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1995-12-31

    Selection of corrosion inhibitors for wet pipelines is based on laboratory testing and field confirmation. Both the use and selection of corrosion inhibitors are driven by economics. Economics of alternative corrosion protection methods is not treated in this paper, but the economics of proper inhibitor selection are. The key to successful inhibitor selection is careful analysis of pipeline flow conditions and experimental emulation of its corrosive environment. Transportation of inhibitor to the corroding interface must be explicitly considered in the emulation. Standard corrosion rate measurement methods are used to evaluate inhibitors. Inhibitor properties tabulated during evaluation form a core database for continuing quality control.

  2. [The synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, G M

    1987-04-01

    The review deals with directed synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors. They are classified within the framework of the mechanistic approach, namely, stable analogues of substrates, which form enzyme complexes mimicking the Michaelis complex or those which influence the chemical stages of enzyme catalysis; conformational inhibitors; substrate analogues participating in enzyme reactions and producing modified products; suicide inhibitors; stage inhibitors (inhibitors influencing certain stages of enzyme reaction); transition state analogues; multisubstrate analogues and collected substrates. Types of chemical modification used in synthesis of the specific inhibitors are discussed. Some possibilities of the quantity structure-activity relationship methods, computer modelling and molecular graphics in designing the optimal structure of inhibitors are mentioned. PMID:3300658

  3. Pharmacology of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J D; Francis, S H

    2002-01-01

    The clinical properties (efficacy and safety profile) of a medicine are related not only to its mode of action, but also to its selectivity for its target (usually a receptor or enzyme) and are also influenced by its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). The growing number of phosphodiesterase inhibitors that are selective for phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) represent a promising new class of compounds that are useful for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and perhaps other disorders. Some of the basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters that describe drug action are discussed with regard to the new PDE5 inhibitors. Central topics reviewed are the concentration that produces a given in vitro response, or potency (IC50), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), area under the curve (AUC), bioavailability, onset and duration of action, and the balance to achieve optimum safety and efficacy. To illustrate these concepts, a group of inhibitors with varying selectivities and potencies for PDE5 (theophylline, IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil) are discussed. Each drug has its own set of unique pharmacological characteristics based on its specific molecular structure, enzyme inhibition profile and pharmacokinetic properties. Each PDE5 inhibitor has a distinct selectivity that contributes to its safety profile. As with all new drugs, and especially those in a new class, careful evaluation will be necessary to ensure the optimal use of the PDE5 inhibitors. PMID:12166544

  4. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  5. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  6. [Two recombinant adenovirus vaccine candidates containing neuraminidase Gene of H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) elicited effective cell-mediated immunity in mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Chen, Hong; Li, Kui-Biao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Liang; Xu, Hong; Shu, Yue-Long; Tan, Wen-Jie; Zeng, Yi

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the recombinant adenovirus vaccine (rAdV) candidates containing neuraminidase (NA) gene of H5N1 influenza virus and test in BALB/c mice the effect of cell-mediated immunity. In this study, two kind of NA gene (WtNA gene, the wild type; Mod. NA gene, the codon-modified type) derived from H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) were cloned and inserted respectively into plasmid of adenovirus vector, then the rAdV vaccines candidates (rAdV-WtNA and rAdV-Mod. NA) were developed and purified, followed by immunization intramuscularly (10(9) TCID50 per dose, double injection at 0 and 4th week) in BALB/c mice, the effect of cell-mediated immunity were analysed at 5th week. Results indicated that: (i) NA protein expression was detected in two rAdV vaccines candidates by Western blotting; (ii) the rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine could elicit more robust NA specific cell-mediated immunity in mice than that of rAdV-WtNA vaccine (P = 0. 016) by IFN-gamma ELIspot assay. These findings suggested rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine was a potential vaccine candidate against H5N1 influenza and worthy of further investigation. PMID:19954107

  7. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%. PMID:22561212

  11. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  12. Monoglyceride lipase: Structure and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scalvini, Laura; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL), the main enzyme responsible for the hydrolytic deactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), is an intracellular serine hydrolase that plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, such as pain, inflammation, neuroprotection and cancer. The crystal structures of MGL that are currently available provide valuable information about how this enzyme might function and interact with site-directed small-molecule inhibitors. On the other hand, its conformational equilibria and the contribution of regulatory cysteine residues present within the substrate-binding pocket or on protein surface remain open issues. Several classes of MGL inhibitors have been developed, from early reversible ones, such as URB602 and pristimerin, to carbamoylating agents that react with the catalytic serine, such as JZL184 and more recent O-hexafluoroisopropyl carbamates. Other inhibitors that modulate MGL activity by interacting with conserved regulatory cysteines act through mechanisms that deserve to be more thoroughly investigated. PMID:26216043

  13. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  14. SGLT2 inhibitors: new reports.

    PubMed

    2015-10-12

    A significant decrease in cardiovascular mortality has been reported with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin (Jardiance) to treat patients with type 2 diabetes who have established cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of this reduction is unclear, and these results may not apply to patients with type 2 diabetes and less advanced cardiovascular disease. Whether the increase in fractures reported with canagliflozin (Invokana) could also occur with empagliflozin remains to be established. All SGLT2 inhibitors are only modestly effective for treatment of diabetes. PMID:26445203

  15. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  17. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  18. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  19. SYBR green-based real-time reverse transcription-PCR for typing and subtyping of all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of avian influenza viruses and comparison to standard serological subtyping tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsukamoto, K.; Javier, P.C.; Shishido, M.; Noguchi, D.; Pearce, J.; Kang, H.-M.; Jeong, O.M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Nakanishi, K.; Ashizawa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV) infections of wild birds and poultry worldwide emphasize the need for global surveillance of wild birds. To support the future surveillance activities, we developed a SYBR green-based, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) for detecting nucleoprotein (NP) genes and subtyping 16 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes simultaneously. Primers were improved by focusing on Eurasian or North American lineage genes; the number of mixed-base positions per primer was set to five or fewer, and the concentration of each primer set was optimized empirically. Also, 30 cycles of amplification of 1:10 dilutions of cDNAs from cultured viruses effectively reduced minor cross- or nonspecific reactions. Under these conditions, 346 HA and 345 NA genes of 349 AIVs were detected, with average sensitivities of NP, HA, and NA genes of 10 1.5, 10 2.3, and 10 3.1 50% egg infective doses, respectively. Utility of rRT-PCR for subtyping AIVs was compared with that of current standard serological tests by using 104 recent migratory duck virus isolates. As a result, all HA genes and 99% of the NA genes were genetically subtyped, while only 45% of HA genes and 74% of NA genes were serologically subtyped. Additionally, direct subtyping of AIVs in fecal samples was possible by 40 cycles of amplification: approximately 70% of HA and NA genes of NP gene-positive samples were successfully subtyped. This validation study indicates that rRT-PCR with optimized primers and reaction conditions is a powerful tool for subtyping varied AIVs in clinical and cultured samples. Copyright ?? 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Enhanced replication of avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus in eggs, cell cultures and mice by a two-amino acid insertion in neuraminidase stalk.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Xie, Xing; Zhao, Yanbing; Kalhoro, Dildar Hussain; Lu, Chengping; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) is a newly identified, highly contagious respiratory pathogen in dogs. Recent studies indicate that avian-origin H3N2 CIV are circulating in Chinese dogs. To investigate the effects of a two-amino acid (2-aa) insertion naturally occurring at the distal end of the neuraminidase (NA) stalk found in Chinese isolates since 2010 on virus replication and virulence, we rescued the CIV strain, A/canine/Jiangsu/06/2011(H3N2) and its NA mutant without the 2-aa insertion using reverse genetics. The NA stalk length affected virus growth in cell culture. Compared to the short stalk strain (without 2-aa insertion), the long stalk strain (with 2-aa insertion) exhibited higher peak titers and greater yields in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, chicken embryo fibroblasts and canine bronchiolar epithelial cells, as well as much larger plaques in MDCK cell monolayers. Furthermore, mice inoculated with the long stalk strain showed more severe pathologic damage in lung and higher proportion of detectable viral RNA in tissues. The long stalk strain induced local IFN-γ production with faster kinetics and higher levels in mice. However, in chickens, the two viral strains showed no significant difference with nearly the same proportion of detectable viral RNA loads in tissues. These observations suggest that the 2-aa insertion in the NA stalk acquired by avian-origin H3N2 CIV helps to enhance viral replication and is likely a result of adaptive evolution in canine hosts. PMID:27160077

  1. Full Conversion of the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Specificity of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Fusion Protein by Replacement of 21 Amino Acids in Its Head Region with Those of the Simian Virus 41 Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nakahashi, Mito; Matsushima, Yoshiaki; Ito, Morihiro; Nishio, Machiko; Kawano, Mitsuo; Komada, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    For most parainfluenza viruses, a virus type-specific interaction between the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) proteins is a prerequisite for mediating virus-cell fusion and cell-cell fusion. The molecular basis of this functional interaction is still obscure partly because it is unknown which region of the F protein is responsible for the physical interaction with the HN protein. Our previous cell-cell fusion assay using the chimeric F proteins of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and simian virus 41 (SV41) indicated that replacement of two domains in the head region of the PIV5 F protein with the SV41 F counterparts bestowed on the PIV5 F protein the ability to induce cell-cell fusion on coexpression with the SV41 HN protein while retaining its ability to induce fusion with the PIV5 HN protein. In the study presented here, we furthered the chimeric analysis of the F proteins of PIV5 and SV41, finding that the PIV5 F protein could be converted to an SV41 HN-specific chimeric F protein by replacing five domains in the head region with the SV41 F counterparts. The five SV41 F-protein-derived domains of this chimera were then divided into 16 segments; 9 out of 16 proved to be not involved in determining its specificity for the SV41 HN protein. Finally, mutational analyses of a chimeric F protein, which harbored seven SV41 F-protein-derived segments, revealed that replacement of at most 21 amino acids of the PIV5 F protein with the SV41 F-protein counterparts was enough to convert its HN protein specificity. PMID:23698295

  2. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  3. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  4. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  5. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  6. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  7. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  8. Bromodomains and their pharmacological inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gallenkamp, Daniel; Gelato, Kathy A; Haendler, Bernard; Weinmann, Hilmar

    2014-03-01

    Over 60 bromodomains belonging to proteins with very different functions have been identified in humans. Several of them interact with acetylated lysine residues, leading to the recruitment and stabilization of protein complexes. The bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins contain tandem bromodomains which bind to acetylated histones and are thereby implicated in a number of DNA-centered processes, including the regulation of gene expression. The recent identification of inhibitors of BET and non-BET bromodomains is one of the few examples in which effective blockade of a protein-protein interaction can be achieved with a small molecule. This has led to major strides in the understanding of the function of bromodomain-containing proteins and their involvement in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. Indeed, BET bromodomain inhibitors are now being clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematological tumors and have also been tested in clinical trials for the relatively rare BRD-NUT midline carcinoma. This review gives an overview of the newest developments in the field, with a focus on the biology of selected bromodomain proteins on the one hand, and on reported pharmacological inhibitors on the other, including recent examples from the patent literature. PMID:24497428

  9. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  10. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  11. Xylanase inhibitors bind to nonstarch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fierens, Ellen; Gebruers, Kurt; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2008-01-23

    This study is an in-depth investigation of the interaction between polysaccharides and the proteinaceous xylanase inhibitors, Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor (TAXI), xylanase inhibitor protein (XIP), and thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TLXI). The binding affinities of all three known types of xylanase inhibitors from wheat are studied by measuring the residual xylanase inhibition activity after incubation of the inhibitors in the presence of different polysaccharides, such as beta-glucans and (arabino)xylans. The binding affinities of all three xylanase inhibitors for (arabino)xylans increased with a decreasing arabinose/xylose ratio (A/X ratio). This phenomenon was observed both with water-extractable and water-unextractable (arabino)xylans. The inhibitors also interacted with different soluble and insoluble beta-glucans. None of the inhibitors tested had the ability to hydrolyze the polysaccharides investigated. The present findings contribute to the unraveling of the function of xylanase inhibitors in nature and to the prediction of the effect of added xylanases in cereal-based biotechnological processes, such as bread making and gluten-starch separation. PMID:18092758

  12. Biomarkers associated with checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Manson, G; Norwood, J; Marabelle, A; Kohrt, H; Houot, R

    2016-07-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors (CPI), namely anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1/PD-L1 antibodies, demonstrated efficacy across multiple types of cancer. However, only subgroups of patients respond to these therapies. Additionally, CPI can induce severe immune-related adverse events (irAE). Biomarkers that predict efficacy and toxicity may help define the patients who may benefit the most from these costly and potentially toxic therapies. In this study, we review the main biomarkers that have been associated with the efficacy (pharmacodynamics and clinical benefit) and the toxicity (irAE) of CPIs in patients. PMID:27122549

  13. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  14. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition. PMID:21963115

  15. New proteasome inhibitors in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lawasut, Panisinee; Chauhan, Dharminder; Laubach, Jacob; Hayes, Catriona; Fabre, Claire; Maglio, Michelle; Mitsiades, Constantine; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G

    2012-12-01

    Proteasome inhibition has a validated role in cancer therapy since the successful introduction of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, leading to the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors (PI) for MM patients in whom currently approved therapies have failed. Five PIs have reached clinical evaluation, with the goals of improving efficacy and limiting toxicity, including peripheral neuropathy (PN). Carfilzomib, an epoxyketone with specific chymothrypsin-like activity, acts as an irreversible inhibitor and was recently FDA approved for the response benefit seen in relapsed and refractory MM patients previously treated with bortezomib, thalidomide and lenalidomide. ONX-0912 is now under evaluation as an oral form with similar activity. The boronate peptides MLN9708 and CEP-18770 are orally bioactive bortezomib analogs with prolonged activity and greater tissue penetration. NPI-0052 (marizomib) is a unique, beta-lactone non-selective PI that has been shown to potently overcome bortezomib resistance in vitro. All of these second-generation PIs demonstrate encouraging anti-MM activity and appear to reduce the incidence of PN, with clinical trials ongoing. PMID:23065395

  16. New sulfur-containing corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.

    2000-04-01

    No corrosion inhibitor available today is ideal in every way, but a new class of sulfur-containing compounds promises to address many field requirements. This article describes the performance characteristics of these compounds and discusses possible inhibition mechanisms. The emphasis in this work was on better understanding corrosion inhibition by sulfur-containing inhibitors under high shear-stress conditions, with special focus on localized (pitting) corrosion. The results indicate that the new sulfur-containing inhibitors (e.g., mercaptoalcohol [MA]) could be more effective in the field than currently available inhibitors.

  17. Simultaneous exposure of transformed cells to SRC family inhibitors and CHK1 inhibitors causes cell death.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Clint; Hamed, Hossein A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tang, Yong; Bareford, M Danielle; Hubbard, Nissan; Tye, Gary; Yacoub, Adly; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2011-08-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine in greater molecular detail the regulation of CHK1 inhibitor lethality in transfected and infected breast cancer cells and using genetic models of transformed fibrobalsts. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (PD184352, AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine), AZD7762) to kill mammary carcinoma cells and transformed fibroblasts. In transformed cells, CHK1 inhibitor -induced activation of ERK1/2 was dependent upon activation of SRC family non-receptor tyrosine kinases as judged by use of multiple SRC kinase inhibitors (PP2, Dasatinib; AZD0530), use of SRC/FYN/YES deleted transformed fibroblasts or by expression of dominant negative SRC. Cell killing by SRC family kinase inhibitors and CHK1 inhibitors was abolished in BAX/BAK -/- transformed fibroblasts and suppressed by over expression of BCL-XL. Treatment of cells with BCL-2/BCL-XL antagonists promoted SRC inhibitor + CHK1 inhibitor -induced lethality in a BAX/BAK-dependent fashion. Treatment of cells with [SRC + CHK1] inhibitors radio-sensitized tumor cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-RAS-MEK pathway interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill transformed cells. PMID:21642769

  18. Controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion with inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Transport of corrosion inhibitor to the location where they are needed is one of the primary concerns in the use of corrosion inhibitors. Two different types of inhibitors for controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion in gas well wellheads and flowlines are used as examples. In one example, the inhibitor forms a micelle in water which assists in the transport of inhibitor to the metal surface . In the other example, the inhibitor is readily dispersible in the water phase but must be stirred to ensure transport of the inhibitor to the metal surface. Field monitored corrosion rates using continuous application of inhibitor are presented for both types of inhibitor.

  19. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  20. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  1. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  2. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities. PMID:25752982

  3. Inhibitors of apoptosis catch ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Dikic, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) proteins are a class of anti-apoptotic regulators characterized by the presence of BIR (baculoviral IAP repeat) domains. Some of the IAPs also possess a RING (really interesting new gene) domain with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Blankenship et al. unveil the presence of an UBA (ubiquitin-associated domain) in several IAPs. UBAs in c-IAPs (cellular IAPs) bind to monoubiquitin and ubiquitin chains and are implicated in degradation of c-IAPs by promoting their interaction with proteasomes as well as in regulation of TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha)-induced apoptosis. These novel observations establish IAPs as ubiquitin-interacting proteins and opens up new lines of investigation. PMID:19061481

  4. Quinolone-based HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Gopalan; Kilambi, Narasimhan; Rathinasamy, Suresh; Rajendran, Praveen; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan

    2014-08-01

    HDAC inhibitors emerged as promising drug candidates in combating wide variety of cancers. At present, two of the compounds SAHA and Romidepsin were approved by FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and many are in various clinical phases. A new quinolone cap structure was explored with hydroxamic acid as zinc-binding group (ZBG). The pan HDAC inhibitory and antiproliferative activities against three human cancer cell lines HCT-116 (colon), NCI-H460 (lung) and U251 (glioblastoma) of the compounds (4a-4w) were evaluated. Introduction of heterocyclic amines in CAP region increased the enzyme inhibitory and antiproliferative activities and few of the compounds tested are metabolically stable in both MLM and HLM. PMID:25019596

  5. The direct thrombin inhibitor hirudin.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2008-05-01

    This review discusses the pharmacology and clinical applications of hirudin, a bivalent direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI). Besides the current major indication for hirudin--anticoagulation of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT)--the experience with hirudin in other indications, especially acute coronary syndromes, are briefly presented. Hirudins have been formally studied prior to their regulatory approval; however, important information on their side effects and relevant preventative measures only became available later. Therefore, current recommendations and dosing schedules for hirudin differ considerably from the information given in the package inserts. Drawbacks of hirudin and important precautions for avoiding potential adverse effects are discussed in detail in the third part of this review. PMID:18449411

  6. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  7. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  8. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  9. Discovery and SAR of hydantoin TACE inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wensheng; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Chen, Lei; Dai, Chaoyang; Feltz, Robert J.; Girijavallabhan, Vinay M.; Kim, Seong Heon; Kozlowski, Joseph A.; Lavey, Brian J.; Li, Dansu; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda; Piwinski, John J.; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Rizvi, Razia; Rosner, Kristin E.; Shankar, Bandarpalle B.; Shih, Neng-Yang; Siddiqui, M.A.; Sun, J.; Tong, L.; Umland, S.; Wong, M.K.; Yang, D.Y.; Zhou, G.

    2010-09-03

    We disclose inhibitors of TNF-{alpha} converting enzyme (TACE) designed around a hydantoin zinc binding moiety. Crystal structures of inhibitors bound to TACE revealed monodentate coordination of the hydantoin to the zinc. SAR, X-ray, and modeling designs are described. To our knowledge, these are the first reported X-ray structures of TACE with a hydantoin zinc ligand.

  10. Tyrosinase inhibitors from Bolivian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kubo, I; Yokokawa, Y; Kinst-Hori, I

    1995-05-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation monitored by mushroom tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) activity, afforded six inhibitors from three Bolivian medicinal plants, Buddleia coriacea, Gnaphalium cheiranthifolium, and Scheelea princeps. These inhibitors, which are all known phenolic compounds, inhibited the oxidation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) mediated by a mushroom tyrosinase. PMID:7623048

  11. The therapeutic potential of microbial proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Momose, Isao; Kawada, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome influences cellular homeostasis through the degradation of regulatory proteins, many of which are also involved in disease pathogenesis. In particular, numerous regulatory proteins associated with tumor growth, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, tumor suppressors, and NF-κB inhibitors are degraded by the proteasome. Proteasome inhibitors can stabilize these regulatory proteins, resulting in the suppression of tumor development and the regulation of immune responses. Thus, proteasome inhibitors are promising candidate antitumor agents and immune-regulatory agents. Bortezomib is the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Despite its high efficiency, however, a large proportion of patients do not attain sufficient clinical response due to toxicity and drug resistance. Therefore, the development of new proteasome inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties is needed. Natural products produced by microorganisms are a promising source of such compounds. This review provides an overview of proteasome inhibitors produced by microorganisms, with special focus on inhibitors isolated from actinomycetes. PMID:26589840

  12. [Recent development of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are clinically effective against the inflammatory symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent attention has been focused on selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 inhibitors, a type of NSAID that inhibits a subtype of COX. Because of the different actions of COX-1 and COX-2, selective COX-2 inhibitors were expected to reduce adverse reactions such as gastrointestinal disorders. Various clinical studies have confirmed that the efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors for RA is similar to that of conventional NSAIDs, but they cause fewer severe gastrointestinal disorders. The incidence of complications related to renal dysfunction, such as edema and hypertension, is not different. Patients using selective COX-2 inhibitors have recently been reported to show an increase in thrombotic complications such as myocardial infarction. Therefore, more data on adverse events should be collected in the future from large-scale clinical studies to further clarify the actual value of selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:12510364

  13. Current acetylcholinesterase-inhibitors: a neuroinformatics perspective.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Verma, Anupriya; Siddiqui, Saimeen; Ahmad, Syed S; Rizvi, Syed M D; Shakil, Shazi; Biswas, Deboshree; Singh, Divya; Siddiqui, Mohmmad H; Shakil, Shahnawaz; Tabrez, Shams; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    This review presents a concise update on the inhibitors of the neuroenzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7). AChE is a serine protease, which hydrolyses the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine into acetate and choline thereby terminating neurotransmission. Molecular interactions (mode of binding to the target enzyme), clinical applications and limitations have been summarized for each of the inhibitors discussed. Traditional inhibitors (e.g. physostigmine, tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine etc.) as well as novel inhibitors like various physostigmine-derivatives have been covered. This is followed by a short glimpse on inhibitors derived from nature (e.g. Huperzine A and B, Galangin). Also, a discussion on 'hybrid of pre-existing drugs' has been incorporated. Furthermore, current status of therapeutic applications of AChEinhibitors has also been summarized. PMID:24059296

  14. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  15. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  16. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  17. Current use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in urology

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq Said; Jain, Lakshay

    2015-01-01

    The causes of male erectile dysfunction (ED) are quite variable and are now commonly divided into etiologies such as ischemia, smooth muscle damage, or altered blood flow. Although varying rates of ED have been reported in literature, the number of men with ED is projected to increase worldwide by 2025 to approximately 322 million. Since the introduction of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of ED because PDE5 inhibitors address a broad spectrum of etiologies for ED. Today, the American Urological Association recommends the use of three PDE5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil) as a first-line therapy for the treatment of ED. This review evaluates the pharmacological mechanism of PDE5 inhibitors along with the impact and use of sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, and avanafil. By increasing intracellular cGMP levels, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of ED. Through their effects on other cellular signaling pathways, PDE5 inhibitors have the potential for treating other urologic conditions as well. The use of PDE5 inhibitors can also be combined to produce a synergistic effect in conditions such as male hypogonadism and benign prostatic hyperplasia in addition to ED. PMID:26328208

  18. Multi-kinase inhibitors, AURKs and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas; Cicenas, Erikas

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitors that impact function of kinases are valuable both for the biological research as well as therapy of kinase-associated diseases, such as different cancers. There are quite a number of inhibitors, which are quite specific for certain kinases and several of them are either already approved for the cancer therapy or are in clinical studies of various phases. However, that does not mean that each single kinase inhibitor is suitable for targeted therapy. Some of them are not effective others might be toxic or fail some other criteria for the use in vivo. On the other hand, even in case of successful therapy, many responders eventually develop resistance to the inhibitors. The limitations of various single kinase inhibitors can be fought using compounds which target multiple kinases. This tactics can increase effectiveness of the inhibitors by the synergistic effect or help to diminish the likelihood of drug resistance. To date, several families of kinases are quite popular targets of the inhibition in cancers, such as tyrosine kinases, cycle-dependent kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinases as well as their pathway "players" and aurora kinases. Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the mitosis and are often altered in diverse human cancers. Here, we will describe the most interesting multi-kinase inhibitors which inhibit aurora kinases among other targets and their use in preclinical and clinical cancer studies. PMID:27038473

  19. Interaction of Chloroplasts with Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Stuart M.

    1983-01-01

    Several effects on pea (Pisum sativum L. var Onwards) chloroplasts of a new diphenylether herbicide, fomesafen (5-[2-chloro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenoxy]-N-methanesulfonyl-2 -nitrobenzamide) have been compared with those of a herbicide of related structure, nitrofluorfen (2-chloro-1-[4-nitrophenoxy]-4-[trifluoromethyl]benzene). Although both compounds produce the same light-dependent symptoms of desiccation and chlorosis indicative of a common primary mechanism of action, this study is concerned with a more broadly based investigation of different effects on the electron transport system. Comparisons have also been made with other compounds interacting with the chloroplast. Unlike nitrofluorfen, fomesafen has little effect as an inhibitor of electron flow or energy transfer. Both compounds have the ability to stimulate superoxide production through a functional electron transport system, and this involves specifically the p-nitro substituent. The stimulation, which is not likely to be an essential part of the primary herbicidal effect, is diminished under conditions that remove the coupling factor. Evidence suggests that both diphenylethers may be able to bind to the coupling factor, and kinetic studies reveal this for dibromothymoquinone as well. Such a binding site might be an important feature in allowing the primary effect of the diphenylether herbicides to be expressed. PMID:16663025

  20. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marx, Pauline F

    2004-09-01

    The coagulation system is a potent mechanism that prevents blood loss after vascular injury. It consists of a number of linked enzymatic reactions resulting in thrombin generation. Thrombin converts soluble fibrinogen into a fibrin clot. The clot is subsequently removed by the fibrinolytic system upon wound healing. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is identical to the previously identified proteins procarboxypeptidase B, R, and U, forms a link between blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. TAFI circulates as an inactive proenzyme in the bloodstream, and becomes activated during blood clotting. The active form, TAFIa, inhibits fibrinolysis by cleaving off C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin that stimulates the tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Consequently, removal of these lysines leads to less plasmin formation and subsequently to protection of the fibrin clot from break down. Moreover, TAFI may also play a role in other processes such as, inflammation and tissue repair. In this review, recent developments in TAFI research are discussed. PMID:15379716

  1. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as microbicides.

    PubMed

    Lewi, Paul; Heeres, Jan; Ariën, Kevin; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Vanham, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The CAPRISA 004 study in South Africa has accelerated the development of vaginal and rectal microbicides containing antiretrovirals that target specific enzymes in the reproduction cycle of HIV, especially reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). In this review we discuss the potential relevance of HIV-1 RTIs as microbicides, focusing in the nucleotide RTI tenofovir and six classes of nonnucleoside RTIs (including dapivirine, UC781, urea and thiourea PETTs, DABOs and a pyrimidinedione). Although tenofovir and dapivirine appear to be most advanced in clinical trials as potential microbicides, several issues remain unresolved, e.g., the importance of nonhuman primates as a "gatekeeper" for clinical trials, the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants, the combination of microbicides that target different phases of viral reproduction and the accessibility to microbicides in low-income countries. Thus, here we discuss the latest research on RTI as microbicides in the light of the continuing spread of the HIV pandemic from the point of view of medicinal chemistry, virological, and pharmaceutical studies. PMID:22264043

  2. Increased inhibitor incidence in severe haemophilia A since 1990 attributable to more low titre inhibitors.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, H Marijke; Hashemi, S Mojtaba; Fischer, Kathelijn; Petrini, Pia; Ljung, Rolf; Rafowicz, Anne; Carcao, Manuel; Auerswald, Günter; Kurnik, Karin; Kenet, Gili; Santagostino, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported an increased incidence of inhibitors in previously untreated patients (PUPs) with severe haemophilia A after the introduction of recombinant products. It was the objective of this study to investigate whether the inhibitor incidence has increased between 1990 and 2009 in an unselected cohort of PUPs with severe haemophilia A (FVIII< 1 %). Patients were consecutively recruited from 31 haemophilia treatment centres in 16 countries and followed until 50 exposure days or until inhibitor development. Inhibitor development was studied in five-year birth cohorts comparing cumulative incidences. Furthermore the risk for inhibitor development per five-year birth cohort was studied using multivariable Cox regression, adjusting for potential genetic and treatment-related confounders. A total of 926 PUPs were included with a total cumulative inhibitor incidence of 27.5 %. The inhibitor incidence increased from 19.5 % in 1990-1994 (lowest) to 30.9 % in 2000-2004 (highest; p-value 0.011). Low titre inhibitor incidence increased from 3.1 % in 1990-1994 to 10.5 % in 2005-2009 (p-value 0.009). High titre inhibitor incidences remained stable over time. After 2000, risk of all inhibitor development was increased with adjusted hazard ratios 1.96 (95 % CI 1.06-2.83) in 2000-2004 and 2.34 (1.42-4.92) in 2005-2009. Screening for inhibitors was intensified over this 20-year study period from a median of 1.9 to 2.9 tests/year before 2000 to 2.7 to 4.3 tests/year after 2000. In conclusion, the cumulative inhibitor incidence has significantly increased between 1990 and 2009. The high titre inhibitor incidence has remained stable. PMID:26632988

  3. An Updated Review of Tyrosinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  4. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  5. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by isolated rat liver cells. A process partially inhibited by metabolic inhibitors; attempts to distinguish between uptake and binding to intracellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eckel, J; Rao, G S; Rao, M L; Breuer, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Rat liver cells obtained by dispersion with collagenase were used to investigate the mode of entry of L-tri-iodothyronine into the cell. 2. The hormone was taken up very rapidly at 23 degrees C; the linear phase of uptake lasted for up to approx. 20 s. 3. A plot of the initial rates of uptake against different concentrations of L-tri-iodothyronine yielded a sigmoidal curve. The Eadie--Hofstee plot (v/[S]2 versus v) yielded two straight lines. The uptake component with an apparent Kt value of 86 +/- 15 pM was designated as system I, and the second uptake component with an apparent Kt of 726 +/- 11 pM as system II. The Hill plot for system I was not linear; the apparent Hill coefficient for system II was calculated to be 2.1.4. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I was higher at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4; system II was relatively insensitive to changes in the pH of the external medium. 5. Both systems exhibited a transition temperature at about 16 degrees C in the Arrhenius plot. The activation energies of the two systems below and above 16 degrees C were 72.8 and 47.7 and 54.4 and 33.1 J/mol respectively. 6. Inhibitors of cellular energy reduced the uptake by system I to a larger extent than that by system II. 7. Replacement of Na+ in the external medium by either K+ or choline led to uptake that followed normal Michaelis--Menten kinetics. 8. Thiol-group-blocking agents reduced the uptake of the hormone by both systems. 9. Treatment of liver cells with beta-glucosidase, Pronase and neuraminidase led to a decrease in the uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I, whereas uptake by system II was decreased after treatment with phospholipase A2, beta-galactosidase. Pronase and neuraminidase. 10. The stereoisomer D-tri-iodothyronine (100--3000 pM) did not affect system I, but uptake by system II decreased with increasing concentration of D-tri-iodothyronine. Reverse L-tri-iodothyronine (2--100 pM) and L-thyroxine (100--3000 pM) did not influence uptake by either

  6. A tyrosinase inhibitor from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, K Y; Murugesh, C S; Sattur, A P

    2014-10-01

    Tyrosinase, in the presence of oxygen, is the main culprit in post harvest browning of food products, resulting in the drop in its commercial value. In an effort to seek natural tyrosinase inhibitors for food applications, a screening programme was undertaken. Of the 26 fungal cultures isolated from soil samples of Agumbe forest, India, one isolate S16, identified as Aspergillus niger, gave an inhibition of 84 % against the enzyme. The inhibitor was isolated by following an enzyme inhibition assay guided purification protocol. The structure of the inhibitor was elucidated and found to be kojic acid. The IC50 of the Competitive inhibitor was found to be 8.8 μg with a Ki of 0.085 mM. PMID:25328242

  7. Structural Characterization of LRRK2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gilsbach, Bernd K; Messias, Ana C; Ito, Genta; Sattler, Michael; Alessi, Dario R; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kortholt, Arjan

    2015-05-14

    Kinase inhibition is considered to be an important therapeutic target for LRRK2 mediated Parkinson's disease (PD). Many LRRK2 kinase inhibitors have been reported but have yet to be optimized in order to qualify as drug candidates for the treatment of the disease. In order to start a structure-function analysis of such inhibitors, we mutated the active site of Dictyostelium Roco4 kinase to resemble LRRK2. Here, we show saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and the first cocrystal structures of two potent in vitro inhibitors, LRRK2-IN-1 and compound 19, with mutated Roco4. Our data demonstrate that this system can serve as an excellent tool for the structural characterization and optimization of LRRK2 inhibitors using X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25897865

  8. Transdermal delivery of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Helal, Fouad; Lane, Majella E

    2014-09-01

    The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of drugs has been in clinical use since the 1970s for the management of all grades of heart failure, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular events. Because of the advantages associated with transdermal delivery compared with oral delivery many researchers have investigated the skin as a portal for administration of ACE inhibitors. This review summarises the various studies reported in the literature describing the development and evaluation of transdermal formulations of ACE inhibitors. Captopril, enalapril maleate, lisinopril dihydrate, perindopril erbumine and trandolapril are the most studied in connection with transdermal preparations. The methodologies reported are considered critically and the limitations of the various skin models used are also highlighted. Finally, opportunities for novel transdermal preparations of ACE inhibitor drugs are discussed with an emphasis on rational formulation design. PMID:24657822

  9. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  10. Effects of multiphase flow on corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Jepson, W.P.; Chen, H.J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper investigates the inhibition performance of a typical imidazoline based inhibitor under multiphase flow. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out in a 101.6 mm I.D., 15 m long acrylic flow loop using ASTM substitute saltwater and carbon dioxide gas. This flow loop system can generate slug flow, fill pipe flow and other multiphase flow patterns. Effects of different flow conditions on inhibition performance of this typical inhibitor were examined. The system was maintained at a pressure of 0.136 MPa and a temperature of 40 C. EIS measurements for this inhibitor in a Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system were also conducted. Different equivalent circuit models were used to fit the experiment data for both the RCE and flow loop systems. The high shear stress and turbulence due to the mixing vortex and the bubble impact in multiphase flow can enhance the corrosion or reduce the inhibition performance of inhibitors.

  11. Musical hallucinations treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E C

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  12. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  13. Lipoxygenase inhibitors derived from marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kagawa, Yoshio; Konno, Remi; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2014-03-01

    The solvent extracts from the algae Sargassum thunbergii (Sargassaceae) and Odonthalia corymbifera (Rhodomelaceae) were subjected to soybean lipoxygenase inhibitory screening. Two hydrophobic inhibitors were obtained from the extracts of S. thunbergii through inhibitory assay-guided fractionation. The inhibitors were identified as known exo-methylenic alkapolyenes (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-1,6,9,12,15-henicosapentaene (1) and (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-1,6,9,12,15,18-henicosahexaene (2). The alkapolyenes 1 and 2 showed higher inhibitory activity than the known inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Pheophytin a (3) was obtained from the extract of O. corymbifera. The inhibitor 3 also showed higher inhibitory activity than NDGA. This is the first report on lipoxygenase inhibition of exo-methylenic alkapolyenes and a chlorophyll a-related substance. PMID:24495846

  14. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  15. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  16. Pharmacological caspase inhibitors: research towards therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kudelova, J; Fleischmannova, J; Adamova, E; Matalova, E

    2015-08-01

    Caspases are key molecules of apoptosis and the inflammatory response. Up-regulation of the caspase cascade contributes to human pathologies such as neurodegenerative and immune disorders. Thus, blocking the excessive apoptosis by pharmacological inhibitors seems promising for therapeutic interventions in such diseases. Caspase inhibitors, both natural and artificial, have been used as research tools and have helped to define the role of the individual caspases in apoptosis and in non-apoptotic processes. Moreover, some caspase inhibitors have demonstrated their therapeutic efficiency in the reduction of cell death and inflammation in animal models of human diseases. However, no drug based on caspase inhibition has been approved on the market until now. Thus, the development of therapeutic approaches that specifically target caspases remains a great challenge and is now the focus of intense biological and clinical interest. Here, we provide a brief review of recent knowledge about pharmacological caspase inhibitors with special focus on their proposed clinical applications. PMID:26348072

  17. Biomass conversion inhibitors and in situ detoxification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibitory compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment are classified into aldehydes, ketones, organic acids, and phenols based on their chemical functional group that are toxic to fermentative microorganisms. Inhibitors and effects of inhibition to fermentative microbes vary depend...

  18. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  19. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  20. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  1. Temperature effects on inhibitors and corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, A.

    1996-12-01

    Inhibitor systems commonly employed in industrial operations at elevated and high temperatures are surveyed and the available literature data on their performance characteristics at elevated temperatures are analyzed. The functional behavior of phosphates, amines, benzotriazole, and other important inhibitors are briefly summarized. The inhibitors degrade due to thermal decomposition and/or reaction on the metal surface or with other species present in the environment. Degradation modes of various kinds of amines used in steam systems are reviewed and the resultant limitations for use pointed out. Inhibitor systems in heating, heat exchanger-type cooling, hot acid pickling, in hot corrosive environments in turbine engines, as well as systems to prevent stress corrosion cracking at elevated temperatures are analyzed based on literature data.

  2. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  3. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  4. Proteasome inhibitor associated thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Yui, Jennifer C; Van Keer, Jan; Weiss, Brendan M; Waxman, Adam J; Palmer, Matthew B; D'Agati, Vivette D; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Vij, Ravi; Bansal, Dhruv; Dingli, David; Nasr, Samih H; Leung, Nelson

    2016-09-01

    A variety of medications have been implicated in the causation of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Recently, a few case reports have emerged of TMA attributed to the proteasome inhibitors (PI) bortezomib and carfilzomib in patients with multiple myeloma. The aim of this case series was to better characterize the role of PI in the etiology of drug-induced TMA. We describe eleven patients from six medical centers from around the world who developed TMA while being treated with PI. The median time between medication initiation and diagnosis of TMA was 21 days (range 5 days to 17 months). Median laboratory values at diagnosis included hemoglobin-7.5 g dL(-1) , platelet count-20 × 10(9) /L, LDH-698 U L(-1) , creatinine-3.12 mg dL(-1) . No patient had any other cause of TMA, including ADAMTS13 inhibition, other malignancy or use of any other medication previously associated with TMA. Nine patients had resolution of TMA without evidence of hemolysis after withdrawal of PI. Two patients had stabilization of laboratory values but persistent evidence of hemolysis despite medication withdrawal. One patient had recurrence of TMA with rechallenge of PI. There is a strong level of evidence that PI can cause DITMA. In evaluating patients with suspected TMA, PI use should be recognized as a potential etiology, and these medications should be discontinued promptly if thought to be the cause of TMA. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E348-E352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27286661

  5. Proton pump inhibitors and pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard S; Dhingra, Reena; Ryckewaert, Lori; Bonner, Dave

    2009-01-01

    There may be a relationship between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and iron absorption. PPIs may decrease the amount of iron absorbed gastrointestinally specifically due to alteration of the pH in the duodenum. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that includes an urge to move legs, accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations in the legs; the urge to move begins or worsens during periods of rest or inactivity, the urge to move is partially or totally relieved by movement, and the urge is worse or only occurs at night. In the majority of the restless leg syndrome population, the sensation is deep seated, often described as being in the shin bones, and most commonly felt between the knee and ankle. It may be described as a creepy, shock-like, tense, electric, buzzing, itchy, or even numb sensation. A subpopulation of this restless leg syndrome patient population experiences restless leg syndrome associated pain (RLSAP) that has been described as a deep "achy pain." This pain has not been found to be relieved by many of the typical over the counter analgesics. Often, constant movement of the legs appears to be the only remedy, as these sensations usually appear during periods of rest. Furthermore, there appears to be an association between iron deficiency and those suffering from Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS). The authors theorize that there may be a possible correlation between PPIs and the symptoms (e.g. pain) associated with RLS. The authors propose that PPIs, such as omeprazole, may interfere with iron absorption in certain patients and that a subpopulation of patients who develop significant iron deficiency characterized by low serum ferritin levels while on PPIs may also develop RLS-like symptoms (including RLSAP). While there is no robust direct evidence to support any associations of PPIs and iron deficiency or PPIs associated with RLS-like symptoms (including RLSAP), it is hoped that this manuscript may spark research

  6. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  7. HIV pharmacotherapy: A review of integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Trustman, Nathan; Yalong, April

    2016-02-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a class of antiretroviral agents used to treat HIV. These drugs--raltegravir, elvitegravir, and dolutegravir--are preferred options for treatment-naïve patients when used in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Based on clinical trials, INSTIs have been proven to be effective with minimal safety concerns. This article reviews the pharmacologic profile, role in therapy, and safety and efficacy of each agent. PMID:26818644

  8. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  9. On the selectivity of neuronal NOS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, B; Bartus, K; Garthwaite, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isoform-selective inhibitors of NOS enzymes are desirable as research tools and for potential therapeutic purposes. Vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO) and Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA) purportedly have good selectivity for neuronal over endothelial NOS under cell-free conditions, as does N-[(3-aminomethyl)benzyl]acetamidine (1400W), which is primarily an inducible NOS inhibitor. Although used in numerous investigations in vitro and in vivo, there have been surprisingly few tests of the potency and selectivity of these compounds in cells. This study addresses this deficiency and evaluates the activity of new and potentially better pyrrolidine-based compounds. Experimental Approach The inhibitors were evaluated by measuring their effect on NMDA-evoked cGMP accumulation in rodent hippocampal slices, a response dependent on neuronal NOS, and ACh-evoked cGMP synthesis in aortic rings of the same animals, an endothelial NOS-dependent phenomenon. Key Results l-VNIO, NPA and 1400W inhibited responses in both tissues but all showed less than fivefold higher potency in the hippocampus than in the aorta, implying useless selectivity for neuronal over endothelial NOS at the tissue level. In addition, the inhibitors had a 25-fold lower potency in the hippocampus than reported previously, the IC50 values being approximately 1 μM for l-VNIO and NPA, and 150 μM for 1400W. Pyrrolidine-based inhibitors were similarly weak and nonselective. Conclusion and Implications The results suggest that l-VNIO, NPA and 1400W, as well as the newer pyrrolidine-type inhibitors, cannot be used as neuronal NOS inhibitors in cells without stringent verification. The identification of inhibitors with useable selectivity in cells and tissues remains an important goal. PMID:23072468

  10. Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors and their therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y

    2001-04-01

    A number of endogenous inhibitors targeting the tumor vasculature have recently been identified using in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenesis models. While many of these angiogenesis inhibitors display a broad spectrum of biological actions on several systems in the body, several inhibitors including angiostatin, endostatin, and serpin antithrombin seem to act specifically on the proliferating endothelial cell compartment of the newly formed blood vessels. The discovery of these specific endothelial inhibitors not only increases our understanding of the functions of these molecules in the regulation of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, but may also provide an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis dependent diseases, including diabetic retinopathy and chronic inflammations. Systemic administration of these angiogenesis inhibitors in animals significantly suppresses the growth of a variety of tumors and their metastases. However, their production as functional recombinant proteins has been proven to be difficult. In addition, high dosages of these inhibitors are required to suppress tumor growth in animal studies. Other disadvantages of the antiangiogenic protein therapy include repeated injections, prolonged treatment, transmission of toxins and infectious particles, and high cost for manufacturing large amounts of protein molecules. Thus, alternative strategies need to be developed in order to improve the clinical settings of antiangiogenic therapy. Developments of these strategies are ongoing and they include identification of more potent inhibitors, antiangiogenic gene therapy, improvement of protein/compound half-lives in the circulation, increase of their concentrations at the disease location, and combinatorial therapies with approaches including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. Despite the above-mentioned disadvantages, a few inhibitors have entered into the early stages of clinical trials and

  11. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. PMID:27537073

  12. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Słopień, Radosław; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  13. FERRITIN H INDUCTION BY HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; Torti, Suzy V.; Torti, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Because both iron deficiency and iron excess are deleterious to normal cell function, the intracellular level of iron must be tightly controlled. Ferritin, an iron binding protein, regulates iron balance by storing iron in a bioavailable but non-toxic form. Ferritin protein comprises two subunits: ferritin H, which contains ferroxidase activity, and ferritin L. Here we demonstrate that ferritin H mRNA and protein are induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors), a promising class of anti-cancer drugs, in cultured human cancer cells. Deletion analysis and EMSA assays reveal that the induction of ferritin H occurs at a transcriptional level via Sp1 and NF-Y binding sites near the transcriptional start site of the human ferritin H promoter. Classically, HDAC inhibitors modulate gene expression by increasing histone acetylation. However, ChIP assays demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors induce ferritin H transcription by increasing NF-Y binding to the ferritin H promoter without changes in histone acetylation. These results identify ferritin H as a new target of HDAC inhibitors, and recruitment of NF-Y as a novel mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20385107

  14. Discovery of Novel Haloalkane Dehalogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buryska, Tomas; Daniel, Lukas; Kunka, Antonin; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) have recently been discovered in a number of bacteria, including symbionts and pathogens of both plants and humans. However, the biological roles of HLDs in these organisms are unclear. The development of efficient HLD inhibitors serving as molecular probes to explore their function would represent an important step toward a better understanding of these interesting enzymes. Here we report the identification of inhibitors for this enzyme family using two different approaches. The first builds on the structures of the enzymes' known substrates and led to the discovery of less potent nonspecific HLD inhibitors. The second approach involved the virtual screening of 150,000 potential inhibitors against the crystal structure of an HLD from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The best inhibitor exhibited high specificity for the target structure, with an inhibition constant of 3 μM and a molecular architecture that clearly differs from those of all known HLD substrates. The new inhibitors will be used to study the natural functions of HLDs in bacteria, to probe their mechanisms, and to achieve their stabilization. PMID:26773086

  15. PARP1 Inhibitors: antitumor drug design

    PubMed Central

    Malyuchenko, N. V.; Kotova, E. Yu.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Studitskiy, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) enzyme is one of the promising molecular targets for the discovery of antitumor drugs. PARP1 is a common nuclear protein (1–2 million molecules per cell) serving as a “sensor” for DNA strand breaks. Increased PARP1 expression is sometimes observed in melanomas, breast cancer, lung cancer, and other neoplastic diseases. The PARP1 expression level is a prognostic indicator and is associated with a poor survival prognosis. There is evidence that high PARP1 expression and treatment-resistance of tumors are correlated. PARP1 inhibitors are promising antitumor agents, since they act as chemo- and radiosensitizers in the conventional therapy of malignant tumors. Furthermore, PARP1 inhibitors can be used as independent, effective drugs against tumors with broken DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, third-generation PARP1 inhibitors are being developed, many of which are undergoing Phase II clinical trials. In this review, we focus on the properties and features of the PARP1 inhibitors identified in preclinical and clinical trials. We also describe some problems associated with the application of PARP1 inhibitors. The possibility of developing new PARP1 inhibitors aimed at DNA binding and transcriptional activity rather than the catalytic domain of the protein is discussed. PMID:26483957

  16. Discovery of Novel Haloalkane Dehalogenase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buryska, Tomas; Daniel, Lukas; Kunka, Antonin; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek

    2016-03-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) have recently been discovered in a number of bacteria, including symbionts and pathogens of both plants and humans. However, the biological roles of HLDs in these organisms are unclear. The development of efficient HLD inhibitors serving as molecular probes to explore their function would represent an important step toward a better understanding of these interesting enzymes. Here we report the identification of inhibitors for this enzyme family using two different approaches. The first builds on the structures of the enzymes' known substrates and led to the discovery of less potent nonspecific HLD inhibitors. The second approach involved the virtual screening of 150,000 potential inhibitors against the crystal structure of an HLD from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The best inhibitor exhibited high specificity for the target structure, with an inhibition constant of 3 μM and a molecular architecture that clearly differs from those of all known HLD substrates. The new inhibitors will be used to study the natural functions of HLDs in bacteria, to probe their mechanisms, and to achieve their stabilization. PMID:26773086

  17. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  18. Potent pyrrolidine- and piperidine-based BACE-1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Iserloh, U.; Wu, Y.; Cumming, J.N.; Pan, J.; Wang, L.Y.; Stamford, A.W.; Kennedy, M.E.; Kuvelkar, R.; Chen, X.; Parker, E.M.; Strickland, C.; Voigt, J.

    2008-08-18

    Based on lead compound 1 identified from the patent literature, we developed novel patentable BACE-1 inhibitors by introducing a cyclic amine scaffold. Extensive SAR studies on both pyrrolidines and piperidines ultimately led to inhibitor 2f, one of the most potent inhibitors synthesized to date. The discovery and development of novel BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a cyclic amine scaffold is described.

  19. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  1. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  2. SGLT2 Inhibitors and the Diabetic Kidney.

    PubMed

    Fioretto, Paola; Zambon, Alberto; Rossato, Marco; Busetto, Luca; Vettor, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Blood glucose and blood pressure control reduce the risk of developing this complication; however, once DN is established, it is only possible to slow progression. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, the most recent glucose-lowering oral agents, may have the potential to exert nephroprotection not only through improving glycemic control but also through glucose-independent effects, such as blood pressure-lowering and direct renal effects. It is important to consider, however, that in patients with impaired renal function, given their mode of action, SGLT2 inhibitors are less effective in lowering blood glucose. In patients with high cardiovascular risk, the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowered the rate of cardiovascular events, especially cardiovascular death, and substantially reduced important renal outcomes. Such benefits on DN could derive from effects beyond glycemia. Glomerular hyperfiltration is a potential risk factor for DN. In addition to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renal tubular factors, including SGLT2, contribute to glomerular hyperfiltration in diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule, causing, through tubuloglomerular feedback, afferent arteriole vasoconstriction and reduction in hyperfiltration. Experimental studies showed that SGLT2 inhibitors reduced hyperfiltration and decreased inflammatory and fibrotic responses of proximal tubular cells. SGLT2 inhibitors reduced glomerular hyperfiltration in patients with type 1 diabetes, and in patients with type 2 diabetes, they caused transient acute reductions in glomerular filtration rate, followed by a progressive recovery and stabilization of renal function. Interestingly, recent studies consistently demonstrated a reduction in albuminuria. Although these data are promising, only dedicated renal outcome trials will clarify whether

  3. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  4. Polyphenol oxidase inhibitor(s) from German cockroach (Blattella germanica) extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract from German cockroach appears effective in inhibiting browning on apples and potatoes. Successful identification of inhibitor(s) of PPO from German cockroach would be useful to the fruit and vegetable segments of the food industry, due to the losses they incur from enzymatic browning. Ide...

  5. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  6. Inhibitors in LPE growth of garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roode, W. H.; Robertson, J. M.

    1983-09-01

    The growth rate of LPE growth garnets can be reduced considerably by the addition of small amounts of group II oxides. This effect can be helpful for the controlled growth of very thin garnet films for sub-micron bubbles and optical devices. The largest effect was found with the addition of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+, resulting in a maximum decrease of the growth rate of approximately 70%. A semi-empirical formula was used to describe the growth rate as a function of the dipping temperature. The change in the growth rate on the addition of the inhibitor ion at constant temperature was found to be proportional to ( aMO)/( aMO+2 Ln 2O 3), where M is a group II element, Ln 2O 2 is the sum of the yttrium and RE oxides in the melt, and a is the inhibitor factor. The value of the inhibitor factor depends on both the inhibitor ion as well as the composition of the garnet. The lowering of the growth rate on the addition of an inhibitor ion is explained by the introduction of an extra growth resistance due to the charge compensation mechanism of the divalent ions. The influence of the different charge compensation possibilities in the garnet system is examined and the relative importance of these possibilities for charge compensation is discussed.

  7. Clinical Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ayumu; Kondo, Shunsuke; Tada, Kohei; Kitano, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has been remarkable. Most striking are the clinical development and approval of immunomodulators, also known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are directed to immune checkpoint molecules, which are expressed on immune cells and mediate signals to attenuate excessive immune reactions. Although mAbs targeting tumor associated antigens, such as anti-CD20 mAb and anti-Her2 mAb, directly recognize tumor cells and induce cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of immune checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of cancers. The first in class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4) mAb. Two pivotal phase III randomized controlled trials demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Several clinical trials have since investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for various cancers. In this review, we discuss the current development status of and future challenges in utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26161407

  8. Clinical Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ayumu; Kondo, Shunsuke; Tada, Kohei; Kitano, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has been remarkable. Most striking are the clinical development and approval of immunomodulators, also known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are directed to immune checkpoint molecules, which are expressed on immune cells and mediate signals to attenuate excessive immune reactions. Although mAbs targeting tumor associated antigens, such as anti-CD20 mAb and anti-Her2 mAb, directly recognize tumor cells and induce cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of immune checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of cancers. The first in class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4) mAb. Two pivotal phase III randomized controlled trials demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Several clinical trials have since investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for various cancers. In this review, we discuss the current development status of and future challenges in utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26161407

  9. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  10. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  11. Functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Hameed, Abdul; Ackermann, Lisa-Maria; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Wagner, Manfred; Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of novel functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, which can be easily modified with thiol containing biomolecules such as tumour targeting structures. The linkage between inhibitor and biomolecule contains cleavable bonds to enable efficient intracellular delivery in the reductive milieu of the cytosol as well as in the acidic environment within endosomes and lysosomes. The suitability of this synthetic approach was shown by the successful bioconjugation of a poor cell-permeable inhibitor with a cell-penetrating peptide. Additionally, we have demonstrated the excellent inhibitory effect of the compounds presented here in a live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer-based assay in human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:25319071

  12. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: a pharmacological comparison.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-03-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences- differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  13. Topoisomerase I inhibitors: camptothecins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) is an essential human enzyme. It is the only known target of the alkaloid camptothecin, from which the potent anticancer agents irinotecan and topotecan are derived. As camptothecins bind at the interface of the TOP1-DNA complex, they represent a paradigm for interfacial inhibitors that reversibly trap macromolecular complexes. Several camptothecin and non-camptothecin derivatives are being developed to further increase anti-tumour activity and reduce side effects. The mechanisms and molecular determinants of tumour response to TOP1 inhibitors are reviewed, and rational combinations of TOP1 inhibitors with other drugs are considered based on current knowledge of repair and checkpoint pathways that are associated with TOP1-mediated DNA damage. PMID:16990856

  14. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  15. Use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moghul, S; Wilkinson, D

    2001-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a growing problem in an aging Western world, estimated to have cost the US economy USD 1.75 trillion. Until recently, the management of Alzheimer's disease largely comprised support for the family, nursing care and the use of unlicensed medication to control behavioral disturbances. The three new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors licensed to treat Alzheimer's disease (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) have provided clinicians with a major impetus to their desire to diagnose and treat this lethal disease. Their effects on cognition are proven. More recent work on the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral symptoms, activities of daily living and caregiver burden have also been encouraging. Emerging work indicates their likely efficacy in other dementias (e.g., vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies). This review summarizes the evidence concerning the impact of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in dementia both currently and over the next 5 years. PMID:19811047

  16. LDL cholesterol, statins and PCSK 9 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20-30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through 'Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)'. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  17. Synthesis of amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Rachel K; Khan, Tanweer A; Olsen, David B; Sleebs, Brad E

    2016-06-14

    Aspartyl proteases are important pharmacological targets. Historically aspartyl proteases have been commonly targeted with transition state derived peptidomimetics. The strategy to develop aspartyl protease inhibitors has undertaken a dramatic paradigm shift in the last 10 years. The pharmaceutical industry in 2005 disclosed several scaffolds or "head groups" that prompted the field to move beyond peptidomimetic derived inhibitors. Since the discovery of the first amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitor, the amino hydantoin, industry and academia have positioned themselves for a foothold on the new molecular space, designing a variety of related "head groups". Both the design and synthetic efforts involved in constructing these scaffolds are varied and complex. Here we highlight the synthetic strategies used to access these amino heterocycle scaffolds. PMID:27143279

  18. Prospects for novel inhibitors of peptidoglycan transglycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Galley, Nicola F.; O’Reilly, Amy M.; Roper, David I.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of novel antimicrobial drugs under development coupled with the increasing occurrence of resistance to existing antibiotics by community and hospital acquired infections is of grave concern. The targeting of biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan component of the bacterial cell wall has proven to be clinically valuable but relatively little therapeutic development has been directed towards the transglycosylase step of this process. Advances towards the isolation of new antimicrobials that target transglycosylase activity will rely on the development of the enzymological tools required to identify and characterise novel inhibitors of these enzymes. Therefore, in this article, we review the assay methods developed for transglycosylases and review recent novel chemical inhibitors discovered in relation to both the lipidic substrates and natural product inhibitors of the transglycosylase step. PMID:24924926

  19. Global Metabolic Inhibitors of Sialyl- and Fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Rillahan, Cory D.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Lefort, Craig T.; Sonon, Roberto; Azadi, Parastoo; Ley, Klaus; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Paulson, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fundamental roles of sialyl- and fucosyltransferases in mammalian physiology, there are few pharmacological tools to manipulate their function in a cellular setting. Although fluorinated analogs of the donor substrates are well-established transition state inhibitors of these enzymes, they are not membrane permeable. By exploiting promiscuous monosaccharide salvage pathways, we show that fluorinated analogs of sialic acid and fucose can be taken up and metabolized to the desired donor substrate-based inhibitors inside the cell. Due to the existence of metabolic feedback loops, they also act to prevent the de novo synthesis of the natural substrates, resulting in a global, family-wide shutdown of sialyl- and/or fucosyltransferases and remodeling of cell surface glycans. As an example of the functional consequences, the inhibitors drastically reduce expression of the sialylated and fucosylated ligand Sialyl Lewis X on myeloid cells, resulting in loss of binding to selectins and impaired leukocyte rolling. PMID:22683610

  20. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases. PMID:23142242

  1. Substituted quinolines as noncovalent proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Tanner J; Lansdell, Theresa A; Dissanayake, Amila A; Azevedo, Lauren M; Claes, Jacob; Odom, Aaron L; Tepe, Jetze J

    2016-06-01

    Screening of a library of diverse heterocyclic scaffolds identified substituted quinolines as inhibitors of the human proteasome. The heterocyclic library was prepared via a novel titanium-catalyzed multicomponent coupling reaction, which rendered a diverse set of isoxazoles, pyrimidines, pyrroles, pyrazoles and quinolines. SAR of the parent lead compound indicated that hydrophobic residues on the benzo-moiety significantly improved potency. Lead compound 25 inhibits the chymotryptic-like proteolytic activity of the proteasome (IC50 5.4μM), representing a new class of nonpeptidic, noncovalent proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27112450

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor discontinuation during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Resham; Leibson, Tom; Koren, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question I have a patient who discontinued her selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in pregnancy against my advice owing to fears it might affect the baby. She eventually attempted suicide. How can we deal effectively with this situation? Answer The “cold turkey” discontinuation of needed antidepressants is a serious public health issue strengthened by fears and misinformation. It is very important for physicians to ensure that evidence-based information is given to women in a way that is easy to understand. The risks of untreated moderate to severe depression far outweigh the theoretical risks of taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:25642484

  3. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected. PMID:24176211

  4. Identification of potent, selective KDM5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Victor S; Bellon, Steven F; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; LeBlanc, Yves; Poy, Florence; Odate, Shobu; Buker, Shane; Lan, Fei; Arora, Shilpi; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Sandy, Peter; Cummings, Richard T; Bailey, Christopher M; Bergeron, Louise; Mao, Weifeng; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; VanderPorten, Erica; Audia, James E; Trojer, Patrick; Albrecht, Brian K

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes the identification and optimization of a series of pan-KDM5 inhibitors derived from compound 1, a hit initially identified against KDM4C. Compound 1 was optimized to afford compound 20, a 10nM inhibitor of KDM5A. Compound 20 is highly selective for the KDM5 enzymes versus other histone lysine demethylases and demonstrates activity in a cellular assay measuring the increase in global histone 3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3). In addition compound 20 has good ADME properties, excellent mouse PK, and is a suitable starting point for further optimization. PMID:27476424

  5. HIV Entry Inhibitors and Their Potential in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting the viral entry process. The three main classes (attachment inhibitors, co-receptor binding inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors) are further broken down by specific mechanism of action and structure. Many of these inhibitors are in advanced clinical trials, including the HIV maturation inhibitor bevirimat, from the authors’ laboratories. In addition, the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has recently been FDA-approved. Possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV therapy, including treatment of virus resistant to current drugs, are also discussed. PMID:18720513

  6. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion. PMID:26132857

  7. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  8. Cardiovascular effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, M; Tziomalos, K

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are effective glucose-lowering agents that do not increase body weight and are associated with a low risk for hypoglycemia. Also, they appear to exert beneficial effects on other established cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia and hypertension. Moreover, DPP-4 inhibitors exert antiinflammatory and antioxidant actions, improve endothelial function and reduce urinary albumin excretion. In contrast to these favorable cardiovascular effects, three recent large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established cardiovascular disease or multiple cardiovascular risk factors showed that DPP-4 inhibitors do not affect the risk of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke and might increase the risk of heart failure. The findings of the former randomized studies highlight the limitations of surrogate markers and show that beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors do not necessarily translate into reductions in hard clinical endpoints. Ongoing trials will shed more light on the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors and will clarify whether they will improve the cardiovascular outcomes of patients with T2DM. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 195-199. PMID:27418775

  9. Histidines, histamines and imidazoles as glycosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R A; Haines, A H; Chrystal, E J; Luszniak, M C

    1991-01-01

    This present study reports the ability of a range of derivatives of L-histidine, histamine and imidazole to act as inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase, yeast alpha-glucosidase and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The addition of a hydrophobic group to the basic imidazole nucleus greatly enhances binding to both the alpha- and beta-glucosidases. L-Histidine (beta-naphthylamide (Ki 17 microM) is a potent competitive inhibitor of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase as is omega-N-acetylhistamine (K1 35 microM), which inhibits the sweet-almond beta-glucosidase at least 700 times more strongly than either yeast alpha-glucosidase or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, and suggests potential for the development of selective reversible beta-glucosidase inhibitors. A range of hydrophobic omega-N-acylhistamines were synthesized and shown to be among the most potent inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase reported to date. PMID:2012615

  10. A chemotactic inhibitor in synovial fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Matzner, Y; Partridge, R E; Babior, B M

    1983-01-01

    Synovial fluid was found to contain an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. The activity of this inhibitor was masked in native synovial fluid, but could be detected in fluid in which complement had been deactivated by mild heating. The inhibitor was most effective against the chemotactic activity of zymosan-activated serum (C5ades arg). It had little effect when N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine served as chemoattractant. Inhibition was not the result of a direct effect on the neutrophils, since incubation of cells with synovial fluid did not alter their chemotactic response. The inhibitory activity was destroyed by boiling the synovial fluid or treating it with trypsin, suggesting that it is a protein (or proteins); it was not affected by hyaluronidase treatment. Gel filtration revealed that the inhibitor was present in native as well as decomplemented synovial fluid, and that its molecular weight was in the vicinity of 25,000. It is proposed that this inhibitory activity plays a role in the regulation of the inflammatory response in joints. PMID:6840801

  11. Resistant mechanisms to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Manzano, José Luís; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; de Los Llanos Gil, María; Vila, Laia; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have traditionally had very poor prognosis. However, since 2011 better understanding of the biology and epidemiology of this disease has revolutionized its treatment, with newer therapies becoming available. These newer therapies can be classified into immunotherapy and targeted therapy. The immunotherapy arsenal includes inhibitors of CTLA4, PD-1 and PDL-1, while targeted therapy focuses on BRAF and MEK. BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) have shown benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) compared to chemotherapy, and their combination with MEK inhibitors has recently been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS), compared with monotherapy with BRAF inhibitors. However, almost 20% of patients initially do not respond, due to intrinsic resistance to therapy and, of those who do, most eventually develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, including reactivation of the MAP kinase pathway, persistent activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKS) receptor, activation of phosphatidyinositol-3OH kinase, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Herein we comment in detail on mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy and discuss the strategies to overcome them. PMID:27429963

  12. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  13. FAAH inhibitors in the limelight, but regrettably

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Christophe; Dubray, Claude; Dualé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. This short review focuses on the recent drug development of FAAH inhibitors, as recent serious adverse events have been reported in a phase I study with a compound of this class. The authors overview the potential interest in targeting FAAH inhibition, the current programs, and the available information on the recent dramatic events. PMID:27191771

  14. Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mimi L; Pinto, Donald J P; Rossi, Karen A; Sheriff, Steven; Alexander, Richard S; Amparo, Eugene; Kish, Kevin; Knabb, Robert M; Luettgen, Joseph M; Morin, Paul; Smallwood, Angela; Woerner, Francis J; Wexler, Ruth R

    2010-02-15

    We have discovered that phenyltriazolinone is a novel and potent P1 moiety for coagulation factor Xa. X-ray structures of the inhibitors with a phenyltriazolinone in the P1 position revealed that the side chain of Asp189 has reoriented resulting in a novel S1 binding pocket which is larger in size to accommodate the phenyltriazolinone P1 substrate. PMID:20100660

  15. Photodynamic therapy using a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fingar, V H; Wieman, T J; McMahon, K S; Haydon, P S; Halling, B P; Yuhas, D A; Winkelman, J W

    1997-10-15

    The use of endogenously created porphyrins as an alternative to photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy is a rapidly evolving area of study. One common method to induce porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cells is the topical, oral, or parenteral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor for heme biosynthesis. Porphyrin accumulation may also be elicited by the use of enzyme inhibitors of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Groups of DBA/2 mice bearing SMT-F mammary tumors were placed on a diet containing 0-4000 ppm of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, FP-846. This agent blocks a critical step in porphyrin metabolism and results in elevated intracellular levels of protoporphyrin IX. Light treatment of tumors produced both initial and long-term regression that was dependent on the amount of inhibitor, the duration of inhibitor exposure to animals, and the amount of light used in PDT. Tumor regression occurred without significant destruction of normal tissues in the treatment field and without initial vascular constriction or blood flow stasis. Tumor cure in animals given 4000 ppm FP-846 in feed for 3 days and 300 J/cm2 602-670 nm light (23% cure) was similar to the response in animals given 10 mg/kg Photofrin and the same light dose (20%). PMID:9377568

  16. Resistant mechanisms to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; de los Llanos Gil, María; Vila, Laia; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have traditionally had very poor prognosis. However, since 2011 better understanding of the biology and epidemiology of this disease has revolutionized its treatment, with newer therapies becoming available. These newer therapies can be classified into immunotherapy and targeted therapy. The immunotherapy arsenal includes inhibitors of CTLA4, PD-1 and PDL-1, while targeted therapy focuses on BRAF and MEK. BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) have shown benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) compared to chemotherapy, and their combination with MEK inhibitors has recently been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS), compared with monotherapy with BRAF inhibitors. However, almost 20% of patients initially do not respond, due to intrinsic resistance to therapy and, of those who do, most eventually develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, including reactivation of the MAP kinase pathway, persistent activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKS) receptor, activation of phosphatidyinositol-3OH kinase, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Herein we comment in detail on mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy and discuss the strategies to overcome them. PMID:27429963

  17. [Myoclonic encephalopathy associated with proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Boulliat, J; Polard, E; Colin, F; Bentué-Ferrer, D; Allain, H

    2004-03-01

    Two men (66 and 73 Years) with a cardiovascular history were hospitalized for rapid onset encephalopathy associated with myoclonia and an extrapyramidal syndrome. On the basis of the French Pharmacovigilance system, this symptomatology has been attributed to the coadministration of a proton pump inhibitor, lansoprazole (15mg/day) with levodopa. Lansoprazole withdrawal led to a normalisation of the situation. PMID:15037850

  18. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  19. Cost of care of haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Di Minno, G; Di Capua, M; Cerbone, A M; Coppola, A

    2010-01-01

    In Western countries, the treatment of patients with inhibitors is presently the most challenging and serious issue in haemophilia management, direct costs of clotting factor concentrates accounting for >98% of the highest economic burden absorbed for the healthcare of patients in this setting. Being designed to address questions of resource allocation and effectiveness, decision models are the golden standard to reliably assess the overall economic implications of haemophilia with inhibitors in terms of mortality, bleeding-related morbidity, and severity of arthropathy. However, presently, most data analyses stem from retrospective short-term evaluations, that only allow for the analysis of direct health costs. In the setting of chronic diseases, the cost-utility analysis, that takes into account the beneficial effects of a given treatment/healthcare intervention in terms of health-related quality of life, is likely to be the most appropriate approach. To calculate net benefits, the quality adjusted life year, that significantly reflects such health gain, has to be compared with specific economic impacts. Differences in data sources, in medical practice and/or in healthcare systems and costs, imply that most current pharmacoeconomic analyses are confined to a narrow healthcare payer perspective. Long-term/lifetime prospective or observational studies, devoted to a careful definition of when to start a treatment; of regimens (dose and type of product) to employ, and of inhibitor population (children/adults, low-responding/high responding inhibitors) to study, are thus urgently needed to allow for newer insights, based on reliable data sources into resource allocation, effectiveness and cost-utility analysis in the treatment of haemophiliacs with inhibitors. PMID:19845772

  20. Inhibitors from Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.)

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mary Ritzel

    1970-01-01

    Two inhibitory fractions (B1 and C) from extracts of immature fruit of carob were tested for their ability to inhibit the action of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in three bioassays. There was no reduction of IAA-induced reactions in the Avena curvature test, abscission of debladed coleus petioles, or growth of cucumber hypocotyls. The highest ratio of inhibitor to IAA was 10,000 times greater than the ratio necessary to inhibit by 50% the growth caused by an equivalent amount of gibberellin A3 in pea seedlings. At the highest concentration used, fraction C alone caused curvature of Avena coleoptiles. The inhibitory fractions appeared to enhance the effect of IAA in the cucumber test. Concentrated whole extract and fractions B1 and C were tested for reduction of growth caused by gibberellins A1, A4, A5, A7, and a neutral gibberellin-like substance from beans in the dwarf-5 maize bioassay. Each gibberellin was inhibited and required the same amount of inhibitor for a 50% reduction of the induced growth. The inhibiting effect could be completely overcome by increasing the amount of gibberellin while maintaining the same concentration of inhibitor. Fractions B1 and C were also tested with gibberellins A2 and A4 in the cucumber hypocotyl test. Both inhibitory fractions reduced growth but were more effective against gibberellin A3 than gibberellin A4 in the assay. The ability to reduce gibberellin-induced growth and not reduce IAA-induced growth indicates that the inhibitors from carob have a greater specificity of action than that previously reported for any inhibitor. PMID:16657500

  1. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  2. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  3. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  4. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L

    2013-09-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H₂O₂. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:23772801

  5. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2014-11-11

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a "DFG-out" covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  6. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  7. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H+ ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:25981168

  8. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 is a novel inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases with implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Michael P.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Kisiel, Walter; Foster, Don; Kehry, Marilyn R.; Libby, Peter; Schönbeck, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of ECM, particularly interstitial collagen, promotes plaque instability, rendering atheroma prone to rupture. Previous studies implicated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in these processes, suggesting that dysregulated MMP activity, probably due to imbalance with endogenous inhibitors, promotes complications of atherosclerosis. We report here that the serine proteinase inhibitor tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) can function as an MMP inhibitor. TFPI-2 diminished the ability of the interstitial collagenases MMP-1 and MMP-13 to degrade triple-helical collagen, the primary load-bearing molecule of the ECM within human atheroma. In addition, TFPI-2 also reduced the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In contrast to the “classical” tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), TFPI-2 expression in situ correlated inversely with MMP levels in human atheroma. TFPI-2 colocalized primarily with smooth muscle cells in the normal media as well as the plaque’s fibrous cap. Conversely, the macrophage-enriched shoulder region, the prototypical site of matrix degradation and plaque rupture, stained only weakly for TFPI-2 but intensely for gelatinases and interstitial collagenases. Evidently, human mononuclear phagocytes, an abundant source of MMPs within human atheroma, lost their ability to express this inhibitor during differentiation in vitro. These findings establish a new, anti-inflammatory function of TFPI-2 of potential pathophysiological significance for human diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:11342575

  9. Action of anti-HIV drugs and resistance: reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2004-01-01

    Currently, 20 drugs have been approved for Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) clinical therapy. These drugs inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, or virus entry. Introduction of a combination therapy with reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors has resulted in a drastic decrease in HIV-1 related mortality. Although the combination therapy can suppress viral replication below detection levels in current available assays, low levels of on-going viral replication still persist in some patients. Long-term administration of the combination therapy may increase selective pressure against viruses, and subsequently induce emergence of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Attempts have been made to design novel antiretroviral drugs that would be able to suppress replication of the resistant variants. At present, several investigational drugs are being tested in clinical trials. These drugs target not only the resistant variants, but also improvement in oral bioavilability or other viral proteins such as HIV-1 integrase, ribonuclease H, and HIV-1 entry (CD4 attachment inhibitors, chemokine receptors antagonists, and fusion inhibitors). Understanding mechanism(s) of action of the drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance is necessary for successful designs in the next generation of anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this review, the mechanisms of action of reverse transcriptase- and protease-inhibitors, and the mechanism of resistance to these inhibitors, are described. PMID:15579086

  10. Disulfide bridge structure of ascidian trypsin inhibitor I: similarity to Kazal-type inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, T; Ishii, S

    1990-03-01

    The primary structures of ascidian trypsin inhibitors (iso-inhibitors I and II) were reported in the preceding paper (Kumazaki, T. et al. (1990) J. Biochem. 107, 409-413). Both of them have eight half-cystines in a molecule composed of 55 amino acid residues with a sequence showing no extensive homology to other known protease inhibitors. To locate the four disulfide bridges in the molecule, native inhibitor I was digested with thermolysin to yield cystine-containing peptides. The peptides were separated from each other by reversed-phase HPLC. A core peptide still containing six closely located half-cystines (e.g. -Cys-Arg-Cys and -Cys-Cys-) was further digested with Streptomyces griseus trypsin for cleavage of the Arg-Cys bond. On the other hand, the Cys-Cys bond was split by applying manual Edman degradation to the core peptide. Amino acid composition analyses of the resulting cystine peptides allowed us to define the whole disulfide bridge structure in the parent molecule. The topological relation between the disulfide loops and the reactive site suggested that the ascidian trypsin inhibitor may be classified as a member of the Kazal-type inhibitor family. PMID:2111316

  11. Studies on amylase inhibitors in some Egyptian legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Shekib, L A; el-Iraqui, S M; Abo-Bakr, T M

    1988-01-01

    Amylase inhibitor activity was determined in four legume seeds which are widely consumed in Egypt. The effect of dehulling, heat treatment, soaking and germination were also assessed. The results showed that faba bean contained the highest activity of amylase inhibitor followed by cowpea, lentils, then chickpea. Dehulling resulted in raising the amylase inhibitor activities in all samples investigated, while heat treatment and cooking lowered it. Soaking for 10 h and germination eliminated completely the inhibitor from all samples. PMID:2467277

  12. Controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.J.; Gdanski, R.D.; McCabe, M.A.; Buster, D.C.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes results of laboratory and field testing of a solid, controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments. Laboratory testing with a continuous flow apparatus has yielded inhibitor release rates under dynamic conditions. The inhibitor was tested to determine the minimum inhibitor concentration required to inhibit the formation of CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}, and BaSO{sub 4} scales in a brine. A model to predict the long-term release rate of the inhibitor was developed from data collected on the continuous flow apparatus. Data from treated wells will be compared with predictions of the model. Inhibitor release-rate testing in a continuous-flow apparatus shows that a solid, calcium-magnesium polyphosphate inhibitor has a sustained release profile. Release-rate testing shows that the inhibitor can be used up to 175 F. The inhibitor is compatible with both borate and zirconium crosslinked fracturing fluids and foamed fluids. The effective lifetime of the scale treatment can be predicted based on a model developed from laboratory data. The input variables required for the prediction include: temperature, water production, amount of inhibitor, minimum effective concentration of inhibitor for the specific brine. The model can be used to aid in the design of the scale inhibitor treatment.

  13. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  14. P3 SAR exploration of biphenyl carbamate based Legumain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine; Bouazzaoui, Samira; Gaddale, Kishore; D'Costa, Zenobia; Templeman, Amy; O'Rourke, Martin; Young, Andrew; Scott, Christopher; Harrison, Tim; Mullan, Paul; Williams, Rich

    2014-06-01

    This Letter describes the further development and SAR exploration of a novel series of Legumain inhibitors. Based upon a previously identified Legumain inhibitor from our group, we explored the SAR of the carbamate phenyl ring system to probe the P3 pocket of the enzyme. This led to the identification of a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of Legumain. PMID:24775305

  15. Unveiling new chemical scaffolds as Mnk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Diab, Sarah; Li, Peng; Basnet, Sunita K C; Lu, Jingfeng; Yu, Mingfeng; Albrecht, Hugo; Milne, Robert W; Wang, Shudong

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of small molecules that selectively inhibit Mnks is considered of paramount importance towards deciphering the exact role of these proteins in carcinogenesis and to further validate them as anti-cancer drug targets. However, the dearth of structural information of Mnks is a major hurdle. This study unveils the 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives as potent inhibitors of Mnks. ATP and substrate competition assays showed that this scaffold interacts with the ATP binding site, but not with the substrate site. Screened against a panel of cancer cells, Mnk inhibitors were most potent against MV4-11 acute myeloid leukemia cells. The induction of apoptosis was shown to be mediated by downregulation of Mcl-1. PMID:26910782

  16. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  17. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  18. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology.

  19. Development of inhibitors in the ubiquitination cascade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-01-21

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is essential in regulating myriad aspects of protein functions. It is therefore a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism that impacts most if not all aspects of cellular processes. Indeed, malfunction of UPS components is implicated in human diseases such as neurodegenerative and immunological disorders and many cancers. The success of proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy suggests that modulating enzymes in the ubiquitination cascade would be clinically important for therapeutic benefits. In this review, we summarize advances in developing inhibitors of a variety of UPS components. In particular, we highlight recent work done on the protein engineering of ubiquitin as modulators of the UPS, a novel approach that may shed light on innovative drug discovery in the future. PMID:24239534

  20. Naphthyridines as novel BET family bromodomain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mirguet, Olivier; Lamotte, Yann; Chung, Chun-Wa; Bamborough, Paul; Delannée, Delphine; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Françoise; Krysa, Gael; Lewis, Antonia; Witherington, Jason; Huet, Pascal; Dudit, Yann; Trottet, Lionel; Nicodeme, Edwige

    2014-03-01

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are small protein domains found in a variety of proteins that recognize and bind to acetylated histone tails. This binding affects chromatin structure and facilitates the localisation of transcriptional complexes to specific genes, thereby regulating epigenetically controlled processes including gene transcription and mRNA elongation. Inhibitors of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins BRD2-4 and T, which prevent bromodomain binding to acetyl-modified histone tails, have shown therapeutic promise in several diseases. We report here the discovery of 1,5-naphthyridine derivatives as potent inhibitors of the BET bromodomain family with good cell activity and oral pharmacokinetic parameters. X-ray crystal structures of naphthyridine isomers have been solved and quantum mechanical calculations have been used to explain the higher affinity of the 1,5-isomer over the others. The best compounds were progressed in a mouse model of inflammation and exhibited dose-dependent anti-inflammatory pharmacology. PMID:24000170

  1. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  2. [Once-weekly DPP-4 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Harada, Norio; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-12-01

    Trelagliptin is the first once-weekly dipeptidyl peptidase-4(DPP-4) inhibitor in the world. Trelagliptin inhibits DPP-4 activity with lower drug concentration compared with other once- (or twice-) daily DPP-4 inhibitors in in vitro study. More than 70 % of DPP-4 activity is inhibited even 1 week after administration of trelagliptin administration in human study. 24-week trelagliptin monotherapy improved HbA1c(-0.33%) and fasting plasma glucose levels in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Trelagliptin did not affect body weight and frequency of hypoglycemic events in this study. 52-week monotherapy and add-on therapy of trelagliptin also improved HbA1c levels without body weight gain and severe hypoglycemia. Therefore, trelagliptin has high efficacy and safety on glucose control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26666159

  3. New potential AChE inhibitor candidates.

    PubMed

    de Paula, A A N; Martins, J B L; dos Santos, M L; Nascente, L de C; Romeiro, L A S; Areas, T F M A; Vieira, K S T; Gambôa, N F; Castro, N G; Gargano, R

    2009-09-01

    We have theoretically studied new potential candidates of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors designed from cardanol, a non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew Anacardium occidentale nut-shell liquid. The electronic structure calculations of fifteen molecule derivatives from cardanol were performed using B3LYP level with 6-31G, 6-31G(d), and 6-311+G(2d,p) basis functions. For this study we used the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N,N-dimethylamine, N,N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N,N-methylbenzylamine. Among the proposed compounds we identified that the structures with substitution by N,N-dimethycarbamoyl, N,N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine, and represent possible AChE inhibitors against Alzheimer disease. PMID:19446931

  4. Inhibitor prevents corrosion, scale in Chinese waterflood

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, W.; Jianhua, W. )

    1994-03-14

    An imidazoline derivative-based series inhibitor has prevented both corrosion and scale formation in produced-water treatment and water-injection equipment in China National Petroleum Co.'s (CNPC) Shengli oil field. Development of the inhibitor started in 1986, and after successful field trials the chemical is now being extensively applied. To increase oil recovery, water injection is widely used in China's onshore oil fields. Oil production in the Shengli oil field, for example, requires injection of about 4 bbl of water/1 bbl of oil produced. The large volumes of produced formation water contain many substances that can cause serious corrosion and scale. Also, the makeup water from other sources, subsurface or surface, complicates water handling. The paper discusses the following: corrosion and scale, oxygen, carbon dioxide, H[sub 2]S and sulfur reducing bacteria, temperature, inhibition, field tests, applications, and economics.

  5. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  6. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions. PMID:26734566

  7. Drug Delivery Strategies of Chemical CDK Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Daniel; Mondragón, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological use of new therapeutics is often limited by a safe and effective drug-delivery system. In this sense, new chemical CDK inhibitors are not an exception. Nanotechnology may be able to solve some of the main problems limiting cancer treatments such as more specific delivery of therapeutics and reduction of toxic secondary effects. It provides new delivery systems able to specifically target cancer cells and release the active molecules in a controlled fashion. Specifically, silica mesoporous supports (SMPS) have emerged as an alternative for more classical drug delivery systems based on polymers. In this chapter, we describe the synthesis of a SMPS containing the CDK inhibitor roscovitine as cargo molecule and the protocols for confirmation of the proper cargo release of the nanoparticles in cell culture employing cell viability, cellular internalization, and cell death induction studies. PMID:26231714

  8. Secreted and transmembrane wnt inhibitors and activators.

    PubMed

    Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Niehrs, Christof

    2013-03-01

    Signaling by the Wnt family of secreted glycoproteins plays important roles in embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Wnt signaling is modulated by a number of evolutionarily conserved inhibitors and activators. Wnt inhibitors belong to small protein families, including sFRP, Dkk, WIF, Wise/SOST, Cerberus, IGFBP, Shisa, Waif1, APCDD1, and Tiki1. Their common feature is to antagonize Wnt signaling by preventing ligand-receptor interactions or Wnt receptor maturation. Conversely, the Wnt activators, R-spondin and Norrin, promote Wnt signaling by binding to Wnt receptors or releasing a Wnt-inhibitory step. With few exceptions, these antagonists and agonists are not pure Wnt modulators, but also affect additional signaling pathways, such as TGF-β and FGF signaling. Here we discuss their interactions with Wnt ligands and Wnt receptors, their role in developmental processes, as well as their implication in disease. PMID:23085770

  9. mTOR Inhibitors at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yin; Jiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved threonine and serine protein kinase that was identified more than two decades ago as the target of immunosuppressive drug rapamycin. Since then considerable amount of information has been learned about the function of this kinase. It is now well-established that mTOR plays a pivotal role in governing cell growth and proliferation, hence making mTOR a therapeutic target for disease conditions caused by deregulated cell proliferation, such as cancer. In the past decade, numerous mTOR inhibitors have been developed and many are currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. This commentary is to provide a brief summary of these mTOR inhibitors. PMID:27134695

  10. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Andrei V. . E-mail: gudkov@ccf.org; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-06-10

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha} that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53.

  11. Neuroserpin, an axonally secreted serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Osterwalder, T; Contartese, J; Stoeckli, E T; Kuhn, T B; Sonderegger, P

    1996-01-01

    We have identified and chromatographically purified an axonally secreted glycoprotein of CNS and PNS neurons. Several peptides derived from it were microsequenced. Based on these sequences, a fragment of the corresponding cDNA was amplified and used as a probe to isolate a full length cDNA from a chicken brain cDNA library. Because the deduced amino acid sequence qualified the protein as a novel member of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors, we called it neuroserpin. Analysis of the primary structural features further characterized neuroserpin as a heparin-independent, functional inhibitor of a trypsin-like serine protease. In situ hybridization revealed a predominantly neuronal expression during the late stages of neurogenesis and in the adult brain in regions which exhibit synaptic plasticity. Thus, neuroserpin might function as an axonally secreted regulator of the local extracellular proteolysis involved in the reorganization of the synaptic connectivity during development and synapse plasticity in the adult. Images PMID:8670795

  12. Alternative therapies for the management of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shima, M; Lillicrap, D; Kruse-Jarres, R

    2016-07-01

    The development of inhibitors to factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) remains a major treatment complication encountered in the treatment of haemophilia. Not all patients with even the same severity and genotype develop inhibitors suggesting an underlying mechanism of tolerance against FVIII- or FIX-related immunity. One mechanism may be central tolerance observed in patients in whom the FVIII mutation enables some production of the protein. The other is a peripheral tolerance mechanism which may be evident in patients with null mutation. Recently, recombinant porcine FVIII (rpFVIII, Obixur, OBI-1, BAX801) has been developed for the haemostatic treatment of both congenital haemophilia with inhibitor (CHAWI) and acquired haemophilia A (AHA). In 28 subjects with AHA with life-/limb-threatening bleeding, rpFVIII reduced or stopped bleeding in all patients within 24 h. The cross-reactivity of anti-human FVIII antibodies to rpFVIII remains around 30-50%. Recently, new therapeutics based on the quite novel concepts have been developed and clinical studies are ongoing. These are humanized asymmetric antibody mimicking FVIIIa function by maintaining a suitable interaction between FIXa and FX (Emicizumab, ACE910), and small interfering RNAs (siRNA, ALN-AT3) suppress liver production of AT through post-transcriptional gene silencing and a humanized anti-TFPI monoclonal antibody (Concizumab). Their main advantages are longer half-life, subcutaneous applicability and efficacy irrespective of the presence of inhibitors which will make it easier to initiate more effective treatment especially early childhood. PMID:27405674

  13. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  14. Aromatase inhibitors and anti-synthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mascella, Fabio; Gianni, Lorenzo; Affatato, Alessandra; Fantini, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer (BC) is actually centered on the use of anti-aromatase inhibitors (AI). Several reports, however, are emerging in literature associating the use of this drugs to rheumatic disorders. This case report describes the first case of anti-synthetase syndrome diagnosis after treatment with anti-estrogen agents in a patient with pre-existing rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27225465

  15. Serendipity in discovery of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Derek; Iqbal, Mohamed; Husten, Jean; Ator, Mark A; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2012-05-15

    Among its various catalytic activities, the 'chymotrypsin-like' activity of the proteasome, a large multicatalytic proteinase complex has emerged as the focus of drug discovery efforts in cancer therapy. Herein, a series of first generation (2S, 3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid derived proteasome inhibitors that were discovered serendipitously en route to original goal of generating a series of sterically constrained oxazoline derivatives has been reported. PMID:22503349

  16. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  17. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called "ubiquitin-proteasome system" (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  18. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  19. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  20. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.